Thursday, August 15, 2013

Beech A36 Bonanza, Omega 337 LLC, N77DC: Harrisburg International Airport (KMDT), Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N77DC



  Dr. David Cooper talks about having to make an emergency landing last week in the Harrisburg area while piloting his private plane.





WILKES-BARRE — Dr. David Cooper said he wasn’t scared at all, even though the plane he was piloting had lost power and he had to make an emergency landing with its landing gear unable to lock last week. 

 “It was like being up there all alone like (Charles) Lindbergh,” Cooper said Tuesday. “I just had to get it on the ground without bumping into another airplane.”

Cooper made the emergency landing at Harrisburg International Airport in Middletown late Thursday afternoon. He was traveling alone.

Cooper, an orthopedic surgeon who owns The Knee Center on Kidder Street, was on his way to Hershey, where he had scheduled surgeries on Friday — appointments he kept despite the harrowing experience.

For most of the 25-minute flight from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport to Harrisburg, Cooper said it was uneventful. He was at about 8,000 feet and had just received clearance to go to 6,000 feet for his approach into Harrisburg — about 10 minutes away.

“After that, things started to go bad real quickly,” he said.

His single, jet-engine Beech Bonanza — converted from a piston-driven engine — began to oscillate and the electrical system began to shut down. In a matter of minutes, Cooper said, the plane, valued at $750,000 and one of only 40 in the world, was without electrical power.

He said the jet engine never lost power, but he was flying an aircraft with no communication that was undetectable on radar. The airport couldn’t track him and other planes in the air would not know he was there.

Cooper used a hand-held radio to notify the airport he was going to make an emergency landing. He used a hand-held GPS device to help get him to the airport. He also was able to use the towers at Three Mile Island, located adjacent to the airport, to guide him.

Cooper said he was able to keep the plane level as he manually cranked the landing gear down. However, he was unable to know if the gear locked in place. When he hit the runway, the landing gear collapsed because it wasn’t locked.

“I felt the best thing was to get the plane on the ground,” he said. “I had a normal approach and the airport had the fire engines out in case of a problem.”

Cooper said the landing went well, despite being unable to use flaps to slow the plane. He said the plane veered slightly off the runway and sparks caused a small grass fire.

“I came in at a higher speed than normal,” he said. “I was uninjured, but the plane sustained between $100,00 and $200,000 worth of damage.”

Cooper said sheet metal was damaged, but the largest expense will be in tearing down the engine. He said the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate to determine what caused the electrical system to quit.

The 25-year licensed pilot said it will take four months to repair the aircraft at Seamans Airport in Factoryville.

Cooper said he flies all over the U.S. and can’t wait to get back into the air.

“Pilots, like surgeons, solve problems,” he said. “In this case, you accept your fate and make the most of it.”

What will Cooper take away from this experience? He said he was concerned about encountering another aircraft.

“Well, you learn how you react in an emergency,” he said. “It’s interesting; I didn’t panic and I had no fear — just determination. I was confident I was going to get the plane and myself on the ground safely.”


Story, Photo and Comments/Reaction:   http://www.timesleader.com


MIDDLETOWN, Pa. (WHTM) - 

An emergency landing at Harrisburg International Airport last week was even riskier than first believed.

The pilot, Dr. Dave Cooper, told abc27 News Monday that he landed Thursday night without any power to the plane.

"Well, it all started out with a very uneventful flight. I was looking forward to coming to Harrisburg, flying out of Wilkes-Barre/Scranton," said Cooper, an orthopedic surgeon in Wilkes-Barre. 
"Normally, it's about a half an hour flight."

About 10 minutes away from Harrisburg, Cooper said everything went dark.

"Frankly, at that point, I didn't really know what was going on," he said. "You just sort of collect yourself and we have three things we do in aviation; it's called aviate, navigate and communicate."
But Cooper had no way to communicate other than a handheld radio, and with his panel out, he had no way to navigate. He had to do it the "old school" way.

"I knew that the airport was near the stacks, the stacks are readily visible," he said, referring to the cooling towers at Three Mile Island. "So, you started flying sort of to the stacks, understanding they're probably not too happy that the plane is flying near a nuclear power plant."

But there was another problem: Cooper had to manually release the landing gear.

"There's a crank that - you have to lean backwards and turn it 50 times counter-clockwise, all while flying the plane with your left hand," Cooper said.

As if that was not stressful enough, Cooper had to worry about colliding with other planes in mid-air because the power outage essentially made him invisible. Once he saw the emergency lights, Cooper went in for the landing.

"Then, you're at the mercy of what's happening," he said. "The plane went along straight. You hear a lot of screeching because as you can see the propeller hit and then the belly of the plane hits. But planes are made, structurally, to withstand a belly landing."

Cooper said he kept his cool and let his 25 years of flying experience kick in. He said he could not have made such a successful landing without the help of HIA's air traffic controllers.

