Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Loss of Lift: Cessna 150B, N1193Y, accident occurred July 26, 2018 in Matthews, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1193Y




Location: Matthews, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA202
Date & Time: 07/26/2018, 1900 EDT
Registration: N1193Y
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of lift
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 26, 2018, about 1900 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150B, N1193Y, was substantially damaged during a precautionary landing in Matthews, North Carolina. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a solo-instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated at Wilgrove Air Park (8A6), Charlotte, North Carolina at 1810.

The pilot reported that the preflight procedures, taxi, takeoff, and departure were uneventful. The fuel tanks were full and no water was noted. About 40 minutes into the flight, about 1,800 feet above mean sea level, he noticed that the airplane was "sluggish" and would not "maintain lift." The engine indications were normal with no sputtering or hesitation noted. He applied carburetor heat and the engine speed dropped about 300 rpm. The airplane was still sluggish, so he turned off the carburetor heat. Since the airplane continued to fly sluggishly, the pilot decided to land the airplane in a grass field adjacent to a church. During the landing rollout, the airplane nosed over and came to rest, inverted.

The pilot reported in a postaccident interview and a written statement that there were no mechanical issues with the airplane in flight, and the engine would produce 2,750 rpm at full power. He also reported that the high ambient temperature (100°F) and the full fuel tanks may have contributed to the airplane's sluggishness.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. He reported that the wings and fuselage sustained structural damage. His examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot held a student pilot certificate and reported 3.1 hours of dual instruction and 15 hours of solo flight time. He did not have an instructor's endorsement to operate the airplane in solo flight. The FAA inspector reviewed his pilot logbook and reported that there were "severe training deficiencies."



Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/22/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 18 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18 hours (Total, this make and model)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1193Y
Model/Series: 150 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15059593
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/07/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1499 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 15 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6697 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JQF, 704 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1850 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Charlotte, NC (8A6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Charlotte, NC (8A6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1810 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class B

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.160278, -80.720556 (est)

Mooney M20J/201, N201DG: Fatal accident occurred May 29, 2019 in Cape May, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N201DG

Location: Cape May, NJ
Accident Number: ERA19FA184
Date & Time: 05/29/2019, 1115 EDT
Registration: N201DG
Aircraft: Mooney M20J
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 29, 2019, at 1115 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20J, N201DG, was destroyed by contact with the water and subsequent collision with the surf while maneuvering at low altitude along the beach at Cape May, New Jersey. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which originated at the Trenton-Robbinsville Airport (N87), Robbinsville, New Jersey, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a written statement, a witness described his position on the beach near the Cape May Lighthouse where the Atlantic Ocean meets the Delaware Bay and the New Jersey coastline curves westward from its generally north-south direction. According to the witness, "… I saw a single engine plane flying parallel to the beach but only about 10 feet above the water. It appeared stable and in control but then dipped, hit the water, and skipped up out of control. It climbed steeply gaining perhaps 100-200 feet, stalled, turned downward, and plunged almost straight into the water perhaps 500 feet off shore, directly off or slightly west of the (WWII civil defense) battery."

The witness estimated the pitch-up attitude of the airplane after it contacted the water at 65-70 degrees and the nose-down attitude at 75-80 degrees during its descent. The witness said that a strong odor of fuel "came ashore" about 10 minutes after the accident.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector, reports of a low-flying airplane travelling along the beach from north to south were received from several towns north of Cape May. Witnesses reported that the airplane would dive to the surface, fly low-level along the beach, and climb again.

