Tuesday, September 11, 2012

The man who gave 9/11 terrorists flying lessons

Houston weather, traffic, news | FOX 26 | MyFoxHouston  


HOUSTON (FOX 26) -  Houston is now home to a man who unwittingly trained two of the 9/11 terrorists to fly.
 

Rudi Dekkers owned Huffman Aviation in Venice, Florida.  And for six months he and his instructors worked with Mohamed Atta and Marwan Al-Shehhi, the hijackers who were at the controls of the planes that later took out the twin towers.

Dekkers says he met Atta on Independence Day of 2000 when the pair first inquired about flying lessons, and he immediately sensed an evil aura about him.

"The only thing that I ask myself sometimes is, ‘Should I have listened to my inner self'?" Dekkers told FOX 26 News. "You don't like that guy.  Should you train him?  But you know what?  If I would not have trained him, they would have been trained somewhere else."

Dekkers says he had no idea what the two men were really up to.  After several run-ins, he eventually kicked them out of his flight school.

He never heard from them again until the FBI came asking about Atta and Al-Shehhi on September 12, 2001.

In the wake of 9/11, through the whispers that followed, Rudi Dekkers says he lost nearly everything.

He wrote a book – "Guilty By Association" – and moved to Houston to nourish his new career as a keynote speaker.

When asked, "Do you think you'll ever outrun the shadow of this event?" Dekkers immediately shot back: "Yeah. When I die."

LMI Aerospace expands its Savannah operation

LMI Aerospace, a leading supplier of structural components, assemblies and kits to the aerospace industry, is expanding its Savannah facility, which provides kits and assemblies to both Gulfstream Aerospace and Aviation Partners Boeing, general manager Phil Lajeunesse told the board and advisory council of the Savannah Economic Development Authority Tuesday.

“We started in 2003 with Gulfstream, developing fuselage skin kit assemblies that worked with their lean, just-in-time manufacturing process,” he said.

Over the years, LMI’s reputation for quality and reliability allowed them to deliver the kits directly to the assembly line on the manufacturing floor for the shift they would be needed, Lajeunesse said.

Five years ago, the company added Aviation Partners Boeing to its client list, producing a kit that supports the installation of winglets on the Boeing 737, 757 and 767.

Read more here:   http://savannahnow.com

FCC attempts to shut down Florida cable operator for violating signal leakage, EAS rules

The FCC said Thursday that it was fining Florida cable operator St. George Cable $236,500 for allegedly violating rules governing signal leakage and the Emergency Alert System, and for failing to adhere to an order to cease operations. 

According to an FCC notice, an inspector from its Tampa office discovered 33 leaks on aeronautical frequencies emanating from the cable system on St. George Island during a visit on Sept. 7, 2011. The commission ordered the system to cease operations, but the cable system remained in operation.

"We conclude St. George's actions were egregious—given the potential public safety hazard, its blatant disregard for Commission authority, and a demonstrated pattern of failing to maintain its cable system," the FCC wrote in the order.
 

The FCC said its inspectors returned to the system in October and March, and once again found signal leaks that could interfere with frequencies used by emergency locator transmitters on airplanes and emergency radio beacons on boats. The commission said it also discovered that St. George Cable had never installed Emergency Alert System equipment needed to relay messages to subscribers. St. George has also never registered its cable system at the FCC, according to the FCC notice.

Read more:   http://www.fiercecable.com

Reno, Nevada: Air Races Medical Staff Hopes for Best, Prepares for Worst

As the aviation community gears up for the 49th annual National Championship Air Races, it's not just the pilots looking back at last year's event.

Doctors, nurses, and EMTs are preparing to staff the medical tent at the Reno-Stead Airport this year. The medical professionals said normally, that job includes handing out band aids and sunscreen, and making sure people stay hydrated.

But with the memory of last year still fresh in their minds, they are hoping for the best, while preparing for the worst.

"You always learn to expect something like [last year's crash], to prepare for something like this," Saint Mary's Regional Health Center Doctor Jenny Wilson said, "and sometimes you're going through drills and you're thinking 'Why am I doing this?' And we got our question answered."

Read more:   http://www.ktvn.com

Reno, Nevada: Area First Responders Ready Again For The Air Races

Last year's Reno Air Races ended in tragedy, a crash killing 11 and injuring more than 60. It tested the readiness of local emergency agencies.
Those who took part say the plan worked and they're even better prepared now.

It was an incident no one expected, but many had prepared for. An aircraft plunging into the ground in front of the stands, sending deadly debris into the box seats.

"It sort of sucks the air out of you," says St. Mary's Medical Center emergency nurse Julie Morgan. "And then you're like 'I know what I'm going to do because I've done it a hundred times in drills."

She was stationed at Stead that day as were other emergency responders. Back at the hospital, Dr. Jenny Wilson was on duty. Receiving her first patient she said delivered a momentary shock.

Read more here:   http://www.kolotv.com

Indian Air Force pilot refuses to ferry AICC general secretary Rahul Gandhi

GUWAHATI: An IAF chopper pilot who took AICC general secretary Rahul Gandhi to riot-hit areas of lower Assam from Guwahati airport on Tuesday refused to ferry him back citing bad weather. The pilot stood his ground despite defence minister A K Antony intervening.

"Guwahati ATC had cleared its flight but the IAF had a bad weather report," a source said. The chopper carried Rahul to Kokrajhar from Dhubri, from where he returned to Guwahati by road. Rahul will fly back to New Delhi by a special aircraft on Tuesday morning.

Chief minister Tarun Gogoi, who accompanied Rahul by the same chopper, is returning by train . The IAF refused to reveal the name of its pilot.

"The IAF earlier rejected Salakati helipad for the chopper's landing in Kokrajhar saying it was unsafe. 

A new helipad was built overnight at nearby Bongaigaon stadium. The IAF again refused to land at Bongaigaon and took the chopper to Kokrajhar at 2.45 pm. The weather over Kokrajhar was alright but the pilot said that weather over Guwahati wasn't suitable for flying. At 5.30 pm, Rahul returned to Guwahati by road," a source said.

Source:   http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Piper PA-34-200T Seneca II, Aviatour Air, RP-C4431: Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines official ‘speculated’ on Robredo plane crash probe - Department of Transportation and Communication

THE Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC) disapproved recent statements of an aviation agency official regarding the plane crash that killed Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo, saying they were “unauthorized” and “speculative.”

The DOTC said the statements of Captain John Andrews, deputy director general of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (Caap), that there was no foul play involved in the plane crash were “personal conjecture” and must not be interpreted as official results of the ongoing probe.

“The remarks made by ret. Captain John Andrews were unauthorized albeit elicited from a joint Congressional committee hearing to look into the cause of the accident,” the DOTC said in a statement.

“They are mere possible theories and not the result of a complete, impartial and thorough probe of the Special Investigation Committee created by DOTC right after the fatal plane crash,” the agency added.

