Saturday, September 7, 2019

Delta Air Lines, Airbus A330-200, N856NW: Incident occurred September 02, 2019 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Unknown

Aircraft sustained bird strike while on approach to land.

Delta Air Lines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N856NW

Date: 02-SEP-19
Time: 02:02:00Z
Regis#: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: 332
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA
Flight Number: DAL4
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK

Piper J3C-65 Cub, N3482N: Incident occurred August 31, 2019 near Warwick Municipal Airport (N72), Orange County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro

Aircraft suffered engine problems and crash landed in lake. 

https://registry.faa.gov/N3482N

Date: 31-AUG-19
Time: 14:00:00Z
Regis#: N3482N
Aircraft Make: Piper Cub
Aircraft Model: JC3
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: WARWICK
State: NEW YORK



Warwick, New York, Fire Department
August 31, 2019

This morning, at 10:05 am, Warwick Fire Department was dispatched to a plane in the water at Wickham Lake on the airport side. Upon arrival, a small plane was down, in the water, the two (2) passengers were able to safely exit the aircraft and swim to shore. The aircraft had a mechanical problem and the pilot chose to place the aircraft into the water. No injuries reported. Thank you to the Volunteers who responded, the Warwick EMS, Warwick PD and State Police.






WARWICK, New York (CBSNewYork) – The pilot of a small plane was forced to make an emergency landing in a lake in Orange County Saturday morning.

The plane went down in Warwick, which is about 50 miles north of Manhattan.

The tail-end of the two-seater could be seen sticking up out of Wickham Lake.

After hitting the water, the two men aboard the plane escaped uninjured and swam ashore.

“They had just taken off Warwick Airport, experienced some engine problems, turned around to return to the airport. At that point they felt it was a better option and safer option to land in the water and that’s what they did,” Lt. John Rader of the Warwick Police Department said.

The plane has been pulled from the lake, and federal aviation officials are investigating the cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://newyork.cbslocal.com

Piper J3C-65, N26754: Incident occurred August 30, 2019 in Erwin, Harnett County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro

Aircraft landed on grass strip and ran into ravine.

https://registry.faa.gov/N26754

Date: 30-AUG-19
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N26754
Aircraft Make: Piper
Aircraft Model: J3
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ERWIN
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Piper PA-60-602P Aerostar, N1R: Incident occurred September 02, 2019 at Tulsa International Airport (KTUL), Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City

Aircraft nose gear collapsed upon landing.

CBU Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N1R

Date: 02-SEP-19
Time: 15:20:00Z
Regis#: N1R
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 60
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TULSA
State: OKLAHOMA

Piper PA-32R-301, N8248D: Incident occurred September 01, 2019 at Cherry Ridge Airport (N30), Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N8248D

Date: 01-SEP-19
Time: 15:16:00Z
Regis#: N8248D
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HONESDALE
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Piper PA-38-112, N6400A: Incident occurred September 02, 2019 at Taylor Municipal Airport (T74), Williamson County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

Aircraft lost power on initial climb out.

https://registry.faa.gov/N6400A

Date: 02-SEP-19
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N6400A
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 38
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 91
City: TAYLOR
State: TEXAS

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee Cruiser, N55633: Accident occurred August 31, 2019 near Conroe-North Houston Regional Airport (KCXO), Montgomery County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.govN55633

Location: Conroe, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA299
Date & Time: 08/31/2019, 0800 CDT
Registration: N55633
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 31, 2019, about 0800 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140 (Cherokee Cruiser) airplane, N55633, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing to a large pond near Conroe, Texas. The commercial pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Palestine Municipal Airport (PSN), Palestine, Texas, about 0700.

The pilot reported the purpose of the flight was to transport him and his sister to the Conroe-North Houston Regional Airport (CXO), Conroe, Texas, for a personal event. The flight originated from the Cherokee County Airport (JSO), Jacksonville, Texas at 0620. The airplane was previously filled with fuel and the pilot verified the fuel status before departing, which was 36 gallons of fuel onboard. The airplane arrived at PSN at 0645, and the pilot picked up his sister. After greetings, a passenger briefing, the runup procedures, and taxiing, the airplane departed from PSN at 0700 for CXO.

