Monday, January 30, 2012

Trinidad and Tobago: Aircraft owner claims unfair treatment

Around the middle of July last year a top police officer went on a pleasure ride in a Cessna 172  with a former US airman Dirk Barnes, managing director of T&T Air Support Co Ltd (TTASC).

In December last year the police service signed a contract with the TTASC for the lease of two Zenith light aircraft for close to $1million for a three months period. The leisure ride was confirmed yesterday by Eddie Dallsingh, managing director of Navi-Comm Avionics Ltd (NAL), who said the Cessna was his company’s aircraft. Dallsingh said it was his friend Daniel Condon who used his airplane regularly. Dallsingh, who described himself as an aircraft engineer with some 39 years experience, shot into the news recently when his name (Eddie) was called in Parliament as one of the two senders of emails concerning the ride involving “Jack.”

Opposition MP Donna Cox made the expose in Parliament last Friday as she queried the signing of the contract between the police service and the TTASC. Colleague, PNM MP Colm Imbert, also read e-mails before the Lower House between “Eddie and Danny”. Coming forward to confirm that the police officer did, indeed, fly in his aircraft, Dallsingh yesterday said he met Condon in August 2010 and introduced his proposal to him in October. He said Condon became his friend. Condon later introduced Barnes to him in January last year, he said. “But before this Dan had introduced my proposal to Dirk without my knowing. Later, Dirk formed TTASC.” He recalled, “Dan was my friend and is a pilot and he would regularly use my aircraft for leisure rides. “I know of one instance in July which he, the officer and Dirk went on a ride together.” Dallsingh made the disclosures as he repeated his call at a news conference yesterday at his company’s Piarco office for Minister of National Security John Sandy and chairman of the Police Service Commission Dr Ramesh Deosaran to launch an enquiry into the circumstances surrounding the award of the contract to the TTASC.

In a fax sent from the office of attorney Dave Persad, Dallsingh stated, “The company (NAL) intends to refute many of the statements being made by Dirk Barnes of TTASC with documentary evidence. “We are of the view that issuance of this contract was not above board and transparent.” Dallsingh’s main ground for this charge is that his proposal to the police service to supply the Zenith aircraft was not given equal treatment as Barnes’. Stressing that the Government was not involved in the issuance of the contract and that no blame should be cast upon the Government he said it was between the police service and the TTASC. Dallsingh said on October 6, 2010 he wrote Police Commissioner Dwayne Gibbs requesting an early opportunity to present his proposal to use the Zenith aircraft in the fight against crime and was not successful. He said on December 31 Gibbs wrote him back stating that all such presentations must be made to the National Security Ministry.

He claimed that he was the one who had been the leading, if not only, advocate for light sports aircraft for aerial surveillance and support purposes in the fight against crime. He further wondered if his idea was hijacked. Noting that his effort to present his proposal was well documented, Dallsingh said he did a presentation to former PNM national security minister Howard Chin Lee since 2003. “On August 44, 2004 further presentations were made to Martin Joseph, then national security minister. “Pursuant to instructions from Joseph, presentations were made on August 5, 2004 to the army, Coast Guard and the Air Wing Division. He said in June 2010, he made a presentation to Sandy. Dallsingh, clearly offended, asked, “Why was NAL not afforded the same courtesy/treatment as the TTASC?

Meet the high-flying team members: Royal Malaysian Air Force - Ready for combat anytime

From left) Maj Nasruddin Khalid, Maj Azri Ahmad, Maj Razali Ahmad Jumali, Capt Mohd Azizi Musa and Lt Col Mior Nor Badrishah Mohamad.


Lt Col Mior Nor Badrishah 'GHOST' Mohamad, Commanding Officer -- Smokey 1 (Leader)

Mior, 41, is in his second tour in the MiG-29N aerobatic team. He currently flies the Blue Tail Jet as Smokey 1. Mior joined the air force in June 1988, graduating from RMAF Cadet School in Kuala Lumpur. He has logged more than 2,500 hours so far with over 600 jet instructional hours.

Capt Mohd Azizi 'SKINNER' Musa, head of training -- Smokey 2 (Right Wing)

Azizi, 34, is in his second season in the MiG-29N aerobatic team and flies as No. 2 on the right wing in the formation as Smokey 2. Azizi joined the air force in June 1999, graduating from the Air Force College in Alor Star.

Before being selected to the team, he flew the Aermacchi MB 339A as an operational pilot and has logged more than 1,200 hours so far, with more than 500 hours on the MiG-29N.

Maj Razali 'VENDOR' Ahmad Jumali, executive officer -- Smokey 3 (Left Wing)

Razali, 35, is in his second season in the MiG-29N aerobatic team flying as Smokey 3 (Deputy Lead) on the left wing. Razali joined the air force in June 1995, graduating from RMAF Cadet School in Kuala Lumpur. Before his assignment to the team, he served as a qualified flying instructor at the Basic Flying School in Alor Star.

He has logged more than 2,000 hours so far with over 400 instructional hours.

Maj Nasruddin 'DIGI' Khalid, squadron safety officer -- Smokey 4 (Slot)

Nasruddin, 32, is in his second season in team flying in the No. 4 position as slot pilot (Smokey 4).

Nasruddin joined the air force in June 1998, graduating from the Air Force College in Alor Star with a diploma in mechanical engineering (aeronautics). In the team, he is also responsible for all preparations for the demo especially prior to flying into new sites for air displays. He has logged more than 1,300 hours so far with over 500 hours on the MiG-29N.

Maj Azri 'ADIQ' Ahmad, standards officer -- Smokey 5 (Solo)

Azri, 34, is in his fourth season in the team flying in the No. 5 position (Solo) as Smokey 5. He was previously positioned on the left wing during the Petronas F1 Sepang Air Show in 2010 and was already performing as a solo during the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace Exhibition (Lima) 2009 and Lima 2011.

Azri joined the air force in May 1995, graduating from the Air Force College with a diploma in aeronautical engineering. He is a seasoned MiG-29N driver with six years of experience in the jet since 2006.

He is serving as an instructor pilot in the squadron as well as the Standard, Safety and Readiness officer. He has logged more than 2,000 hours so far with over 200 jet instructional hours.

Maj Balvinder 'JACK' Singh Bajwa, senior engineering officer (SENGO)/Commentator

Balvinder, 35, is in his fifth season with the team and is the team's senior engineer. He oversees nearly 170 maintainers staff and is responsible for keeping the squadron's fleet of MiG-29Ns combat and mission ready.

Balvinder joined the air force in June 1995, graduating from the Malaysian Armed Forces Academy in the first batch of officers in 1999 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. He is the longest serving and most experienced engineer in the RMAF for the MiG-29N.

Capt Tan 'MUMBO' Wei Han, ground safety/engineering officer

Tan, 26, is in his second year with the team after joining in 2010. He has a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering (first class honours). He assists in managing the Smokey Bandits' technical crew and takes care of the ground safety aspects at display sites.

