Saturday, September 21, 2019

Beechcraft V35 Bonanza, N5438U: Fatal accident occurred September 18, 2019 near Madison County Airport (KUYF), London, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5438U

Location: London, OH
Accident Number: CEN19FA323
Date & Time: 09/18/2019, 0731 EDT
Registration: N5438U
Aircraft: Beech V35TC
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On September 18, 2019, at 0731 eastern daylight time, a Beech V35TC, N5438U, impacted terrain about 1/4-mile short of runway 09 at Madison County Airport (UYF), London, Ohio. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-impact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the accident site and at the time of the accident. No flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Apple Airstrip (0OH7), Piqua, Ohio, about 0715 and was destined for UFY.

A dash camera video from a passing motorist captured the accident and showed the airplane turning from left base to final approach and descending to the ground. Examination of the wreckage disclosed the flaps were set at 20° and the landing gear was extended. Flight control continuity was confirmed. One propeller blade bore signatures of power being developed.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N5438U
Model/Series: V35TC
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: UYF, 1081 ft msl
Observation Time:  EDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 10°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Piqua, OH (0OH7)
Destination: London, OH (UYF)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.932778, -83.461944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Before May 2018, pilots were required to be evaluated every two years by an FAA-licensed physician. Many pilots considered the process burdensome. Under the FAA’s more-recent BasicMed program, pilots have the option to be seen every four years by any licensed physician. Donald Apple, a 79-year-old pilot killed in a crash in Madison County this month, had neither certification.

Aviation experts want to know why an experienced recreational pilot would let his medical certification lapse and whether doing so was related to his death in a crash this month at Madison County Airport.

“For somebody who loved to fly, why would he do that? Why would you risk your own safety,” said Richard G. McSpadden Jr., executive director of the Air Safety Institute, a branch of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

The 52-year-old Beechcraft Bonanza being flown by Donald Apple, 79, was seen banking sharply before it crashed about 7:30 a.m. Sept. 18 in a soybean field short of the airport runway. It erupted in flames, forcing back motorists who stopped to help.

Apple had left the airstrip in the backyard of his Miami County farm near Piqua north of Dayton for a flight of about 20 minutes to London to visit Ohio State University’s annual Farm Science Review.

His wife, Sally, said it was a trip he’d taken every year for decades.

“This was a piece of cake,” she said. “When he went out the back door, I said, ‘Have fun.’”

The tragedy has raised questions about pilot age, medical clearances to fly and recent Federal Aviation Administration standards that make it easier for all private and recreational pilots to remain airborne.

Before May 2018, pilots were required to be evaluated every two years by an FAA-licensed physician. Many pilots considered the process burdensome.

Under the FAA’s more-recent BasicMed program, pilots have the option to be seen every four years by any licensed physician. Some doctors, fearing liability, balked at the new leniency.

One doctor, quoted in an article in General Aviation News this year, said: “If you have a physician like that, go to another doctor.”

The article advised, “If you run into several doctors who say no, just keep looking for one who will say yes.”

Apple had neither medical certification. His third-class medical certification was last updated in September 2016 and expired on Sept. 30, 2018.

“I can’t believe he missed it,” Sally Apple said of her husband not obtaining medical certification to fly through one of the procedures. She said her husband had no known physical limitations other than prescription eyeglasses, which was indicated on his expired medical certification records with the FAA.

The freedom of the open sky has a strong pull on older pilots who want to remain behind the controls. Hours after Apple’s crash, several older pilots — one of them age 83 — waited for the airport to reopen.

McSpadden, of the Air Safety Institute, said there is no data to indicate that geriatric pilots are less safe than younger ones.

“I’ve seen 93-year-old pilots that are incredibly sharp, and there’d be no reason to take away their licenses,” he said.

Courtney Chapman, 89, who gave up flying in the 1980s due to a vascular condition, said he misses it every day.

Chapman, who has been a flight instructor and FAA examiner, said pilots should know their limitations.

“If you want to know what real freedom is, fly,” he said. “The call of freedom is very strong.”

“But you have to stop and look at yourself honestly ... that we’re getting older and slower.”