"They did a fantastic job clearing the air space. "As you know, there were some delays, unfortunately, and I apologize for that. Some flights had to be diverted because the runway was closed. But the tower did a great job," he said.

"I'd like to say in defense of small planes and single pilots that most land very successfully," he said. "We have a great track record."

Cooper's plane will stay at HIA for a few days so that a mechanic can figure out what went wrong and how to fix the problem.

Story, Photo and Comments/Reaction:    http://www.abc27.com
 

 A single-engine plane made a crash landing Thursday night at Harrisburg International Airport, which forced the airport’s lone runway to close for at least 45 minutes, according to an airport spokesman.

The pilot of the plane was not injured and was the only person on board, said Scott Miller, the airport spokesman.

The plane, a Beechcraft Bonanza, had an issue with its landing gear and that caused it to skid across the runway on its belly, Miller said.

The incident occurred sometime between 7 and 7:30 p.m. The runway was reopened at 8:15. The closure was necessary because the plane was blocking part of the runway and posed a safety concern.

The incident is under investigation. The pilot's identity was not immediately available.

Source:    http://www.pennlive.com

 
An emergency landing forces Harrisburg International Airport in Dauphin County to close for about an hour Thursday evening.  A single engine Beechcraft Bonanza declared an emergency when the pilot couldn’t get his landing gear down.  The incident began at about 7:15 pm.

The pilot safely made a wheels up belly landing but the aircraft skidded off the runway before coming to a halt.  The airport closed while emergency crews removed the aircraft.  The pilot was not injured. Flight operations resumed at about 8:15 pm.

The name of the pilot was not released.  The Federal Aviation Administration will examine the aircraft.

Source: http://fox43.com

Israeli steals life jackets from plane

Stewardesses on charter flight to Crete spot 17-year-old passenger taking three life jackets to use as swimming floats during vacation on Greek island. Police also find 19 Kalashnikov bullets in her handbag


A young Israeli woman has been arrested on suspicion of stealing three life jackets from a charter flight on her way to a summer vacation in the Greek island of Crete.

And if that were not enough, 19 Kalashnikov bullets were found in her bag.

The incident took place last Friday. During a flight to Crete, stewardesses spotted the 17-year-old Israeli taking three life jackets located under the place's seats in case of an emergency landing at sea. The girl had planned to use the life jackets as swimming floats while vacationing with her friends in Greece.

When she got off the plane, she was arrested by Greek police officers, who also found a magazine of a Kalashnikov rifle with 19 bullets in her handbag. The girl had apparently left Israel with the magazine, which was not discovered during the Ben-Gurion Airport security check.

She told police investigators that her handbag was an old bag used by her father during his military reserve service and that she had been unaware of the magazine's presence. Her claim is rather puzzling as the Kalashnikov rifle is not considered a standard weapon in the Israel Defense Forces.

The Israeli girl was brought before a judge on Friday and released for being a minor.

Nonetheless, the Greeks are planning to charge her with theft and possession of weapons.

She was allowed to return to Israel after promising to return for the trial, which has been scheduled for October.

Meanwhile, the Foreign Ministry is pleading with Israelis to check their bags thoroughly before going abroad in order to ensure that no bullets or magazines have been forgotten inside.

Source:  http://www.ynetnews.com

Beechcraft 76 Duchess, N803FC: Fatal accident occurred May 10, 2018 in San Diego County and incident occurred August 15, 2013 at Gillespie Field Airport (KSEE), California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming; Phoenix, Arizona
Hartzell; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Scandinavian Aviation Academy

http://registry.faa.gov/N803FC 

Location: Julian, CA
Accident Number: WPR18FA139
Date & Time: 05/10/2018, 2031 PDT
Registration: N803FC
Aircraft: BEECH 76
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On May 10, 2018, about 2031 Pacific daylight time, a Beech BE76 twin-engine airplane, N803FC, collided with mountainous terrain while maneuvering in the vicinity of Julian, California. The certificated flight instructor, pilot receiving instruction, and student pilot rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by a post impact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Scandinavian Aviation Academy as an instructional cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Apple Valley Airport (APV), Apple Valley, California, at an undetermined time and was destined for Gillespie Field Airport (SEE), El Cajon, California.

According to the representatives from the flight school, the purpose of the flight was a day and night 100 nautical mile (nm) cross country flight. The flight to APV was conducted during the day, and the return flight from APV to SEE was to be conducted at night.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identified the airplane near the Ramona Airport (RMN) about 2003. Radar tracking showed that the airplane traveled east from RMN, climbed to about 5,600 ft mean sea level (msl), with the groundspeed varying from 116 knots to 133 knots for about 14 miles. The airplane then began to slow and it made a left turn from about a 48° course heading to about a 176° course heading. Throughout the turn, the altitude remained about 5,600 ft msl, and the groundspeed decreased to 55 knots. At the completion of the turn, the groundspeed increased to about 67 knots, and a climb was initiated to 6,600 ft msl while continuing on a southwestern course of about 195°. The airplane then made a right turn to an easterly heading for about 10 miles.