For the fuel planning for the flight, the pilot reported his plan was to use the right fuel tank until the descent into CXO. When the onboard global positioning system showed the airplane was about 15 miles (nautical) north of CXO, the pilot turned on the fuel pump and switched to the left fuel tank. After coordination with the air traffic control tower at CXO, the pilot maneuvered the airplane for a straight-in approach to runway 14. As the airplane approached the traffic pattern altitude and with the airport in sight, the pilot executed the before landing check.

The engine rpm was set to 1800, the mixture was adjusted to full rich, and the carburetor heat was turned on. The pilot reported that as soon as he turned the carburetor heat on, the engine went to idle. He immediately turned the carburetor heat back to off. He surmised that having the carburetor heat off would not fix the problem, and so he turned the carburetor heat back on.

After assessing the situation and realizing the airplane didn't have adequate power for flight, the pilot called the air traffic control tower at CXO to report the emergency and elected to conduct a forced landing to a nearby road. The pilot verified all of the circuit breakers were in, he verified the various switches were in the correct locations (particularly making sure the fuel pump switch and the master switch were both on), he verified the position of the magneto switch, and the location of the controls of the throttle quadrant. He reported he did not observe anything out of place.

He did not try to turn the magneto key since it was already in position and the engine was still running, but at idle. He switched the fuel selector back to the right fuel tank, he cycled the throttle twice, and left it at full power. The airplane was about 100 ft and 60 kts over the trees and the pilot assessed the situation that the airplane would not be able to land to the road. The pilot observed a pond and decided to execute a water landing to the pond. During the water impact, the airplane came to rest upside down, in a nose-down attitude as shown below in figure 1. The left wing sustained substantial damage from the water impact.


Figure 1 – View of the submerged airplane in the pond (courtesy of the Texas Department of Public Safety).

The circular shaped freshwater pond has an estimated width of 520 ft and a length of 430 ft. The estimated depth of where the airplane came to rest in the pond was between 5 to 7 ft. The bottom of the pond consisted of sand. The pond is about 3 miles to the north of the threshold for runway 14 at CXO.

During the underwater egression, the pilot stationed in the left seat and passenger stationed in the right seat released themselves from their restraint systems, up righted themselves, and switched positions in the cockpit since the door was on the passenger's side (the right side of the cockpit). In the Piper PA-28 series, the pilot is stationed in the left seat and there is only one door which is on the right side of the cockpit, above the right wing. After they switched positions, part of a passenger window breached from the force of the water, and water rapidly filled up the cabin and cockpit.

The pilot turned the safety latch at the center top of door, which was under his feet, and reported "it didn't feel right." He then pulled the locking latch located on the rearward side of the door, but it would not move. Since he could not open the door to egress, he then punctured and pushed out the acrylic glass door window, which provided a suitable avenue of escape for him and the passenger as shown below in figure 2. The pilot and passenger waded to shore without further incident. A good Samaritan driving by stopped to assist the pilot and passenger, and first responders were contacted. The airplane was recovered from the pond and moved to a secure location for a future examination of the airframe and engine.


Figure 2 – View of the door as the airplane was being recovered from the pond (courtesy of the Montgomery County Police Reporter).


The NTSB has previously identified egression difficulties with the Piper PA-28 series, particularly with an accident involving a fire or water egression. NTSB Safety Recommendations Letter A-81-26 Through -28, based upon several Piper PA-28 accidents, states in part:

The cabin door on the Cherokee, like several other single-engine aircraft designed for five or less persons, is the only available exit. Therefore, when the cabin door becomes jammed, blocked, or otherwise unusable during an accident, there are no alternate means of egress. Furthermore, the Cherokee door is designed with two separate latches: a locking latch located on the rearward side of the door, and a safety latch at the center top of the door which should be latched prior to the flight to provide a proper seal around the door. The prompt location and operation of the top safety latch can be difficult for occupants and rescuers alike.