During an en banc meeting of the congressional oversight committee on Caap in Pasay City on Monday, Andrews said the plane crash was indeed an accident as there was no foul play involved based on “initial investigation.”

Andrews also asked for an executive session to "bring up the different causes and reasons behind the crash."

Read more:  http://www.sunstar.com.ph

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky Air Antonov AN-28, RA-28715, Flight PTK-215: Accident occurred September 11, 2012 near Palana Airport, Kamchatka peninsula, Russia

An An-28 propeller plane carrying 14 people crashed in the far eastern region of Kamchatka on Tuesday, killing 10 of those on board.

Air-traffic controllers lost contact with the plane travelling from the Kamchatkan regional capital of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsy to the city of Palana, near the Kamchatka peninsula's northwest coast, at around 12:30 p.m. local time (4:30 a.m. in Moscow), the Emergency Situations Ministry said in a statement on its website.

A Mi-8 helicopter was sent in search of the plane and found it around 10 kilometers from Palana, regional emergency officials said, Interfax reported.

Ten of the 14 people on board died in the crash, including a 4-year-old and both members of the flight crew, the Emergency Situations Ministry statement and Interfax reported.

The four survivors, among whom was a 13-year-old, two women and a man, are in critical condition in a Palana hospital with a variety of broken bones and other injuries, a statement on the Kamchatka regional administration website said. The 13-year-old is in a coma and is in the worst condition of the four survivors, the statement said.

A statement by the Investigative Committee cited a number of possible reasons for the crash, including poor weather conditions, a technical failure in the plane, and pilot error. The statement said an investigation into the crash is underway.

A Kamchatka region air-traffic-control source told Interfax that one possible reason for the crash being considered by investigators is engine failure in the plane. The source also said there was bad weather near Palana at the time of the crash, including torrential rains and clouds as low as 400 meters from the ground.

Piper PA-28RT-201 Arrow IV, N2878V: Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Gilmer, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA623 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Gilmer, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/09/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28RT-201, registration: N2878V
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that while he was performing flight maneuvers in preparation for a checkride, the engine backfired and lost partial power. He attempted unsuccessfully to regain engine power. Because he could not maintain altitude and the local terrain was tree-covered, the student pilot chose to ditch the airplane in a nearby lake. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed the No. 3 cylinder lost compression due to the seizure of the No. 3 cylinder piston rings. The No. 3 cylinder fuel nozzle was found partially clogged, which likely resulted in a lean fuel mixture and excessive heat in the cylinder and the subsequent piston ring failure. The reason for the clogged fuel nozzle could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The partial loss of engine power due to the loss of cylinder compression. The loss of cylinder compression was the result of the No. 3 piston ring failure due to excessive heat because of the lean fuel mixture from a partially clogged fuel nozzle.

On September 9, 2012, approximately 1500 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28RT-201 single-engine airplane, N2878V, sustained substantial damage when it ditched into a lake following a partial loss of engine power near Gilmer, Texas. The student pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to AirLease Nevada, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional solo flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from Fox Stephens Field (JXI), Gilmer, Texas, at 1400.

The student pilot stated he was practicing basic flight maneuvers in preparation to take his private pilot check ride. During a 20 degree bank turn at 1,500 feet above ground level, the engine backfired and lost partial power. The pilot attempted to regain engine power; however, his attempts were unsuccessful. The pilot could not maintain altitude, and due to the tree covered terrain surrounding the area, he elected to ditch the airplane into a lake. The airplane landed in the water and sank. The pilot was able to egress and was rescued by nearby boaters.

A review of the maintenance records revealed the Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 (serial number RL 28998-51A) engine, underwent its most recent annual inspection on October 11, 2011, at a total time of 1,011.7 hours since major overhaul. During the inspection, no abnormal engine discrepancies were noted. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 1,043.2 hours since major overhaul.

On January 30, 2013, the engine was examined by the NTSB investigator-in-charge and a representative from Lycoming engines. Examination of the engine revealed the No. 3 cylinder had little to no compression when the engine crankshaft was rotated by hand. The No. 3 cylinder was removed, and the piston displayed excessive exhaust blow-by and the piston rings were seized in the ring lands. The No. 3 fuel injector nozzle was removed and found partially blocked with debris. The magnetos were functionally tested and no anomalies were noted. The spark plugs were functionally tested and no anomalies were noted. The intake box to fuel control air hose displayed black discoloration consistent with engine backfire. The cockpit mixture control lever was found in the mid-range position.



 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA623
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Gilmer, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28RT-201, registration: N2878V
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2012, approximately 1500 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28RT-201 single-engine airplane, N2878V, sustained substantial damage when it ditched into a lake following a partial loss of engine power near Gilmer, Texas. The student pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to AirLease Nevada, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional solo flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from Fox Stephens Field (JXI), Gilmer, Texas, at 1400.

The pilot stated he was practicing basic flight maneuvers in preparation to take his private pilot check ride. During a 20 degree bank turn at 1,500 feet above ground level, the engine lost partial power. The pilot attempted to regain engine power; however, his attempts were unsuccessful. The pilot could not maintain altitude, and due to the tree covered terrain surrounding the area, the pilot elected to ditch the airplane into a lake. The airplane landed in the water and sank. The pilot was able to egress and was rescued by nearby boaters.

The airplane was recovered from the lake and transported to a secure facility for further examination.


MARION COUNTY, TX (KLTV) -   A plane crash at Lake O' the Pines is currently under investigation by the FAA.

The plane crashed into the middle of the lake Sunday evening near the Johnson Creek Mariana off of FM 729.

The pilot of the plane, who has not been identified, was able to escape from the plane before it sank. He was then rescued by first responders and transported to a local hospital. His injuries are not yet known.

The plane is a Piper PA-28RT-201 registered to Airlease Nevada LLC in Carson City, Nevada. Officials have laid out buoys near the submerged plane.

Read more:    http://www.ksla.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N2878V

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 2878V        Make/Model: PA28      Description: PA-28 ARROW
  Date: 09/09/2012     Time: 1950

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: LONGVIEW   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. LONGVIEW, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DALLAS, TX  (SW05)                    Entry date: 09/10/2012 #

Neil Armstrong to be honored at Reno Air Races

DAYTON —  Seven well-known aviation pioneers, performers and pilots will honor the late astronaut Neil Armstrong when a trophy renamed after the moon walker is unveiled at the Reno Air Races on Sunday.

World War II triple ace Clarence “Bud” Anderson; test pilot Bob Hoover; Southwest Airlines founder Herb Kelleher; business aviation pioneer Clay Lacy; aviation record-setter Dick Rutan; and air show performers Sean Tucker and Patty Wagstaff are expected to participate, according to the Dayton-based National Aviation Hall of Fame.

Read more here:   http://www.daytondailynews.com

Rare Russian WWII tank killer to fly in Everett, Washington

EVERETT - What's believed to be the only flying Ilyushin II-2 Shturmovik - a Russian plane known as a "tank killer" - left in the world will make its U.S. public flying debut this weekend.