Cessna 310F, N6725X: Accident occurred January 01, 2011 in Orange, Massachusetts

http://www.flyboysalvage.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N6725X

http://www.ntsb.gov/AccidentReport
NTSB Identification: ERA11FA102
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 01, 2011 in Orange, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/23/2012
Aircraft: CESSNA 310F, registration: N6725X
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Minor.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot and passenger were on a pleasure flight in the multi-engine airplane and at the last moment the pilot decided to conduct a touch-and-go landing and takeoff at a nearby airport. During a short final leg of the landing approach, the pilot recalled seeing white and red lights on the left side of the runway and believed these were visual approach slope indicator lights. He was uncertain of what light color arrangement indicated a proper glide path to the runway. As the airplane approached the runway, the lights started to flicker, at which time the pilot applied full engine power, but the airplane immediately collided with trees and came to rest inverted. The pilot stated that there was less ambient light than he had anticipated and that there was haze in the air. He was not aware of the trees at the approach end of the runway. The airport was not tower controlled and none of the 4 runways were equipped with visual approach slope indicator lights. The intended landing runway has a published displaced threshold that is 850 feet from the runway’s original threshold. Published information cautions about trees at the approach end of that runway. The pilot did not review any publication for the intended airport before the flight. Additionally, the pilot did not hold a multi-engine rating or a multi-engine solo endorsement. The last entry in his flight logbooks for night flight was in 2000. The pilot reported no mechanical issues with the airplane before the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot did not maintain separation from trees during landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s inadequate preflight planning and lack of recent night flight experience.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 1, 2011, about 1757 eastern standard time, a Cessna 310F, N6725X, registered to and operated by an individual, crashed in a wooded area adjacent to the Orange Municipal Airport (ORE), Orange, Massachusetts, during a visual approach to runway 19. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. The personal flight was conducted under Title 14 of Federal Regulations Part 91, and no flight plan was filed. The airplane incurred substantial damage. The pilot received minor injuries and the passenger was killed. The flight departed from Dillant-Hopkins Airport (EEN), Keene, New Hampshire, earlier that day, about 1630,

A Massachusetts State Police representative (MSPR) stated that there were no eye witnesses to the accident. Residents near the airport, along the approach path to runway 19, reported hearing the airplane and noted from its sound that it was flying low compared to what they were accustomed to. Moments later they heard the crash. One witness ran toward the area where a person (the pilot) was yelling the passenger’s name, the pilot instructed the witness to call 911.

The pilot stated to the MSPR that he became a pilot in 1989 and has about five hundred hours of flight experience. For a period of 6 to 7 years he stopped flying and resumed about a year ago with an instructor. He purchased the accident airplane around May or June of 2010. About 1630 he and the passenger departed from EEN and flew over Franklin County where the pilot is originally from. He had decided to practice a “touch and go” landing at ORE before returning to EEN; the pilot mentioned he had flown to ORE previously. When the pilot approached the airport there was less ambient light than he’d anticipated and there was a “haze” in the air; he also found the airplane to lose altitude faster than his previous airplane. He recalled seeing white and red lights off to the left near the runway, believing there were a visual slope indicator. He was uncertain of what arrangements indicate a proper glide path onto the runway. As the airplane approached the runway, the lights started to flicker, at which time he applied full engine power. He was unaware of the tree until after the crash and he was on the ground. He reported no mechanical issues with the airplane prior to the accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, who was seated in the left seat, held a private pilot certificate with rating for airplane single engine land. He did not hold a multiengine rating. He was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate on September 10, 2010, with limitations that he must wear correcting lenses for distant and possess glasses for near vision. He had documented 500 total hours at that time. A review of the pilot’s flight logbook by FAA showed the pilot had about 50 hours of multi-engine instructional time. There was no multi-engine solo endorsement. The last entry for night time flight was in 2000.

The passenger, seated in the right seat, held no FAA certificates.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cessna 310F, a 4 place all metal, low wing, multi-engine airplane, with retractable landing gear, serial number 310-0025, was manufactured in 1960, and issued a standard airworthiness certificate, in the normal category. The airplane was powered by 2 each Continental IO-470-D, 260-horsepower engine and equipped with Hartzell two bladed, variable-pitch, propellers.

The airplane’s last annual inspection was February 1, 2010 and had a total of 5,416, hours at that time. The airplane’s engines were last inspected on February 1, 2010. The airplane last had maintenance on September 4, 2010; addressing a FAA Condition Notice. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated a total of 5,471 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The ORE 1752 METAR, was winds from 310 degrees at 3 knots; visibility, 9 statute miles; clear sky; temperature 02 degrees Celsius (C); dew point minus 1 degrees C; altimeter 30.00 inches of mercury.

The United States Naval Observatory Astronomical Applications Department recorded the phase of the Moon, on 1 January, 2010 for Orange, Massachusetts, as waning crescent with 8 percent of the Moon’s visible disk illuminated. The Moon’s position was recorded just above the horizon during the time of the accident. The sunset was at 1648 and the end civil twilight was 1658.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Runway 19 at ORE is an asphalt, 5000 foot long by 75 foot wide, with a 850 feet displaced threshold, at an elevation of 533 feet mean sea level (msl). The airport does not have a control tower and none of the 4 runways are equipped with a visual slope indicator. Information cautioning trees at the approach end of runway 19 are published. The runway lighting system is controlled by the airport’s common traffic frequency.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main wreckage came to rest at latitude 42 degrees, 34.604 minutes north and longitude 072 degrees, 17.407 minutes west, at an elevation of 536 feet msl; the nose of the airplane was on a heading of 080 degrees. The airplane’s energy path was on a 200 degrees heading. The airplane initial contact was with a 70 foot tall tree, about 202 feet north from the main wreckage. The second contact was with a tree at a height about 55 feet above ground level (agl). The right aileron was located 125 feet north from the main wreckage. The third contact was with a thick tree at a height of 45 feet agl. Near that location a section of the right outboard wing was located on the ground. The fourth contact was with a thick tree at a height of 40 feet agl. The mid section of the right wing along with the right main landing gear, in the extended position, was located at the base of that tree.

Several trees were impacted thereafter along the energy path until the airplane’s left forward inboard wing to fuselage area struck a large diameter tree about a height of 25 feet agl. The airplane lodge itself at that location. The tree broke over near the base, which resulted in the airplane impacting the ground, in a fresh water creek, inverted. The left out board wing section with the tip fuel tank was located 20 feet southeast of the main wreckage. The nose gear assembly was located the furthest from the initial tree contact, about 45 feet east of the main wreckage. The left engine came to rest about 5 feet from the main wreckage, left wing area. The right engine came to rest about 30 feet east of the main wreckage. The engines and the left outboard wing section came to rest across the creek on public property. The distant from the initial tree contact to the beginning of the displaced threshold was about 640 feet and 1,490 feet to the touch down zone of runway 19.