Robert Katz, a Texas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor, monitors news coverage of crashes and then checks the medical credentials of pilots involved. He said he wants to send a message of aviation safety and personal responsibility.

“There comes a point when you have to give this up, just like our parents have to give up driving,” Katz said. “You do something stupid with an airplane, you’re not going to get slightly killed.”

Sally Apple found notes that her husband left behind, one directing that his ashes be placed at the end of his airstrip, “where all of his flights originated.”


https://www.dispatch.com

Donald E. Apple
April 19th, 1940 - September 18th, 2019
Born in Piqua, Ohio
Resided in Piqua, Ohio
~

Donald E. Apple, 79, of Piqua died unexpectedly while flying his plane at 7:37 am Wednesday, September 18th, 2019 at the Madison County Airport. He was born April 19, 1940 in Piqua to the late Forrest and Treva (Warner) Apple. He married Sally K. Copsey June 10, 1961 in Piqua and she survives.

Other survivors include two daughters, Donna (Mark) Kinsella of Newburgh, Indiana, Sandy (Alan) Wilson of Norton Shores, Michigan; one son, Dan (Kelsey) Apple of Dublin; six grandchildren, Austin Apple, Cade Apple, Riley Kinsella, Wesley Wilson, Max Wilson, Sydney Wilson; and one sister, Dolores Morris of Columbus.

Mr. Apple was a 1958 graduate of Piqua Central High School and attended Ohio State University, studying agricultural engineering. Don was a farmer for over 60 years and truly enjoyed his work. He was a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church. He was active with the International Flying Farmers, Ohio Flying Farmers, Piqua Rotary Club, Noon Optimist, FFA, and 4-H where he received national honors. 

Don enjoyed flying over our beautiful nation and in May of 2018 was honored with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award for 50 years of safe flying. He had a great love for the beauty of the earth from above and loved seeing what God had created below. 

Don loved to fly and had flown our great nation from all corners in his many trips. He enjoyed traveling around the country and internationally with his beloved wife where they have been blessed to visit all 50 states, over 60 countries and 6 continents, always enjoying what God created. He also enjoyed their winters in Florida. 

Don was a lifelong learner who believed in education and donated to a half dozen college scholarships. Above all, he loved his wife, children and grandchildren. He did his best to know he left this earth better than he found it.

Funeral arrangements are currently pending at this time. More details will follow at a later date. Funeral arrangements are being provided to the family through the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home. Memorial contributions are suggested to be made to the Piqua Community Foundation, P.O. Box 226, Piqua, OH 45356. Guestbook condolences and expressions of sympathy, to be provided to the family, may be expressed through jamiesonandyannucci.com.




Federal investigators are scheduled to be back out in a Madison County farm field on Thursday to tie up the loose ends of a fatal plane crash.

Lt. Robert Curry with the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s West Jefferson Post said 79-year-old Donald Apple from Piqua was killed when the single-engine plane he was piloting crashed into a field just west of the Madison County Airport on Ohio 40 in Somerford Twp

The pilot was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Madison County Coroner.

Curry said he believes Apple was flying into the airport for the Farm Science Review happening across the road. The three day event is held at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center and attracts about 140,000 visitors from the U.S. and Canada who come to learn about the latest agricultural products.

During the Farm Science Review, the airport does see an increased amount of air traffic.

Curry said Apple’s plane was flying from west to east and was trying to make a landing at the airport just after 7:30 a.m. A witness to the crash said the plane just seemed to lose control and go down.

“No distress calls or anything of that nature that we’ve been able to identify,” Curry said. “We’re investigating currently to see if we can get any information as to the flight pattern or itinerary of the aircraft.”

The weather was favorable on Wednesday — sunny with some wind picking up into the afternoon. Curry said the sun was low at the time of the crash, but it’s unclear whether weather played a factor.

The runway at the Madison County Airport was closed for several hours after the crash, but reopened to pilots in the afternoon.

Curry said the investigation was turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol was assisted on scene by the Madison County Sheriff’s Office, Madison County EMS, London Fire Department, Central Township Fire, the FAA and the NTSB.

