Saturday, April 29, 2017

Incident occurred April 29, 2017 at Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport (KLBB), Lubbock County, Texas



A United Airlines flight made an emergency landing Saturday evening in Lubbock after a report of fumes on the plane.

The United Airlines Boeing 737 landed safely about 8:45 p.m. at Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport, according to Lubbock Fire Rescue.

United flight 453 departed Atlanta and was destined for Denver, according to Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford.

He said the pilot reported fumes in the cockpit, prompting the emergency landing.

No passengers or crew on board required medical attention, but the plane was completely evacuated by shortly after 9 p.m. Lubbock first responders were on scene.

Original article can be found here:  http://lubbockonline.com

LUBBOCK, TX - An airliner was forced to make an emergency landing in Lubbock after the pilot reported "fumes in the cockpit," according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson said on Saturday, United Flight 453, flying from Atlanta to Denver diverted to Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport "where it landed safely."

There were no initial reports of any injuries.

Emergency crews responded to the airport, and checked the plane for damage and leaks, as first-responders were heard escorting passengers off the plane.

It was not immediately clear what caused the "fumes" on the plane, or how much damage, if any, occurred.

Original article can be found here: http://www.everythinglubbock.com

Josh Hoch: Pilot charged for tampering with planes, but no changes in the air

Josh Hoch.



Months after Mount Isa pilot Josh Hoch was arrested for allegedly tampering with competitors’ planes, the review into the country’s aviation authority has brought no changes forward.

Hoch, 31, was arrested on January 24 and charged with 342 counts covering 14 offences after he allegedly poured contaminants in the fuel tanks of planes and flew members of Katter’s Australian Party around North Queensland without the proper licensing between 2012 and 2016.

The arrest raised serious questions about rural airport security and plunged the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) into crisis, with police and officials probing what the authority knew or should have known about the charges levelled against Hoch.

Days after Hoch’s arrest, CASA launched an internal review into its dealings with the North Queensland pilot and Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester called for an urgent briefing on the case.

In a statement at the time of his arrest, a spokeswoman for CASA said it would look into the safety-related issues involving Hoch.

“CASA has launched an internal review to determine whether any significant safety-related issues involving Mr Hoch and the operations of Hoch Air were, or ought to have been, identified and acted on prior to launch of the police investigation and the arrest of Mr Hoch,” she said.

“We are currently reviewing our records to inform such safety-related action as we may need to take now, and to ensure the integrity and sufficiency of our entry control, audit and surveillance activities. Should we need to, we will look more closely at any aspect of our regulatory functions should additional attention be required.”

Three months down the track, the internal review CASA launched into its dealings with Hoch has yet to reveal anything and the only change it implemented was made last week to Hoch’s air operator’s certificate.

“CASA’s director of aviation safety (DAS) cancelled the air operator’s certificate (AOC) held by Hoch Air Pty Ltd on April 19, 2017,” Mr Chester said.

“Mr Hoch is also not permitted to fly due to his bail conditions.

“As the matter is currently before the court in relation to the criminal charges laid against Mr Hoch, no further comment can be made.

“CASA’s decision to cancel the Hoch AOC is subject to review by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal should Mr Hoch wish to pursue the matter.”

It is understood police are still investigating a number of people and agencies, and that the Australian Federal Police have become involved in the investigation.

Mount Isa detective Senior-Sergeant Michelle Clark said detectives were busy building the massive brief of evidence for the court case against Hoch, but had not finished investigating other agencies.

“At the moment we are tied up with the court side of things, so we are trying to progress the full briefs and he will have his committal mention on August 30,” Sen-Sgt Clark said.

“Our focus is still on others associated with it (Hoch’s case) and we will be continuing in that light.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au
 
Josh Hoch



A full  review into how North Queensland pilot Josh Hoch, 31, got away with his alleged offending for so long has been ordered by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Federal Transport Minister Darren Chester has also called for an “urgent briefing” from CASA into the explosive case of alleged plane tampering in Mount Isa.

Josh Hoch, 31, was arrested on Tuesday afternoon in Mount Isa and charged with 342 counts across 14 offenses, including tampering with aircraft, dangerous operation of aircraft and fraud, allegedly committed from 2013 through to 2016.

Mount Isa Magistrates Court heard on Wednesday that Hoch had allegedly tampered with his competitors’ planes on five different occasions to win commercial contracts and had flown members of the Katter Australia Party around North Queensland, including Bob Katter spending $257,000 on chartering flights with Hoch.

Mr Chester yesterday asked the country’s aviation watchdog for a report into all aspects of the case and investigation against Hoch.

“Given the serious nature of the allegations I have requested a full report from CASA and an urgent briefing on all aspects of the investigation,” Mr Chester said.

“With legal proceedings underway, I’m not in a position to comment any further at this stage.”

A CASA spokeswoman said they had launched their own review into the dealings they have had with Hoch, their investigative process and auditing process.

“CASA has launched an internal review to determine whether any significant safety-related issues involving Mr. Hoch and the operations of Hoch Air were, or ought to have been, identified and acted on prior to launch of the police investigation and the arrest of Mr. Hoch,” the spokeswoman said.

“We are currently reviewing our records to inform such safety-related action as we may need to take now, and to ensure the integrity and sufficiency of our entry control, audit and surveillance activities. Should we need to, we will look more closely at any aspect of our regulatory functions should additional attention be required.”