One witness forwarded a video of the airplane as it passed her position on Diamond Beach, about 5 miles or an estimated 2.5 minutes north of the accident site. The airplane was near the shoreline, about 10 feet above the wave break, and the sound of the engine was smooth and continuous throughout. At one point, the airplane descended below the horizon line. About 20 seconds into the 30-second video, the airplane began a steep climb. The airplane was about 200 feet above the surface when the video ended.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land and he completed the FAA BasicMed course on September 20, 2018. A review of the pilot's logbook by the FAA inspector revealed the pilot had accrued 333 total hours of flight experience, of which 17 were in the accident airplane make and model. The owner/operator of the airplane stated that the pilot had "returned" to flying in October 2018. Training and rental records revealed that since that time the pilot completed on-line FAA flight-review training, received 17 hours of dual instruction, and had accrued 44.1 total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1977 and was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-A3B6D 200-horsepower engine. Its most recent annual inspection was completed February 13, 2019 at 5,233.2 total aircraft hours, and the airplane had accrued 58.7 hours since that date.
State and local law enforcement attempted recovery of the pilot in the days following the accident but were hampered by the strong current, low visibility, and storms. On June 1, 2019, a commercial underwater salvage operator recovered the pilot along with the wreckage.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that all major components were recovered except for the left wing. The roof, left wing, and empennage were separated from the fuselage. The fracture surfaces displayed features consistent with overload failure. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area, through several breaks, to all available flight control surfaces. The fracture surfaces at the breaks displayed features consistent with overstress. The leading edge of the right wing was uniformly crushed aft along its entire span.

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller and powertrain continuity was confirmed through to the accessory section. Thumb compression was confirmed on all cylinders. Examination of the top spark plugs from each of the 4 cylinders revealed signatures consistent with normal wear and salt water immersion. The single-drive dual magneto was destroyed by impact and salt water immersion. The engine driven fuel pump was removed and when actuated by hand, pumped fluid from the output port. The fuel supply line was removed at the inlet port to the fuel manifold where trace amounts of fuel were detected.

The propeller was attached at the hub, and all 3 blades displayed similar aft bending.

At 1056, the weather recorded at Cape May County Airport (WWD), Wildwood, New Jersey, 5 miles north of the accident site included clear skies and winds from 260 degrees at 7 knots. Visibility was 10 statute miles, the temperature was 30°C, and the dew point was 20°C. The altimeter setting was 29.75 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N201DG
Model/Series: M20J No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Air Mods And Repair Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KWWD, 23 ft msl
Observation Time: 1056 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:   10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.75 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Robbinsville, NJ (N87)
Destination: Robbinsville, NJ (N87)  

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.925556, -74.943056 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Lawrence Klimek

Howell, New Jersey - Larry left us last week to go on to his forever home, where he is filled with joy in the presence of Jesus! He exited this side of Heaven doing what he loved best, flying a Mooney M20J aircraft! Larry loved anything that was adventurous. He spent his spare time skydiving, skiing, driving fast cars, riding motorcycles, and of course the not so adventurous, golfing!

Toward the end of his life his relationship with Jesus became his priority. He had a deep desire to draw closer to God and a sincere repentance in his heart for his past actions. 

Larry was predeceased by his father, Lawrence Klimek. He is survived by his daughter, Ashley; his mother Edna Klimek; his wife Catherine Klimek; his 5 step children Emily, Billy, Erin, Eddie and Jimmy, his sister Donna Clement, and nephews Clay, Kyle and JT.

A Memorial Service will be held at 6 PM on June 9th at Shiloh Baptist Church located at 44 Union Ave., Manasquan, NJ. In lieu of flowers please consider donating to a mission very close to Larry's heart, Destiny's Bridge, which is a non-profit organization that provides temporary housing and care to homeless adults. (www.destinysbridge.org).


Published in Asbury Park Press on June 6, 2019









N201DG

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CAPE MAY POINT — The body of a 58-year-old Monmouth County pilot and the plane he was flying were recovered Friday evening after they crashed into the ocean Wednesday.

After an extensive search, the plane and the body of Lawrence Klimek, of Howell Township, were located by divers and brought into Cape May Harbor, said Captain Jack Moran, owner of Sea Tow Cape May, the salvage company that worked with Northstar Marine in the recovery effort.

