Thursday, July 7, 2016

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, Plane Nonsense Inc., N190ND: Accident occurred July 07, 2016 at Dillant-Hopkins Airport (KEEN), Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Plane Nonsense Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N190ND

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Portland, Maine FSDO-65


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA377
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Keene, NH
Aircraft: PIPER PA 44, registration: N190ND
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor in the multi-engine airplane reported that during a simulated single-engine instrument approach to runway 2, the right engine was configured for the simulated failure. The instructor reported that the goal was to perform a missed approach on one engine and note the airplane's performance. The pilot under instruction descended to the decision height and executed the missed approach procedure, but the airplane would not climb. The flight instructor told the pilot to go to full power on both engines. "Mixtures, props and throttles were all full forward and the fuel flow levers were both at the ON position," according to the flight instructor, and he took control of the airplane.

The flight instructor reported that there were trees and buildings to the north and he made a left turn about 400 feet above ground level with the intent to land on runway 14. He extended the landing gear; but realized that he would not make the runway. He executed a forced landing to the southwest on taxiway Sierra, the airplane crossed over runway 32-14, and although heavy braking was applied, the airplane exited the taxiway and impacted a drainage culvert. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage stringers and longerons.

The airport elevation was 488 feet, the density altitude was 2,120 feet, the temperature was 81° and the dew point was 66° F, the wind was calm, and the flight instructor stated that carburetor heat was not used during the approach on either engine. 

Per the AOPA Carburetor Ice Probability Chart, the relative humidity was about 60 percent and there was serious icing probability when operating in a gliding flight profile.




NORTH SWANZEY — A pilot experienced a landing gear problem with his small plane Thursday, which caused the plane to come down in a ditch at Dillant-Hopkins Airport.

The plane, a Piper PA 44, was attempting to land on runway 14-32 at 11:55 a.m. Neither the pilot nor the passenger was injured. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is investigating.

Fire trucks, ambulances, and rescue vehicles were parked around the plane after it landed.

The incident marks the third at the Keene-owned airport in North Swanzey since May 1.

A single-engine aircraft went off the west side of the main runway after making its descent on May 1. Approaching from the south in the late afternoon, the plane was carrying two passengers. Damage was limited to five lights along the runway strip.

On May 11, a Vans RV-8 aircraft went off the side of Runway 2 and flipped, after hitting a deer as it attempted to land. Both the pilot and a passenger got out of the plane on their own; neither was injured; the deer was killed. The NTSB is looking into that mishap, too.

The airport that sits on 888 acres and has just two runways. Airport Manager John G. “Jack” Wozmak chalked the string of incidents up to fate.

“Planes are in and out a lot; we get a lot of visitors,” he said. “Chances increase with traffic.”

A municipal airport that serves corporate and hobbyist planes as opposed to commercial use, Dillant-Hopkins still has the second largest runway in the state, at 6,200 feet, second only to the Manchester-Boston Airport, which has a runway of 9,250 feet, according to the Manchester-Boston Airport website.

The Federal Aviation Administration and industry are working on a number of key initiatives to improve general aviation safety, according to a news release from the governing body. Together, the release noted, it will use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies.

Tracy Keating, who owns a new restaurant at the terminal, The Flight Deck, was at work during each of the incidents, although she didn’t witness them, she said.

“We live in a technical world and sometimes technology is amazing and sometimes it’s not,” she said.

Keating said for a tiny airport, she was impressed with how quickly workers responded to each instance.

“There were three in the last two months so you know anything they may have not known how to do, they do now,” she said.

“It’s all just coincidence though.”

Source:   http://www.sentinelsource.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Christiansen Aviation Inc., N872SP; incident occurred on Fourth of July over Eagle Mountain Lake, Tarrant County, Texas -Kathryn's Report

CHRISTIANSEN AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N872SP














EAGLE MOUNTAIN LAKE, Texas (NBC News) The FAA is investigating after several people captured video of a small airplane flying low over a Fort Worth-area lake on the Fourth of July.