The radar data further depicted a left 180o turn was initiated at an altitude of 6,200 ft msl and a groundspeed of about 121 knots. At what appears to be the apex of the turn, the airplane was at 6,100 ft msl and a groundspeed of 50 knots. The airplane then began to descend, and groundspeed increased to 74 knots, then decreased to 50 knots. The last radar return was recorded at 2031, with the airplane at an altitude of 5,700 ft msl and a groundspeed of 67 knots in the vicinity of the accident site.

The accident site was located less than 1 mile southeast of the Julian VOR (Very-High-Frequency Omnirange Navigation Equipment) in mountainous terrain near the bottom of a draw at an elevation of about 4,200 ft. The wreckage debris was orientated along an east-west direction and the initial impact direction was on a westerly heading. The wreckage was contained within a 150-foot circumference of the initial impact point. The first piece of identified wreckage near the initial impact point was the fire extinguisher. The farthest portion of wreckage located downslope of the initial impact was the right side propeller. All structural components were located at the accident site.

The wreckage was transported to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N803FC
Model/Series: 76 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: SCANDINAVIAN AVIATION ACADEMY
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRNM, 1393 ft msl
Observation Time: 0353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 280°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: APPLE VALLEY, CA (APV)
Destination:  SAN DIEGO/EL CAJON, CA (SEE) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  33.134444, -116.578333 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

May 29, 2018 (San Diego’s East County) – A plane that crashed on May 11th on Volcan Mountain near Julian has been positively identified as a twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess reported missing by Gillespie Field, according to the FAA. 

The plane crash sparked a brush fire that charred the bodies of three men aboard. 

Due to the blaze in the remote location, the bodies could not be recovered until four days after the tragedy.

All three bodies suffered blunt force and thermal injuries.

The County Medical Examiner’s office has not yet confirmed the identities of those onboard. 

According to Alex Bell, communications officer for the County’s Public Safety Group, “While we do have leads on who the victims are, positively confirming their identities requires DNA testing. Those samples have been sent to the lab, and it takes approximately 6-8 weeks for the results. We hope to be able to confirm their identities and notify their next of kin in the next month or so. After notifying the next of kin, we can release that information publicly.” 

http://www.eastcountymagazine.org



Three people found dead in the wreckage of a small plane crash in East County were part of a flight that never arrived at Gillespie Field last week, officials confirmed Tuesday. 

A twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess did not land at the El Cajon airport as scheduled Thursday night, according to Ian Gregor, spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Pacific Division.

That same night, a plane crash on Volcan Mountain sparked a 12-acre brush fire in the Ranchita area. Deputies described the area as Arkansas Canyon. It's located east of Warner Springs and west of Borrego Springs. 

On Tuesday, officials confirmed the crashed plane was the missing Beechcraft Duchess. 

Three bodies were removed Monday from the wreckage, four days since the crash was first reported.

Someone saw the plane crashing and called 911 at around 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Due to the remote location of the crash, it wasn't found until Friday.

Search teams could not reach the wreckage until Sunday when they confirmed three people were dead at the crash site.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board airlifted the bodies out of the canyon.

Some parts of the plane were also recovered and have been taken to a salvage yard in the Phoenix area where a thorough examination will be conducted by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the FAA said.

Keith Holloway with the NTSB said his agency will look into radar data, aircraft communications, weather and medical records. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbcsandiego.com



RANCHITA (CNS) - Authorities Monday recovered the remains of three victims from amid the wreckage of a plane that crashed and ignited a forest fire last week in a remote and rugged wilderness area near Volcan Mountain.

With help from National Transportation Safety Board personnel, a search-and-rescue team early this afternoon airlifted the remains out of the steep terrain where the aircraft went down for unknown reasons Thursday evening, sheriff's Lt. Greg Rylaarsdam said.

After firefighters extinguished the 12-acre blaze ignited by the crash, deputies discovered the bodies Sunday morning. However, the challenging territory made it impossible to move the remains except by helicopter, and high winds prevented the sheriff's aircraft from reaching the remote canyon until today.

"Our number-one mission and priority (was) to get those souls off the mountain," Rylaarsdam said.

The lieutenant described the crash site in a gorge known as Arkansas Canyon as a "treacherous climb, in and out," and likened reaching it by foot as "hiking almost down the face of a cliff."

Making matters worse were the still-smoldering remnants of the vegetation fire. The ground was so hot that firefighters warned the sheriff's search team Saturday that their ropes and boots would melt if they tried hiking down to the aircraft wreckage.

On Sunday, still wary of using climbing lines, Cal Fire crews laid down dry hoses that sheriff's personnel were able to use to climb down to the crash site, the lieutenant said.