The spokeswoman said CASA needed to have evidence to act on, rather than unsubstantiated claims of actions.

“It is important to remember that, like any other regulatory authority, CASA is only able to act on evidence that tends to show there has been a breach of the regulations, not on unsubstantiated claims of such conduct,” she said.

“It would be premature for CASA to comment further on this at this time.

“We will not comment on the criminal allegations against Mr. Hoch.

“These are matters before the court and any questions should be directed to the prosecutorial authority.”

Hoch walked from Mount Isa watch-house yesterday after posting the $50,000 surety he failed to produce when given bail on Wednesday.

Source:   http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au

Kennedy MP Bob Katter spent $257,000 on chartered flights with alleged fraudster pilot Josh Hoch, the Mount Isa Magistrates Court was told.


Hundreds of thousands in taxpayer dollars may have been paid to alleged fraudster Josh Hoch, with a court hearing Kennedy MP spent $257,000 on chartered flights with the pilot.

Prosecutor Sergeant Vaughan Cooper yesterday detailed Mr. Katter’s expenses with Mr. Hoch, at his bail application for more than 300 offenses.

“The offenses the defendant faces are serious, not only those five offences (tampering with aircraft), but also the offenses of fraud,” Sgt Cooper said.

“Your honor will note the defendant using, without accreditation, aircraft to fly the honourable Bob Katter without the correct accreditation.

“Allowing him to pilot and receive payment for these charters and that will be alleged your honour is some $257,000 and I do round that down.

“The case against the defendant regarding those matters is strong.”

According to documents from the Department of Finance, Mr Katter claimed more than $53,000 on chartered flights in the first half of 2016 alone.

The Kennedy MP is given a large travel allowance, particularly for charter flights, to traverse a massive electorate that is bigger than some countries.

Mr. Katter would not comment when contacted by the Bulletin over the charges against Koch.

“As this matter is now before the courts it would be inappropriate to comment,” he said.

Senator Ian Macdonald said he would take up industry regulation concerns with Infrastructure and Transport Minister Darren Chester.

“I will certainly be following this up with the Transport Minister … I’m quite confident he has already been briefed but this is clearly a matter for the police and CASA investigators to report to him with any recommendations of any new regulatory action,” he said.

“I’m very curious in this instance how this has not come to their attention previously … CASA should have been leading the charge rather than police.”

Herbert MP Cathy O’Toole said it was necessary to look further into the current level of oversight after the arrest of Hoch.

“Questions need to be asked, and answers provided, about what officials did and did not know,” she said.

“How can this happen surely needs to be the question. The real issue is that we have absolutely no certainty that incidents of this nature are not falling through the gap.” 

Source:  http://www.ntnews.com.au




The charter operator charged with 340 offenses of endangering public safety was issued with a CASA operator’s license as recently as last month, prompting leading figures to attack the regulator for incompetence and dysfunction.

CASA records show the regulator issued Hoch Air with an Air Operators Certificate on December 8, even though CASA had been co-operating with the Queensland Police investigation for two months. The AOC is valid for four years.

Queensland Police charged the principal and pilot Josh Hoch, 31, this week with offences that include five counts of tampering with competitors’ fuel. Police allege that Mr Hoch added an “abrasive material directly into engines” which caused a catastrophic failure and forced the landing of two aircraft. Engine failure occurred to two other planes prior to take-off.

Kennedy MP Bob Katter allegedly spent $257,000 on charter flights with Hoch Air although Mr Hoch was unlicensed at the time. Mr Katter’s office declined to comment. CASA’s licensing of Hoch Air appears to be inconsistent with the Queensland Police statement, which says that a “review of aircraft security and passenger safety at Mount Isa Airport was immediately commenced” as part of the investigation launched in October. “Additional measures were implemented to further ensure the safety of passengers and crews,” the police added.

A CASA spokeswoman said the regulator was “actively reviewing information arising out of the Queensland Police investigation and will take such further action as necessary”. CASA could not comment further.

Police asked the Mount Isa Court to refuse bail, but the magistrate granted it. However, Mr Hoch’s family was unable to raise the $50,000 bond by Wednesday afternoon and as a result he spent a second night in the Mount Isa watch-house.

Mr Hoch’s defence lawyer, ­Michael Spearman, blasted CASA, telling the Mount Isa court: “CASA has known about these flights since 2013. Now if CASA had any concern about a pilot it can invoke provisions of section 30DC of the Civil Aviation Act, instantly grounding a pilot if there is a serious and imminent risk to air safety.

“CASA has not done so, despite knowing of the allegations for months. These started back in October (2016) and certainly those charges from back in 2013,” the Townsville Bulletin reported.

Mr Spearman added that CASA had conducted an audit of Mr Hoch and his company earlier last year, yet he was allowed to remain in the air.

Ben Morgan, executive director at Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, said the incident showed CASA was far too focused on “misdemeanours” while allowing serious wrongdoing to go unchecked.

“If in fact CASA were not aware this is absolutely serious and it’s going to need the minister’s attention to work out how the regulator let this slip through the cracks,” he said.

“CASA is in court with misdemeanour pilot activities when something as brazen as this has been going on for four years.”

Former CASA chairman Dick Smith said the regulator was a “totally dysfunctional organisation”. He said he had tried to introduce an “administrative fines system” that would replace the system of continuously writing letters to non-compliers.