Witnesses said it appeared as if the plane was dive-bombing boats.

“I thought he was gonna hit us,” said Adam Pick, who had taken his family to the lake.

Fun on the water turned to fear.

The video, captured by someone on the shore, shows a plane buzzing the Pick’s boat, their two daughters on a tube behind, one of them even screams.

“We’re like really scared,” said Pick. “We’re like, ‘there’s a plane coming at us.'” He had called for help, worried the pilot was having trouble.

“At first when I was on with 911, I said, ‘there’s a plane, it’s in danger.’ then you realize he’s not in danger, he’s having fun and that’s when you go from caring to mad.”

And he wasn’t alone. Several people captured video of the plane making numerous passes over the lake.

“And there was people running, as he was coming by people were running off their docks.”

At times the pilot, flying so low the Picks say you could see the expressions on the faces of people in the plane.

“They came over the boat and we just saw them like pointing at us and laughing at us and we were like, ‘why are those people doing this,'” said Avery Pick.

“I thought I was going to see somebody die that day or we were gonna die.”

The Picks say it put an end to their time on the water.

“We were off the lake after that.”

“We didn’t go back out, we were done. And you’re afraid, is he gonna come back? Is he gonna do this again?”

There are several regulations that could be at play here – one of them having to do with reckless operation of an aircraft.

The plane’s owner says he leases it to a company that does traffic monitoring in North Texas – that company didn’t want to comment citing the ongoing investigation.

Story and video:  http://kxan.com 

§ 91.13 Careless or reckless operation

(a) Aircraft operations for the purpose of air navigation. No person may operate an aircraft in a careless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another.

(b) Aircraft operations other than for the purpose of air navigation. No person may operate an aircraft, other than for the purpose of air navigation, on any part of the surface of an airport used by aircraft for air commerce (including areas used by those aircraft for receiving or discharging persons or cargo), in a careless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another.

And, regulations requiring minimum altitudes could also apply. (See below)

§ 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General

Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes:

(a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface.

(b) Over congested areas. Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.

(c) Over other than congested areas. An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure.

Cirrus SR-22, Cirrus Design Corporation, N7YT; accident occurred January 25, 2015 in Hilo, Hawaii -Kathryn's Report

‘Seafarer of the Year’ Awarded to Crew for Maui Coast Rescue

Crew members of the ms Veendam after rescuing a pilot off the coast of Maui back in 2015. 
Photo Courtesy: Holland America Line


The captain and crew of Holland America Line’s ms Veendam were named “Seafarer of the Year” at this year’s Lloyd’s List North American Maritime Awards, for the rescue of a pilot who ejected from his aircraft 225 miles off the coast of Maui.


The cruise line received the award at a ceremony in New York in May.


The “Seafarer of the Year” award recognizes the skills, bravery and professionalism that seafarers demonstrate daily.


On Jan. 25, 2015, Veendam rescued a pilot 225 miles off the coast of Maui who had ditched his single-engine aircraft after running out of fuel. The plane had a parachute system and the pilot was able to safely escape into a life-raft where he was retrieved by the cruise ship.


“Holland America Line employees consistently strive for professional and personal excellence, and to be honored for saving a life is both humbling and rewarding,” said Orlando Ashford, Holland America Line’s president. “On behalf of Veendam’s captain and crew, thank you to Lloyd’s List for bestowing the honor of ‘Seafarer of the Year,’ a recognition we greatly appreciate.”


“The officers and crew performed exceptionally well and made a dramatic rescue—I am very proud of the Veendam team,” added Keith Taylor, executive vice president, fleet operations, Holland America Group, and retired Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard. “This rescue is a great reminder of the commitment all of us at Holland America Line, our sister brands and the cruise industry have in supporting rescue efforts at sea when we are near.”


Lloyd’s List called Veendam’s award one of the “stand-out moments of the gala dinner.”