An on-scene wreckage examination showed all of the flight control surfaces and control cable continuity were accounted for. The right wing was the first to contact the trees separating, the tip tank, the wing section between the engine nacelle and tip tank and then separating the wing from outboard of the engine to the fuselage. The right aileron was observed separated from the wing and early in the wreckage path. The right fuel tip tank was observed stuck in the tree approximately 60 feet agl. The left wing was observed separated just outboard of the engine. There was an impact with a tree approximately, 12 inches in diameter, just outboard of the left side of the fuselage which severed the main spar.

Both horizontal stabilizer were observed to have impact damage from the trees approximately 6 inches inboard of the tip. Both control yokes were observed in the respective locations in the instrument panel and moved together. The rudder pedals moved when the rudder was moved by hand. The elevator cables in the tailcone were observed connected; impact damage to the forward fuselage prevented the control yokes from moving when the elevator was moved by hand.

The aileron cables were continuous from the cockpit to the left wing aileron bellcrank. The aileron cables for the right wing were not observed, due location of the wreckage and damage to the right wing. All four of the flap panels were observed extended. The flap actuator was not observed due to the position of the wreckage. The empennage flight control surfaces were observed attached to their respective aerodynamic surfaces. All three trim tabs were observed attached to their respective control surfaces. The trim tab actuator measurement for the rudder was observed beyond the limits displacing the rudder tab to the right. The right aileron was observed separated from the wing. The left aileron was observed attached to the left wing.

Both front seats were observed separated from the seat pedestals and found outside the aircraft. The seat pedestal for the left front seat was observed distorted. The seat pedestal for the right front seat was observed with minor damage. The top forward section of the cabin area was crushed inward. The left side of the cabin area absorbed most of the impact. Both forward center attachment tabs for the front, left and right, lap seat belt systems were observed with their respective bolts ripped through the metal tab. The forward windshield was broken; remnants remained. Both of the rear seats remained attached to the fuselage. The left engine magneto switch was observed in the “Both” position. The right engine magneto switch was observed in the “Left” position. The left fuel selector was observed in the “Left Main” position. The right fuel selector was observed in between “Right Main” and “Right Aux” position. Engine control levers (throttles, propellers, and fuel mixtures) were observed in the full forward position. The altimeter setting was observed at 29.95 inches of mercury.

The left engine’s number 2 cylinder’s valve cover was observed with impact damage. Tree debris was observed in the area in between the engine cowling and top cylinders. Engine continuity was established by rotating the propeller and observing the alternator belt rotate. The fuel control assembly was intact. The fuel divider was observed with clean screen and fuel was present when opened. All top cylinder spark plugs were removed and observed with indication of the engine running rich. The left engine’s propeller was attached at the engine crankshaft flange. The propeller hub was compromised by impact damage. Both blades were bent aft at mid span. One blade was observed in the low pitch and the other in the high pitch angle. No cord scoring was observed on the blades.

The right engine’s number 1 cylinder valve cover was observed with impact damage. The oil sump pan was crushed. The fuel control assembly separated and was observed with impact damage. Engine continuity was established by rotating the propeller and observing the alternator belt rotate. The fuel engine driven fuel pump drive shaft was intact. The fuel divider’s top screws were not properly safety wired. The fuel divider was observed with clean screen and fuel was present when opened. The top cylinder spark plugs were removed; unremarkable. The right engine’s propeller was attached at the engine crankshaft flange. The propeller hub was unremarkable. One of the blades was observed with cord “S” twisting and bent aft, the other blade was bent aft at mid span. Erosion on the leading edge of the blades was observed. One blade was in the low pitch and the other in the high pitch angle.

TEST AND RESEARCH

The airport’s runway and taxiway lighting system was inspected and discovered one red lens cover separated from a light assembly for the left side threshold displacement lighting system for runway 19. There were no other discrepancies noted.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Medical Examiner’s Office in Holyoke, Massachusetts, conducted a postmortem examination of the passenger. The cause of death was blunt force trauma.





 
An FAA investigator looks up at the trees hit by a small plane as it crashed near the Orange Municipal Airport Jan. 1, 2011.




A New Hampshire pilot who prosecutors said wasn't qualified to fly without an instructor on board has been indicted on an involuntary manslaughter charge in connection with a western Massachusetts plane crash that killed his 35-year-old daughter.

Steven T. Fay, 57, of Hillsborough, N.H., caused Jessica L. Malin's death through "wanton and reckless conduct" when the twin-engine Cessna he was piloting on approach to Orange Municipal Airport after dark on Jan., 1, 2011 clipped the tops of some trees and crashed upside-down, prosecutors said Monday.

"Fay ... was neither licensed nor qualified to fly that twin-engine plane without an instructor on board" Assistant District Attorney Steve Gagne said.

According to federal investigators, Fay was certified to fly only single-engine planes without an instructor.

Fay's lack of expertise, training and supervision on the Cessna flight violated Federal Aviation Administration rules and regulations and "created a high degree of likelihood that substantial harm would result to another," Gagne said.

Fay also endangered people on the ground, Gagne said.

Malin was married with two children and had worked as a certified nursing assistant, according to her obituary. A phone listing for her husband could not be found Monday.

"I loved my daughter and I've been suffering from her loss for a year now," Fay said Monday. "I haven't been able to work and I'm making it day by day."

Fay said he been a licensed pilot for 20 years but declined to discuss the crash further.

"I don't want to say anything because I haven't found a lawyer yet and I don't know what I'm up against," Fay said.

Fay told federal investigators that he became a pilot in 1989 and resumed flying about a year ago after not flying for about six or seven years. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, Fay held a private pilot certificate authorizing him to fly single-engine planes and had completed about 500 hours of flying time as of September 2010. He had completed about 50 hours of instruction in multi-engine planes like the Cessna, but was not licensed to fly them.

Fay told authorities he had taken off from Keene, N.H., at about 4:30 p.m. on New Year's Day and decided to practice touch-and-go landings in Orange before returning to Keene.

The crash occurred about 90 minutes after sunset.

Federal investigators have ruled out mechanical failure, weather, and operator impairment as factors in the crash. Fay is scheduled to be arraigned Wednesday in Greenfield, Mass. The charge carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

Irish golfer Padraig Harrington in take-off scare as jet jolts to halt on runway

Irish golf legend Padraig Harrington and his caddie were among more than 200 plane passengers who were at the centre of a take-off scare in dense fog.

Mr Harrington (40) and Ronan Flood were seated in the business section of an Etihad Airways A330-200 aircraft at the centre of the incident at Abu Dhabi Airport early yesterday.

The champion golfer was returning home following a disappointing showing at the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship.

As the jet was taxiing down the runway to prepare for take-off, he and the other 205 passengers experienced a severe jolt followed by a sudden shaky halt.

Initially, the captain said the take-off for flight EY045 from Abu Dhabi to Dublin had been abandoned due to dense fog.

But a spokesman for the airline later admitted the aircraft was forced to abort its take-off when the left tyre on its front landing gear punctured, shattering lights on the airport's main runway.