The four-seat capacity airplane, serial number 28-7325447, was manufactured in 1973. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming Engines O-320 series engine. According to the pilot, the airplane's registration records were in the process of being changed at the time of the accident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N55633
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No  
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCXO, 245 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2200 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Palestine, TX (PSN)
Destination: Houston, TX (CXO)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 30.403889, -95.437222 (est)








Two people suffered minor injuries Saturday morning after the plane they were flying in crashed into a pond near Farrell Road in Willis, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

The plane was headed for Conroe Airport, where air traffic controllers had dispatched firefighters for a report of an aircraft emergency. Shortly after, officials from the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office were told the plane might have to land on Interstate 45.

Minutes later, it was capsized in a nearby pond. A 50-year-old male and a 50-year old female were transported in stable condition, according to the Montgomery County Police Reporter.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Original article ➤ https://www.mysanantonio.com



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Texas (KTRK) -- Officials are working to determine what caused a plane to crash into a pond in Montgomery County Saturday morning.

Montgomery County Sheriff's Office responded to reports of a plane crash on Seven Coves Road near FM 2432.

TxDPS tweeted out a photo showing the plane upside down in a body of water.

Officials said the 50-year-old pilot and his passenger were transported to the hospital with minor injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration says they will investigate the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://abc13.com



WILLIS, Texas - Two people were injured Saturday when a small plane crashed into a pond near Willis.

The crash was reported about 8 a.m. along Farrell Road.

According to officials, the tower at the Conroe airport received an emergency declaration from the pilot.

Officials said they thought the pilot might attempt to land on Interstate 45, but got a call a few minutes later that the aircraft was upside down in a pond.

According to the Texas Department of Public Safety, both the pilot and passenger suffered minor injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.click2houston.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N212BS: Accident occurred September 02, 2019 at Fayette Regional Air Center Airport (3T5), La Grange, Fayette County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N212BS

Location: La Grange, TX

Accident Number: CEN19LA302
Date & Time: 09/02/2019, 1515 CDT
Registration: N212BS
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 2, 2019, about 1515 central daylight time, a Cessna 172S airplane, N212BS, experienced a hard landing at the Fayette Regional Air Center Airport (3T5), La Grange, Texas. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to Euros Aircraft leasing LLC and operated by Brazos Valley Flight Services under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a student cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight.

An initial report from the pilot stated that he did a normal approach to runway 34. During the flare and just before touchdown, a gust of wind came from the right and lifted the airplane. The airplane then landed hard onto the runway. The plane bounced from the impact and then came to a stop. An initial inspection of the airplane noted substantial damage to the firewall and a collapsed nose landing gear.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N212BS
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Euros Aircraft Leasing Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 3T5
Observation Time: 1535 CDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 38°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 40°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: College Station, TX (CLL)
Destination: La Grange, TX (3T5)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.908333, -96.950000

Stinson 108 Voyager, N97699: Accident occurred September 01, 2019 at Bandera State Airport (4W0), King County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle

https://registry.faa.gov/N97699

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA522
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 01, 2019 in Bandera, WA
Aircraft: Stinson 108, registration: N97699

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft went off end of runway after landing.

Date: 01-SEP-19
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N97699
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BANDERA
State: WASHINGTON

CubCrafters CCK-2000, N345S: Incident occurred September 02, 2019 at Yakima Air Terminal (KYKM), Yakima County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane

Aircraft lost control upon landing and went off runway.