“Whenever the crew of a vessel is actively involved in a rescue it shows the capabilities and the humanity of the profession,” said Sander Wielemaker, Atlantic area manager DNV GL, sponsors of the award. “The master and crew, through coordination with the authorities, were able to save the life of the individual and no doubt add a moment of out-of-the-ordinary excitement for the passengers of the cruise ship.”


Holland America Line participates in rescues at sea whenever called upon. Two other vessels of Holland America made similar rescues last year, ms Zuiderdam rescued eight crewmembers from a sinking vessel in the Caribbean and the cruise lines ms Zaandam came to the aid of seven stranded crewmembers at the Arctowski Polish research station at King George Island in Antarctica.


Holland America offers more than 500 cruises to more than 400 ports in 98 countries around the world. The cruises also visit all seven continents, including Antarctica.


Original article can be found here:  http://mauinow.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N7YT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Honolulu FSDO-13

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA089
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, January 25, 2015 in Maui, HI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/13/2015
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR22 - NO SERIES, registration: N7YT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during the transpacific flight, he was unable to transfer fuel from the aft auxiliary fuel tank to the main fuel tanks. Despite multiple attempts to troubleshoot the fuel system issue, he was unable to correct the situation. After transferring fuel from the forward auxiliary fuel tank to both main fuel tanks, he estimated that there was only enough fuel in the main tanks to reach within about 200 miles of land, so he decided to divert to a nearby cruise ship. Once the airplane was in the immediate vicinity of the cruise ship, the pilot activated the airplane’s parachute system, the parachute deployed, and the airplane descended under the canopy into the ocean. The pilot immediately exited the airplane and inflated an emergency life raft; he was recovered from the water a short time later. The airplane subsequently became submerged in the water and was not recovered. The reason for the pilot’s inability to transfer fuel from the aft auxiliary fuel tank to the main fuel tanks could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s inability to transfer fuel from the aft auxiliary fuel tank to the main fuel tanks for reasons that could not be determined because the airplane was ditched and not recovered.

On January 25, 2015, about 1644 Hawaiian standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N7YT, ditched into the waters of the Pacific Ocean about 230 miles east of Maui, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to Cirrus Design Corporation, Duluth, Minnesota, and operated by The Flight Academy, Kirkland, Washington, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the repositioning flight. The cross-country flight originated from Tracy, California, about 0530, with an intended destination of Maui.

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that the flight was uneventful, and a previous fuel transfer from the front and aft auxiliary fuel tanks was successful as the flight was about 200 miles offshore. However, as the flight passed the BILLO intersection, the pilot opened the valves to transfer fuel from the aft auxiliary fuel tank to the right wing fuel tank and did not observe any fuel flow. Upon verifying that the pressure line was open, he closed the valve to the aft tank and opened the valve for the forward auxiliary fuel tank, and observed that fuel immediately began flowing to the right wing fuel tank.

The pilot further stated that as he was well past the half-way point to Hawaii, he performed various maneuvers in an attempt to get fuel to flow from the aft auxiliary fuel tank to either the left or right main wing fuel tanks with no success. The pilot utilized a satellite phone and obtained further troubleshooting assistance from company personnel. After transferring fuel from the forward auxiliary fuel tank to both left and right wing fuel tanks, he estimated that he had about enough fuel onboard to be about 200 miles short of Hawaii.

The pilot stated that numerous attempts to transfer fuel from the aft auxiliary fuel tank to the main fuel tanks were unsuccessful, and siphoning fuel from the aft auxiliary to the forward auxiliary fuel tank was partially successful, however, eventually fuel would not transfer into either wing fuel tank.

While in contact with the United States Coast Guard, the pilot made the decision that he would eventually have to deploy the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). The pilot was informed of a cruise ship near his location, and subsequently diverted towards that location. He further reported that once he was in the immediate vicinity of the cruise ship, he activated the CAPS and the parachute deployed. The airplane descended under the canopy into the waters of the Pacific Ocean. The pilot stated that he immediately exited the airplane and inflated an emergency life raft; he was extracted from the water a short time later.

The airplane became submerged within the water shortly thereafter. At the time of this report, there is no intention of recovering the wreckage.