The incident led to massive disruptions in the busy Emirates hub, with dozens of flights either delayed or diverted. The flight eventually left about 12 hours late.

Etihad Airways issued an apology yesterday, noting that the incident was being investigated.

Southwest Airlines jet hits light pole at Denver International Airport

A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 hit a light pole while taxiing to a gate after landing at Denver International Airport Monday.

“I was just in a plane crash!! Seriously. The pilot hit a light pole,” says passenger HilaryNH, who posted a picture she took from inside the cabin.

DIA spokeswoman Laura Coale says it was Flight 792, which landed at DIA at 9:34 a.m. MST after leaving Los Angeles International Airport.

It hit a light pole near Concourse C at 9:45 a.m. DIA crews assisted in getting passengers off the plane and then busing them to their concourse.

Nobody was hurt and operations at the airport were not disrupted.

See photo:   http://www.kwgn.com

Tiger Airways hit hard by flying restrictions

THE beleaguered Tiger Airways continues to struggle due to flying restrictions that followed its devastating grounding last year, however it has high hopes for the future.

The Tiger Airways Group has reported a loss of $17.4 million for the quarter ending 31 December last year, which it said is a result of its reduced operations in Australia. This is compared to a profit of $22.5 million for the quarter ending 31 December 2010.

“The under-utilization of the Group’s aircraft fleet continues to have a significant impact on financial performance,” the airline said in a statement.

The airline continues to operate a smaller schedule following its grounding by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority for six weeks due to safety reasons last year.

Passenger numbers dropped 12 per cent due to the limited operations, with seat capacity falling 2.7 per cent.

The loss is despite the airline upping average airfares by 16.9 per cent during the same period. Despite the reduction in passengers, Tiger’s passenger seat revenue increased by 2.8 per cent to $139.9 million.

The airline was also hit by a “substantial” increase in fuel prices.

However Tiger Airways is hoping to get back on track this year with plans to have all 10 of its aircraft in Australia in use by the second half of 2012.

“This will mean additional frequencies on existing routes, the introduction of new routes and the establishment of a second Australian base.”

The airline said it has continued to see improvements in it operations following an emphasis on reliability and punctuality.

It comes as passengers were warned to expect another whack in the hip pocket this year as carriers rein in capacity and increase fares.

Source: http://www.heraldsun.com.au

Pilots vent fury at airport storm chaos

Pilots have slammed Gold Coast Airport for having "Third World" technology after last week's storms forced dozens of missed landings on the runway, with some planes being diverted to Brisbane.

The airport, now the sixth busiest in Australia and the international gateway to Australia's holiday playground, had its inability to operate during bad weather exposed during last week's storms, putting the lives of thousands of passengers at risk.

Jetstar had to divert six flights to Brisbane last week, Tiger Airways diverted two and Virgin Australia also sent several to Brisbane.

Scores of pilots took to an online industry forum to vent about the Coast not having an Instrument Landing System, which guides pilots to the runway when visibility is low and which is commonplace in airports across the world and even at regional Australian airports, including Wagga Wagga, Townsville, Cairns and Launceston.

Airservices Australia yesterday said it was investigating installing an ILS, with Gold Coast Airport chief operating officer Paul Donovan saying it was "well overdue".

Cessna 340, N340HF: Accident occurred January 27, 2012 in Ocala, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA161 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 27, 2012 in Ocala, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/15/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 340A, registration: N340HF
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot entered the left downwind leg of the traffic pattern to land to the north. A surface wind from the west prevailed with gusts to 15 knots. Radar data revealed that the airplane was on final approach, about 1.16 miles from the runway and about 210 feet above the ground. The airplane then crashed in a pasture south of the airport, in a slight left-wing-low attitude, and came to rest upright. The cockpit and cabin were consumed in a postcrash fire. The pilot's wife, who was in the aft cabin and survived the accident, recalled that it was choppy and that they descended quickly. She recalled hearing two distinct warning horns in the cockpit prior to the crash. The airplane was equipped with two aural warning systems in the cockpit: a landing gear warning horn and a stall warning horn. The pilot likely allowed the airspeed to decay while aligning the airplane on final approach and allowed the airplane to descend below a normal glide path. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the landing gear were in transit toward the retracted position at impact, indicating that the pilot was attempting to execute a go-around before the accident. The pilot made no distress calls to air traffic controllers before the crash. The pilot did not possess a current flight review at the time of the accident. Examination of the wreckage, including a test run of both engines, revealed no evidence of a pre-existing mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed and altitude on final approach, resulting in an impact with terrain short of the airport.


On January 27, 2012, about 1227 eastern standard time, a Cessna 340A, N340HF, was substantially damaged following a collision with terrain during approach to Ocala International Airport (OCF), Ocala, Florida. The certificated private pilot was fatally injured and one passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to a corporation and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Middle Georgia Regional Airport, Macon, Georgia, about 1117.

An examination of recorded radar data revealed that the pilot entered a left downwind leg on a southerly heading, about 6 miles west of OCF. The airplane was abeam the approach end of runway 36, and about 1,800 feet mean sea level (msl), when a left base turn was initiated. The pilot then initiated a turn to final about 2.5 miles from the runway approach end, at an altitude of about 700 feet msl. The last radar return with an altitude readout other than zero occurred about 1.16 nautical miles south of runway 36, at 1727:27 (HHMM:SS) at an altitude of about 300 feet msl (about 210 feet above the ground).

According to recorded voice transmissions between the accident pilot and Ocala FAA Contract Tower (FCT) personnel, the pilot checked in at 1723:51. The local controller provided the pilot with the current wind information and the pilot reported turning left base at 1724:07. The local controller reported that the airplane was not in sight and issued a landing clearance to the pilot. At 1725:41, the local controlled advised the pilot that he had him in sight. At 1727:52, the local controller stated, "zero hotel foxtrot altitude altitude." No response was received from the pilot, and there were no distress calls received from the pilot.

The pilot's wife was seated in the aft cabin and reported the following after the accident. During the descent for landing at OCF, she recalled the "choppy" and "bumpy" conditions, and the "ground was coming up on them quickly." She recalled hearing two distinct warning horns in the cockpit prior to the crash. She also reported that, during the final phase of the flight, the airplane veered left noticeably two times. Prior to the crash, her husband made no comments regarding any mechanical difficulties with the airplane.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He reported a total flight experience of 1,005 hours on his latest third-class medical certificate application, dated June 10, 2011.

According to the pilot's logbook that was located in the wreckage, as of January 21, 2012, he recorded about 416 hours in single engine airplanes, about 632 hours in multi-engine airplanes, and about 828 hours as pilot-in-command. His first recorded flight in the accident airplane was on December 19, 2011, and he recorded about 14.2 hours total time in the accident airplane.