The World War II-era ground-attack aircraft was built in Kuybyshev, Russia, in the middle of 1943, according to the Flying Heritage Collection that now has it. The plane was assigned to the 828th Attack Aviation Regiment of the 260th Composite Air Division operating on the lower part of the Karelian Front. 

After flying more than a year of combat missions, the plane was hit by anti-aircraft fire on Oct. 10, 1944, while attacking an enemy airfield southeast of Luostari, near the Norwegian border, according to Cory Graff, military aviation curator for the Flying Heritage Collection.

The pilot attempted to land the damaged plane on a frozen lake. The wreck was abandoned and sank into the lake during the spring thaw.

Read more here:   http://www.thenewstribune.com

Read
more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2012/09/11/2290605/rare-russian-wwii-tank-killer.html#storylink=cpy

Southern Oregon Warbirds: 'We can continue to press on for the people that died'


ROSEBURG, Ore. -- The sun was shining on Tuesday morning, as members of the Southern Oregon Warbirds gathered at the Roseburg Regional Airport, 11 years to the day that four planes changed American history forever. 

The veterans and their family members spent a lot of time in planes during wars and conflicts.

Now that their careers defending the country are long past, some haven't flown in decades.

On Tuesday morning, that changed.

Ageless Aviation Dreams Flight is a non-profit organization that offers to take veterans for a spin.

Bill Fisher of Ageless Aviation told KPIC News just how thankful he is to be able to give back to those who have served our country. "I'll tell you, they mean about everything to me," he said. "We owe the others, the Warbirds here that were basically willing to give their lives for the type of life that we're able to enjoy now. I can't thank them enough."

Read more here:  http://www.kpic.com

RR-Griffon powered P51 "Precious Metal" qualifying at 451mph - Reno, Nevada on September 10, 2012

Call for boycott of DANA planes

The Nigerian Airline Passengers Association (NAPA) yesterday advised  air travelers to shun DANA Air planes when they resume operations  until  the issues surrounding the  June 3 crash are resolved.

The Association said that since the Accident Investigation Bureau (AIB) is still probing the cause of the crash, where all the 153 passengers on board died, it is too hasty and insensitive to allow the airline resume operations.

In a statement  by Oba  Donald Nwandu and Alhaji Umar Lukman, President and Executive Director respectively, the Association wondered how an  airline whose aircraft was involved in a fatal crash that claimed 153 lives three months ago can now be said to have resolved all issues and certified fit to fly, even when the AIB is yet to release its report on the crash.


http://www.thenationonlineng.net

Press Release: Southeast Aviation Expo 2012

For Immediate Release
Contact Lara Kaufmann
864-634-1380
LaraLKaufmann@gmail.com

Southeast Aviation Expo to Reach New Heights

The South Carolina Aviation Association (SCAA) is expecting a large turnout for its 2nd annual Southeast Aviation Expo!" stated SCAA President Marion Hope.  “Last year the expo far exceeded our first year's attendance goals with nine hundred and seventy-three people at the Greenville Downtown Airport for the event, the majority of which were pilots.  Others in attendance had careers in aviation or enjoy it as a hobby.  All this despite the unusually cold weather that made it impossible for people from the Northeast to fly in,” stated Hope.  

"This year the event is scheduled to be one month earlier in the year in an effort to avoid weather issues like that this year,” stated Joe Frasher, Airport Director of the Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU).  “It is incredible that we have so many nationally recognized companies registered to exhibit this year!  Last year’s event was great and this year it looks like we will even far surpass that,” stated Frasher.  "Last year several exhibitors said that the Southeast Aviation Expo was a much more productive show for them than other national ones that they have attended lately since so many aviation people were here.  That must be why most of them are registered to exhibit again this year and we have added 15 new exhibitors!" added Frasher.

The Southeast Aviation Expo will showcase the latest aviation products; have over 14 static aircraft displayed and educational sessions will be held.   “Most people interested in aviation will find the entire expo interesting.  Of special note to students, will be two sessions on Saturday, September 29th:   ‘Training and Careers in the Aerospace and Aviation Industry’ at 12:30 and ‘How to Become a Pilot’ at 2:30.  Experienced pilots might be interested in attending a session about the latest technology including the use of iPads in the cockpit,” Frasher said.  All educational sessions are listed on the SCAA website:  http://www.scaaonline.com/content/seae-agenda-education-session-titles

The keynote speaker for the event will be Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) President Craig Fuller.   Fuller will address the latest issues facing general aviation.

Trade-A-Plane, a top national publication that is geared towards pilots is an event sponsor again this year.  The South Carolina Technology and Aviation Center (SCTAC) will also sponsor the event and provide the exhibitors with lunch.  Greenville Downtown Airport is hosting an exhibitor reception.

So far Cessna, Cirrus, Michelin Aircraft Tires, ADEX Machining Technologies, AeroCab, Louis Berger Services Inc., James A. Gardner Company, Mint Air, Flight Design USA, Baldwin Safety & Compliance, Motley Rice LLC, Advocate Consulting, Aircare Aviation Services & Support, Hope Aviation Insurance, Just Aircraft, Greenville Downtown Airport, Sebring US Sport Aviation Expo, Lycoming, Aviation Tax Consultants, LLC.,  US AeroTech - Professional Aircraft Maintenance Training, Liberty University, PF Flyers, Wings Over Greenville,  Runway Cafe, Special Services Corporation, Trade-A-Plane, Eclipse Aerospace, Precision Hose Technologies, Inc.,  CTS International, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Daher-Socata, Champion Aerospace, Skytech, Tempest, Stevens Aviation, LandRover Carolinas, Premier Aircraft Sales, Diamond Aircraft, SWT Aviation Inc., Cubcrafters, Airwolf Aviation Services, 4 Paws Aviation, DTC Duats, Applied Technical Services, Inc., Camden/Donaldson/Greenville Jet Centers, Fractrade, Civil Air Patrol, Pilots N Paws,  Eastern Aviation Fuel - Shell Aviation, Eagle Aviation, SCAA, SC Aeronautics Commission, SC Aviation Safety Council, The FAA Flight Standards Districts Office, BMW Performance Driving School and Angel Flight have registered to exhibit in 2012!

The Southeast Aviation Expo will be held on September 28th and 29th at the Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU), which is located at 100 Tower Dr., Greenville, SC 29607.   More information can be found by visiting:  http://www.greenvilledowntownairport.com/SEAE.html and http://www.scaaonline.com/content/southeast-aviation-expo  It is open to the public.  Tickets are $5.  Children, and students with ids, can get in free.

"This event is like an industry trade show for people who work or have an interest in aviation but all are welcome,” Frasher said.  "The aviation community in the Southeast is very strong so we expect a large turnout.  We would like to encourage people to register to attend online at http://www.scaaonline.com/seaviationshow-registration. This will help us to have an idea of how many people to plan on and it will also get them admitted into the event quicker,” added Frasher.