Gulfstream American Corp AA-5A, Tomorrow's Aeronautical Museum Inc., N26908; accident occurred July 07, 2016 near Cheyenne Regional Airport (KCYS), Laramie County, Wyoming -Kathryn's Report

TOMORROW'S AERONAUTICAL MUSEUM INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N26908

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAAA Casper FSFO-04


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA256
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Cheyenne, WY
Aircraft: GULFSTREAM AMERICAN CORP AA 5A, registration: N26908
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2016, about 1200 mountain daylight time, a Gulfstream American CORP AA-5A airplane, N26908, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after departing Cheyenne Regional Airport/Jerry Olson Field (KCYS), Cheyenne, Wyoming. The flight instructor and student pilot were not injured. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and it is unknown if a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and was en route to Eppley Airfield (KOMA), Omaha, Nebraska.

The flight instructor reported that after takeoff the airplane encountered very windy conditions and he was unable to control the airplane. The airplane was unable to climb out and the flight instructor performed a forced landing to a road. The pilot maneuvered the airplane to avoid a collision with a construction crew on the road. The right wing was substantially damaged when it impacted a construction sign.


Cheyenne, Wyo. - A plane that crashed near Central High School on Thursday (7/7/16) was being piloted by 16 year-old Isaiah Cooper.

Cooper was not hurt in the hard landing; he was on a quest to become the youngest African American to pilot an airplane around the continental United States of America. His crash comes just moments after we spoke to him about his flight.

Immediately following takeoff, he encountered extreme wind shear in what is called a microburst. Recognizing this adverse weather phenomena, Isaiah executed emergency procedures flawlessly, avoided obstacles, and landed on a nearby street. During ground rollout, the plane struck a street sign and sustained damage. No people were injured, and no property was damaged in this landing.

He will stay in Cheyenne, WY until a replacement aircraft is secured. Isaiah remains determined to complete his flight around the continental United States.

Information on Cooper's flight:

Compton, California – July, 5th 2016 (TAM) A pioneering African-American teenage pilot from Compton, who learned how to fly at the Los Angeles inner city aeronautical program, is Piloting an airplane around the Continental United States from Compton to Washington, to Maine, to Florida, and back to Compton on a record setting journey.

On July 5th, 16 year-old Isaiah Cooper started his quest to become the youngest African American to pilot an airplane around the continental United States of America. He left from Tomorrow’s Aeronautical Museum at the Compton airport at 9:00am. This is a practice flight in preparation for the Guinness World Record breaking attempt to be the youngest person to fly solo around the Earth at age 18.

Isaiah was mentored by Robin Petgrave, founder and Executive Director of Tomorrow’s Aeronautical Museum (TAM). In 1998 Mr. Petgrave, a successful entrepreneur and pilot, decided to focus his attention on at-risk inner city youth so he sold his multimillion company, Bravo Helicopters & Wings and build TAM.

In addition to aviation, TAM offers after-school educational programs, gang and drug intervention, life skills, safe haven and many other activities designed as an alternative to self- destructive behaviors. TAM is noted for being the recipient of a unanimously passed United States Congressional Resolution 532 in recognition of the museum’s achievement and success in teaching aviation, engineering, and flying to “at-risk” and economically disadvantaged minority students. Mr. Petgrave was an Ebony Power 100 in 2013.

Original article can be found here: http://www.kgwn.tv

The Cheyenne Police Department responded to a plane that landed in the 5700 blk of Education Drive around noon today. No injuries reported.





Cheyenne Regional Airport (KCYS)

Cheyenne Regional Airport (KCYS)

Cheyenne Regional Airport (KCYS)

Cheyenne Regional Airport (KCYS)
          





As seen from Sky5, Isaiah Cooper takes off from Compton airport on July 5, 2016.


A 16-year-old boy who learned to fly at Compton/Woodley Airport is aiming to become the youngest pilot to fly solo around the Earth, taking aim at an entry in the Guinness World Records.