The remains will be turned over to the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office for identification and family-notification purposes.

Officials believe that the crashed plane was a twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess that was registered at El Cajon's Gillespie Field. The aircraft was due to land at Ramona Airport on Thursday night but never showed up and remains unaccounted for.

A Julian resident reported seeing a plane going down near Volcan Mountain around 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Less than 30 minutes later, authorities got word that a brush fire had erupted in the same general area.

An NTSB contractor was at the crash site this morning, Rylaarsdam said. The federal agency is responsible for identifying the plane and investigating the crash. Authorities were hoping that there were large enough pieces of the plane left to allow for identification of the wreckage, Rylaarsdam said.

While working to get the bodies out of the crash site, officials also gathered pieces of the demolished aircraft to aid in the investigation.

"We have not yet been able to confirm whether or not the wreckage of this plane is the missing plane from Gillespie Field," the lieutenant said.

Though the blaze, dubbed the Volcan Fire, was fully contained as of this morning, firefighters expected to remain at the scene at least until midweek, monitoring the burn area and snuffing out remaining hot spots, Cal Fire spokesman Issac Sanchez said.


Story and video: http://www.cbs8.com




A sheriff’s search-and-rescue crew on Sunday found three victims amid the wreckage of a plane that crashed and sparked a 12-acre fire on Volcan Mountain, officials said.

The unidentified aircraft went down in a steep canyon on the east side of the mountain about 8:40 p.m. Thursday. Flames from the crash quickly spread. The terrain was steep and mountainous and the weather was windy and cloudy making firefighting difficult from the ground and the air.

Firefighters found the plane on Friday, but search-and-rescue team members weren’t able to make it to the aircraft until the fire was 100 percent contained on Sunday morning.

Sheriff’s Lt. Greg Rylaarsdam said the canyon was too steep and treacherous to guide Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board investigators to the wreckage, as they usually would. Instead, a team of sheriff’s investigators made the appriximate half-mile hike and conducted the initial investigation.

The team found three victims near the crash site, but they weren’t able to recover the bodies because the winds were too high for the helicopter needed to fly them out.

The victims have not been identified.

Investigators also haven’t been able to identify if the crashed plane is that of a twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess that was supposed to land at Ramona Airport on Thursday but never showed, Rylaarsdam said.

"We haven't positively identified the plane yet,” the lieutenant said. “I think we may be able to at some point, perhaps with a serialized part, but it's not like there's a plane sitting down there. There's a debris field."

A Beechcraft with the same tail number as the missing plane is registered to Scandinavian Aviation Academy, also known as SAA, a flight school located at Gillespie Field, according to FAA records.

Cal Fire Capt. Isaac Sanchez said firefighters were expected to be in the area of the crash until least until midweek due to “heavy fuels and extensive mop up required,” the fire agency tweeted.


http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com



RANCHITA (CNS) - A fire apparently sparked by a nighttime plane crash near Volcan Mountain in North County was 100 percent contained by a line of cleared vegetation Sunday, authorities said.

The blaze, dubbed the Volcan Fire, held at 12 acres, according to Cal Fire San Diego.

It was sparked by the plane crash, late Thursday.

Firefighters were expected to be at the scene at least until midweek due to "heavy fuels and extensive mop up required," the fire agency tweeted.

Cal Fire San Diego spokesman Issac Sanchez said he's not sure when Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board investigators will be able to inspect the wreckage of the plane that's believed to have sparked the fire.

"The fire threat has been mitigated," he said. "But there's still an accessibility issue."

The destroyed airplane remained unidentified Sunday, though a twin- engine Beechcraft Duchess was reported overdue Thursday night when it failed to land at Ramona Airport as expected, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The missing plane is registered to Scandinavian Aviation Academy, a flight school that operates out of Gillespie Field airport in El Cajon, according to FAA records.

A resident of Julian reported seeing an aircraft apparently plunging to the ground northeast of town about 8:30 p.m. Thursday, sheriff's officials said.

Less than 30 minutes later, authorities got word of a small brush fire in the Ranchita area, Lt. Amber Baggs said.

A sheriff's helicopter crew was unable to find any plane wreckage in the darkness, and firefighters had to wait until morning to make their way to the remote canyon where the blaze was burning.

By the time they reached the site shortly after sunrise Friday morning, the flames had spread over about 10 acres, according to Cal Fire.

At about 9:30 a.m. Friday, firefighters found aircraft wreckage in the burn zone, Baggs said, but the fire prevented authorities from taking a closer look.


http://www.cbs8.com



RANCHITA (CNS) - A fire apparently sparked by a nighttime plane crash near Volcan Mountain on Thursday inched closer to containment Saturday.

The blaze, dubbed the Volcan Fire, was 55 percent contained and holding at 12 acres Saturday morning, according to Cal Fire San Diego.