SCAA's mission is to actively promote and encourage aviation and airport development to meet air transportation needs and assist the state in achieving economic development goals.  For more information about the event visit http://www.scaaonline.com/content/southeast-aviation-expo  , call 1 (877) FLY-SCAA (359- 7222) or email Katie@associationsplus.com .

AOPA's purpose is to protect the freedom to fly while keeping general aviation safe, fun, and affordable.   AOPA is the largest and most influential aviation organization in the world. AOPA membership has grown to more than 414,000; a number that represents more than two thirds of all certificated pilots in the United States. For more information about Craig Fuller and AOPA please visit http://www.aopa.org  and http://www.aopa.org/prez/events.html

GMU is the busiest general aviation airport in South Carolina and is a self-sufficient entity with financial strength that doesn't rely on local taxpayers for funding. GMU is home to Greenville Jet Center, the largest Fixed Base Operation (FBO) in S.C., as well as more than 25 other aviation-related businesses creating 453 jobs that annually contribute more than $35.2 million to the Upstate economy.  For more information about GMU please visit http://www.greenvilledowntownairport.com or contact Joe Frasher at864-242-4777 or joe@greenvilledowntownairport.com




Despite Risks, Pilots Keep Returning to Air Races

Flying around an 8-mile track at 500 miles per hour is something most of us probably can't comprehend.

But for many pilots, it's a lot like Christmas, in September.

"The biggest part of that is not so much getting and opening up the presents, it's seeing your family," Will Whiteside said. "These guys and gals up here have become, over the past ten years for me, my family."

"If you miss it, you feel a void in your life," Marilyn Dash said. "When I started racing about ten years ago, I couldn't imagine doing anything else with my September except coming here and we call ourselves our September family."

Read more here:  http://www.ktvn.com

Video: F7F Tigercat in practice action - Reno, Nevada on September 10, 2012

Video: P51 Precious Metal, Griffin engine, counter rotating propellers, Valley of Speed - Reno, Nevada on September 10, 2012

Hawker MK 11 Sea Fury, Air Zurich LLC, N4434P: Accident occurred September 11, 2012 in Reno, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N 4434P

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA422
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 11, 2012 in Reno, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/31/2013
Aircraft: HAWKER MK 11 SEA FURY, registration: N4434P
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that following an uneventful takeoff, the landing gear malfunctioned when he attempted to retract it. After several attempts, the landing gear retracted, and he performed his race course qualifying lap. Upon exiting the closed race course, he attempted to extend the landing gear. Following multiple attempts, the landing gear appeared to be down. The right main landing gear warning light was illuminated, and the pilot executed a precautionary landing. During the landing roll, the right main landing gear collapsed. Subsequently, the airplane exited the right side of the runway and came to rest upright. Examination of the airplane revealed that the landing gear rotary selector valve seal had failed, which allowed hydraulic pressure to bypass the landing gear. The bypass in hydraulic pressure would preclude the landing gear system from operating normally.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The collapse of the right main landing gear due to failure of the landing gear rotary selector valve seal.

On September 11, 2012, about 1500 Pacific daylight time, a Hawker MK11 Sea Fury, N4434P, was substantially damaged when the right main landing gear collapsed during landing roll at the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to Air Zurich LLC, Lake Zurich, Illinois, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as Race 15. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the air race flight. The local flight originated from RTS about 30 minutes prior to the time of the accident.

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that following an uneventful takeoff, he had a malfunction with retracting the landing gear. After several attempts, the landing gear retracted, and he performed his race course qualifying lap. Upon exiting the closed race course, he attempted to extend the landing gear. After about 20 minutes of troubleshooting the landing gear, it appeared to be down, however, with the right main landing gear warning light illuminated. The pilot initiated a precautionary landing on runway 14. During the landing roll, the right main landing gear collapsed and the airplane exited the right side of the runway. Subsequently, the airplane came to rest upright adjacent to the runway.

Examination of the airplane by the NTSB IIC revealed that the right wing, right aileron, and rudder were damaged.

Further examination of the recovered airplane by a representative from Sanders Aeronautics, Ione, California, revealed that the landing gear rotary selector valve seal had failed, which allowed landing gear hydraulic pressure to bypass. The representative stated that the bypass in hydraulic pressure would preclude the landing gear retraction system from operating normally.



 NTSB Identification: WPR12LA422 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 11, 2012 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: HAWKER MK 11 SEA FURY, registration: N4434P
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 11, 2012, about 1500 Pacific daylight time, a Hawker MK11 Sea Fury, N4434P, was substantially damaged when the right main landing gear collapsed during landing roll at the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to Air Zurich LLC, Lake Zurich, Illinois, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as Race 15. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the air race flight. The local flight originated from RTS about 30 minutes prior to the time of the accident.

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that following an uneventful takeoff, he had a malfunction with retracting the landing gear. After several attempts, the landing gear retracted and he performed his race course qualifying lap. Upon exiting the closed race course, he attempted to extend the landing gear. After about 20 minutes of troubleshooting the landing gear, it appeared to be down, however, with the right main landing gear warning light illuminated. The pilot initiated a precautionary landing on runway 14. During the landing roll, the right main landing gear collapsed and the airplane exited the right side of the runway and came to rest upright.

Examination of the airplane by the NTSB IIC revealed that the right wing, right aileron, and rudder were damaged. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 4434P        Make/Model: FURY      Description: FURY, SEA FURY
  Date: 09/11/2012     Time: 2315

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Minor

LOCATION
  City: RENO   State: NV   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT RIGHT GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING. RENO, NV

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: RENO, NV  (WP11)                      Entry date: 09/13/2012 
 



RENO, Nev. —  A pilot made a rough emergency landing at the Reno National Championship Air Races but escaped unhurt.
 

Race officials say Matt Jackson of Van Nuys, Calif., radioed in a May Day because of a problem with the landing gear in his vintage World War II fighter during qualifying heats about 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in the Unlimited class at Reno-Stead Airport.

Fire trucks and emergency crews manned a runway on the far side of the course away from the grandstand as Jackson brought his Hawker Sea Fury called "Furias" down slowly. But race spokeswoman Valerie Miller-Moore says his right gear collapsed. His plane slid off the runway and spun around in the sagebrush, sending up a cloud of dust.

Miller-Moore says Jackson is fine, but he did wreck the paint job on the plane. Qualifying has resumed.


Read more:    http://www.foxreno.com

Air Guard bombing practice set for northern New York

FORT DRUM (AP) -- People in parts of northern New York can expect the noise of military aircraft and explosions as Air National Guard units practice close air support bombing runs at the Army's Fort Drum.

New York military officials say F-16 jets from the guard in New Jersey and Vermont will be conducting exercises along with controllers from New York, New Jersey and other states from Tuesday through Friday.