But first, Isaiah Cooper intends to break another barrier: he wants to become the youngest African-American pilot to fly around the continental United States.

He departed on that attempt Tuesday morning, leaving from outside Tomorrow’s Aeronautical Museum at the Compton Airport, where he was a member of an at-risk youth program that teaches local children to fly.

“I’m so happy that I get this opportunity,” Cooper said. “Most people don’t.”

He hopes his flight will inspire other teens.

His mother just wants him to call home every time he lands. She cried at her son’s departure event, which brought dozens of family members and friend to the airport before takeoff.

Cooper and his flight instructor Roger Azad will fly from California to Washington state, to Maine, down to Florida and back across the country, with several stops along the route. They’ll fly about eight hours a day.

The attempt is a practice flight for the larger goal, which Cooper hopes to complete next year.

"It's making him truly believe he can do anything he wants to," said Robin Petgrave, who founded the museum and flight program.

The current Guinness record-holder for the youngest person to fly solo around the world is Matthew Guthmiller, who finished his flight in El Cajon, in San Diego County, at age 19 in July 2014.

Cooper wants to break the record when he is 18. An 18-year-old Australian man is trying to break the record now.


Story and video:  http://ktla.com




After a group prayer, Isaiah Cooper gets a hug before his departure from Compton airport on July 5, 2016.



COMPTON, Calif. (KABC) -- A 16-year-old from Compton is aiming to break a world record by becoming the youngest African-American pilot to fly around the continental U.S.

Isaiah Cooper's family and friends gathered around the teen and prayed for his journey before he took off Tuesday morning.

"I'm so happy that I get this opportunity, and most people don't," Cooper said.

That opportunity began when Cooper was just 5 years old. That's when he first attended Tomorrow's Aeronautical Museum in Compton, a program that teaches inner-city kids about flying and offers academic support.

"Around 9 years old is when he became a co-pilot," said Natalia Knox, Cooper's mother.

However, Cooper admits he later left the program and started making some bad choices.

"After middle school, I got involved with the wrong crowd," Cooper said.

Inspired by the founder of the museum, Robin Petgrave, Cooper came back and asked for help.

"I want to do everything he did times 10, but at the same time I want to be humble enough to come back here and tell him, 'It only happened because of you,'" Cooper said.

So Petgrave challenged Cooper to break a world record.

"At first I didn't believe him, so then I was at work, and he called and he put Robin on the phone, and then I knew he was serious," Knox said.

For Cooper, it's all about motivating other young people and making Compton proud.

"I'm trying to teach them at a young age that if they put guns down and they make better decisions with their lives, they can all do something like this," Cooper said. "Or even if they don't want to do something like this and they want to do something better, they still have that opportunity."

Cooper's instructor is accompanying him on the trip, which will span more than 8,000 miles. Cooper is already making plans for next year.

"If this does go successfully, then next year at the age of 18, I'll be the youngest to fly around the world," Cooper said.

Story and video:  http://abc7.com

Air Tractor AT-602, Bootheel Ag Air Services LLC, N967JB; fatal accident occurred July 07, 2016 in Kennett, Dunklin County, Missouri -Kathryn's Report

BOOTHEEL AG AIR SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N967JB 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Kansas City FSDO-63

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA260
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Kennett, MO
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT-602, registration: N967JB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2016, at 0650 central daylight time, an Air Tractor Inc AT-602, N967JB, collided with power lines and terrain during an aerial application of a field about 4 miles northeast of Kennett, Missouri. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Bootheel Air Services LLC under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight last departed from Kennett, Missouri at time unknown.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



DUNKLIN COUNTY, MO (KFVS) -

Authorities have identified a man who was killed Thursday morning in a plane crash in Dunklin County, Mo.

At approximately 6:55 a.m., the Dunklin County Sheriffs' Office was notified of a plane crash that took place near County Road 426 just east of Hwy. EE, outside of Kennett. 

Deputies and the sheriff responded to the scene and found a crop dusting plane had indeed crash landed. They also learned that the pilot, Jack Short, 48, of Kennett, was killed in the accident. 