Klimek’s body was found still strapped into his seat in the cockpit of the Mooney M20J/201 plane, Moran said.

State Police, who are leading the investigation into the crash, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Three divers and a dozen other crew members used sonar to find the plane on the ocean floor, Moran said. The diving conditions were difficult, with zero visibility, he added, but they got the plane on board a 90-foot boat about 7 p.m.

“It was completely, in several different places, held together by rigging and wiring running through the plane, but it was structurally destroyed,” Moran said.

The crash did no damage to the environment, Moran said, leaving behind no gas or oil pollution and no damage to the ocean floor.

Klimek took off in the Mooney M20J/201 from Trenton-Robbinsville Airport about 8 a.m. Wednesday, and reports came in of a plane in the water about 11:30 a.m.

Klimek was the only person on the plane.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

According to records from the Federal Aviation Administration, Klimek was issued his commercial pilot’s license in January 2016.

Original article ➤  https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

Lawrence Klimek

N201DG

CAPE MAY POINT — Authorities have identified the pilot of a small plane that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, and divers are still searching for his remains.

State Police announced Friday the pilot was 58-year-old Lawrence Klimek, of Howell, Monmouth County. Klimek was the only person on the plane.

Klimek’s Facebook page is full of photos and videos of him flying and skydiving. A March posting shows a rented Mooney M20J 201 plane — the same model involved in the accident — when he first flew it solo in January.

“Checked out and approved to solo in just 5 hours flight time on 1/26/19,” he wrote. “I do have over 300 flight hours logged day and night (simple and complex).”

Klimek was apparently fearless.

He describes the video of him doing three jumps from 14,000 feet, saying he was crammed into a plane with 15 others sitting on the floor facing backward, “with someone’s legs wrapped around you from behind.”

All of a sudden the door opens, freezing air rushes in, and people start jumping out, he said.

“Then you realize, you’re next.”

The recovery of the pilot is being conducted by State Police, and the recovery of the aircraft is being conducted by a private salvage company. Both operations are active and ongoing.

According to records from the Federal Aviation Administration, Klimek was issued his commercial pilot’s license in January 2016.

He was the former owner of Environmental Specialists of Howell, which specialized in oil tank removals, according to a Better Business Bureau listing on the closed business.

Klimek took off in the single-engine plane from Trenton-Robbinsville Airport about 8 a.m. Wednesday, and reports came in of a plane in the water about 11:30 a.m.

Heidi Pontoriero, general manager of Trenton-Robbinsville Airport, said Wednesday she was familiar with Klimek.

“The gentleman ... has flown out of this airport many times before. He’s most certainly up to date on all his credentials, and the plane is most certainly up to date,” Pontoriero said.

Beachgoers described a plane flying low near the beach before turning out to open water, skipping off the surface and flying straight up, a trail of black smoke behind it, before falling into the ocean, coming to rest in 18 feet of water.

Original article ➤ https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com


Mike Peteani of Cape May Court House, says the likeliest cause of any aviation accident is pilot error.


A pilot and his plane remain submerged in the water off Cape May Point more than a day after they crashed into it.

“There’s been no recovery at this time,” said State Police Lt. Ted Schafer. “We still have troopers on scene diving. The operator of the plane still has not been recovered.”

On Thursday, as State Police boats idled near an orange buoy marking the spot where a single-engine plane came to rest in 18 feet of water, beachgoers watched a short distance away at the water’s edge.

Patty Oat arrived at the beach about 10 minutes after hearing the Mooney M20J go down Wednesday morning.

“There was literally no sign of it,” said Oat, whose husband, Bill, heads the Cape May Point Beach Patrol. “The gentleman that was there, that was the witness, said that it went 75 feet off the beach … and there was (no) bubbles, smoke, nothing.”

A section of the beach was still cordoned off Thursday around noon, and a parking lot near the Cape May Lighthouse was closed to all but official vehicles.

Authorities were unable to elaborate on what difficulties the recovery team faced.