The investigation also uncovered extraordinary evidence relating to the alleged grievous bodily harm of an aircraft engineer at Charters Towers in July 2014. The engineer, aged in his 60s, sustained “permanent and life-changing head injuries”, the police statement said.

Read more here:   http://www.theaustralian.com.au

Dick Smith at a hangar in Bankstown Airport, Bankstown.



North Queensland aviators do not want a knee-jerk reaction by aviation regulators following a Mount Isa pilot’s arrest on Tuesday.

Hinchinbrook Deputy Mayor Mary Brown, who is also co-owner of North Queensland Aviation Services, said the alleged actions of Josh Hoch did not reflect the industry as a whole.

Chief pilot Joshua Liddle, of Liddles Air Service, said he was shocked by the allegations, but the Civil Aviation Authority was already “heavy-handed” in enforcing regulations.

Hoch, 31, was bailed on Wednesday over charges of tampering with aircraft, but has spent two nights behind bars after failing to pay a $50,000 surety before close of business on Wednesday.

Ms Brown said aviation in the North had a very strong safety record and backed CASA’s decision to await a review of police information before considering taking further action.

“I would appeal to people not to think in general aviation, behaviour in this manner is common,” she said.

“Fundamentally, we are a very safety-conscious community and on the whole, operators out there will also do the right thing.

“Unfortunately this particular case appears to have tarnished that and I would hate to see a knee-jerk reaction from the regulators that has a negative impact on general aviation.”

Mr Liddle said the industry was tightly controlled so he was “bewildered” by the allegations.

“I am extremely surprised,” he said. “We’ve got a couple of contracts with government agencies and bigger businesses and the qualifications and experience we need and the auditing process we have to go through as operators is very stringent.”

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, in Townsville yesterday for Australia Day commitments, would not be drawn on the aviation controversy or whether CASA should be reviewed.

“They would be Commonwealth matters but I think you would probably need to ask the Police Commissioner,” she said.

Kevin Gill, Queensland Airports Ltd’s chief operating officer for Townsville, Mount Isa and Longreach airports, did not return calls.


Source:   http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au

Josh Hoch's solicitor Michael Spearman leaves the Mount Isa Police Station watch house.


The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has been plunged into chaos, labeled as “dysfunctional” in the wake of claims it knew about concerns over Mount Isa pilot Josh Hoch as early as 2013. 

Lawyer Michael Spear told a court at Mr. Hoch’s bail appearance that CASA had known about conduct related to the 342 charges police had laid.

“(The flights) have happened since 2013, CASA has known about these flights since 2013,” he said.

“Now if CASA had any concern about a pilot it can invoke provisions of section 30DC of the Civil Aviation Act instantly grounding a pilot if there is a serious and imminent risk to air safety.

“Now CASA has not done so, despite knowing of the allegations for months, these started back in October (2016) and certainly those charges from back in 2013.

“CASA conducted an audit for Mr Hoch and his company and reissued his AOC (Air Operators Certificate) earlier last year.

“If CASA hasn’t grounded him, they don’t consider him to be a serious risk to the public and I would submit that CASA would be far more cognisant of safety in aviation than the police service.”

Entrepreneur Dick Smith, a former Civil Aviation Authority chairman and advocate for reform, said it did not surprise him to hear the authority had known about accusations but not acted.

“CASA is a totally dysfunctional organisation and because of that I would believe anything,” he said.

“This seems to be an ongoing problem. It tends to concentrate on the good players and the rogue ones are too hard I think. It’s basically very weak.

“Some of these alleged acts also seem to involve oversight at the local airports, I wonder if people have known about this bloke and done nothing.”

Mr. Smith said CASA did not aggressively pursue rule breakers.

“As chairman I introduced an administrative fines system. Instead of writing continuous letters to noncompliers they would be fined.

“After the Seaview disaster we discovered the regulator knew what was going on but just kept writing letters.”

But the organisation has held back on any pledge to conduct an internal review, with a spokeswoman committing to read the current police investigation.

“CASA personnel have been working closely with Queensland Police in Operation Oscar-Demotic since October 2016, culminating in Mr Hoch’s arrest,” she said.

“Our role involved the provision of specialist aviation-related technical advice.

“CASA is actively reviewing information arising out of the Queensland Police investigation and will take such further action as necessary.”

The department did not answer questions about whether CASA had received complaints about Mr Hoch in previous years or whether it would conduct its own research into how he received his licences

“It would be inappropriate to comment further on those matters at this point due to ongoing investigations,” she said.

“It is important to note that the vast majority of commercial aircraft operators in Australia are professional, responsible pilots who put safety as their number one priority and comply with all relevant safety regulations.”

Source:  http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au




The Mount Isa charter pilot alleged to have put glass beads in his rivals’ planes is to be granted bail from the Mount Isa Magistrates Court.

However, Josh Hoch will likely be in the Mount Isa Police Station watch house on Australia Day. Part of his conditions set by Magistrate Stephen Guttridge is that Mr. Hoch supply $50,000 surety before release.

The Mount Isa Court House had not received the surety or approved the paperwork by its closing time of 4.30pm, Wednesday. The court opens again at 8.30am on Friday. Thursday is the Australia Day public holiday.  

Mr. Hoch is to appear again before the Mount Isa Magistrates Court on February 22. He is charged with 342 offenses. 

Police prosecutor Sergeant Vaughan Cooper opposed bail and said five of the charges had a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. 

“He is at risk of flight, quite literally,” Sergeant Cooper said. 