The pilot's last recorded Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 61.56 flight review occurred on December 28, 2009. The flight included an instrument proficiency check and was conducted in a single-engine Cessna 182. The accident pilot's last flight review in a Cessna 340A occurred on November 3, 2007. The certified flight instructor (CFI) who administered the examinations was interviewed by the NTSB investigator-in-charge following the accident. The CFI reported that he last flew with the accident pilot in 2011. The CFI also owned a Cessna 340A and asked the accident pilot to fly the airplane to Albany, Georgia for him, since the CFI was injured from a recent fall. The CFI reported that the flight from Florida to Albany was uneventful until entering the traffic pattern for landing. The accident pilot lined up on an incorrect runway, and the CFI provided verbal guidance to correct the situation. Once aligned on the correct runway, the accident pilot allowed the airspeed to decay on short final to the point where the CFI responded out loud, "power, power!" The airplane landed hard on the runway, and a hard landing inspection was accomplished after the flight with no damage found.

A friend of the accident pilot, who was also a CFI, provided dual instruction following the pilot's purchase on the accident airplane in December, 2011. The CFI was interviewed by the NTSB investigator-in-charge following the accident. He stated that he did not administer a flight review to the accident pilot. During recent dual instruction, the accident pilot flew precise, smooth approaches and landings. He stated that the accident pilot would have passed a flight review based on how he flew when they were together. The CFI and the accident pilot conversed prior to the flight, and he was aware that the accident pilot needed to be in Ocala by 12 o'clock noon on the day of the accident to meet with a realtor.

The CFR part 61 addresses certification of pilots. The following pertains to flight reviews:

Except as provided in paragraphs (d), (e), and (g) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft unless, since the beginning of the 24th calendar month before the month in which that pilot acts as pilot in command, that person has—
(1) Accomplished a flight review given in an aircraft for which that pilot is rated by an authorized instructor; and
(2) A logbook endorsed from an authorized instructor who gave the review certifying that the person has satisfactorily completed the review.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a twin-engine, low wing, retractable gear airplane, serial number 340A0624. It was powered by two Continental TSIO-520 engines with RAM conversions rated at 335 horsepower each.

According to the aircraft maintenance records, the last annual inspection on the airframe and engines was performed on April 18, 2011, at a total aircraft time of 5,057.4 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1227 surface weather observation for OCF reported wind 260 degrees at 9 knots with gusts to 15 knots, visibility 10 miles or better, few clouds at 2,800 feet, ceiling 3,400 feet overcast, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 14 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.00 inches of mercury.

At 1224, the Ocala FAA Control Tower local controller provided with following wind information to the accident pilot, "…wind two seven zero at nine and uh gust one four." The pilot acknowledged the transmission.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was situated on level ground and was an active livestock pasture. The main wreckage was located about 0.65 nautical miles south-southwest of the approach end of runway 36. The airplane fuselage came to rest on a heading of 120 degrees. Small flecks of white paint and a broken portion of the left wing navigation light were found with the first ground scar along the wreckage path. The straight line distance from the initial impact scar to the main wreckage was about 86 feet and was on a heading of 300 degrees.

An initial examination of the wreckage revealed the following. The cockpit and cabin were extensively burned from a post-impact fire. The landing gear handle was found in the retracted position. The position of the landing gear actuator linkage indicated an "in transit" position and was in close proximity to the up/retracted position. The wing flaps were found extended about 15 degrees. All engine controls were found near the full-forward positions.

Control cable continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the rudder and elevators. The left aileron cables were attached to the bell crank with overload separations noted near the wing root. The right aileron cables were continuous from the wing bell crank to the wing root. The pilot and co-pilot control wheels were linked together by the chain.

The left engine remained attached to the airframe via the engine mounts and thermal damage was evident to the accessory section. The engine-driven fuel pump was removed by investigators and the drive coupling was intact. The pump did not rotate freely by hand. The fuel metering unit/mixture control exhibited thermal damage and both control arms moved freely by hand. The crankshaft rotated by hand when the propeller flange was rotated manually with a hand tool. The turbocharger compressor wheel turned freely by hand and was coupled to the turbine wheel.

The right engine remained attached to the airframe by three of the four mount legs and thermal damage was evident to the accessory section. The engine-driven fuel pump was removed by investigators and the drive coupling was intact. The pump did not rotate freely by hand. The fuel metering unit/mixture control exhibited thermal damage and both control arms moved freely by hand. The crankshaft rotated by hand when the propeller flange was rotated manually with a hand tool. The turbocharger compressor wheel turned freely by hand and was coupled to the turbine wheel.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination of the pilot was performed at the District 5 Medical Examiner's Office, Leesburg, Florida, on January 28, 2012. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "Acute carbon monoxide poisoning and thermal injuries due to fire due to airplane crash" and the manner of death was "accident."

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on specimens of the pilot by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The CAMI toxicology report indicated 31 percent carbon monoxide detected in blood and 1.3 ug/ml of cyanide detected in blood. No ethanol was detected in vitreous fluid. No drugs were detected in the urine.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The engines were shipped to the Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) facilities in Mobile, Alabama for further examination. The investigation team reconvened on April 3 through 5 to perform the examinations. After an initial evaluation of overall condition, it was concluded that test runs of the engines would be attempted.

Left Engine

Due to impact and thermal damage, the following items were substituted or repaired prior to the test: fuel manifold valve fittings, the throttle control link rod, the induction system "Y" pipe, and the exhaust system.

The engine was fitted to the test stand and a test club propeller was installed. The engine started normally on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling in observed RPM. The engine RPM was advanced in steps for warm-up in preparation for full power operation. The engine was advanced to 1,200 RPM, 1,600 RPM , and 2,450 RPM and held for 5 minutes at each RPM setting to stabilize. The engine throttle was then advanced to the full open position and held for an additional 5 minutes to stabilize. Throughout the test phase, the engine accelerated normally without any hesitation, stumbling, or interruption in power and demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower. The engine fuel system was not adjusted and was found to be set at a lean condition as compared to CMI specifications.

Right Engine

Due to impact and thermal damage, the following items were substituted or repaired prior to the test: fuel pump fittings, the induction system "Y" pipe, and the engine starter.

The engine was fitted to the test stand and a test club propeller was installed. The engine started normally on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling in observed RPM. The engine RPM was advanced in steps for warm-up in preparation for full power operation. The engine was advanced to 1,200 RPM, 1,600 RPM, and 2,450 RPM and held for 5 minutes at each RPM setting to stabilize. The engine throttle was then advanced to the full open position and held for an additional 5 minutes to stabilize. Throughout the test phase, the engine accelerated normally without any hesitation, stumbling, or interruption in power and demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The airplane was equipped with two aural warning systems, a landing gear warning horn and a stall warning horn.

According to the Cessna 340A Information Manual, the landing gear warning horn was controlled by the throttles and the wing flap position. The horn would sound intermittently if either throttle was retarded below about 15 inches of manifold pressure with the landing gear retracted or if the wing flaps were lowered past the 15 degree position with the landing gear in any position except extended and locked.

The stall warning horn would sound 5 to 10 knots above the stall in all flight configurations.