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and said they would be on scene at approximately 12:30 p.m. 

The FAA arrived as mentioned and conducted their investigation of the incident. 

According to Dunklin County Sheriff Bob Holder, the crop duster hit power lines and went down.

Deputies with the Pemiscot County Sheriff's Department, the Missouri State Highway and the Kennett Fire Department also assisted.

An autopsy has been set for Friday, July 8.

Story and video: http://www.wbtv.com





A crop duster pilot died after his plane apparently struck a power line and crashed Thursday morning, according to Dunklin County Sheriff Bob Holder.

The victim was identified as Jack Short, 48, of Kennett.

The crash happened at around 6 a.m. in a field off County Road 426, Sheriff Holder added. Short was pronounced dead at the scene. Holder says a cause of the crash has not yet been determined.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash, and is expected to be on the scene later today.

Original article can be found here: http://www.dddnews.com

Bell 525 Relentless, Bell Helicopters Textron Inc., N525TA: Fatal accident occurred July 06, 2016 in Italy, Ellis County, Texas

Bell Helicopters Textron Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N525TA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05 


NTSB Identification: DCA16FA199
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 06, 2016 in Italy, TX
Aircraft: BELL 525, registration: N525TA
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 6, 2016, about 1148 central daylight time, an experimental Bell 525 helicopter, N525TA, broke up inflight and impacted terrain near Italy, Texas. The two pilots onboard were fatally injured and the helicopter was destroyed. The flight originated from Arlington, Texas, as a developmental flight test and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




FORT WORTH -- A twin-engine Bell helicopter on a test flight crashed Wednesday morning in southern Ellis County, killing two crew members, the company said in a statement.

The people killed were the only ones on board, said Sgt. Lonny Haschel, Department of Public Safety spokesman.

The Bell Helicopter B525 Relentless crashed around 11:45 a.m. three miles northwest of Italy, Texas, off FM 876 north of Chambers Creek, authorities said. The aircraft was destroyed.

“This is a devastating day for Bell Helicopter,” Bell’s statement said. “We are deeply saddened by the loss of our teammates and have reached out to their families to offer our support.”

The crew members’ names have not been released.

The FAA was investigating at the accident site, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified, FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said.

The FAA and NTSB do not release names of pilots or passengers.

Two farmers told WFAA that they saw the helicopter flying from the northeast when it hit a power line and exploded.

Ellis County Emergency Management tweeted about 1 p.m. that the FAA closed the airspace above the crash.

Bell unveiled the 525 Relentless model in February 2012, saying that the long-range helicopter was designed and built aimed at the commercial market. The helicopter, which could be used to fly workers to offshore oil rigs, can carry up to 20 passengers and has a maximum range of 570 nautical miles.

The aircraft has computer-controlled flight controls known as fly-by-wire that Bell said would make it easier and safer to fly.

On a quarterly earnings call in April, Scott Donnelly, chief executive of Bell’s Rhode Island-based parent Textron, said the company had built two 525 aircrafts for flight testing with a third expected soon.

“The Relentless is meeting or exceeding all of its performance objectives, including having demonstrated a top speed in excess of 200 knots,” Donnelly said on the call. “The effectiveness of 525’s integrated fly-by-wire design has been evident during the testing, by the aircraft’s superior in-flight handling, maneuverability and stability.”

Bell anticipated having the 525 Relentless certified next year and planned to deliver its first aircraft to customers in late 2017. The company has received several dozen orders for Relentless helicopters from customers in China, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates and Ireland.

Although a pricetag for the commercial helicopter has not been made public, similar-sized helicopters usually cost at least $18 million to $20 million a piece, said Richard Aboulafia, an aviation analyst at the Teal Group. Bell has invested hundreds of millions of dollars into the Relentless program as it looked to ramp up commercial sales as orders for its military aircraft, such as the V-22 tiltrotor, have slowed.

Aboulafia estimates that, depending on the investigation, the crash could delay the Relentless helicopter’s first delivery anywhere from six months to a year.