A resident of Julian reported seeing an aircraft apparently plunging to the ground northeast of the tourist destination highland town about 8:30 p.m. Thursday, according to sheriff's officials.

Less than 30 minutes later, authorities got word of a small brush fire in the Ranchita area, Lt. Amber Baggs said.

A sheriff's helicopter crew was unable to find any plane wreckage in the darkness, and firefighters had to wait until morning to make their way to the remote canyon where the blaze was burning. By the time they reached the site shortly after sunrise Friday morning, the flames had spread over about 10 acres, according to Cal Fire.

The fire posed no structural threats, the state agency reported.

At about 9:30 a.m. Friday, firefighters found aircraft wreckage in the burn zone, Baggs said. There was no immediate word on the condition of whoever was aboard the aircraft when it went down.

The destroyed airplane remained unidentified today, though a twin- engine Beechcraft Duchess was reported overdue Thursday night when it failed to land at Ramona Airport when expected, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

"We do not know where the aircraft is," FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said Friday.

The missing plane is registered to a flight school that operates out of Gillespie Field airport in El Cajon, according to an online aircraft registration roster.

Story and video ➤ http://www.cbs8.com




While Cal Fire crews are keeping an eye on a 10-acre fire in San Diego’s East County, deputies have located the plane reported missing and believed to have crashed, sparking the fire.

The brush fire in the Ranchita area was first reported to authorities as a possible plane crash on Volcan Mountain around 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Cal Fire crews responded and found a 3 to 4-acre brush fire, east of Warner Springs and west of Borrego Springs.

The San Diego County Sheriff's Department (SDSO) received reports of a plane crash and the Federal Aviation Administration confirms there was a plane reported overdue from the Ramona airport.

At 11:45 a.m. Friday, deputies confirmed finding the wreckage of the plane but said the tail number was illegible so the identity of the aircraft was unknown.

The fire was in a steep, inaccessible area so firefighters were unable to get close enough to determine if it may have been caused by a plane crash as reported, deputies said.

A twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess did not land as scheduled Thursday night, according to Ian Gregor, spokesperson for the FAA Pacific Division.

When asked if the overdue plane had crashed, Gregor suggested NBC 7 ask first responders if a wreckage has been found.

Cal Fire said the fire, dubbed the Volcan Fire, was slow-moving and there were no homes nearby that could be in danger. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbcsandiego.com




(KGTV) – Firefighters battling a brush fire near Volcan Mountain in the East County Friday discovered the wreckage of a plane that reportedly crashed in the area the night before.

Shortly before 9 p.m. Thursday, San Diego County sheriff's officials said they received reports of a possible plane crash in Ranchita, an area between Warner Springs and Borrego Springs.

About an hour after the crash reports, Cal Fire officials said crews responded to a vegetation fire near Volcan Mountain, in the area close to the possible plane crash.

Cal Fire officials tweeted that the so-called Volcan Fire was burning "in an area that is steep and inaccessible to ground resources."

At daylight Friday, ground crews reached the fire's edge to battle the blaze. As of 11 a.m., the fire has burned at least 10 acres, but no homes or other structures are nearby.

During the firefighting effort, sheriff's officials said "a possible crash site was located in the area" but crews have not been able to reach the wreckage due to the fire.

Sheriff's officials said: "Once we are able to access the crash site, elements of the Sheriff's Search and Rescue Team will respond to assist the FAA, who are the leading the investigation of this incident … We have been unable to identify the plane or occupants at this time."

An FAA official told 10News Friday that a twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess aircraft was reported overdue when it did not land at Ramona on Thursday night. The official said they do not know of the plane's whereabouts.

There is no official confirmation linking the missing plane to the brush fire.

Story and video ➤ https://www.10news.com




Firefighters contended with rugged terrain and high winds Friday while working to control a wildfire sparked by a nighttime plane crash near Volcan Mountain.

A resident of Julian reported seeing an aircraft apparently plunging to the ground northeast of the tourist-destination highland town about 8:30 p.m. Thursday, according to San Diego County Sheriff’s officials. Less than half an hour later, authorities got word of a small brush fire in the Ranchita area, Lt. Amber Baggs said.

A sheriff’s helicopter crew was unable to find any plane wreckage in the darkness, and firefighters had to wait until morning to make their way to the remote canyon where the blaze was burning. By the time they reached the site shortly after sunrise, the flames had spread over about 10 acres, according to Cal Fire.

The fire was posing no immediate structural threats, the state agency reported.

About 9:30 a.m., firefighters found aircraft wreckage in the burn zone, Baggs said. There was no immediate word on the condition of whoever was aboard the aircraft when it went down.

The destroyed airplane remained unidentified at midday, though a twin- engine Beechcraft Duchess was reported overdue Thursday night when it failed to land at Ramona Airport when expected, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

“We do not know where the aircraft is,” FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said late Friday morning.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://timesofsandiego.com




EL CAJON (CNS) - A light plane with faulty landing gear made a non-injury hard landing at Gillespie Field Thursday. 