Original article ➤ https://www.daytondailynews.com

Best Off Skyranger, N1671L: Accident occurred September 18, 2019 at Halliburton Field Airport (KDUC), Duncan, Stephens County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N1671L

Location: Duncan, OK
Accident Number: CEN19LA324
Date & Time: 09/18/2019, 1930 CDT
Registration: N1671L
Aircraft: Best Off SKYRANGER
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On September 18, 2019, about 1930 central daylight time, an amateur-built Best Off Skyranger airplane, N1671L, caught fire during a ground engine run at Halliburton Field Airport (DUC), Duncan, Oklahoma. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight.

According to the pilot, he taxied normally from his hangar and performed an engine runup, during which the engine lost power. The pilot exited the airplane to examine the engine and noticed a fire had started below the front of the airplane. The fire quickly spread and burned most of the airplane. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Best Off
Registration: N1671L
Model/Series: SKYRANGER No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDUC, 1113 ft msl
Observation Time: 1935 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 110°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Duncan, OK (DUC)
Destination: Duncan, OK (DUC)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.471389, -97.959722 (est)




A small aircraft caught fire Wednesday night around 7 p.m. at  Halliburton Field Airport after the pilot heard a “pop” during his pre-flight start up. 

No one was injured, according to Duncan Fire Chief Dayton Burnside. 

Duncan Fire, Duncan Police, Oklahoma Highway Patrol and OSBI responded. 

The Federal Aviation Administration conducted its investigation early Thursday morning. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.duncanbanner.com

Van's RV-8, N7TL: Fatal accident occurred September 17, 2019 in Stroudsburg, Monroe County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Allentown, Pennsylvania
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N7TL


Location: Stroudsburg, PA
Accident Number: ERA19FA275
Date & Time: 09/17/2019, 1218 EDT
Registration: N7TL
Aircraft: Vans RV 8
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 17, 2019, at 1218 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Vans RV-8 airplane, was destroyed when it collided with terrain near Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the pilot (and two co-owners) and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed the Pegasus Air Park (50PA), Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, about 1215.

According to the Pennsylvania State Police, the pilot was giving a demonstration flight of the airplane to the pilot-rated passenger, who was interested in buying a share of the airplane. The flight was intended to be a 30-minute flight in the local area. When the airplane did not return, the pilot's family reported the airplane missing. The airplane was located the following day in wetlands on private property about three miles east-northeast of the airport.

A preliminary review of radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed a target at 1216:20 on an easterly heading about 2.3-miles east of 50AP. At that time, the target was moving at a groundspeed of 113 knots at an altitude about 1,300 ft above ground level (agl). The target continued east before it made a left 180° turn to the west at 1217:27 at an altitude of 1,700 ft and a groundspeed of 122 knots. Over the next 24 seconds, the target continued west and accelerated to a groundspeed of 199 knots and descended to 1,600 ft agl. At 1218:06, about 11 seconds later, radar contact was lost. At that time, the airplane was heading 258°, at a groundspeed of 191 knots. The altitude was not recorded.

The airplane was located about a quarter mile north of where the last radar return was recorded. It impacted terrain in a nose down attitude and was buried in 4-6 ft of mud. The airplane was heavily fragmented and there was no post-impact fire. The engine and airplane wreckage were recovered for further examination.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His last FAA third-class medical was issued on October 16, 2018. At that time, he reported a total of 1,845 flight hours.

The pilot-rated passenger held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and sea, and multi-engine land. His last FAA first-class medical was issued on October 5, 2018.

Weather reported at the Pocono Mountains Municipal Airport (MPO), about 12 miles north of the accident site, at 1153, included wind from 010° at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles and clear skies. The temperature was 19° C and a dewpoint of 6° C, with a barometric altimeter setting of 30.20 inches of Hg.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make:Vans 
Registration: N7TL
Model/Series: RV 8 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MPO, 1915 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 10°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Stroudsburg, PA (50PA)
Destination: Stroudsburg, PA (50PA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.570000, -75.180000

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Matthew J. Berszoner, age 34, an Air Force veteran and United Airlines pilot, passed away suddenly in an accident on September 18th, 2019. He was born in Downers Grove, IL and lived in Nazareth, PA before his untimely death. He is survived by his stepmother, Sarah Kimball, her son, Dustin (Karly) Davis ; his uncle Bruno (Jennifer) Berszoner and aunt Kris (Richard) Winiarski; uncles Jim Shostok (Nancy), Paul, Tom, Richard and Michael Shostok; cousins Charlie, Stephanie, Nicholas, Mark (Lauren), Monica, and godchild Everett. Preceded in death by his parents Mary and John Berszoner, his maternal and paternal grandparents and uncle Bob Shostok, Jr.