“So many of [Bell’s] defense programs are ramping down over the next few years that they’re counting on rejuvenating the civil product line as a way of coping with this downturn,” Aboulafia said. “This crash doesn’t kill the program, but it does delay it.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.star-telegram.com


Two people are dead after a fiery helicopter crash near Italy Wednesday, Ellis County Emergency Management officials said.

An experimental twin-engine Bell Helicopter 525 Relentless, with two people aboard, crashed about about 11:45 a.m. Wednesday while performing flight test operations, Bell Helicopter said.

The names of those killed in the crash have not been confirmed.

The aircraft came down in a field along Farm-to-Market Road 876 north of Chambers Creek, northwest of Italy, according to Trooper Lonny Haschel with the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Initially, it appeared that the helicopter may have struck a nearby utility pole because the top of the pole is black and appears to have been charred. However, Haschel said Brazos Electric Company investigated and determined the aircraft did not hit the pole. In addition, there was no power outage as a result of the crash.

Most of the helicopter's debris was localized to the crash site, though parts of the helicopter were spotted hundreds of feet away including a section of the helicopter's boom located approximately 1,500 feet to the southeast.

There are two other helicopters landed near the scene, one of which was registered to Fort Worth-based Bell Helicopter who released the following statement after the crash:

On July 6, 2016, a Bell 525 was involved in an accident while conducting developmental flight test operations south of our Xworx facility in Arlington, Texas. Unfortunately, the accident resulted in a loss of two crew members. This is a devastating day for Bell Helicopter. We are deeply saddened by the loss of our teammates and have reached out to their families to offer our support. Bell Helicopter representatives are onsite to assess the situation and provide any assistance to local, state, and federal authorities. At this time we ask for your understanding as we work through all of the details. We will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available.

The cause of the crash has not yet been determined.

The FAA is en route to the crash site to investigate. The National Transportation Safety Board has been notified.

The crash site is approximately 45 miles south of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.


Original article can be found here:   http://www.nbcdfw.com







ELLIS COUNTY -- Two fatalities have been confirmed in a helicopter crash in Ellis County.

DPS and the Ellis County Sheriff's Office are on the scene of the crash near FM 876 and Bell Branch Road.

Bell Helicopter confirmed two people were killed in the crash just before 12 p.m. on Wednesday. The National Transportation Safety Board said the crash occurred in Chambers Creek, Texas, about nine miles northwest of Corsicana.

The Texas Department of Public Safety says the first 911 call came in at 11:50 a.m.

Bell said in a statement its helicopter was "conducting developmental flight test operations on the Bell 525 at our Xworx facility in Arlington, Texas, that resulted in a helicopter accident."

A Bell spokesperson said there was one "chase" helicopter present as well, which is standard in test flight scenarios. 

No one else was injured.

Lynn Lunsford with the Federal Aviation Administration says the helicopter had two people on board when it crashed at about 11:45 a.m. The helicopter was destroyed, Lunsford said.

Investigators with the FAA are heading to the site, and the National Transportation Safety Board was notified.

Two farmers who witnessed the crash told News 8 they saw the helicopter flying from the northeast and came into contact with a transmission line.

Lonny Haschel with DPS says the helicopter did not strike the line and electricity transmission was unaffected.

An eyewitness who works at a nearby body shop told News 8 he heard two "booms" and saw the helicopter immediately descend.

He asked not to be identified.

"There was nothing the pilot could do," he said.

TXDOT has also placed roadblocks south of the crash site on L.R. Campbell Road

Stephanie Parker with the Ellis County Office of Emergency Management said on Twitter the FAA is closing the airspace above the crash location.

Bell says the 525 first began test flights in 2015. The aircraft is set to be certified for commercial sale in 2017, according to a spokesperson. This is the first crash of a Bell 525.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wfaa.com

Cessna 180J Skywagon, N767MH: Accident occurred July 06, 2016 in New Durham, Strafford County, New Hampshire

http://registry.faa.gov/N767MH

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Portland FSDO-65


Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA370
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 06, 2016 in New Durham, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N767MH
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a float-equipped airplane reported that immediately after touch down, the float plane encountered a boat wake, veered sharply to the left, water-looped, and became submerged inverted. 