Saacks Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N345S

Date: 02-SEP-19
Time: 20:36:00Z
Regis#: N345S
Aircraft Make: CUBCRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: 2000
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: YAKIMA
State: WASHINGTON

Hughes 369D, N54528: Incident occurred August 31, 2019 in Lewiston, Nez Perce County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane

Rotorcraft crashed under unknown circumstances.

https://registry.faa.gov/N54528

Date: 01-SEP-19
Time: 05:42:00Z
Regis#: N54528
Aircraft Make: HUGHES
Aircraft Model: 500
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: ASOTIN
State: WASHINGTON

On August 31, 2019 at about 2245 hours Whitcom advised Nez Perce County of a helicopter crash on the Snake River near Ten Mile Canyon. The Nez Perce County Marine Deputy was called out to investigate. The helicopter crashed in the middle of the river. Witnesses reported to Whitcom that two males exited the helicopter and left the scene in a vehicle. The two males, later identified as Lewis G. Weiss of Duvall, Washington and Alexander J. Jobe of Sammamish, Washington were not able to be reached. The complainant on this crash, Josephine F. Weiss of Duvall, reported that Alexander made it back to a address in Asotin, no word was obtained on Lewis.

Nez Perce County asked Asotin County for an Agency Assist to get eyes on the Alexander, Asotin County was unable to contact him. The dive team will be deployed in the morning to inspect the crash. This investigation is ongoing. -Nez Perce County Sheriff's Office






LEWISTON, Idaho (KLEW) — On Sunday, crews pulled a helicopter from the bottom of the Snake River after it crashed with two people inside the night before.

The Nez Perce County Sheriff's Office says they were called to the scene at 10:45 p.m. after the helicopter went down in the river near Ten Mile Canyon.

"The reports that we're getting were, in an attempt to help some hunters on the Idaho side of the river, they deployed from their helipad," says Cpl. Patrick Dupea with the sheriff’s office.

Dupea says the helicopter launched from the Washington side but only got about 200 yards before plummeting into the Snake River. The two men inside, Lewis Weiss of Duval and Alexander Jobe of Sammamish, where able to escape the sinking helicopter and make it to shore. But then they drove off without talking to law enforcement and authorities say they're still trying to contact them at this time.

"We're here to ensure everyone's safety and we need the pieces of the puzzles to put together what happened and make sure that everybody is safe,” says Dupea.

The sheriff's office got reports the helicopter had a mechanical failure but are still working to determine the exact cause of the crash. The helicopter sank to the bottom of the Snake River and was there until late afternoon.

"We marked it for precaution, just to make sure that nobody did hit it,” Dupea says.

Dupea adds that the hunters were never in danger and that citizens should contact local authorities if they think there's an emergency before going to help.

"We would sure like to be aware if they were going to launch some type of rescue mission to help these hunters out because the sheriff's office does have resources to deploy search and rescue."

The sheriff's office did say they've talked with the occupants’ family members as well as the owner of the helicopter. There have been no charges filed and no injuries reported in the incident at this time.

The investigation into the crash is ongoing.

Story and video ➤ https://klewtv.com

Velocity, N21HV: Incident occurred August 31, 2019 at Friday Harbor Airport (KFHR), San Juan County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle

Aircraft veered off runway while landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N21HV

Date: 31-AUG-19
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N21HV
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: VELOCITY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FRIDAY HARBOR
State: WASHINGTON

Envoy Air, Embraer ERJ-145, N667GB: Incident occurred August 31, 2019 at La Crosse Regional Airport (KLSE), Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee

Aircraft struck a bird on landing.

American Airlines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N667GB

Date: 31-AUG-19
Time: 22:41:00Z
Regis#: N667GB
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: 145
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: ENVOY
City: LA CROSSE
State: WISCONSIN

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N7777W: Accident occurred September 01, 2019 at Manchester Airport (KMHT), Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

https://registry.faa.gov/N7777W

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA524
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 01, 2019 in Manchester, NH
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N7777W

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft lost control on landing taking out precision approach path indicator lights.