Bystanders near Cove Beach the day before described a plane flying very low near the beach before heading to open water. One said a trail of black smoke followed the aircraft before it nosed straight up, crashing back down into the water. Authorities said the plane took off from Trenton-Robbinsville Airport about 8 a.m. and reports of a plane crash were received about 11:30 a.m. The Coast Guard and State Police responded soon after.

The pilot’s identity has not been made public.

Mike Peteani, 64, of Cape May Court House, has been flying out of Cape May County Airport in Lower Township since 1989. Leaned over a small plane’s engine, he said the likeliest cause of any aviation accident is pilot error, but until the conclusion of the investigation, led by the National Transportation Safety Board, “it’s just speculation.”

“They have to inspect the airframe, the engine. They tear down the whole airplane,” Peteani said. “It’ll take months for that to happen.”

But he had an educated guess following news reports.

“From what I gather, from what I think, he just pulled it up,” Peteani said, “and he just didn’t have enough altitude to recover from the stall and just nosedived it right in.”

Ed and Paul Johnston, co-owners of The Cove Restaurant right off the beach, saw a similar plane last week close to the water.

“A guy was flying really dangerously low last week,” Ed Johnston said. “And when it happened yesterday … I thought it was the same plane.”

Across the beachfront near Cape May, the crash was on residents’ and visitors’ minds, with State Police boats offshore driving home the gravity of the accident.

Susie Woodland, 75, of Souderton, Pennsylvania, stared out over the water with her husband, Dale, discussing theories. None was satisfactory for them.

“Your mind tries to explain it,” Susie said, “and it’s an accident, and that’s what happens with an accident.”

Original article ➤  https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

Mike Peteani of Cape May Court House has been flying out of Cape May County Airport since 1989.  Leaned over a small plane's engine Thursday , he said the likeliest cause of any aviation accident is pilot error.

  
CAPE MAY, New Jersey (WPVI) -- A search has been suspended after a small aircraft crashed into the ocean in Cape May, New Jersey.

The aircraft departed Trenton-Robbinsville Airport in Robbinsville, New Jersey, about 8 a.m. Wednesday.

U.S. Coast Guard officials confirm a Mooney M20J single-engine plane went down in the water approximately 1,200 feet from the lighthouse before 11:30 a.m.

"I heard a big boom, like a big explosion," said witness Patty Oat.

"Next thing I know all the lifeguards from Cape May were racing down the beach," Oat added.

Other witnesses who saw the plane gliding by the water said they knew something was amiss.

"We thought they were just showing off and buzzing the beach, they were very close. It didn't seem right at all to me, I don't know how illegal it is to be that close to the water," said Frank Newman and his wife Annakate Price.

Officials say there was one person on board the aircraft that is now submerged.

The U.S. Coast Guard as well as local first aided in the search.

Viewer Jacqueline Morroni of Villas captured the moments the small plane veered into the water.

The aircraft crashed in the area of South Cape May Meadows Path, at the southwest tip of the Cape May peninsula.

Late Wednesday night, Coast Guard officials said the search for the missing pilot has been suspended.

The NTSB will be investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://6abc.com


N201DG


N201DG

Van's RV-4, N319RL and Van's RV-4, N203DD, registered to and operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flights: Fatal accident occurred May 29, 2019 near Haller Airpark (7FL4), Green Cove Springs, Clay County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

N319RL  Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N319RL

Location: Green Cove Springs, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA183A
Date & Time: 05/29/2019, 1045 EDT
Registration: N319RL
Aircraft: Vans VANS RV 4
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 29, 2019, about 1045 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur built Vans RV-4, N319RL, and a second, experimental amateur built Vans RV-4, N203DD, collided in midair about near Green Cove Springs, Florida. N319RL was destroyed and N203DD sustained substantial damage. The air transport pilot of N203DD was seriously injured and the commercial pilot of N319RL was fatally injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flights. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and neither flight was operated on a flight plan. The local flights both originated from Haller Airpark (7FL4), Green Cove Springs, Florida, about 1030.