“His capacity not just to leave Queensland, but Australia.” 

Sergeant Cooper said one of the charges related to a Piper Chieftain plane that lost power flying from the Northern Territory to Mount Isa. There were three people on board. Sergeant Cooper alleged that an inspection of the plane revealed glass beads in the oil filter. 

Sergeant Cooper alleged also that oil had been removed from a Cessna plane kept at the Mount Isa Airport. This was discovered during a daily inspection on August 18, 2016. 

On September, 2016, a Piper Chieftain about to fly from Mount Isa to Burketown experienced loss of oil pressure, the court heard. The flight was aborted. An oil sample allegedly showed glass beads, metals and dirt mixed in with it, Sergeant Cooper said. 

On October 6 to 7 a Cessna belonging to the Northern Territory Air Services, travelling between Alice Springs and Mount Isa, experienced low pressure. Glass beads were allegedly found in the engines, Sergeant Cooper said. 

On October 18 a pilot on another plane noticed a drop in pressure. The plane arrived in Mount Isa safely. It is alleged that an inspection found paste in the oil system. 

Sergeant Cooper said other offences included fraud. Mr Hoch is alleged to have supplied two fraudulent insurance claims. 

Mr. Hoch did not have proper accreditation of an aircraft, the prosecutor alleges. 

The court heard that Mr Hoch has flown Federal Member for Kennedy Bob Katter and Katters Australian Party State MPs Rob Katter and Shane Knuth through his charter service. The Federal MP has paid $275,000 in total to Mr Hoch for his charter services. 

The prosecutor alleges further that the defendant has flown an aircraft to hide it from police. 

Mr. Hoch’s solicitor Michael Spearman, Resolute Legal’s principal lawyer,  said the charges were “quite circumstantial” and said many of the charges “doubled-up”. 

Mr. Spearman said that Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has known of Mr Hoch’s flights since 2013. They could have grounded him immediately if they had concerns with the pilot and audited the company, he said. 

“Despite knowing of the allegations for months they could have grounded him.” 

Mr Hoch has already suffered a “trial by jury” and it has affected his business. He also has two young children and a long-term partner. 

“There are significant stresses in the family right at this point,” Mr Spearman said. 

Other bail conditions is that Mr Hoch not apply for a passport. If he has one he must surrender it. 

Mr. Hoch cannot pilot a plane or enter an airport. He must also report to the Mount Isa Police Station on specific days twice a week. He also must not contact witnesses. 

Read more here: http://www.northweststar.com.au

A north Queensland pilot accused of sabotaging commercial rivals' planes causing "catastrophic engine failure" has been charged with more than 340 offenses including grievous bodily harm.

Police arrested 31-year-old Josh Hoch, whose Linkedin profile lists him as the owner, director and chief pilot of Hoch Air, on Tuesday after a three-month investigation.


His charges stretched back to July 2014, when he allegedly attacked an aircraft engineer in Charters Towers, leaving him with "permanent and life-changing head injuries", and raised serious questions about aircraft security at Mount Isa and Charters Towers airports.


Police alleged Mr. Hoch targeted two private air charter operations, but not major commercial carriers, at Mount Isa and Charters Towers.


Aviation experts found "abrasive material" applied directly into engines caused the "catastrophic engine failure" and the forced landing of two planes, police alleged.


Another two suffered engine failures identified before they took off.


The incidents sparked a safety review at Mount Isa Airport, which police said resulted in new measures put in place and no further aircrafts being damaged.


Police also alleged fraudulent insurance claims, flying without a license, dangerous operation of aircraft and "numerous" safety breaches, mostly at Mount Isa and Charters Towers.


Police said a "significant witness had come forward in relation to the aircraft damage but appealed for anyone else who knew anything to get in touch.


Mr. Hoch's 342 charges include numerous counts of endangering the safety of a person in a vehicle with intent, dangerous operation of a vehicle, flying aircraft without a license, fraud offenses, and offenses in relation to aircraft.


He is due in Mount Isa Magistrates Court on Wednesday.


Source:  http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au 


A North Queensland pilot allegedly poured contaminants into commercial rivals’ fuel tanks, faked crashes for insurance and flew charters without a license for years before his dramatic arrest in Mount Isa yesterday.

Josh Hoch, 31, was intercepted by police about 2.30pm yesterday on a highway east of the town and last night charged with more than 300 offences going back several years.

The company is a significant player in the western commercial travel market and it is believed VIPs, including politicians, may have flown with Hoch at times from 2012 to 2016 when he is alleged to have been unlicensed.

The arrest poses serious questions about rural airport security and will plunge the Civil Aviation Safety Authority into crisis as police and officials probe what the authority knew or should have known about the claims against Hoch.

Last night senior police told the Bulletin the arrest was the culmination of several months of investigative work.

Hoch was questioned for seven hours before being charged with 342 counts of 14 different offenses late last night.

Detective Inspector Chris Hodgman said it was only by sheer luck that no one had died when one of the allegedly sabotaged planes took to the sky.

“We are lucky over a number of years that an alleged rogue operator like this wasn’t responsible for a disaster,” Insp Hodgman said.

“Two engine failures and the forced landing of the aircraft has happened — the pilots … were lucky to walk away.”

Insp Hodgman said safety measures were put in place as soon as police became aware of the alleged offending.

“The safety aspect was considered right from the start of the investigation. We had methodologies in place to ensure the continued safety of aircraft on that apron,” he said.