Date: 01-SEP-19
Time: 22:20:00Z
Regis#: N7777W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MANCHESTER
State: NEW HAMPSHIRE

Van's RV-12, N767FS: Fatal accident occurred September 06, 2019 in Lady Lake, Lake County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N767FS



Location: Lady Lake, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA265
Date & Time: 09/06/2019, 1312 EDT
Registration: N767FS
Aircraft: Vans RV-12
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 6, 2019, at 1312 eastern daylight time, a Vans Aircraft Inc. RV-12 airplane, N767FS, was destroyed when it impacted terrain in Lady Lake, Florida, shortly after takeoff from runway 27 at Love Field Airport (97FL), Weirsdale, Florida. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Yankee Flyers LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated at 1311.

According to two pilots and one pilot/mechanic who were scheduled to practice a formation flight with the accident pilot, the accident pilot stated that he was unable to start his airplane's engine prior to the flight. The three pilots flew for about 45 minutes and returned to 97FL to debrief. The accident pilot joined them at the debrief and stated he had likely flooded his engine, and the group went to his hangar to assist him. They removed the upper cowling and top spark plugs from each cylinder. Two of the spark plugs were sooty, two were wet, and the mechanic considered all of them insufficiently torqued. They cleaned and reinserted the top spark plugs then decided to check the bottom spark plugs. After cleaning and reinserting the bottom spark plugs, the engine started on the first attempt. The mechanic asked the pilot to perform an ignition check and a full static rpm check, and the engine responded appropriately. The mechanic then asked the pilot to turn off the engine, then restart it. After a normal engine start, the pilot stated that he would fly the airplane around the pattern once. The group left him to replace the engine cowling, which they estimated took 30 minutes. One of the pilots observed the airplane taxi and take off, and noted that the engine "sounded good" as the airplane departed runway 27 and began a left turn. The mechanic reported that he heard the accident pilot perform an engine run-up before takeoff.

Preliminary Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) data revealed that the airplane departed runway 27, climbed to an altitude of about 1,000 ft in an enlarged left-hand traffic pattern. Near the end of the downwind leg, the recorded data indicated a brief initial climb, followed by a rapid descent to the ground, while the track remained consistent along the downwind leg heading.

Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the airplane impacted a grass field in a near vertical nose down attitude about 1.8 nautical miles and 134° from the departure end of runway 27. All major components of the airplane were present at the accident site. The airplane was significantly fragmented and partially consumed by a postcrash fire. The wings came to rest with the leading edge down, and the right wingtip oriented toward a heading of about 135° magnetic. Two linear ground scars, consistent with the length of each wing, radiated from the center of the wreckage with the right wingtip scar oriented toward a heading of about 105°. The debris field extended about 120 ft from the main wreckage on a heading of about 80° and was surrounded by an area of burned grass about 200 ft long by 150 ft wide.

The engine and cockpit area were found in an impact crater about 2 ft deep. Both wings were crushed aft from the leading edge against the main spar, and from the trailing edge forward to the main spar. The right flaperon was impact and fire damaged, and the inboard half was separated from the wing. The left flaperon was impact and fire damaged and completely separated from the wing. The fuselage forward of the stabilator was severely fragmented and partially fire damaged. The stabilator, vertical stabilizer, and rudder were separated from the aft fuselage. The stabilator was largely intact, with most of the fire and damage near its center. The stabilator spar was fractured at midspan. The pitch trim tab remained attached to the stabilator; however, the input control rod and attachment bracket were fractured and separated from the trim tab. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer; it was damaged and the lower 4 inches of the trailing edge was bent toward the right. Flight control continuity was established from the stabilator and the rudder from the control surface to the cockpit controls. Flaperon control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage. Control push-pull rod ends remained attached at the main cockpit control tube, and on the flaperon input control tubes. The fuel selector valve was not located. The electric fuel boost pump was found sooted and thermally damaged. The nose landing gear was separated from the airplane and was found near the wing ground scars.