Coliseum Health CEO Allen Golson died from smoke inhalation and thermal burns. 


That's according to Jenifer Lowe with the Marion County, Florida Sheriff's Office.


Golson's plane crashed near the Ocala International Airport Friday.


The District 5 Medical Examiner's office conducted the autopsy.


The incident report from the Marion County Sheriff's office says several people witnessed the plane go down.


It details that an officer contacted Golson's family at his wife, Carol's, request. She was injured in the crash.


The report says witnesses helped get Carol out of the burning plane.


In a statement with officers, Carol told them her husband was conscious and talking after after the crash. 


When officer met her for interviews at the hospital, she was reportedly suffering of back pain.



A medic who responded to the scene said he heard screaming and other noises from the plane, which was fully involved at that time, but he said he could not find the pilot.

 

One officer says in his report he noticed a debris field to the east of the location. He says the left wing was partially separated from the fuselage. The nose of the aircraft appeared to have the majority of the damage.

 

Surveillance video from a nearby business recorded the crash. 


The report says there were four transmissions from the control tower with the aircraft, and no indications of an emergency.


Lead investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board Ralph Hicks says at this point they're not ruling out anything as a cause of the crash.  


He says the autopsy results will be used in their investigation, as well as air traffic reports and radar information.


Hicks says their preliminary findings on the crash will be released later this week, but it could take three to four months until the investigation is competed.

 
IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 340HF        Make/Model: C340      Description: 
  Date: 01/27/2012     Time: 1227

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: OCALA   State: FL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, NEAR OCALA, FL

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ORLANDO, FL  (SO15)                   Entry date: 01/30/2012 
 

Pitts S2-ZZ (built by Kent Gorton), VH-RDW: Accident occurred January 29, 2012 at Murray Bridge Airport - YMBD, SA - Australia


http://dev.regosearch.com/aircraft/au/RDW

Conflict has erupted within the national aircraft aerobatics fraternity in the wake of the death of amateur pilot Rob Morgan in South Australia at the weekend.

Australian Aerobatic Club South Australia president Dave Foord yesterday hit out at NSW-based former club president Paul Bennet, who had said Mr Morgan, 33, was too inexperienced to be flying the highly modified Pitts Special S2-S biplane and did not have the ability to safely engage in solo freestyle aerobatics.

Mr Foord yesterday slammed the comments as "sickening" and said he had confronted Mr Bennet, who stood by his remarks.

Mr Foord said renowned aviator Chris Sperou, a 13-time winner of the Australian Aerobatic Championships, had spent a year training Mr Morgan.

"Chris coached Rob for about 100 hours of flying in the past 12 months, so Rob was extremely experienced and well coached," Mr Foord said.

"He may not have had a whole lot of experience in the aircraft when he left Maitland where it was put together with Paul Bennet, but he certainly had constant supervision and coaching from Chris Sperou and some other very experienced pilots."

Mr Morgan died after his plane crash-landed in a paddock about 11am on Sunday near the Pallamana airstrip, 9km northwest of Murray Bridge.

Mr Morgan, who was not married and had no children, lived in Murray Bridge, 75km southeast of Adelaide, where he worked as an earthmoving contractor. It is understood he was attempting aerial tricks before he crashed and planned to compete for the first time in the Victorian Aerobatic Championships next month.

Mr Bennet, the 2009 Australian Unlimited Aerobatic Champion, said Mr Morgan had been "too inexperienced with this plane, and that's the problem . . . I warned him about it".

Mr Bennet helped assemble the plane when it was imported from the US in November 2010.

Mr Foord yesterday said he was shocked by Mr Bennet's comments.

"I have spoken to Paul about what he said and he stands by that, but Rob had been assessed for low-level aerobatics," Mr Foord said. "Paul Bennet is no doubt a very experienced man, but he's not the only person who can fly aerobatics."

Bombardier Q400 employee shuttle aircraft


Bombardier launched a new corporate shuttle using a Q400 aircraft, with a special blue and white livery and the Bombardier name on the underside, in January 2012 to transport employees between Montreal and Toronto. The Q400 shuttle replaces a Q200 turboprop, reflecting the need to greatly increase passenger capacity to fulfill the busy product development schedule at Bombardier Aerospace.

Harrietstown seeks solutions to airport woes: Board forms citizens' airport committee. Adirondack Regional Airport (KSLK), Saranac Lake, New York.

The Adirondack Regional Airport in Harrietstown.


— The Harrietstown Town Board will be headed downstate this month to speak with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) officials and formally discuss the status of the town’s financially-strapped Adirondack Regional Airport in Lake Clear.

Meanwhile, board members recently formed a citizens’ airport committee to help the board seek ways to make the property more financially stable, and they are drafting a response to the New York State Comptroller’s audit of the airport, released Jan. 10, that cites accounting problems with the facility’s fuel inventory, related sales tax reporting, and accounting for capital projects.

Supervisor Larry Miller told Town Board members at the Jan. 26 meeting that he has been in contact with the FAA on Long Island and state of New York officials to let them know the town was interested in holding a public meeting about turning the Adirondack Regional Airport over to Franklin County. One FAA official said Harrietstown’s story about running an airport during rough financial times is not a new one.

“He told me that there are a lot of little airports like us who are in a world of hurt,” Miller said. “They’re getting a lot of feedback from the northeastern United States. There are a lot of little airports in trouble.”

The Town Board gave Airport Manager Corey Hurwitch permission to travel to Jamaica, N.Y. to visit with FAA officials on Feb. 13 to formally discuss the airport’s status “and to gather help, support and ideas” about how to sustain the facility. The supervisor will make the trip as well. 

In other airport news, the Town Board approved Ray Scollin’s proposal to create a citizens’ airport committee to “think outside of the box” and help town officials brainstorm ways to make the Adirondack Regional Airport more financially stable. 

"The purpose of the committee is to look at the airport from a perspective other than from within the town government,” Scollin said. “Our focus would be to review current operational practices as they relate to cost.”

Long Beach Airport Operators Fear Fallout From Aviation Fuel Suit

Aviation Official Says State Case Over Avgas Ban Would Devastate Industry

January 31, 2012 - Legal action initiated in state court last year, aimed at prodding the end of leaded aviation fuel by aircraft users due to the potential health risks to residents near airports, may devastate aviation business in California, and eventually the country, according aviation business advocates.

The Center for Environmental Health (CEH), a non-profit environmental justice advocacy group, filed a preliminary lawsuit in May 2011, claiming that the suppliers and producers of 100-low-lead, or avgas, fuel used by piston-engine airplanes, primarily classified as general aviation aircraft, have violated California law for not warning the public about lead exposure.

Under California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, known as Proposition 65, established in 1986, residents near sources of high lead emissions must be notified of the potential for lead exposures, while lead found in drinking water above legal limits is prohibited.

Small planes, corporate jets and helicopters are mainly the only aircraft federally permitted to use avgas, which includes lead additives. Although federal efforts are underway to formulate an alternative, the CEH has brought the case forward at the state level, mainly to spur the eventual elimination of lead in avgas and to reduce air pollution throughout the nation, according to CEH officials.