The pilots of both airplane were friends, and in a postaccident interview the pilot of N203DD reported that the purpose of the flights was for the pilots to perform maneuvers north of 7FL4, their home airport. He stated that both airplanes departed in formation and headed north of 7FL4. The pilot of N203DD, began to trail N319RL while checking the airspeed of his airplane. About 10 minutes after the completion of the maneuvers, the pilot of N203DD radioed the pilot of N319RL and said he was returning to the airport. The pilot of N203DD reported that did not receive a response and started a left turn in the opposite direction to head back towards the airport. As the pilot of N203DD descended through 2,000 ft. he suddenly saw N319RL pass under his airplane just before the collision. He said that they were so close he could see the pilot of N319RL, seconds before the collision. After the collision the pilot of N203DD looked back and could see N319RL falling to the ground. He said that after the collision "he knew his propeller was out of balance because the airplane began to vibrate violently." He knew he could not make it back to the airport so he conducted a forced landing in a cow pasture.

The pilot of N203DD held a airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land and commercial pilot privileges for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on November 1, 2017, with a limitation requiring the use of corrective lenses. The pilot reported his civil flight experience included 17,062 total and 25 hours within the last six months of his medical examination.

The pilot of N319RL held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on October 10, 2018, with a limitation requiring the use of corrective lenses. The pilot reported his civil flight experience included 3,800 total and 60 hours within the last six months of his examination.

Examination of the wreckage area revealed that N319RL came to rest 4 miles northwest of 7FL4. The wreckage of N203DD came to rest 2 miles east-northeast of N319RL, and about 5 miles north of 7FL4.

The airframe of N203DD was generally painted yellow. During the wreckage examination of the airplane, red paint transfer marks were found on a six-inch-deep 17-inch-wide semi-circle on the leading edge of the left wing. There was also a red paint transfers on the bottom outboard section of the right wing leading edge. Examination of the main landing gear revealed the left main gear strut was broken, but still attached to the fuselage. The left main landing gear tire was broken on the hub and remained attached to the axle. There was a skid mark on the tire and the strut fairing and wheel pant was not recovered. Examination of the propeller revealed both blades were bent and one blade displayed a two inch semi-circular gouge on the leading edge of the blade.

Examination of the flight controls revealed continuity from all flight controls to their respective control surfaces. Examination of the engine revealed valvetrain continuity to the accessory section and compression. Spark was observed on all ignition leads. Trace amounts of fuel was observed with in the fuel system.

The airframe of N319RL was generally painted red. During the wreckage examination of the airplane, yellow paint transfers were found on the lower part of the rudder. A 3-foot tire skid mark was found on top of the empennage and ended at the vertical stabilizer. The vertical stabilizer was fragmented and broken away from the fuselage. Pieces of the vertical stabilizer skin and rudder was located at the wreckage site. The upper section of the rudder was fragmented and only the lower part of the rudder remained attached at the attachment fitting and the rudder control cables. The horizontal stabilizers and the elevators were broken, fragmented and remained partially attached by the skin of the fuselage. The airplane impacted the ground nose first and was accordion crushed aft. All control surfaces were accounted for at the accident site. Flight control continuity was established to the push pull tubes. The control tubes reveal overstress breaks within the fuselage and wings. Examination of the engine revealed the crankshaft was impact damaged and bent. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange and showed signs of rotational scoring. Valvetrain continuity was observed but the compression could not be obtained due to the bent crankshaft. The engine accessories, magnetos, vacuum pump and fuel pump were crushed aft. The ignition system wiring was destroyed. No fuel was noted in the fuel system. The instrument panel was destroyed.