The propeller hub separated from the engine, and both blades separated from the hub. Three sections of propeller blades were located: one in the impact crater and two at 31 ft and 60 ft along the debris path. One blade section displayed chordwise scratching on the front side of the blade. One partial circumferential scrape mark was present on the front of the engine case near the main drive gear. The engine would not rotate by hand. A borescope inspection of all four cylinders revealed normal coloration and condition of the piston tops, cylinder walls, and valves. All rocker arms and valve spring assemblies remained intact and were undamaged. Cylinder head No. 3 was coated in soot. The gascolator was breached by a puncture, empty of fuel, and contained a small amount of debris in the filter screen. The inside of the gascolator bowl was sooted. Both carburetors were thermally damaged and separated from the engine and found hanging by their control cables. Each throttle control cable remained attached to its respective control arm on the carburetor. Both carburetor bowls were melted away and the floats were not present. Both sides remained in place but were unable to move. The sparkplug electrodes and insulators appeared normal and were clean, except for the No. 2 top spark plug which had white deposits on the bottom of the electrode. The Nos. 1 and 3 bottom spark plugs were slightly wet with oil. None of the intake or exhaust manifold tubing remained attached to the intake and exhaust ports of the engine. The muffler remained partially attached and the springs were in place, with the case, inlet and exit tubes partially damaged. The engine driven fuel pump remained attached to the engine case; however, the fittings were separated, and the ports were partially fractured. The pump was removed and could be rotated by hand with some binding. A small amount of debris was found inside the pump, primarily on the side exposed by the fractured fitting port.

Examination of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness records revealed that the airplane was manufactured by Van's Aircraft Inc. and issued experimental light sport airworthiness certificate on August 10, 2010. The single engine, low-wing airplane was designed to seat two occupants in a side-by-side seating configuration. It was constructed primarily from aluminum alloy materials and was powered by a 100-horsepower Rotax 912 ULS engine which drove a two-bladed, composite propeller. The airplane was equipped with a forward opening, tip-up canopy.

FAA records indicated that the pilot purchased the airplane in 2013. According to maintenance records, a condition inspection was completed on July 1, 2019, at which time the airplane had accrued 123.8 total hours.

The pilot held an FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot was operating under the provisions of Basic Med and his most recent physical examination was issued on June 1, 2017. In a 2018 aviation insurance application, the pilot reported 10,075 hours of total flight experience with 90 hours in the accident airplane make and model. Review of his logbook revealed that he had accrued 12.2 hours in the accident airplane since his most recent flight review on November 8, 2017.

At 1253, the recorded weather at the Leesburg Regional Airport, Leesburg, Florida, 8 nm southeast of the accident site, included wind from 270° at 6 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, a few clouds at 4,100 ft, temperature 33° C, dew point 22° C and an altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury.

A Dynon primary flight display was removed from the airplane and forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for data recovery.

The airplane was retained for further NTSB examination. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N767FS
Model/Series: RV-12 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: Yankee Flyers LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLEE, 759 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4100 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 270°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lady Lake, FL (97FL)
Destination: Lady Lake, FL (97FL) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 28.945000, -81.869167

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N14365: Fatal accident occurred September 06, 2019 at Ken Jernstedt Airfield (4S2), Hood River County, Oregon

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

Aircraft crashed after departure. 

PA-18 LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N14365


Date: 06-SEP-19
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N14365
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
City: HOOD RIVER
State: OREGON

Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum (WAAAM) volunteers Robin Reid, Ben Davidson, Matthew Titus and Marici Reid at last year’s Fly-In. Davidson and Titus died on September 6th, the result of a plane crash.

Matt Titus


HOOD RIVER, Oregon (KPTV) - Two people died in a plane crash Friday morning at the Ken Jernstedt Airfield.

The Hood River County Sheriff’s Office says witnesses reported hearing the engine sputter before the plane nose dived into the ground at a steep angle, killing the pilot, Matthew Titus, of California, and his passenger, Ben Davidson, of Hood River.


According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub crashed just after departure from Runway 25.


Family members confirmed Davidson is the chief pilot of the Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum, which is next to the Hood River airport.