“At no stage was there any chance for tampering on any commercial aircraft at the Mount Isa Airport.”

Insp Hodgman said it was one of the most in-depth and unique investigations he had been part of in 30 years.

“There was a dedicated bunch of detectives who put in a lot of long hours to pull this investigation off,” he said.

Detectives working under Operation Oscar-Demotic allegedly uncovered evidence of fraud, tampering with aircraft, dangerous operation of aircraft and numerous aircraft safety breaches.

Police will allege they became aware of Hoch’s alleged offending in October last year when another pilot reported damage to his plane for the second time that year.

It is understood detectives are investigating four such claims of tampering on three planes in 2016 alone.

It will be alleged each case was the same, with a contaminant poured into the fuel tanks of the aircraft, under the cover of darkness at Mount Isa Airport.

When the engines fired, the contaminant caused “catastrophic” damage to the aircraft, grounding the planes for months, it is alleged.

Hoch has also been charged with insurance fraud relating to the alleged staged crash landing of two planes in 2014 and 2015.

It is understood Hoch had flown Katter’s Australian Party politicians Bob Katter, Robbie Katter and Shane Knuth around the North and it is believed he has been chartered by other politicians and clients as well.

It will also be alleged Hoch was masking those commercial flights as private trips and would not log flight hours in order to bypass crucial maintenance checks.

Hoch is set to face Mount Isa Magistrates Court this morning.

Source:  http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au

Yakovlev Yak-52, N132MD: Accident occurred April 29, 2017 in Porterville, Tulare County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N132MD


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA094 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 29, 2017 in Porterville, CA
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK 52, registration: N132MD
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 29, 2017, about 1015 Pacific daylight time, a Yakovlev Yak 52 airplane, N132MD, experienced a total loss of engine power while en route to Porterville Municipal Airport (PTV), Porterville, California. The airplane was substantially damaged during the off airport forced landing to a field. The air transport pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from PTV.

The pilot reported that after participating in a formation flight, he detached from the group and proceeded back towards the airport at traffic pattern altitude. Suddenly, the airplane's engine started to run rough. He checked the ignitions, fuel quantity, and other engine instruments, all showing normal indications. The engine continued to run rough for a brief time before it lost all power. The pilot executed a forced landing onto a field; when the airplane touched down, the nose wheel sunk into the dirt and the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.  The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.
=====================

Two people taking part in a flight training event at the Porterville Municipal Airport Saturday walked away with minor injuries after their airplane suffered mechanical issues and caused the pilot to make an emergency landing in a vineyard.

The training event, hosted by the The Red Star Pilots Association, was a formation training clinic which started started Thursday and was expected to finish Sunday. Association President Hartley Postlethwaite confirmed Sunday that the pilot and passenger were participating in the event. The training marked the 16th year of the event.

Postlethwaite said the plane came down about six miles from the airport. Tulare County Sheriff’s Lt. Harold Liles said the exact location was in a vineyard in the area of Road 192 and Avenue 184. Liles added that the landing caused “quite a bit of damage” to the plane.

The aircraft is described as a Yak-52 plane. Postlethwaite said the pilot is experienced, and the off-field landing with minor injuries “is directly attributable to his previous experience which was augmented by the training at the All Red Star event.”

The report was made around 10:23 a.m. Saturday about a plane going down in a field. At noon, the California Highway Patrol was reporting the occupants were out of the plane. Liles said the pilot was taken to Sierra View Medical Center in Porterville for observation, but would be OK. The passenger walked out of the landing with minor injuries, Liles added.

Porterville Municipal Airport Manager Jim McDonald said the plane was in a storage unit at the airport Sunday. The Federal Aviation Agency and the National Transportation Safety Board were conducting an investigation. The agencies could not be reached Sunday. Roadways were not affected by the aircraft landing, according to the CHP reports.

Source: http://www.fresnobee.com

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) --

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a small plane crash in Tulare County.

The plane went down in an orchard around 10:30 a.m. just north of Porterville. 

Investigators say the plane was participating in the All Red Star event at the city airport.

Action News was there Friday when the plane was on display. 

Investigators say the pilot experienced mechanical trouble and was forced to make an emergency landing.

A passenger inside the plane suffered minor injuries.

The hard landing comes just two days after a 75-year-old man from Phoenix was killed when his plane crashed while planning to attend the same event.

Story and video:  http://abc30.com

Mooney M20E Super 21, N5863Q: Accident occurred December 14, 2015 near Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA039
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 14, 2015 in Corona, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E, registration: N5863Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that the accident flight was the airplane’s first flight after being painted. After completing a preflight inspection, the pilot started the engine and observed a decrease in power. He leaned the mixture slightly, and the engine rpm returned to normal idle speed. The pilot reported that during the engine run-up, he noticed that the engine had a delayed response when he increased the throttle, but that the run-up otherwise revealed no anomalies. The pilot stated that the takeoff roll took longer than expected, and after lifting off near the end of the runway, the airplane climbed more slowly than normal. The pilot stated that during the initial climb, engine power had decreased to 2,000 rpm. As the airplane reached about 100 ft above ground level, the engine was producing about 1,800 rpm and could not maintain a climb. The pilot elected to continue straight ahead rather than return to the runway, and the airplane subsequently descended into trees. A postaccident examination revealed no anomalies with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. The reason for the partial loss of engine power was not determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power during initial climb for reasons that could not be determined based on available information. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s decision to conduct the takeoff with observed engine deficiencies.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California 

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5863Q

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA039
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 14, 2015 in Corona, CA
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E, registration: N5863Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 14, 2015, about 1341 Pacific standard time, a Mooney M20E, N5863Q, experienced a partial loss of engine power during takeoff from the Corona Municipal airport (AJO), Corona, California. The pilot (sole occupant) was uninjured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight and no flight plan was filed. The airplane was destined for the Chino Airport (CNO), Chino, California.