The suit against five oil companies and 38 aviation fuel retail businesses, such as fixed based operators, or FBOs, aircraft charter companies and private suppliers, at 25 airports in California, threatens to assess significant civil penalties against the businesses if warnings, such as mailers, about the existence of lead exposure from aircraft aren’t provided to residents living near airports.

According to CEH, at seven airports drinking water sources are polluted with leaded avgas. Los Angeles International, Oakland International, John Wayne, San Diego and Long Beach airports are among the 12 airports in the country with the highest lead emissions.

Under Prop 65, the aviation businesses and fuel producers could be assessed fines of up to $2,500 per day for lead exposures, including past violations, which could lead to several millions of dollars worth of fines or more, if the CEH wins the case. Also, the law allows CEH to get a 25 percent share of the penalties if the lawsuit is upheld.

In a meeting with business aviation representatives and airport officials at Toyota AirFlite at Long Beach Airport, James Coyne, president of the National Air Transportation Association (NATA), said the CEH’s lawsuit is a form of “legal abuse,” since the suppliers of avgas are often required under lease agreements to provide the fuel to general aviation aircraft users.

Avgas fuel is currently the only fuel able to be used by general aviation aircraft users, and until an alternative form of fuel is found, which is currently underway at the federal level, aviation businesses have their hands tied, he said. The industry doesn’t anticipate a working alternative to avgas until about 2020, Coyne said.

The NATA, which represents some 2,000 aviation business organizations nationwide, is currently taking on the case on behalf of the defendants. The NATA took the case to federal court last year, declaring that federal law preempts Prop 65. However, a federal judge threw out the case since the defendants couldn’t prove industry damages yet.

The NATA also requested the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) send a letter to California’s attorney general in defense of federal regulations. However, the FAA has so far declined to take any action on behalf of the NATA due to the current political climate in Washington, D.C. A settlement is currently being negotiated by the CEH, which would get a percentage of the award and paid legal fees. However, the outcome of the settlement, expected in the next six months, would largely determine legal standing for both parties if the case goes back to federal court, and the potential for any future lawsuits, Coyne said.

“We really got to get the message out to the business community . . . that aviation in California is facing a threat that exists nowhere else in America today,” he said. “We have the State of California, individually, all by itself, deciding how dangerous aviation fuels are or not and imposing the threat of very, very significant mitigation which may lead to the abandonment of fuel for piston-aircraft if worse comes to worse.”

In an industry that has already been heavily impacted by the down economy, the lawsuit most likely has already had an impact on aircraft sales and values in California since potential buyers wouldn’t want to buy an airplane if they can’t purchase the fuel, Coyne said.

Curt Castagna, president and CEO of Long Beach-based Aeroplex Aerolease Group, said aircraft users, such as pilots and airplane owners, would be greatly impacted if the litigation goes forward, even though they aren’t directly tied to the lawsuit. “From my perspective, there’s a clear disconnect between what the FBOs are challenged with, the defendant and the end users, which some may have this perception that it’s not an issue and it’s not impacting them,” he said. “I don’t think the majority of pilots in California have a clear understanding of the real threat that exits.”

Charles Margulis, spokesperson for CEH, told the Business Journal that the goal of the litigation is to push for a speedier process of finding an alternative to avgas and reducing lead pollution nationwide.

“Will this have a big impact on the industry? Well, we hope that it has such a big impact that it will reduce lead pollution while [aviation businesses] can maintain their fleets,” he said. “That’s why we brought the lawsuit: to encourage those efforts to go forward as quickly as possible so people aren’t polluted anymore.”

Photo: Winston Larison (Aircraft Builder) and Gabriel Brennan. Galveston, Texas.


Gabriel Brennan, left, covers his ears to block out the noise of the propeller while his stepfather Winston Larison, right, runs his airplane’s engine in their front yard on Sunday afternoon in Galveston. An aircraft mechanic at Galveston’s Lonestar Flight Museum, Winston built the airplane in a year’s time from wood and aluminum and plans to fly it locally.

TSA baggage screener likely to be fired over security breach at Newark Liberty International Airport

A baggage screener at Newark Liberty International Airport who failed to do his job last month is likely to be dismissed, while six others have been relieved of their duties under a crackdown intended to improve security, TSA and union representative said Sunday.

The veteran Transportation Security Administration employee failed to adequately check two bags on Dec. 22 after they had raised red flags, causing two planeloads of luggage to be unloaded and rescreened, TSA said. The failure was spotted immediately, the TSA said at the time, and the bags never made it onto an aircraft.

Last month’s incident followed a string of security lapses at Newark Liberty last year that led to the replacement of the airport’s federal security director. And an investigation by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s inspector general’s office is ongoing.

The other six employees are being investigated for failing to follow procedures, according to Stacy Bodtmann, an official with Local 2222 of the American Federation of Government Employees union, which represents TSA workers.

TSA spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein declined to comment on any of the screeners’ cases. But she issued a statement reiterating the TSA’s commitment to "the highest level of security for the traveling public."

"TSA routinely tests security operations to ensure that protocols are being followed and investigates any indication of misconduct," the statement read. "TSA takes immediate action when our high standards aren’t met. TSA also utilizes a number of measures to ensure protocols are being followed, including closed circuit video surveillance, random inspections and covert tests, as well as peer and management oversight."

Bodtmann identified the screener in the Dec. 22 incident as Kujuanne McNiel, a New Jersey resident employed by TSA since 2002. Bodtmann said TSA proposed dismissing McNiel following a disciplinary hearing soon after the incident. She said McNiel contested the proposal and a final determination is likely this week. McNiel could not be reached for comment.

Bodtmann said any failures involving the six other screeners were likely the result of poor or insufficient training under Newark’s ousted federal security director, Barbara Bonn Powell, who was replaced by Donald Drummer.

"It has a lot to do with the training," Bodtmann said. "It has a lot to do with the management, it has a lot to do with the supervisors, it has a lot to do with being short staffed."

Piper PA-28R-200 Cherokee Arrow II, N746R: Accident occurred January 30, 2012 in San Diego, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N746R

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA085 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, January 30, 2012 in San Diego, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/19/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28R-200, registration: N746R
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The passenger reported that he and the pilot were both seated in the airplane when the pilot made three unsuccessful attempts to start the engine. The pilot told the passenger to “get out, I need to jump it.” The passenger got out of the airplane and was walking away when he heard a noise. When he looked back toward the front of the airplane, he saw the pilot lying on the ground below the propeller. The airplane’s engine was not running. Postaccident examination revealed that the magneto switch was in the both position. It is likely that the pilot moved the propeller, and because the magnetos were in a ready-to-start condition, this resulted in a spark plug firing, which caused the propeller to turn rapidly and strike the pilot.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's failure to turn the magneto switch to the off position before moving the propeller to start the engine by hand.

