Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Man arrested for throwing unlit lighter at jet fuel storage tank: Orion Flight Services at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin

A Milwaukee man was arrested Tuesday afternoon after he threw an unlit lighter a storage tank containing jet fuel on the airport grounds.

Oshkosh Police received a report from a witness who saw the 49-year-old man throw an object at a fuel storage tank at Orion Flight Services, 525 W. 20th Ave., at 3 p.m. Tuesday. Police found the man, who was intoxicated, outside the Wittman Regional Airport terminal. A cigarette lighter was found by the fuel storage tanks, said Joe Nichols, spokesman for the Oshkosh Police Department.

No damage was done to the tanks and no fuel was exposed to the lighter, Nichols said.

Police said they didn’t believe it was a public safety issue since the lighter was not lit when the man threw it.

The man was arrested for disorderly conduct and taken to the Winnebago County Jail, where a no bond condition was placed on him.

http://www.thenorthwestern.com

Settlement reached in F-22 Raptor crash that killed Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson pilot

In March, defense contractors were sued by the widow of award-winning Air Force pilot Capt. Jeff Haney, who died in a crash in the Alaska wilderness in November 2010, after the oxygen system in his F-22 Raptor malfunctioned during a training flight from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

Anna Haney named Lockheed Martin, Boeing Co., Honeywell and Pratt & Whitney, the jet's primary contractors, in the suit. She claimed Lockheed knowingly sold the U.S. Air Force "dangerous and defective" planes.

This week, a settlement has been reached between Haney and the named parties, the Air Force Times reports. The amount of the settlement is unknown. A record of the proceedings has been sealed, and John Gagliano, Haney’s attorney, could not provide any details, although he did confirm that a settlement was reached.

The F-22 Raptor has been criticized over ongoing concerns that the plane’s oxygen system causes pilots to experience symptoms of hypoxia, a form of oxygen deprivation, while in flight. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta blamed the problem on a pressurized vest pilots wear, which has in some cases inflated “before it should," making breathing difficult. Panetta said the early inflation is due to a faulty valve, and pilots have been ordered not to wear the vests until the valves have been switched out.

A hearing to approve the settlement is scheduled for September.

Read more, here.

http://www.alaskadispatch.com

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N4001Z: Aircraft crashed on landing, near Surprise Glacier, Farewell, Alaska

ANCHORAGE, Alaska— A plane crash near Healy Wednesday in which one person suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries is being responded to by Alaska State Troopers, the Alaska Air National Guard and the National Transportation Safety Board. 

 Alaska National Guard spokesperson Maj. Guy Hayes says the crash occurred above the Surprise Glacier, about 181 miles southwest of Fairbanks. 

Guardsmen were alerted by troopers after someone reported the incident from a satellite phone. 

The crash reportedly involved a pilot who was picking up a hunter and crashed on landing.

The pilot may have a broken arm and leg. 

The 11th Air Force's Rescue Coordination Center is sending an HC-130 search plane and an HH-60 Pavehawk helicopter to rescue the pilot and hunter.

Please check KTUU.com and the Channel 2 newscasts for updates.

http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=4001Z

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 4001Z        Make/Model: PA18      Description: PA-18 Super Cub (L-18C, L-21, U-7)
  Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 2230

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: FAREWELL   State: AK   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON LANDING, NEAR SURPRISE GLACIER, FAREWELL, AK

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: FAIRBANKS, AK  (AL01)                 Entry date: 08/16/2012 

Cirrus SR20-G3: Flying start for charity - Lance Weller of Angel Flight NZ

 
Lance Weller of Angel Flight.


The founder of a Northland non-emergency air ambulance service has flown his first flight for the charity. 

 Lance Weller, 64, founder of Angel Flight NZ (AFNZ) flew the service's seventh and eighth mission last week.

His flight involved flying from his base in Whangarei to Kaitaia, where he collected 11-year-old Kauri Potaka and his mother, Sylvia.

They left Kaitaia at 9.30am and landed at Whenuapai Air base in Auckland at 10.25am, where an "Earth Angel" drove the boy and his mother to Middlemore Hospital.

Kauri had an appointment with a surgeon to review his progress after five cleft palate operations. Mr Weller said it would not have been possible for the mother to be back with her six other children the same day without the free Angel Flight.

He said it would have taken them three to four days on the Hospital Shuttle bus, which would have resulted in Kauri missing another three days of school.

Mr Weller said the flight was enjoyed by all. "Kauri hadn't been in a plane before," he said.

"He sat next to next to me. I said 'well, Kauri you can help me fly this thing down there'.

"As an 11-year-old boy, his eyes were everywhere, it was pretty exciting for him."

Mr Weller said coincidentally it was his first landing at Whenuapai. The first time he flew in an aircraft was when he was an 11-year-old in a DC3.

The AFNZ service began when Mr Weller returned to New Zealand after spending 43 years living abroad.

The retired businessman was most recently in Australia where he flew for Angel Flights there. "When I came back over here, I wanted to keep doing it but it didn't exist, so I put the money in and set it up."

Mr Weller estimated he has spent at least $13,000 setting up the charity.

Not wanting to leave his beloved Cirrus SR20-G3 plane behind, Mr Waller flew the single-engine plane across the Tasman, stopping at Lord Howe and Norfolk islands on the way.

The day he arrived, January 16 was the day AFNZ was officially established in New Zealand.

AFNZ now has 25 volunteer pilots and aircraft spread throughout the country ranging from the North Shore airfield, Ardmore, Hamilton, Wellington to Nelson and Christchurch.