The pilot reported that this was the first flight after the airplane underwent a new paint application. After a thorough preflight, the pilot started the airplane and he observed the RPMs drop a little. He leaned the mixture slightly and the RPMs returned to normal idle speed. He taxied the airplane to the run-up area and conducted a run-up. As he increased the engine's RPMs to 1,800 for a magneto check, he observed a slight delay in the RPM increase, but otherwise all indications were normal. The pilot positioned the airplane onto the runway and added full power. He observed the RPMs increase slowly to 2,400 RPM. Halfway down the runway the airplane was not at lift off speed, however, the RPMs were above 2,400 RPM. The airplane reached 80 knots and lifted off the ground near the end of the runway; the airplane climbed slower than normal. The pilot leveled the airplane to gain airspeed, but he observed that the engine RPM dropped to 2,000 RPM. Expecting to conduct an emergency landing the pilot left the landing gear down and the fuel pump on, he also ensured the throttle and mixture were full rich. The RPMs decreased to 1,800 and at about 100 feet above the ground, the airplane started to descend into the trees at the end of the runway. The left wing impacted a tree top and the airplane descended abruptly into the ground below.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector and a mechanic did not reveal any anomalies. Flight control continuity was established, as well as, continuity to the throttle, mixture, and propeller controls. The fuel system was intact and fuel flowed freely through it. The valve covers were removed; the intake and exhaust valves sustained no abnormal wear signatures. The oil filter was removed and disassembled; no debris or contaminates were noted. The spark plugs were removed and displayed "normal" wear signatures when compared with the Champion "Check-a-plug" chart. The propeller was manually rotated and no binding or grinding was noted within the engine. Thumb compression was established on all cylinders. The magnetos were tested and fired normally.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA039 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 14, 2015 in Corona, CA
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E, registration: N5863Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 14, 2015, about 1341 Pacific standard time, a Mooney M20E, N5863Q, experienced a partial loss of engine power during takeoff from the Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. The pilot (sole occupant) was uninjured and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight and no flight plan was filed. The airplane was destined for the Chino Airport (CNO), Chino, California. 

The pilot reported that this was the airplane's first flight after a new paint application. The pilot conducted a run-up with no abnormal indications. He started the takeoff roll and about halfway down the runway the airplane lifted off at 65 MPH. The pilot kept the initial climb shallow so the airplane could gain speed and altitude; however, it was not climbing. While quickly approaching the trees at the end of the runway, the pilot observed that the RPM was lower than normal despite full power and mixture. He leveled the airplane and flew towards a low spot in trees; the airplane's wing impacted a tree and it descended rapidly into the terrain below. 

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Cessna 210F Centurion, N6450N: Fatal accident occurred May 16, 2016 in Wantage Township, Sussex County, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Lu Chen: http://registry.faa.gov/N6450N

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA189
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Wantage, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N6450N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane collided with trees about 1 hour into a night cross-country flight. The weather was clear, with nearly a full moon and unrestricted visibility. The airplane was not reported overdue, but air traffic control began receiving reports of an emergency locator transmitter shortly after the accident. The wreckage was subsequently located 3 days later in a wooded area about 6 miles north of an airport. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. While purchasing fuel prior to the flight, the pilot stated that he would be away for 1 week, but did not specify a destination. Autopsy and toxicological testing did not reveal any medical anomalies that would have affected the pilot's performance. It was unlikely that the pilot became incapacitated as the airplane's track was consistent with control inputs during the final descent.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A collision with terrain for reasons that could not be determined as the investigation did not reveal any postaccident anomalies with the airplane or pilot.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 16, 2016, about 2242 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 210F, N6450N, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain under unknown circumstances near Wantage, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Griffiss International Airport (RME), Rome, New York, at 2143. The flight's destination was unknown.

There were no known witnesses to the accident and the airplane was not reported overdue. Air traffic control (ATC) began receiving reports of an emergency locator transmitter near the accident site at 2252. The wreckage was subsequently located by the Civil Airport Patrol on May 19, 2016. The pilot had no contact with flight service or ATC prior to or during the accident flight; however, review of radar data revealed targets with a transponder code of 1200. The targets originated at RME and terminated near the accident side. The last recorded target was at 2241:56, indicating an altitude of 900 feet mean sea level (msl). According to the manager of a fixed based operator at RME, the pilot purchased 25 gallons of fuel during the day of the accident flight and indicated that he would be away for 1 week, but did not specify his destination. The pilot's father reported that he was not aware of the flight or its intended destination.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot, age 59, held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration third-class medical certificate was issued on October 26, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 300 hours. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The six-seat, high-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, was manufactured in 1966. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley constant-speed three-blade propeller. Review of the airplane's logbooks revealed that its most recent annual inspection was completed on November 25, 2015. At that time, the airplane had accrued 2,777.28 total hours of operation and the engine had accrued 1,471.66 hours since its most recent major overhaul. The airplane flew about 1.75 hours from the time of that inspection, until the accident; of which, 1 hour was the accident flight itself.