According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot and passenger were experienced with land and seaplane ratings. Davidson was also a certified flight instructor and mechanic.


“He flew everything,” Gary Boggs, a longtime friend, said. “He started at a young age and flew float planes, he flew helicopters in the service, and was just dedicated to flying and helping people.”


Family member say Davidson served as the museum’s chief pilot and was set to participate in this weekend’s annual Fly In, which attracts hundreds of pilots from around the Pacific Northwest each year.


While their flag now flies at half-mast, the museum has decided their event will go on as scheduled, saying in a Facebook post Friday night they aim to make this a Fly In the two pilots would be proud of.


The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kptv.com

Ben Davidson

HOOD RIVER, Oregon (KOIN) — Two people died when a small plane crashed during a popular fly-in event Friday morning at Hood River’s Ken Jernstedt Airfield.

Hood River deputies said the plane was in the air after takeoff around 10:10 a.m. but then sputtered before making a right turn and a nosedive. It plunged into a field near a hanger. Nothing

The pilot, 56-year-old Matthew Titus of Turlock, California and passenger 55-year-old Ben Davidson of Hood River died at the scene. It’s unclear at this time what caused the crash.

The Hood River Sheriff’s Office said the plane was an antique 2-seat, single-engine aircraft called a Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub. Deputies said it was likely attempting a field takeoff. The 2 main runways at the airport were not affected by the crash.

“There’s a lot of people here and this is a pretty tight-knit community and so this is a pretty tragic time for them,” said Deputy Joel Ives.

The crash marked a tragic start to a typically fun-filled weekend in Hood River. The fly-in is organized by the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum (WAAAM), which calls itself a “living museum” and contains working antique planes.

Deputy Ives said the plane that crashed may have been part of WAAAM’s fleet.

“Sympathies with the family,” said Jeff Burns, an attendee at the fly-in. “It’s a terrible way to start a wonderful event but accidents happen in airplanes just as they do in automobiles.”

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Story and video ➤ https://www.koin.com















HOOD RIVER, Oregon — A pilot and passenger were killed in a small plane crash at an airport near Hood River on Friday morning, authorities said.

A Hood River County Sheriff’s Office spokesman said the single-engine plane crashed just after 10 a.m. after an unspecified problem during takeoff.

Witnesses told deputies they heard the engine cut out, at which point the plane nosed down and turned to the right before crashing at a steep angle.

Rescuers had to use the Jaws of Life tool to free the pilot and passenger from the wreckage.

The two people were later pronounced dead at the scene. 

The pilot was identified as 56-year-old Matthew Titus, of Turlock, California.

The passenger was identified as 55-year-old Ben Davidson, of Hood River.

The Ken Jernstedt Airfield is located two miles south of Hood River.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Story and video ➤ https://www.king5.com






SALEM, Oregon (AP) — As dozens of horrified pilots and other aviation enthusiasts looked on, a small plane took off Friday from an airfield in the scenic Oregon town of Hood River then plummeted to the ground after its engine cut out, killing the pilot and his passenger.

The crash occurred as an annual “fly-in,” where hundreds gather to view planes, many of them antiques, was about to start.

One of the people killed was Ben Davidson, chief pilot for a museum of antique planes and cars that hosts the event, Hood River County sheriff’s Deputy Joel Ives said. Also killed was Matthew Titus of Turlock, California, who was piloting the Super Cub airplane, Ives said.

Ives said the two men were apparently related.

The Piper PA-18 Super Cub is a two-seat, single-engine monoplane, introduced in 1949 by Piper Aircraft.

Witnesses said the plane probably didn’t get more than 100 feet (30 meters) off the ground when the engine cut out, almost caught, and then cut out again, Ives said. The weather was clear, with scattered clouds and light winds.

Davidson was chief pilot for the Western Antique Airplane & Automobile Museum, which hosts the Hood River Fly-In, being held on Saturday and Sunday.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.seattletimes.com