Much of the activity will be at night to simulate typical combat operations.


http://www.cnycentral.com

Ridley, Pennsylvania: Boeing plant determined safe following bomb threat



RIDLEY — Operations at the Boeing facility resumed earlier this afternoon after a bomb threat resulted in the evacuation of hundreds of employees this morning. The plant has been swept for explosives, and employees reporting for work at 2:30 p.m. have started their shifts.

This morning, the southern end of the sprawling Boeing plant had been evacuated and police investigated a threat that explosives have been planted inside one of the facility's hangars.

Read more:   http://www.delcotimes.com

County manager addresses MEDSTAR closure

NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral  

LEE COUNTY, FL - Lee County Commissioners lashed out at the county manager over the abrupt grounding of MEDSTAR, the county's medical helicopter. 

Karen Hawes appeared before commissioners Tuesday. It was the first time someone in charge has spoken publicly since an NBC2 investigation uncovered patients were incorrectly billed millions of dollars.

One commissioner called for Hawes' resignation while others wanted the EMS Chief and head of public safety fired.

Read more here:   http://www.nbc-2.com

Casper Mountain Fire: Tuesday updates

4:35 p.m. Tuesday A portion of the fire is burning on the north side of Casper Mountain, reports photographer Alan Rogers. The flames seem to be situated about halfway up the slope, more or less south of the country club, he said.

Jason Parks of Casper Fire-EMS said the northern spread is to be expected.

"It's all part of the process," he said, noting that there has not been significant movement throughout Tuesday.

4:30 p.m. Tuesday Aerial assets fighting the fire and based at the Casper/Natrona County International Airport are a DC-10, a BAe-146 four-engine jet, seven helicopters including two Wyoming National Guard UH-60 Blackhawks, four single-engine air tankers similar to crop-dusters and two twin-engine guide planes. All were active this afternoon.

Read more here:   http://trib.com

Yakovlev YAK-55M, N176FD: Accident occurred June 01, 2014 in Stevens Point, Wisconsin

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA266
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 01, 2014 in Stevens Point, WI
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK-55M, registration: N176FD
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 1, 2014, about 1222 central daylight time, a Yakovlev model YAK-55M airplane, N176FD, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an aerobatic flight over the Stevens Point Municipal Airport (STE), Stevens Point, Wisconsin. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local airshow demonstration flight that departed about 1220.

The flight team manager, who also provided the public-announcement during the accident flight, reported that the accident flight began with the airplane rolling inverted shortly after liftoff, followed by a shallow inverted climb past show-center. The airplane then rolled upright before entering a 90-degree turn away from show-center and the crowd. The airplane continued to climb, while on the opposite heading used for the takeoff, before it turned back to the runway heading and reentered the aerobatic box. The airplane then rolled inverted before it entered a 45-degree dive toward show-center. The airplane then completed several descending aileron rolls before it rolled wings level and entered a near vertical climb. At the apex of the climb/loop, the airplane entered an inverted flat spin.

Ground-based video footage showed that the airplane completed 3-1/2 rotations in the inverted flat spin before it entered a near vertical dive. The video footage then showed a momentary increase in airplane pitch, achieving a positive deck angle of about 20-degrees, before the airplane entered a rapid left roll. The airplane then entered a nose-down left descending spiral into terrain.

A postaccident examination established that the airplane impacted terrain in a near vertical attitude. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The engine was located in a 2-1/2 feet deep impact crater and remained partially connected to the firewall. Three engine cylinders had partially separated from the crankcase, which prevented the engine from being rotated. After removing several cylinders, an internal examination did not reveal any mechanical discontinuities within the engine drivetrain. The No. 1 magneto exhibited impact damage that prevented a functional test. The No. 2 magneto provided a spark on all leads when rotated. All three propeller blades exhibited damage consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact. The postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. A handheld GPS and GoPro video camera were recovered from the wreckage and were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for readout.


 AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO A WOODED AREA DURING AN AIRSHOW, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS FATALLY INJURED, STEVENS POINT, WI 

FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13: http://www.asias.faa.gov

WILLIAM M. COWDEN, N176FD:   http://registry.faa.gov/N176FD


Bill Cowden
 Aerobatics pilot Bill Cowden stops for a photo next to his Yak 55M. Cowden, an airline pilot by profession, has been flying aerobatics in air shows for five years.
 Photo by Phillip Bock


Aerobatic pilots took to the skies during Wheels and Wings with an arsenal of high-flying flips, loops and corkscrews that wowed audiences and put pilots’ bodies to the test. 

 Airline pilot Grant Nielsen of New Richmond screeched across the blue afternoon sky in his 1994 built Pits Special, pulling off maneuvers that pushed against his body with more than two Gs (gravitational forces). The pilot has been flying acrobatics for years, but only received his FAA authorization to fly in air shows this past August.

“I’ve been flying acrobatics for quite awhile,” he said. “I grew up around airports and always liked flying, but it was so expensive I couldn’t justify doing it. Then, when I was 20 years old, I went on my first aerobatics flight and was hooked. I started taking lessons that year.”

Eighteen years later, the pilot is still following his dream. The Wheels and Wings audience shielded their eyes from the afternoon sun as they looked to the skies, watching as Nielsen looped, rolled, and dove his way effortlessly over the airport.

“It’s just much fun and I enjoy it so much,” he said.

Of course, it’s not as easy as Nielsen makes it seem. The pilot said he starts out every spring easing into new tricks to acclimate his body to the gravitational forces. The G-force often causes air sickness early on, he said, but the body can build up a tolerance to the affects.

“Every spring, even though I’ve been doing it for years, I have to start a little easier and just start pulling more and more Gs to get my tolerance up,” he said. “I usually get queasy every spring during the first few flights.”

Nielsen fits snugly into his small plane. The lap belt, which has a ratchet to make sure Nielsen is strapped in tight, is all that holds the pilot in his plane as he careens across the sky. It is so tight that the belt sometimes bruises his thighs. The tight fit in the tiny cockpit occasionally causes him harm as well, he said.

“I fit in it like a cork,” he laughs. “When I’m practicing new maneuvers I’ll come back with bruises on my shoulders. The inside of my knees can get bruised when I’m aggressive with the [steering] stick. I’ll smack myself pretty good. The seatbelt can leave bruises, too.”

For his show Saturday, Nielsen said he was set to perform his “regular” routine, but was forced to improvise when high winds swept through the sky.

“Today, with the strong wind, I was traveling much faster, so I had trouble getting all the maneuvers in due to the higher speed,” he explained. ”You have to have a plan, but you have to  be able to improvise.”

Bill Cowden, a pilot from Eau Claire, said his set of aerobatics Saturday was also affected by the high winds.

“I threw some low maneuvers, but with the wind today I had to adjust a few things,” he said.

Cowden has been flying in air shows for five years, but was granted his low altitude “surface level” waiver just below the show — which meant he could perform tricks just above the runway.