The pilot had purchased the airplane in 2013. It had been operated for approximately 40 hours, from the time of purchase, until the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Sussex Airport (FWN), Sussex, New Jersey, was located about 6 miles south of the accident site. The recorded weather at FWN, at 2253, included wind calm, visibility 10 miles and clear sky.

Review of sun and moon data from the U.S. Naval Observatory revealed that during the day of the accident, moonrise was at 1522 and moonset was 0339 the following day. The moon was waxing gibbous with 77 percent of its visible disk illuminated.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

A debris path was observed, beginning with severed tree branches and a section of left horizontal stabilizer and left elevator. The debris path extended approximately 200 feet on a magnetic course of 240 degrees to the main wreckage, which was at an elevation of 670 feet msl. The main wreckage was inverted, oriented about a magnetic heading of 300 degrees, with both wings partially separated at their respective wing root. Both wings exhibited buckling and leading edge impact damage. No fuel was recovered from the left or right fuel tanks; however, both fuel tanks were breached during impact. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to their respective wing, with the flaps observed in the retracted position. The empennage was intact and exhibited buckling. The vertical stabilizer and rudder also remained intact. The right horizontal stabilizer remained attached and a portion of the right elevator had separated and was recovered beneath the main wreckage.

Control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder to the cockpit. Continuity was also confirmed from the right aileron to the cockpit. The left aileron control cable had separated at the doorpost and exhibited a broomstraw separation. The left aileron balance cable remained intact. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 5-degree tab up (nose down) trim position. The cockpit remained intact and the pilot's lapbelt had been unfastened by rescue personnel. The landing gear was in the retracted position. The magneto switch was in the left position and the fuel selector was positioned to the left fuel tank. The throttle control was midrange and the mixture control was in the idle/cutoff position. The landing light was in the on position.

The three-blade propeller remained attached to the engine. Two blades were bent aft and one blade remained straight. About 1/4 ounce of fuel was recovered in the fuel line from the engine driven fuel pump to the fuel metering unit. The fuel was bright, clear, and consistent in color and odor to 100 low-lead aviation gasoline. No other measurable fuel was recovered from the engine or fuel system. The top spark plugs were removed from the engine for examination. Their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. The valve covers were removed from the cylinders and oil was observed throughout the engine. When the propeller was rotated by hand, crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity were confirmed to the rear accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders and the magnetos produced spark to all top leads.

A GPS was recovered from the wreckage and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for data download. Review of the data plot revealed that it corroborated the radar data, with the last recorded target indicating a GPS altitude of 1,005 feet, located about .20 mile west of the accident site. The plot also revealed a descent over a period of time, with an approximate right 90-degree turn, followed by a left 90-degree turn toward the end of the descent. The GPS data did not record the selected destination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Morris County Medical Examiner, Morristown, New Jersey, on May 20, 2016. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple injuries" and there was no evidence of natural disease.

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results were negative for alcohol and drugs.


 
Mr. Lu Chen



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA189 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Wantage, NJ
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N6450N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 16, 2016, about 2242 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 210F, N6450N, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain under unknown circumstances near Wantage, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Griffiss International Airport (RME), Rome, New York, at 2143. The flight's destination was unknown.

There were no known witnesses to the accident and the airplane was not reported overdue. Air traffic control (ATC) began receiving reports of an emergency locator transmitter near the accident site at 2252. The wreckage was subsequently located by the Civil Airport Patrol on May 19, 2016. The pilot had no contact with flight service or ATC prior to or during the accident flight; however, review of radar data revealed targets with a transponder code of 1200. The targets originated at RME and terminated near the accident side. The last recorded target was at 2241:56, indicating an altitude of 900 feet mean sea level (msl). According to the manager of a fixed based operator at RME, the pilot purchased 25 gallons of fuel during the day of the accident flight and indicated that he would be away for 1 week, but did not specify his destination. The pilot's father reported that he was not aware of the flight or its intended destination.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot, age 59, held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration third-class medical certificate was issued on October 26, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 300 hours. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The six-seat, high-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, was manufactured in 1966. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley constant-speed three-blade propeller. Review of the airplane's logbooks revealed that its most recent annual inspection was completed on November 25, 2015. At that time, the airplane had accrued 2,777.28 total hours of operation and the engine had accrued 1,471.66 hours since its most recent major overhaul. The airplane flew about 1.75 hours from the time of that inspection, until the accident; of which, 1 hour was the accident flight itself.

The pilot had purchased the airplane in 2013. It had been operated for approximately 40 hours, from the time of purchase, until the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Sussex Airport (FWN), Sussex, New Jersey, was located about 6 miles south of the accident site. The recorded weather at FWN, at 2253, included wind calm, visibility 10 miles and clear sky.

Review of sun and moon data from the U.S. Naval Observatory revealed that during the day of the accident, moonrise was at 1522 and moonset was 0339 the following day. The moon was waxing gibbous with 77 percent of its visible disk illuminated.