The recorded weather conditions reported at Palatka Municipal Airport (28J), Palatka, Florida, located 13 nautical miles southwest of the accident site reported at 1515, was: wind from 180° at 9 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and clear, temperature 33° C, dew point 17° C, altimeter 30.00 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N319RL
Model/Series: VANS RV 4 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K28J, 196 ft msl
Observation Time: 1515 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Green Cove Springs, FL (7FL4)
Destination: Green Cove Springs, FL (7FL4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 29.957778, -81.727222

N203DD  Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N203DD


Location: Green Cove Springs, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA183B
Date & Time: 05/29/2019, 1045 EDT
Registration: N203DD
Aircraft: Vans RV4
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 29, 2019, about 1045 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur built Vans RV-4, N319RL, and a second, experimental amateur built Vans RV-4, N203DD, collided in midair about near Green Cove Springs, Florida. N319RL was destroyed and N203DD sustained substantial damage. The air transport pilot of N203DD was seriously injured and the commercial pilot of N319RL was fatally injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flights. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and neither flight was operated on a flight plan. The local flights both originated from Haller Airpark (7FL4), Green Cove Springs, Florida, about 1030.

The pilots of both airplane were friends, and in a postaccident interview the pilot of N203DD reported that the purpose of the flights was for the pilots to perform maneuvers north of 7FL4, their home airport. He stated that both airplanes departed in formation and headed north of 7FL4. The pilot of N203DD, began to trail N319RL while checking the airspeed of his airplane. About 10 minutes after the completion of the maneuvers, the pilot of N203DD radioed the pilot of N319RL and said he was returning to the airport. The pilot of N203DD reported that did not receive a response and started a left turn in the opposite direction to head back towards the airport. As the pilot of N203DD descended through 2,000 ft. he suddenly saw N319RL pass under his airplane just before the collision. He said that they were so close he could see the pilot of N319RL, seconds before the collision. After the collision the pilot of N203DD looked back and could see N319RL falling to the ground. He said that after the collision "he knew his propeller was out of balance because the airplane began to vibrate violently." He knew he could not make it back to the airport so he conducted a forced landing in a cow pasture.

The pilot of N203DD held a airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land and commercial pilot privileges for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on November 1, 2017, with a limitation requiring the use of corrective lenses. The pilot reported his civil flight experience included 17,062 total and 25 hours within the last six months of his medical examination.

The pilot of N319RL held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on October 10, 2018, with a limitation requiring the use of corrective lenses. The pilot reported his civil flight experience included 3,800 total and 60 hours within the last six months of his examination.

Examination of the wreckage area revealed that N319RL came to rest 4 miles northwest of 7FL4. The wreckage of N203DD came to rest 2 miles east-northeast of N319RL, and about 5 miles north of 7FL4.

The airframe of N203DD was generally painted yellow. During the wreckage examination of the airplane, red paint transfer marks were found on a six-inch-deep 17-inch-wide semi-circle on the leading edge of the left wing. There was also a red paint transfers on the bottom outboard section of the right wing leading edge. Examination of the main landing gear revealed the left main gear strut was broken, but still attached to the fuselage. The left main landing gear tire was broken on the hub and remained attached to the axle. There was a skid mark on the tire and the strut fairing and wheel pant was not recovered. Examination of the propeller revealed both blades were bent and one blade displayed a two inch semi-circular gouge on the leading edge of the blade.

Examination of the flight controls revealed continuity from all flight controls to their respective control surfaces. Examination of the engine revealed valvetrain continuity to the accessory section and compression. Spark was observed on all ignition leads. Trace amounts of fuel was observed with in the fuel system.