“We had a great time here and it’s great to perform for the folks,” he said.

The pilot flew a Russian built Yak 55M for his flight, hitting seven Gs during his maneuvers.

“The airplane sits so my knees are kind of in the air, so it’s actually a good position for pulling Gs,” he said. “You pull quick, so the Gs aren’t sustained for a long time.”

The pilot said he started flying aerobatics years ago in a Cessna 150, but went on hiatus from aerobatics when he entered the Air Force and flew F-16 fighter jets. When he retired in 2006, Cowden said he got right back into aerobatics.

“I always had that desire to fly upside down,” he chuckled. “I still get a thrill with it. Flying in general is very precision based and there is never a flight that will be perfect, so I’m always striving for that perfection.” 


 Read more here:   http://www.presspubs.com

Learjet 55B, N55VC: Emergency landing at Westchester County Airport (KHPN), White Plains, New York

A private jet carrying seven people safely landed about 4 p.m. after problems forced the pilot to shut down one of two engines and prepare for an emergency landing at Westchester County Airport. 

 The Learjet 55 corporate jet took off from the county airport bound for Nebraska about 3 p.m. Airport Operations was notified at 3:10 p.m. that the plane was experiencing engine trouble and was returning to the area, Westchester County police spokesman Kieran O’Leary said.

“As a precaution, the pilot shut down the engine – one of two powering the plane,” O’Leary stated. “The plane’s fuel load was too heavy to permit an immediate landing, so the pilot continued to fly to burn off fuel.”


Read more:  http://www.lohud.com


Story and video:   http://newyork.newsday.com

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N55VC

This aircraft (N55VC) is not available for public tracking per request from the owner/operator.

 N55VC - R.T. VANDERBILT COMPANY INC. (NORWALK CT)

http://registry.faa.gov/N55VC

Fly-in draws pilots to Black Hills Airport-Clyde Ice Field (KSPF), Spearfish, South Dakota

SPEARFISH — Aviation is a tried-and-true passion for pilots all over South Dakota and coming together once a year is a great way to nurture their interests.

The Spearfish Fly-in and South Dakota Aviation Hall of Fame was held Saturday at Black Hills Aero located at the Black Hills Airport/Clyde Ice Field. For more than a decade, pilots from all over the state have made the trek to the Northern Black Hills to participate in a variety of seminars and flying events.

"We had really good attendance this year and I think people really enjoyed themselves," said Rich Krogstad of Spearfish. As one of the main organizers of the event itself, he said the weekend seemed to be a great success.

Read more here:  http://www.bhpioneer.com

Cessna 150/180 Banner Pickup

 
 September 5, 2012 by Paul Pilipshen 
"One of my first Banner Pickups. Not great form, I was trolling instead of swinging the hook, but it got the job done."

Casper, Wyoming: Specialized Equipment To Fight Fires

With the size of the Sheep Herder Hill fire in excess of 15,000 acres, all the stops have been pulled and the equipment has been ordered in to fight it.
 

As you can imagine, the Natrona County International Airport has been a hub of activity with lots of aerial firefighting aircraft flying to and from the Casper Mountain fires. Some of the equipment includes single engine air tankers which have been flying in groups of 2 (4 total aircraft) operating from the portable tanker base that was established for the DC-10 and other large air tankers. There are a number of helicopters on site as well to supplement the one that has been flying missions.

Read more:   http://k2radio.com

Goodyear F2G-2 Super Corsair, N5577N: Accident occurred September 07, 2012 in Valley City, North Dakota

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA615
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 07, 2012 in Valley City, ND
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2013
Aircraft: GOODYEAR F2G, registration: N5577N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Witnesses reported that the pilot completed the initial portion of his airshow practice routine without any apparent difficulties. One witness noted that during those maneuvers, the airplane reached altitudes of about 2,000 feet above ground level (agl). The pilot then executed a four-point roll. The witnesses stated that the airplane pitched up and rolled to the left, as if the pilot were entering a barrel roll. However, the airplane only reached an altitude of about 1,000 feet agl during this maneuver. When the airplane was inverted, the roll stopped, and the airplane pitched down toward the ground. One witness noted that vapor trails were visible from the wing tips during the attempted pull out. The airplane subsequently impacted the ground in a nearly level attitude. The airplane was severely fragmented during the accident sequence and the debris field was extensive. No anomalies consistent with preimpact mechanical failure or malfunction were observed during postaccident examination, but the extent of the impact-related damage to the airframe precluded a complete examination of the flight control system. However, witness statements were consistent with the pilot initiating the final aerobatic maneuver from an altitude that did not allow full recovery of the airplane.
Toxicological tests identified ethanol in the pilot’s tissue samples; however, it is likely that the ethanol detected was due to postmortem production.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s decision to initiate the aerobatic maneuver at an altitude that did not allow for full recovery of the airplane before ground impact.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT
On September 7, 2012, about 1755 central daylight time, a Goodyear F2G Corsair, N5577N, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an aerobatic practice routine at the Barnes County Municipal Airport (BAC), Valley City, North Dakota. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air show practice flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from BAC about 1740.

A witness reported that the practice routine proceeded normally. During the final barrel roll, the airplane pitched to about 10 degrees nose up and rolled left until about 10 degrees past inverted, at which point the roll slowed and ultimately stopped. The airplane then pitched down and started to pull through from a vertical nose down attitude. Vapor trails were visible from both wing tips from about 80 degrees to 40 degrees nose down. At this point the airplane was about 100 feet above ground level. The airplane subsequently impacted the ground in about a 10-degree nose down, wings level attitude.

A second witness reported that there appeared to be no issues with the initial part of the practice routine. During most of those maneuvers, the airplane reached altitudes of 2,000 feet to 2,500 feet above ground level (agl). The maneuver immediately before the accident was a four-point roll from east to west, with a turn back toward the east. While heading back toward show center, the airplane pitched up and rolled to the left, as if the pilot was entering a barrel roll. However, during this maneuver, the airplane only climbed to 1,000 feet to 1,200 feet agl. The airplane was inverted at an altitude of about 1,000 feet agl, on a north heading. At that point, the roll stopped and the airplane “pulled through” until it impacted the ground.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION
The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with single- and multi-engine land airplane, single-engine sea airplane, helicopter, and glider ratings. His pilot certificate included type ratings for Cessna 500, Cessna 525, Douglas DC-3, Learjet, and Socata TBM airplanes. He also held pilot and flight instructor authorizations for Chance Vought F4U, Curtis P-40, Mitsubishi A6M, Northrup F-5, North American P-51, North American T-28, Yakovlev Yak-3, and Yakovlev Yak-9 airplanes. His most recent aerobatic competency evaluation (ACE) was completed on December 31, 2012, with an authorization for solo aerobatics. His most recent performance was reportedly on August 26, 1012.