On January 30, 2012, about 0830 Pacific standard time, the pilot of Piper PA-28R-200, N746R, was struck by the airplane’s propeller during engine start at Gillespie Field Airport, San Diego, California. He was fatally injured, and his passenger was not injured. There was no damage to the airplane. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the planned personal cross-country flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot was preparing for a flight to Bermuda Dunes, California. The passenger stated that they were seated in the airplane when the pilot made three unsuccessful attempts to start the engine. He told the passenger “get out, I need to jump it.” The passenger got out of the airplane and was walking away when he heard a noise. When he looked back towards the front of the airplane, he saw the pilot lying on the ground below the propeller. The airplane’s engine was not running.

Federal Aviation Administration inspectors responded to the scene of the accident and reported that photographs of the cockpit taken immediately after the accident by a local law enforcement officer showed that the magneto switch was in the both position, the mixture control was full forward (rich), the propeller control was full forward, the throttle control was about 1/4 travel forward, and the master switch was off.


NTSB Identification: WPR12LA085
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, January 30, 2012 in San Diego, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28R-200, registration: N746R
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
 

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
 

On January 30, 2012, about 0830 Pacific standard time, the pilot of Piper PA-28R-200, N746R, was struck by the airplane’s propeller during engine start at Gillespie Field Airport, San Diego, California. He was fatally injured, and his passenger was not injured. There was no damage to the airplane. The private pilot/owner was operating the flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the planned personal cross-country flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot was preparing for a flight to Bermuda Dunes, California. The passenger stated that they were seated in the airplane when the pilot made three unsuccessful attempts to start the engine. He told the passenger “get out, I need to jump it.” The passenger got out of the airplane and was walking away when he heard a noise. When he looked back towards the front of the airplane, he saw the pilot lying on the ground below the propeller. The airplane’s engine was not running.


Heartland fire paramedics transported a person who was injured while turning over the prop of an airplane by hand and was struck by the prop at Gillespie Field in El Cajon. 









EL CAJON, Calif. -- A pilot died Monday after he was hit in the head by the propeller while trying to manually restart the engine of a small plane.  The accident happened at about 8:30 a.m. at Gillespie Field, said El Cajon spokeswoman Monica Zech.  A single-engine Piper plane with two pilots aboard was taxiing out to the runway when the engine apparently stalled, Zech said. One of the pilots got out of the cockpit and tried to restart the engine by manually turning the propeller, by the propeller struck him in the head, she said.

The man was gravely injured but still alive when he taken by ambulance to Sharp Memorial Hospital, Zech said. He died later at the hospital, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.  The accident was under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, the FAA and the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration, she said.  According to an online aircraft registration database, the plane is a 4-seat Piper Cherokee PA-28R-200 built in 1974. It is registered to an owner who lives in Lakeside, Calif.

Istanbul cancels 108 international flights over heavy snow

Istanbul's Disaster Coordination Center (AKOM) has announced that it has increased its alert status to "red" as heavy snowfall fell in the city late January 29.

AKOM said municipal personnel worked during the night to keep the city's roads free of snow and ice while the public transportation authority added 350 extra buses January 30 to compensate for the ferries and boats that stopped working due to adverse conditions at sea.

Blizzards grounded flights at Istanbul's Atatürk airport, as 108 international and 82 domestic flights were canceled.

The international departures canceled included flights to Athens, Brussels, Birmingham, Sofia, Bucharest, Moscow, Kiev, Berlin, Basel, Tirana, Zagreb, Chisinau, Lyon, Paris, Simferopol, Thessaloniki, Cairo, Toulouse, Hamburg, Milan, Ljubljana, Tel Aviv, Prishtina and Genoa.

Flights were also canceled to Turkish destinations like Konya, Kayseri, Bodrum, Sivas, Sinop, Kahramanmaraş, Trabzon, Ağrı, Ankara, Batman, İzmir, Hatay, Gaziantep. Hatay’s airport, meanwhile, was reportedly flooded.

Atatürk Airport Director Celal Özuğur said airline companies called off the flights but added that runways had remained open at the airport. Delays occurred due to the de-icing of airplanes before take-off, Özuğur said, according to Today’s Zaman.

Source:  http://www.panarmenian.net

Air Malawi told to offload one aircraft

Government has advised Air Malawi to sell one of its two Boeing 737 aircrafts which have been stuck in South Africa for several years due to non-payment of repair charges and use the proceeds to bring back one of them into operation.

The two planes, a Boeing 737 300 christened Kwacha and the Boeing 737 500 named Sapitwa, have been grounded in South Africa since 2008 where they went for routine services.

Both Minister of Transport and Public Works Sidik Mia and Air Malawi's Acting board chairperson Vizenge Kumwenda have confirmed the development to Business Times, admitting that keeping the two aircraft for so long without service has proved to be a costly exercise.

In an exclusive interview last week, Mia said it is up to Air Malawi's board to make a decision on the matter but the airline's continued reliance leased aircraft for its operations was "as good as closing down".

"Air Malawi is an independent firm with a professional board and management which we know is capable of making decisions and delivering results."

"We are aware that the Kwacha [Boeing 737 300] is in a better condition than the other plane [ Sapitwa - Boeing 737 500]. Our suggestion to them is that they should the other plane [Sapitwa] and use the proceeds to bring back the Kwacha," said Mia.

He observed that apart from paying for the repair charges, the cost of bringing back the two airplanes would include warehousing fees accumulated during the whole period the planes have spent in the hangars in South Africa.

Speaking in a separate, Kumwenda said Air Malawi's management is considering the option as suggested by government while at the same time exploring ways on how to still remain in business sustainably.

"There are models that may work here like not owning planes but we have made several recommendations to the shareholder [government], one of them is to institute a study on how best Air Malawi can be run," said Kumwenda.

He said the current board of directors -- which took charge last year, discovered that Air Malawi was sitting on huge debts that have been accumulating a long period of time.

"The debt is in excess of K4 billion. This is huge and would need a fresh capital investment from the shareholder to clear it," said Kumwenda.

He said however Malawi has a good market for air travel that provides an opportunity for the revival of Air Malawi as a vibrant airline for the local and regional markets.

"The number of airlines interested to fly into the country and others wanting to increase their frequency of services is a good sign that there is big business on the market. But the challenge is on how to explore this because it is all about normalising our financial position so that we should start focusing on marketing," said Kumwenda.

Air Malawi is 100 percent owned by Malawi government.

Commenting on the Air Malawi situation, Malawi Institute of Engineers MIE President Matthews Mtumbuka said the delays to service the two aircraft are risky and costly because the many moving parts of the planes that have been idle may require replacement.

"Planes have a lot of moving parts and instead of addressing the initial problems that developed on the two aircraft four years ago, other faults may have developed on the machines that require attention and servicing," observed Mtumbuka.

He called upon Air Malawi and government to speed up the matter and ensure that the two aircraft are in good flying conditions before bringing them into the country for resumption of services.

Source:  http://www.bnltimes.com