The front wheel assembly of the twin-engine aircraft apparently collapsed when it touched down at the El Cajon general-aviation airport shortly before 4:30 p.m., sending the plane's nose scraping along the runway, a Heartland Fire & Rescue dispatcher said.

No injuries were reported and no fire resulted, according to city spokeswoman Monica Zech. It was not immediately clear how many people were aboard the fixed-wing aircraft at the time of the mishap.

Story and video ➤ http://www.cbs8.com Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Scandinavian Aviation Academy

http://registry.faa.gov/N803FC 

JULIAN (NEWS 8) – Firefighters have found debris that could potentially be that of a reported missing aircraft at the site of a roughly 12-acre wildfire burning in Ranchita, northeast of Julian, authorities said.

A 911 caller reported seeing an aircraft go down in the area Thursday evening, shortly before the blaze began spreading in a remote canyon close to Volcan Mountain, but authorities have not confirmed finding remains of a plane in the area. 

According to Cal Fire San Diego, ground crews reached the fire's edge early Friday morning and constructed a containment line.  

As of Friday afternoon, the fire was 30-percent contained and estimated to be 12 acres. Access remained the biggest challenge because of the terrain in the area.

"Ground crews have reached the fire's edge and have begun constructing (a) containment line," Cal Fire officials tweeted at 7:30 a.m. Friday "The fire is estimated to be 10 acres in size and access remains the biggest challenge."

The fire, which was not threatening any homes, was reported around 8:30 p.m. Thursday after the San Diego County Sheriff's Department received reports of a possible plane crash in the area.

Sheriff's investigators held off any search attempts Thursday night because of the darkness and rough terrain, but began searching for the possible aircraft wreckage early Friday morning.

The destroyed airplane remained unidentified at midday Friday, though a twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess was reported overdue Thursday night when it failed to land at Ramona Airport when expected, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

"We do not know where the aircraft is," FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said late Friday morning.


Story and video ➤  http://www.cbs8.com





While Cal Fire crews are keeping an eye on a 10-acre fire in San Diego’s East County, deputies have located the plane reported missing and believed to have crashed, sparking the fire.

The brush fire in the Ranchita area was first reported to authorities as a possible plane crash on Volcan Mountain around 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Cal Fire crews responded and found a 3 to 4-acre brush fire, east of Warner Springs and west of Borrego Springs.

The San Diego County Sheriff's Department (SDSO) received reports of a plane crash and the Federal Aviation Administration confirms there was a plane reported overdue from the Ramona airport.

At 11:45 a.m. Friday, deputies confirmed finding the wreckage of the plane but said the tail number was illegible so the identity of the aircraft was unknown.

The fire was in a steep, inaccessible area so firefighters were unable to get close enough to determine if it may have been caused by a plane crash as reported, deputies said.

A twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess did not land as scheduled Thursday night, according to Ian Gregor, spokesperson for the FAA Pacific Division.

When asked if the overdue plane had crashed, Gregor suggested NBC 7 ask first responders if a wreckage has been found.

Cal Fire said the fire, dubbed the Volcan Fire, was slow-moving and there were no homes nearby that could be in danger. 

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.nbcsandiego.com







(KGTV) – Firefighters battling a brush fire near Volcan Mountain in the East County Friday discovered the wreckage of a plane that reportedly crashed in the area the night before.

Shortly before 9 p.m. Thursday, San Diego County sheriff's officials said they received reports of a possible plane crash in Ranchita, an area between Warner Springs and Borrego Springs.

About an hour after the crash reports, Cal Fire officials said crews responded to a vegetation fire near Volcan Mountain, in the area close to the possible plane crash.

Cal Fire officials tweeted that the so-called Volcan Fire was burning "in an area that is steep and inaccessible to ground resources."

At daylight Friday, ground crews reached the fire's edge to battle the blaze. As of 11 a.m., the fire has burned at least 10 acres, but no homes or other structures are nearby.

During the firefighting effort, sheriff's officials said "a possible crash site was located in the area" but crews have not been able to reach the wreckage due to the fire.

Sheriff's officials said: "Once we are able to access the crash site, elements of the Sheriff's Search and Rescue Team will respond to assist the FAA, who are the leading the investigation of this incident … We have been unable to identify the plane or occupants at this time."

An FAA official told 10News Friday that a twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess aircraft was reported overdue when it did not land at Ramona on Thursday night. The official said they do not know of the plane's whereabouts.

There is no official confirmation linking the missing plane to the brush fire.

Story and video ➤ https://www.10news.com



Firefighters contended with rugged terrain and high winds Friday while working to control a wildfire sparked by a nighttime plane crash near Volcan Mountain.