WRECKAGE INFORMATION

A debris path was observed, beginning with severed tree branches and a section of left horizontal stabilizer and left elevator. The debris path extended approximately 200 feet on a magnetic course of 240 degrees to the main wreckage, which was at an elevation of 670 feet msl. The main wreckage was inverted, oriented about a magnetic heading of 300 degrees, with both wings partially separated at their respective wing root. Both wings exhibited buckling and leading edge impact damage. No fuel was recovered from the left or right fuel tanks; however, both fuel tanks were breached during impact. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to their respective wing, with the flaps observed in the retracted position. The empennage was intact and exhibited buckling. The vertical stabilizer and rudder also remained intact. The right horizontal stabilizer remained attached and a portion of the right elevator had separated and was recovered beneath the main wreckage.

Control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder to the cockpit. Continuity was also confirmed from the right aileron to the cockpit. The left aileron control cable had separated at the doorpost and exhibited a broomstraw separation. The left aileron balance cable remained intact. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 5-degree tab up (nose down) trim position. The cockpit remained intact and the pilot's lapbelt had been unfastened by rescue personnel. The landing gear was in the retracted position. The magneto switch was in the left position and the fuel selector was positioned to the left fuel tank. The throttle control was midrange and the mixture control was in the idle/cutoff position. The landing light was in the on position.

The three-blade propeller remained attached to the engine. Two blades were bent aft and one blade remained straight. About 1/4 ounce of fuel was recovered in the fuel line from the engine driven fuel pump to the fuel metering unit. The fuel was bright, clear, and consistent in color and odor to 100 low-lead aviation gasoline. No other measurable fuel was recovered from the engine or fuel system. The top spark plugs were removed from the engine for examination. Their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. The valve covers were removed from the cylinders and oil was observed throughout the engine. When the propeller was rotated by hand, crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity were confirmed to the rear accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders and the magnetos produced spark to all top leads.

A GPS was recovered from the wreckage and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for data download. Review of the data plot revealed that it corroborated the radar data, with the last recorded target indicating a GPS altitude of 1,005 feet, located about .20 mile west of the accident site. The plot also revealed a descent over a period of time, with an approximate right 90-degree turn, followed by a left 90-degree turn toward the end of the descent. The GPS data did not record the selected destination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Morris County Medical Examiner, Morristown, New Jersey, on May 20, 2016. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple injuries" and there was no evidence of natural disease.

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results were negative for alcohol and drugs.

Mr. Lu Chen




NTSB Identification: ERA16FA189
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Wantage, NJ
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N6450N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 16, 2016, about 2242 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 210F, N6450N, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain under unknown circumstances near Wantage, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Griffiss International Airport (RME), Rome, New York, at 2143. The flight's destination was unknown.

There were no known witnesses to the accident and the airplane was not reported overdue. Air traffic control (ATC) began receiving reports of an emergency locator transmitter near the accident site at 2252. The wreckage was subsequently located by the Civil Airport Patrol on May 19, 2016. The pilot had no contact with flight service or ATC for the accident flight; however, review of radar data revealed targets with a transponder code of 1200. The targets originated at RME and terminated near the accident side. The last recorded target was at 2241:56, indicating an altitude of 900 feet mean sea level (msl). According to the manager of a fixed based operator at RME, the pilot purchased 25 gallons of fuel during the day of the accident flight and indicated that he would be away for 1 week, but did not specify his destination.

A debris path was observed; beginning with severed tree branches and a section of left horizontal stabilizer and left elevator, and extended approximately 200 feet on a magnetic course of 240 degrees to the main wreckage, which was at an elevation of 670 feet msl. The main wreckage was inverted, oriented about a magnetic heading of 300 degrees, with both wings partially separated at their respective wing root. Both wings exhibited buckling and leading edge impact damage. No fuel was recovered from the left or right fuel tanks; however, both fuel tanks were breached during impact. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to their respective wing, with the flaps observed in the retracted position. The empennage was intact and exhibited buckling. The vertical stabilizer and rudder also remained intact. The right horizontal stabilizer remained attached and a portion of the right elevator had separated and was recovered beneath the main wreckage.

Control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder to the cockpit. Continuity was also confirmed from the right aileron to the cockpit. The left aileron control cable had separated at the doorpost and exhibited a broomstraw separation. The left aileron balance cable remained intact. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 5-degree tab up (nose down) trim position. The cockpit remained intact and the pilot's lapbelt had been unfastened by rescue personnel. The landing gear was in the retracted position. The magneto switch was in the left position and the fuel selector was positioned to the left fuel tank. The throttle control was midrange and the mixture control was in the idle/cutoff position. The landing light was in the on position.

The three-blade propeller remained attached to the engine. Two blades were bent aft and one blade remained straight. About 1/4 ounce of fuel was recovered in the fuel line from the engine driven fuel pump to the fuel metering unit. The fuel was bright, clear, and consistent in color and odor to 100 low-lead aviation gasoline. No other measurable fuel was recovered from the engine or fuel system. The top spark plugs were removed from the engine for examination. Their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. The valve covers were removed from the cylinders and oil was observed throughout the engine. When the propeller was rotated by hand, crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity were confirmed to the rear accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders and the magnetos produced spark to all top leads.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration third-class medical certificate was issued on October 26, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 300 hours.

The six-seat, high-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number 21058801, was manufactured in 1966. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley constant-speed three-blade propeller.

Sussex Airport (FWN), Sussex, New Jersey, was located about 6 miles south of the accident site. The recorded weather at FWN, at 2253, included wind calm, visibility 10 miles and clear sky.

A GPS was recovered from the wreckage and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.