The float plane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The pilot reported that the wake that his float plane encountered which precipitated the water-loop may have been generated by a boat that is used by a local ski school.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing after encountering a boat wake, which resulted in the airplane veering left, impacting the water's surface, and subsequently becoming submerged.




NEW DURHAM — The pilot of a Cessna 180J Skywagon floatplane that flipped while landing on Merrymeeting Lake Wednesday afternoon says the most important thing is that nobody was injured during the incident.

Mike Hoffman, who lives in New Durham, said it was a normal landing until the airplane veered, and he was no longer able to control it.

“I was lucky enough to get out,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman is a retired pilot with 56 years of experience under his belt. He flew for commercial airlines for 35 years, he said.

Hoffman said he has never been in a crash, but he has had training on what to do in an emergency, and it kicked in. He was able to remain calm and get himself out of the plane uninjured.

Hoffman’s plane sustained noticeable damage.

Witness David Michaels, who was visiting from New York, said he was sitting inside his house when he saw the plane flip.

“We often see planes landing here, and my wife said ’Oh, here he comes, he’s landing the airplane,’ so I started watching, and as he was coming down, he came in low, he was flying very low, and the plane seemed to lift up a little bit, tilted to one side, tilted to the other, and a wing caught the water, and flipped it right over,” Michaels said.

Those on the public beach in New Durham said this week is particularly busy for the lake community, because of the Fourth of July holiday. Resident Mike Bedard said a number of people have second homes and camps on Merrymeeting Lake. The beach reserved for New Durham residents was packed with those looking to cool off Wednesday afternoon. There were a number of boats and jet skis on the water.

There is no indication Hoffman was close to hitting any watercraft during the incident. Police Chief Shawn Bernier said some boaters assisted Hoffman from the water. The plane was towed to Merrymeeting Market and Marina, where it was flipped over using a crane.

New Durham police, fire, EMS and Marine Patrol responded to the scene.


Original article can be found here: http://www.unionleader.com



NEW DURHAM, N.H. —A floatplane flipped over Wednesday after landing on Merrymeeting Lake in New Durham, federal aviation officials said.

The Cessna 180J Skywagon plane flipped over around 1:45 p.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Mike Hoffman, the only person on board the plane, wasn't injured.

The plane was towed to shore, and officials said there was no leakage from the aircraft. Emerson Aviation used a crane to remove the plane from the lake. It's the third time in the last five years they've recovered a plane from New Hampshire waters.

Briana Harvey saw the incident unfold right in view of her lakefront home and grabbed her camera, hoping to get a picture of the landing.

"It circled around and came down, and all of a sudden it looked like a normal landing and it literally just went overhead over tea kettle," she said.

It wasn't the picture-perfect landing she had seen the pilot perform dozens of times.

"I just so happened to take the photo and I just looked up and I went, 'Wait, that wasn't the landing.' It was just kind of sheer shock," Harvey said. "All of a sudden, we saw the pontoons just kind of sinking."

That's when she called 911. Her uncle ran to a boat to get to the sinking aircraft.

"We zoomed my camera in a lot and my mom grabbed binoculars, and we saw him between the two pontoons," Harvey said.

Hoffman was able to open the door after the cabin filled with water. He did not want to go on camera due to an investigation being conducted by the FAA.

His friends said he is a commercial pilot who has been flying for more than 50 years.

Story and video:   http://www.wmur.com




A floatplane flipped over Wednesday after landing on Merrymeeting Lake in New Durham, federal aviation officials said.

The Cessna 180J Skywagon floatplane flipped over around 1:45 pm., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The pilot was the only person on board the plane. The pilot’s condition was not immediately known.

The FAA is investigating.

Original article can be found here: http://yankeeherald.com