A resident of Julian reported seeing an aircraft apparently plunging to the ground northeast of the tourist-destination highland town about 8:30 p.m. Thursday, according to San Diego County Sheriff’s officials. Less than half an hour later, authorities got word of a small brush fire in the Ranchita area, Lt. Amber Baggs said.

A sheriff’s helicopter crew was unable to find any plane wreckage in the darkness, and firefighters had to wait until morning to make their way to the remote canyon where the blaze was burning. By the time they reached the site shortly after sunrise, the flames had spread over about 10 acres, according to Cal Fire.

The fire was posing no immediate structural threats, the state agency reported.

About 9:30 a.m., firefighters found aircraft wreckage in the burn zone, Baggs said. There was no immediate word on the condition of whoever was aboard the aircraft when it went down.

The destroyed airplane remained unidentified at midday, though a twin- engine Beechcraft Duchess was reported overdue Thursday night when it failed to land at Ramona Airport when expected, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

“We do not know where the aircraft is,” FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said late Friday morning.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://timesofsandiego.com



Cal Fire crews on Friday morning reached and started to fight a brush fire reportedly ignited by a plane crash in a remote area northeast of Julian on Thursday night.

The blaze was in a canyon on the eastside of Volcan Mountain that was not accessible from any roads, and fire crews decided they had to wait for morning to start a fire attack, a Cal Fire official said.

A small plane was reported overdue Thursday when it did not land at Ramona Airport as expected, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said. He said authorities don’t know where the twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess is.

At 8:40 p.m. Thursday, a 911 caller reported seeing a plane go down and hearing two explosions, sheriff’s Lt. Rick Lopez said.A sheriff’s helicopter was sent to try to find the plane, but was unsuccessful Thursday night.

Sheriff’s officials said Friday that possible plane wreckage had been found around 9:30 a.m. but the active fire kept crews from reaching it.

Earlier, at 7:30 a.m., Cal Fire San Diego tweeted out that ground crews had reached the edge of the blaze dubbed the Volcan fire and started a building a containment line.

“The fire is estimated to be 10 acres in size and access remains the biggest challenge,” the agency tweeted.

Fire crews staged at the Volcan Mountain Wilderness Preserve, Lopez said.

On Friday, county officials said the preserve would be closed for the day due to the fire, and all weekend events were canceled.

No homes were threatened by the blaze, Cal Fire Capt. Issac Sanchez said.

Original article ➤ http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com




EL CAJON (CNS) - A light plane with faulty landing gear made a non-injury hard landing at Gillespie Field Thursday. 

The front wheel assembly of the twin-engine aircraft apparently collapsed when it touched down at the El Cajon general-aviation airport shortly before 4:30 p.m., sending the plane's nose scraping along the runway, a Heartland Fire & Rescue dispatcher said.

No injuries were reported and no fire resulted, according to city spokeswoman Monica Zech. It was not immediately clear how many people were aboard the fixed-wing aircraft at the time of the mishap.

Story and Video: http://www.cbs8.com

Airport Officer Assaulted at Terminal: Philadelphia International (KPHL), Pennsylvania

 
 Tyreas Carlyle, 26, of Philadelphia



A Philadelphia Police officer who works at Philadelphia International Airport was assaulted while on patrol at one of the terminals on Wednesday night. 
 
Police say the officer approached a man who was trying to open the Terminal E exit door, marked "Exit Only." The man didn't listen to the officer's order not to go through the door, that reads opening it will result in prosecution.

The man, identified as Tyreas Carlyle, 26, told the officer he had a plane to catch, but wasn't able to show identification or a boarding pass.

Carlyle grabbed the officer around the neck and reached for the officer's gun several times, police say.

Other officers were called to the Terminal to help get Carlyle in custody.

The Philadelphia man is charged with Aggravated Assault, Robbery, Simple Assault, Criminal Mischief, Defiant Trespass, and Resisting Arrest.

Story and Photo:   http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

Airport Commission 'clears the air' on alcohol ban at Aviator Park: Tehachapi Municipal Airport (KTSP), California

Aviator Park, located on the grounds of the Tehachapi Municipal Airport, can be reserved for special events. Lately it has been the center of controversy after some in the aviation community protested the recent ban on alcohol in the park. 
Photo by Gregory D. Cook/Tehachapi News



Airport Commission chairperson Eric Hansen spearheaded an informal open discussion at the commission's regular meeting Tuesday, Aug. 13. The conversation topic was the recent happenings surrounding the commission's request for an exemption to the alcohol ban in Aviator Park.

Phil Shinar represented the Airport Commission with a letter to the City Council, which he read at the Council's meeting on July 15. At the time, Shinar was the elected secretary of the commission, but the verbal response by Councilmember Kim Nixon immediately following his request prompted him to resign his post two days later.

Hansen acknowledged Tuesday that the City Council as a whole did not provide a formal response and that Nixon spoke of her own accord.