Matt loved all things aviation from an early age, spending time with computer flight simulators and the EAA Young Eagles flight program. Matt graduated from Bolingbrook High School in 2003, was nominated to attend the United States Air Force Academy and was a 2007 graduate. He continued his dedicated service in the Air Force as a pilot, primarily the KC-10 refueling tankers, and was deployed in several campaigns in the Middle East. During this timeframe Matt earned a Masters in Aeronautical Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in 2011. After serving in the Air Force for 16 years, Matt joined United Airlines as a professional pilot in March 2019. Matt enjoyed flying a variety of aircraft in his free time, loved working on vehicles and spending time in his garage. Matt was kind, intelligent, dedicated, multi-talented and had a great sense of humor. He leaves behind not only his family of survivors, but his Air Force family and the many friends with bonds formed over the years. Matt was very special to all who had the pleasure of having him in their lives and will be deeply missed.

Funeral services are being handled by the Bolingbrook-McCauley Funeral Chapel, 530 West Boughton Road, Bolingbrook, IL. Local arrangements are under the care of the Schmidt Funeral Home, 407 Belvidere Street, Nazareth, PA.

Contributions to the EAA Young Eagles program or support of veterans’ programs for those in need would honor Matt’s memory.

https://www.schmidtfuneralhomepc.com


Authorities confirmed the identities of the two Hamilton Township plane crash victims on Friday.

Monroe County Coroner Tom Yanac issued a press release stating that 65-year-old John H. Parker Jr. of Saylorsburg and 34-year-old Matthew J. Berszoner of Nazareth died in the crash that likely occurred in the early afternoon hours on Tuesday.

Parker was a well-known local figure, a pilot and a retired businessman. He was a board member for the Monroe County Industrial Development Authority, the Brodhead Creek Regional Authority, Pocono Mountain Industrial Park and Hamilton Township Zoning and Hearing Board.

Berszoner was a former U.S. Air Force pilot who flew for United Airlines. He was originally from the Chicago area.

As of now, it is unclear as to who was flying the plane when it crashed.

Local, state and national organizations convened at a small property on the 200 block of Neyhart Road near Snydersville on Wednesday morning, following the discovery of a small plane crash.

The Van’s RV-8 was located on Wednesday several hundred yards away from a home on Neyhart Road after Dave Moyer, a pilot and friend of Parker, searched the area from the air.

According to a statement from Yanac’s office, Berszoner had been interested in becoming a part owner of the aircraft, and Tuesday’s trip was meant to be a test flight. The two men took off from Pegasus Airpark between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m., according to a Federal Aviation Administration statement.

Parker had been declared missing to the Pennsylvania State Police’s Stroudsburg barracks before 9 p.m. Tuesday. Friends of Parker contacted the FAA, and a search was initiated.

Around 8:25 a.m. Wednesday, the Monroe County Coroner’s office was contacted by the Monroe County Control Center.

Blue Ridge Hook and Ladder Fire Company, Leon Clapper Plumbing and Excavating, Monroe County Emergency Management, Hamilton Township Emergency Management, FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board, Pennsylvania State Police, K-9 units, the Pennsylvania Coroners Association Mass Casualty Response, Lehigh County Emergency Management, the property owner, and several other individuals and organizations assisted in the search and recovery efforts.

Fire Chief Leon Clapper said that the recovery was a harrowing experience for all involved, as the plane was buried deep in the mud on the property.

“Honestly, it was probably one of the most difficult recoveries I’ve done in 31 years of being chief of Blue Ridge Hook and Ladder,” Clapper said, noting that excavation equipment was needed for the effort.