The pilot held a flight instructor certificate with single and multi-engine airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He held a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings, and an inspection authorization. He was issued a second class medical certificate on November 1, 2011, with a restriction for corrective lenses and a waiver for color vision. On the application for that medical certificate, the pilot reported a total flight time of 19,975 hours, with approximately 150 hours within the previous 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
The accident airplane was a restored World War II era fighter airplane. Records indicated that it entered service with the United States Navy in February 1946. It was restored and re-issued an experimental airworthiness certificate for exhibition and air racing purposes in July 2011. Maintenance records indicated that a condition inspection was completed on July 12, 2012. The airplane had accumulated 107.9 hours total time at the time of that inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS
The Jamestown Regional Airport (JMS) Automated Surface Observing System, located 27 miles west of BAC, at 1756 recorded conditions as: wind from 330 degrees at 9 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 18 degrees Celsius, dew point 6 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.12 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION
Initial ground impact was located about 500 feet from the approach threshold of runway 31; about 90 feet southwest of the edge of the runway. The debris path was about 900 feet long by 200 feet wide, and oriented on a south bearing.

The airframe was fragmented during the impact sequence and a postimpact fire ensued. The engine had separated from the airframe. It came to rest in the debris field, about 450 feet from the initial impact point. Three of the four propeller blades had separated near the blade root and were embedded into the ground at the initial impact point. The fourth propeller blade remained attached to the hub, with the hub remaining attached to the engine.

A postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any anomalies consistent with preimpact mechanical failure or malfunction. Damage to the flight control system was consistent with impact forces. However, the extent of the damage to the airframe precluded a complete examination of the flight control system.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION
An autopsy of the pilot was conducted on September 10, 2012, at the North Dakota State Forensic Examiners Office in Bismarck, North Dakota. The pilot’s death was attributed to multiple blunt force injuries sustained in the accident.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute toxicology report noted:
62 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Muscle;
52 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Kidney;
24 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Lung;
No Ethanol detected in Brain;
N-Propanol detected in Kidney;
N-Propanol detected in Muscle.

No drugs in the screening profile were detected in Liver tissue. The report indicated that the tissue samples were putrefied.


 VALLEY CITY, N.D. (AP) — Investigators hope a recovered camera memory card will help them find out what caused an airplane crash that killed a veteran pilot. 

Bob Odegaard died Sept. 7 when he crashed his vintage Super Corsair plane while practicing for a Valley City air show.

His plane had a camera attached. Former North Dakota National Guard commander Mike Haugen says searchers found the camera's memory card Wednesday.

Haugen was a longtime friend of Odegaard's, and he helped to look for the card. He says it's been given to federal investigators.

Haugen says the crash probe will take a long time to finish. He says it will include an autopsy and an analysis of the plane's wreckage.

Odegaard was a longtime pilot and airplane rebuilder who owned an aerial spraying business.


NTSB Identification: CEN12LA615 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 07, 2012 in Valley City, ND
Aircraft: GOODYEAR F2G, registration: N5577N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On September 7, 2012, about 1755 central daylight time, a Goodyear F2G Corsair, N5577N, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an aerobatic practice routine at the Barnes County Municipal Airport (BAC), Valley City, North Dakota. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air show practice flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from BAC prior to the practice routine.

A witness reported that the practice routine proceeded normally. During the final barrel roll, the airplane pitched to about 10 degrees nose up and rolled left until about 10 degrees past inverted, at which point the roll slowed and ultimately stopped. The airplane then pitched down and started to pull through from a vertical nose down attitude. Vapor trails were visible from both wing tips from about 80 degrees to 40 degrees nose down. At this point the airplane was about 100 feet above ground level. The airplane subsequently impacted the ground in about a 10-degree nose down, wings level attitude.

Initial ground impact was located about 500 feet from the approach threshold of runway 31, about 100 feet southwest of the edge of the runway. The debris path was oriented on a southerly bearing and was about 450 feet in length. The airplane was fragmented during the impact sequence and a postimpact fire ensued.

The accident airplane was a restored World War II era fighter airplane. Records indicated that it entered service with the United States Navy in February 1946. It was restored and re-issued an experimental airworthiness certificate for exhibition and air racing purposes in July 2011.


 
Video published on September 6, 2012  
 NOTICE:  AirShow was canceled due to plane crash at airport September 7, 2012.


VALLEY CITY, N.D. (NewsDakota.com) The Barnes County Municipal Airport is open again following the plane crash that killed pilot Bob Odegaard of Kindred.

Barnes County Airport Authority board member Lori Jury says the board will take several weeks to discuss all options concerning what to do with those who purchased advance tickets. She says save your tickets.

Jury says it maybe another two years before another Airshow is scheduled in Valley City. But she stresses, no decisions have been made concerning advance tickets or a future show.

 Barnes County Airport Authority Board Chairman Dennis Helland says anyone with photos of the plane in flight, on the ground or during the crash is asked to submit them to Barnes County Airport officials or the Barnes County Sheriff’s office.

66-year-old Bob Odegaard died after his plane crashed practicing his routine for the Wings & Wheels Airshow on Friday.

A Prayer Service for Odegaard will be held today at 7pm at St. Maurice Catholic Church in Kindred. A Funeral Service will be held Wednesday at the church at 2pm.

Read more:  http://www.newsdakota.com

Goodyear F2G-2 Super Corsair, N5577N

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 5577N        Make/Model: F2G       Description: CORSAIR
  Date: 09/07/2012     Time: 2310

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: VALLEY CITY   State: ND   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED WHILE PRACTICING FOR AN AIRSHOW. VALLEY CITY, ND

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Other      Phase: Maneuver      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: FARGO, ND  (GL21)                     Entry date: 09/10/2012 

Danger of turbulence remains safety threat to air travel

Frequent business traveler Allen Crockett learned a painful lesson about how wind turbulence can jolt even big airline jets.

He bolted for the lavatory before landing during what had been a calm American Airlines flight from Chicago to Raleigh, N.C., in 2006. But the MD-80 suddenly lurched violently, banging Crockett's left knee against the toilet bowl to partially tear a ligament and his right hand against molding to rupture a tendon.

"Two surgeries later they still hurt," says Crockett, 50, a wireless sales executive from Clayton, N.C., who flies 125,000 miles a year.

Read more: http://travel.usatoday.com

FAA: Falling Frozen Waste From Plane Possibly Caused Holes In Long Island Roofs - Homeowners Disgusted At The Notion Of 'Blue Ice' Causing Expensive Damage


VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — The Federal Aviation Administration is now looking into why two homes on Long Island have gaping hole in their roofs. The homeowners suspect something fell from an overhead airplane — and what it may have been has them disgusted. 

The hole in the roof of one Valley Stream home could fit a basketball. Something tore through the shingles, plywood and insulation at 3:30 a.m. Sunday, CBS 2′s Carolyn Gusoff reported exclusively.