The discussion was the only item on the commission agenda. When chided by City Manager Greg Garrett, who was in attendance, for not focusing on economic issues, Hansen responded by saying he thought it important to "clear the air."

Mayor Phil Smith also attended.

Hansen opened the subject with an apology.

"It was kind of in your face," Hansen said about the letter. "I want to apologize to the city and the people of Tehachapi for being kind of blunt on that."

The chairman said he tried filling out a special use permit and found it to be "unwieldy." He then suggested using an alternate registration system for Aviator Park, but the idea was quickly dropped.

Jerry Koszyk, the commission's vice-chairperson, was absent from the last airport commission meeting when the members decided to submit the request to the City Council. During the course of Tuesday's meeting, his opposition to the request became clear.

"The whole thing seems very petty to me," he said. "Of all the things we can discuss, I think this is very petty."

Garrett expressed a similar sentiment.

"It takes $250,000 more per year to run this airport than it brings in," he said. "It's really tiring to hear this petty stuff."

"But it's important to us," airport business owner Ken Hetge said in response to Garrett. "It's not a pilot's job to promote the city's economic development. It's your job."

"I'd like to be able to do more of what we're charged with doing," Hansen said.

In other comments, he stated his desire for the commission to spend more time focusing on how to bring in more business to the airport and help it grow.

The mayor played the arbitrator as the meeting wound down. He said he applauds the volunteers at the airport who helped build Aviator Park.

"Volunteerism makes this airport shine," Smith said. "I think this thing with the beer has been blown way out of proportion... The police officers aren't going to say, 'Here's a ticket, there's the beer.' You're just not going to get someone doing that."

Smith reiterated how city taxpayers are the owners of both the airport and its park.

"The public out there spends a quarter million dollars a year [on the airport] that could be spent on potholes, recreation, or whatever else," the mayor said. "My point I'm trying to make here is, you're on the inside of the fence looking out... But try to pretend the fence isn't there and we're all one big community."

After the meeting, Smith summed up the outcome.

"Everyone left shaking hands," he said.

Story and Photo:   http://www.tehachapinews.com

Airport, Asphalt plant top city issues: Seward Airport (PAWD), Alaska

Wolfgang Kurtz | The Seward Phoenix LOG
 Carl High, DOT’s Kenai Peninsula District superintendent and DOT Regional Hydrologist Paul Janke (right) discuss the airport predicament while behind them the Resurrection River spills over runway 13/31.



The City of Seward administration has publicly weighed in on repeated flooding of Seward Airport and the recent closure of Seward’s main airport runway by the Alaska Department of Transportation. As reported by City Manager Jim Hunt at Monday’s city council meeting, both he and Assistant City Manager Ron Long granted at least a television interview apiece over the past week. 

 In addition to the exposure of the situation via Anchorage media, Hunt says that contact with Rep. Mike Chenault has elevated the awareness of the importance of getting the airport back online and solving the flooding issue. Councilor Marianna Keil mentioned that she communicated with legislators Chenault and Sen. Cathy Giessel and that they signified their awareness of the situation and the need to have it addressed immediately.

One of the factors prioritizing dealing with the airport situation in the short term is the use of the facility for medevac operations. Another is the loss of business which, according to Seward Air’s Denny Hamilton, may put him out of business if it continues much longer. Seward Air, among other services, is the only fuel provider on the airport premises. Hamilton says that the fuel business is a significant underwriter of the rest of his business and presently he’s out close to $100,000 in lost sales.

In June, DOT tested the main runway pavement and determined that it should not be used by aircraft heavier than 12,500 pounds which limits the facility to just small planes. Since then, it has been reopened when it was not flooded and DOT has maintained that the current situation is under study and that the airport is not closed. However, depending on how saturated or undermined the entire area is, use of the short runway may also be restricted and the longer runway closed permanently.

During a visit to the airport by DOT personnel on Aug. 8, Carl High, DOT’s Kenai Peninsula District superintendent and DOT Regional Hydrologist Paul Janke were confronted by another flooding episode. As they waited for a helicopter ride, the Resurrection River washed across the nearby runway. High said that they were there to get the big picture and perform aerial surveys.

Janke asserted that, according to current budgeting and departmental priorities, there would likely be no money for projects at the Seward Airport until 2016. Pending completion of a formal study by DOT, the present conversation lays out a combination of fixes required to permanently address the airport’s problems including dredging the river and armoring the river bank as well as replacing fill materials under portions of the pavement and, overall, raising the elevation of the runways.

Before the recent restrictions by DOT, the airport’s runways had essentially no weight limits and had supported traffic in the past including large and heavy planes such as 100,000-pound DC-6s loaded with outbound Seward Fisheries seafood shipments. The airport also was open to use by medium size commercial jets such as the 737’s typically used for flights between smaller Alaska communities.

Story and Photo:    http://www.thesewardphoenixlog.com