The Monroe County Commissioners are offering grief counseling to all first responders who participated in the recovery.

The Joseph J. Pula Funeral Home in Stroudsburg will be announcing arrangement for Parker and the Schmidt Funeral Home in Nazareth will be announcing arrangements for Berszoner.

The National Transportation Safety Board has recovered the aircraft and is actively investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.poconorecord.com

Cessna 152, N93069: Accident occurred September 18, 2019 at Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

US Aviation Group LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N93069

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA566
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 18, 2019 in Denton, TX
Aircraft: Cessna 152, registration: N93069

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing.

Date: 18-SEP-19
Time: 16:07:00Z
Regis#: N93069
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DENTON
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172E, N5604T: Incident occurred September 18, 2019 at Burlington International Airport (KBTV), Chittenden County, Vermont

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft on taxi to Taxiway C where a CRJ2 was doing a fuel burn before departure which lifted the aircraft off the ground and ground looped. 

Hamptons Air Taxi Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N5604T

Date: 18-SEP-19
Time: 18:39:00Z
Regis#: N5604T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: BURLINGTON
State: VERMONT

Piper PA-12, N4315M: Accident occurred September 15, 2019 in Healy, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks

https://registry.faa.gov/N4315M

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA551
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 15, 2019 in Healy, AK
Aircraft: Piper PA 12, registration: N4315M

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed in the water under unknown circumstances.

Date: 15-SEP-19
Time: 20:20:00Z
Regis#: N4315M
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA12
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: FAIRBANKS
State: ALASKA

Cessna 152, N472TC: Accident occurred September 17, 2019 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Florida Flight Training Center

https://registry.faa.gov/N472TC

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA556
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 17, 2019 in Naples, FL
Aircraft: Cessna 152, registration: N472TC

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing.

Date: 17-SEP-19
Time: 14:55:00Z
Regis#: N472TC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA

Beech V35 Bonanza, N9422S: Accident occurred September 08, 2019 in Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa

https://registry.faa.gov/N9422S

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA557
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 08, 2019 in Fort Myers, FL
Aircraft: Beech 35, registration: N9422S

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck a bird enroute.

Date: 08-SEP-19
Time: 15:01:00Z
Regis#: N9422S
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: FORT MYERS
State: FLORIDA

Robinson R44, N827JE: Accident occurred September 17, 2019 in Sardis, Burke County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N827JE

Location: Sardis, GA
Accident Number: ERA19LA273
Date & Time: 09/17/2019, 1230 EDT
Registration: N827JE
Aircraft: Robinson R44
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On September 17, 2019, about 1230 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44, N827JE, operated by Rowland Air Chem LLC, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Sardis, Georgia. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The aerial application flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departing a staging area in Sardis, Georgia, about 1220.

The pilot reported that he was flying about 100 ft above ground level, applying spray, when he heard a "pop," followed by alarms and lights activating in the cockpit. The helicopter then lost engine power and the pilot performed an autorotation. During the autorotation, the helicopter impacted trees and terrain.

Initial Examination of the helicopter by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that it came to rest on its left side. The inspector observed damage to the fuselage and the tailboom had separated. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The recorded weather at an airport located about 10 miles southeast, at 1235, included wind from 310° at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear sky.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N827JE
Model/Series: R44 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Rowland Air Chem Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 2J5, 240 ft msl
Observation Time: 1235 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Sardis, GA
Destination: Sardis, GA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 33.028056, -81.787778




SARDIS, Georgia (WJBF) — A helicopter went down September 17th near Sardis. The crash was deep in the woods off of Benjamin Road, in southeastern Burke County.

Investigators say the pilot was the only person aboard the helicopter and he got out with minor injuries.

Lieutenant Randall Norman with the Burke County Sheriff’s Office told NewsChannel 6 reporter Devin Johnson the pilot was the only person aboard the helicopter. He was taken to the hospital, and deputies say his injuries were minor.

“We were met by the property owner just a couple miles down this driveway here,” explained Norman. “He allowed us access to the property, and we came to the area to make contact with the accident location.”

One property owner told Devin the helicopter was flying around her house around 11:30 am. But she says the aircraft did not sound normal.