Read more:   http://newyork.cbslocal.com

Emergency landing at West Kootenay Regional Airport, Castlegar, British Columbia

A private, twin-engine aircraft is safely on the ground, along with its two passengers, after what must have been a frightening ordeal this morning at the West Kootenay Regional Airport.

Fire Chief (and airport manager) Gerry Rempel said emergency crews got a call at 9:33 a.m. indicating a local plane was having difficulty.

"We had an aircraft with a landing gear indicator issue inbound to Castlegar," he said. "They called the fire department, and we also requested ambulance and RCMP to attend."

Read more: http://thenelsondaily.com

Do you know of any schools making field trips to the Reno air races?

Do you know of any schools taking field trips to the Reno air races this year?  If so, we'd like to hear about it.  Please send details to online@rgj.com.

Source:   http://www.rgj.com

BA's first A380

G-XLEA serial number 095 British Airways:  http://farm9.staticflickr.com

More A380's at Toulouse, France:
http://www.flickr.com/photos 



75th anniversary Air Canada!




(Hat tip to Rob "Biz Jets"!)

Cessna 150G C-FVXY and Cessna 150L C-GZUB Dewdney, British Columbia, February 09, 2011

Midair collision Cessna 150G C-FVXY and Cessna 150L C-GZUB

Dewdney, British Columbia
09 February 2011

Aviation Investigation Report A11P0027:  http://www.tsb.gc.ca


Pilot David Simpson cleared of Africa massacre hopes to go back

When light aircraft pilot David Simpson came across the bodies in remote bushland in the Central African Republic, his first instinct was to call the police.

But that decision led to him being jailed on suspicion of being involved in the massacre.

It took the authorities nearly six months to clear him of all the charges. Mr Simpson, who's from North Yorkshire, claimed to BBC Breakfast that he was told his release could be secured in exchange for a bribe.

Watch video:   http://www.bbc.co.uk

Extract from Lord Ashcroft's 'Heroes of the Skies'

The Zeppelin-slayer; the 'wing-walker'; the helicopter pilot who thwarted the IRA... In this extract from his major new book, Lord Ashcroft salutes Britain's greatest airmen  

It was Leonardo da Vinci who said: “When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.” Mark Twain wrote: “The air up there in the clouds is very pure and fine, bracing and delicious. And why shouldn’t it be? It is the same the angels breathe.” While Sir Walter Raleigh, the official historian of the RAF (rather than his Elizabethan namesake), said: “The engine is the heart of an aeroplane, but the pilot is its soul.”

Read more here:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Passengers forced off flight after threat at San Antonio International Airport (KSAT), Texas

SAN ANTONIO -- Passengers on board a Southwest Airlines flight were hustled off the Boeing 737 Monday evening after a non-specific threat was reported to the Transportation Security Administration, according to San Antonio Airport officials.

 Video from Chopper 5 in HD showed passengers waiting outside the aircraft and rows of luggage behind the plane.

The flight, which originated from Baltimore, was later cleared of any threat, and passengers reboarded for a flight to Dallas.

Read more:   http://www.kens5.com

Robinson R22 Beta, N281RG: Accident occurred September 10, 2012 in Houston, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA621
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 10, 2012 in Houston, TX
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22 BETA, registration: N281RG
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On September 10, 2012, at 1545 central daylight time, N281RG, a Robinson R22 Beta, was substantially damaged when it impacted a dirt service road in a steel pipe storage yard in Houston, Texas. The commercial pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Helicopter Services, Incorporated, Spring, Texas. No flight plan was filed for the aerial photo flight that departed Baytown Airport (HPY), Baytown, Texas, approximately 1345. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that was conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91.

The helicopter departed David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (DWH), Houston, Texas, about 1300, and flew to Baytown where the pilot purchased 22.9 gallons of fuel at 1329. Around 1345, the pilot and the passenger departed and were observed about two hours later by several witnesses maneuvering over the steel pipe yard in south-east Houston.

A witness was driving west on Highway 90 toward the beltway when he first observed the helicopter. He said it was about a mile away and at first he thought it was a remote controlled helicopter. The witness said the helicopter was “way up there” and estimated that is was approximately 400-500 feet above the ground. The helicopter was spinning slowly around the main rotor shaft and was descending straight down vertically about 70-80 miles per hour. There was no smoke or parts coming off the helicopter as it descended. The main rotor blades were turning "slower than expected" and were not deflected upwards. The tail rotor did not appear to be turning. The helicopter then impacted the ground resulting in a large dust cloud. The witness stopped his vehicle and proceeded to run towards to the helicopter. After he negotiated a chain link fence, he and another witness used fire extinguishers to contain the post-impact fire until the fire department arrived.

Another witness was driving east on Highway 90 toward the Beltway when he first observed the helicopter about a mile away. It was 70 to 100 feet-above the ground and was slowly spinning counter clockwise around the main rotor shaft and was in a slow vertical descent. It seemed like it was in “slow-motion.” When the helicopter was approximately 40 to 50 feet above the ground, its descent rate increased rapidly before it impacted the ground. The witness thought the pilot was trying to land and he did not observe any smoke coming from the helicopter. He noted that the main rotor blades were turning “pretty slow” and it seemed “like he lost power.” The body of the helicopter was level and the main rotor blades were not deflected upwards. The witness could not hear the helicopter prior to the impact, which occurred just as he was stepping out of his vehicle. After the impact, he observed a large dust plume as he was running to the steel yard. As he was trying to crawl under a chain link fence he saw a fireball coming from the helicopter. He and another responder used fire extinguishers to contain the post-impact fire until the fire department arrived.

The helicopter came to rest upright on a heading of 195 degrees magnetic on a dirt road located in the steel pipe storage yard. The entire helicopter was accounted for at the site and the fuselage was consumed by post-impact fire. The skids were spread and level with the belly of the fuselage. The body of the helicopter was listed to the right. The helicopter was moved to a secure storage facility for further examination.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate for rotorcraft-helicopter. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) First Class medical was issued on December 16, 2011. The pilot had applied to attend the Robinson Pilot Safety Course a week before the accident. According to his application, he reported a total of 740 hours, of which 600 hours were in the R22B.

Weather reported at Ellington Field (EFD), Houston, Texas, approximately 16 miles southwest of the accident site, at 1550, was wind 130 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 8,000 feet, temperature 93 degrees F, dewpoint 62 degrees F, and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches HG.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 281RG        Make/Model: R22       Description: R-22
  Date: 09/10/2012     Time: 2100

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: HOUSTON   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. HOUSTON, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   2     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: HOUSTON, TX  (SW09)                   Entry date: 09/11/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N281RG

HOUSTON— Two people were killed Monday after a helicopter crashed in northeast Harris County, Harris County Sheriff’s Department said.

It happened at about 3:30 p.m. just feet from Highway 90. The R-22 Robinson Helicopter was heading to Hooks Airport from Baytown when witnesses said it went into a tailspin and crashed to the ground.

The helicopter exploded shortly after impact, killing the male pilot and his female passenger.

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