The airframe of N319RL was generally painted red. During the wreckage examination of the airplane, yellow paint transfers were found on the lower part of the rudder. A 3-foot tire skid mark was found on top of the empennage and ended at the vertical stabilizer. The vertical stabilizer was fragmented and broken away from the fuselage. Pieces of the vertical stabilizer skin and rudder was located at the wreckage site. The upper section of the rudder was fragmented and only the lower part of the rudder remained attached at the attachment fitting and the rudder control cables. The horizontal stabilizers and the elevators were broken, fragmented and remained partially attached by the skin of the fuselage. The airplane impacted the ground nose first and was accordion crushed aft. All control surfaces were accounted for at the accident site. Flight control continuity was established to the push pull tubes. The control tubes reveal overstress breaks within the fuselage and wings. Examination of the engine revealed the crankshaft was impact damaged and bent. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange and showed signs of rotational scoring. Valvetrain continuity was observed but the compression could not be obtained due to the bent crankshaft. The engine accessories, magnetos, vacuum pump and fuel pump were crushed aft. The ignition system wiring was destroyed. No fuel was noted in the fuel system. The instrument panel was destroyed.

The recorded weather conditions reported at Palatka Municipal Airport (28J), Palatka, Florida, located 13 nautical miles southwest of the accident site reported at 1515, was: wind from 180° at 9 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and clear, temperature 33° C, dew point 17° C, altimeter 30.00 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N203DD
Model/Series: RV4 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K28J, 196 ft msl
Observation Time: 1515 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Green Cove Springs, FL (7FL4)
Destination: Green Cove Springs, FL (7FL4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 29.957778, -81.727222

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 





GREEN COVE SPRINGS, Florida - Two aircraft crashed Wednesday after colliding mid-air not far from a private airstrip south of Green Cove Springs, killing one pilot and injuring a second, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

Sgt. Dylan Bryan said one of the pilots died and the second was seriously injured when both crashed near the Clay County Fairgrounds.

A National Transportation Safety Board team from Orlando took over the investigation Thursday and will determine what caused the planes to collide.

Troopers said Wednesday that the collision happened sometime after takeoff from Haller Airpark off U.S. 17. One plane crashed in an open field and that pilot, David Dollarhide of Green Cove Springs, was hospitalized.

The second plane crashed into trees not far away. That pilot, 74-year-old Robert Woolley, also of Green Cove Springs, was killed.

"Dollarhide has been transported to Orange Park Medical Center where he has non-life-threatening injuries and he’s surrounded by his family," Bryan said.

Joe Tierney, a pilot, lives in the Haller Airpark. He said Woolley was a retired Air Force fighter pilot who instructed many pilots at the airpark. He said Woolley was very by the book when it came to flying.

"One of the most safety conscious guys I've ever met," Tierney said. "They're icons of our community. Both have been here for many years. They're mentors to a lot of us in the airpark, so it's a devastating loss."

News4Jax spoke to Dollarhide back in 2005 at Haller Airpark, where he and fellow pilots shared their passion for flying.

Dollarhide is a retired Navy pilot who flew in combat with the late Sen. John McCain. Dollarhide flew combat missions in Vietnam off the USS Forrestal aircraft carrier.

The NTSB identified both aircraft as Vans RV-4s. They are light homebuilt aircraft that seat two.

The FHP said Dollarhide called someone on the ground to say he'd collided with another plane and crash landed. It took authorities some time to find the second crash scene.

The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, St. Johns County Sheriff's Office and Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission assisted in searching for the aircraft.

News4Jax was told the pilots knew either other. A pilot acquainted with both men said that the two often flew together, sometimes in formation.

The National Transportation Safety Board, the federal panel that routinely investigates incidents involving planes and trains, has a crew headed up from Orlando to investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N78CW: Incident occurred May 28, 2019 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Slid sideways and veered off the runway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N78CW

Date: 29-MAY-19
Time: 06:42:00Z
Regis#: N78CW
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Air Tractor AT-802A, N802WW: Accident occurred May 27, 2019 in Fisher, Poinsett County, Arkansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

https://registry.faa.gov/N802WW

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA289

14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Monday, May 27, 2019 in Fisher, AR
Aircraft: Air Tractor AT802, registration: N802WW

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Went off the runway into a ditch.

Date: 27-MAY-19
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N802WW
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT 802A
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 137
City: FISHER
State: ARKANSAS