“Well, the helicopter was flying low, explained Patricia Bargeron. “I mean it was not above my treetop. So it was flying low, and we have aircraft flying through here all of the time, so I know what aircraft sounds like.”

An official with the sheriff’s office says the pilot is Gary Rowland, a chemical contractor from Kite Georgia.

“He was spraying chemicals to kill the shrub oats,” said Bargeron. “Because they planted pines back there and you have to spray to make sure the pines have a chance to grow.”

Bargeron says when she heard the news, all she could think about was —  “That he was alive please God,” expressed Bargeron. “I didn’t want anything bad to happen to anybody.”

Lieutenant Norman says there is a lot of aircraft that take off from rural airports. And Fall is the season when more agricultural aircraft will be spraying crops.

“It’s not an everyday occurrence that you see,” explained Norman. “But realizing that we do have an airport here in Burke County and the Augusta area, the chance for it to happen is there.”

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration will be at the scene tomorrow around 9 am. They’ll start their investigation then. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.wjbf.com

Piper PA-18-150, N6741L: Accident occurred September 17, 2019 at New Meadows Airport (1U4), Adams County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise

Mountain Aviation Corp

https://registry.faa.gov/N6741L


NTSB Identification: GAA19CA584
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 17, 2019 in New Meadows, ID
Aircraft: Piper PA18, registration: N6741L

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft flipped over on landing.

Date: 16-SEP-19
Time: 21:51:00Z
Regis#: N6741L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NEW MEADOWS
State: IDAHO

Socata TB9 Tampico Club, N2824R: Incident occurred September 17, 2019 near Tipton Airport (KFME), Odenton, Anne Arundel County, Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore

Aircraft landed in trees.

1World Aero LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N2824R

Date: 17-SEP-19
Time: 22:07:00Z
Regis#: N2824R
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TB9
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: FORT MEADE
State: MARYLAND




HANOVER, Maryland (WJZ) — A small plane crashed into a wooded area near the Tipton Airport Tuesday evening, officials said.

The single-engine plane went down in the area of Bald Eagle Road and Maryland Route 198 near Fort Meade east of Laurel. Dispatchers received a 911 call at 6:09 p.m.

The pilot, Thomas Falk, 55, of Silver Spring, and a passenger, James Palazak, 59, of Columbia, were inside the plane when it went down, state police said.

Fire officials had initially identified one of the men as being in his 40s.

One of the men was a student pilot and the other an instructor, firefighters said.

Both were still inside the plane when first responders arrived at the scene. One man was extricated by ground ladders, while the other was rescued by special operations rope rescue teams. Both were taken to Shock Trauma with minor injuries.

The plane was about 50 feet off the ground in a tree on property owned by the Patuxent Research Refuge. It is about 200 feet away from the road in the woods.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating what led to the crash, but state police said it appears the plane may have experienced engine failure.

Story and video ➤ https://baltimore.cbslocal.com

Cessna 525B, N38HD: Incident occurred September 17, 2019 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia

Aircraft struck a bird.

Means To Go LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N38HD

Date: 17-SEP-19
Time: 20:10:00Z
Regis#: N38HD
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: TRENTON
State: NEW JERSEY

Globe Swift GC-1B, N3770K: Incident occurred September 17, 2019 at Arlington Municipal Airport (KGKY), Tarrant County, texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft veered off runway and nosed down.

https://registry.faa.gov/N3770K

Date: 17-SEP-19
Time: 22:26:00Z
Regis#: N3770K
Aircraft Make: GLOBE
Aircraft Model: GC1B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ARLINGTON
State: TEXAS

Delta Air Lines, Airbus A319: Incident occurred September 17, 2019 in Salt Lake City, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City

Aircraft struck a bird.

Date: 17-SEP-19
Time: 23:32:51Z
Regis#: DAL2819
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: DAL2819
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UTAH

Piper PA-28-161, N4317B: Incident occurred September 16, 2019 in Vero Beach, Indian River County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft made a forced landing in a field.

Paris Air Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N4317B

Date: 16-SEP-19
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N4317B
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: VERO BEACH
State: FLORIDA