As support for the charity grows, Mr Weller plans to have planes on hand in Dunedin, Invercargill, New Plymouth and Gisborne.

Also involved in the AFNZ team are 22 Earth Angels and four mission co-ordinators.

AFNZ pilots have flown 1680 nautical miles and Earth Angels have driven 622km.


Story and photo:  http://www.northernadvocate.co.nz

Related:  



  • Angel Flight is soaring now
  • Third time lucky for Angel Flight
  • TravelNevada.com Reno National Championship Air Races and Air Show Presented by Breitling

     
    John Bagley displays his P-51 in this file photo. / Marilyn Newton/RGJ


    Reno air races get a new name; 'it's a mouthful' ...  

    The new official name of the air races is “TravelNevada.com Reno National Championship Air Races and Air Show Presented by Breitling.” 

    The Nevada Commission on Tourism unanimously approved the name today as part of its three-year, $600,000 title sponsorship of the longtime event that was marred last year by a fatal crash.

    Breitling, a watch company, is a presenting sponsor with a $200,000 commitment.

    The new name prompted concern from commissioner Ryan Sheltra, general manager of the Bonanza Casino in Reno, who said, “Twelve words and a ‘dot.com,’ it seems like an awful lot. Try to make it all sit on a T-shirt.”

    But Chris Baum, CEO of the Reno-Sparks Convention & Visitors Authority, said the lengthy name is essentially an on-paper reference only.

    “People will shorten it to what’s comfortable with them,” he said. “They’ll still call it the Reno Air Races. Yes, it’s a mouthful, but not what people expect to say in normal conversation.”

    Added Mike Houghton, Air Races CEO/president, “It can play very effectively to all of us.”

    The $600,000, to be paid in full this year, is seen as crucial to the Reno Air Racing Association’s efforts to keep the event going after the plane crash a year ago that killed 11 people, including Pilot Jimmy Leeward, and injured more than 70.

    http://www.rgj.com

    Brown Mitch CHALLENGER II, N167MB: Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Dexter, Missouri

    NTSB Identification: CEN12CA555 
    14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
    Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Dexter, MO
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
    Aircraft: BROWN MITCH CHALLENGER II, registration: N167MB
    Injuries: 1 Minor.

    NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

    The noncertificated pilot reported that he was flying the experimental airplane between 50 and 300 feet above ground level. The airplane’s front landing gear hit a power line wire, which resulted in the airplane impacting the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The pilot reported that he did not see the power lines crossing the field and that there was no mechanical malfunction of the airplane prior to the wire strike.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
    The operation of an airplane by a noncertificated pilot and his failure to maintain clearance from power lines during low-level flight.

    The pilot reported that he was flying the experimental airplane between 50 to 300 feet above ground level. The airplane’s front landing gear hit a power line wire which resulted in the airplane impacting the terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The pilot reported that he did not see the power lines crossing the field, and that there was no mechanical malfunction of the airplane prior to the wire strike.


    IDENTIFICATION
      Regis#: 167MB        Make/Model: EXP       Description: EXP- CHALLENGER II
      Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1300
    
      Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
      Damage: Substantial
    
    LOCATION
      City: FISK   State: MO   Country: US
    
    DESCRIPTION
      AIRCRAFT STRUCK POWER LINES WHILE IN FLIGHT. FISK, MO
    
    INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                     # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                     # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                     # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
    
    
    OTHER DATA
      Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Cruise      Operation: OTHER
    
    
      FAA FSDO: ST. LOUIS, MO  (CE03)                 Entry date: 08/17/2012 
    

    http://registry.faa.gov/N167MB

     
    (Source: cNews)

    (Source: Cassandra Jones from Fisk, MO)

     (Source: cNews)



    FISK, MO (KFVS)- An ultralight plane clipped some power lines and crashed near Fisk Wednesday morning.

    Trooper Clark Parrott with the Missouri Highway Patrol says it happened between 7 and 7:30 a.m.

    Parrott says the pilot, 58-year-old Russell D. Collins, of Mountain Home, Arkansas, was not injured.

    http://www.kfvs12.com

    Piper PA-38-112, N2572D: Aircraft force landed in a field, near Mason City, Iowa

    http://registry.faa.gov/N2572D

      
    http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N2572D

    MANLY — A student pilot and flight instructor, both from Iowa, suffered minor injuries Wednesday when they were forced to make an emergency landing in a seed corn field near Manly. 

     According to Cerro Gordo County Sheriff Kevin Pals, pilot Geoffrey Tayner, 27, Johnston and instructor Tom Ballard, 65, Granger, were flying around North Iowa and Minnesota as part of Tayner’s instrument training when engine trouble forced the plane down around 12:30 p.m.

    The field is located one mile east of Highway 65, just south of the Worth-Cerro Gordo County line.

    “It’s a miracle. And they were thankful to be alive,” Pals said.

    The two-seater Piper Tomahawk is owned by Tayner.

    The field is owned by Steve Smith, according to Pals.

    Tayner and Ballard declined comment at the scene Wednesday.

    They did not require hospitalization.

    The Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted by authorities, Pals said.

    The exact cause of the crash remains under investigation.


    http://globegazette.com



     A student pilot and instructor from the Des Moines area escaped injury when their single-engine Piper Tomahawk airplane crash into a farm field just south of the Cerro Gordo and Worth County line west of Plymouth at about 12:30 this afternoon.

    Cerro Gordo County Sheriff Kevin Pals says they were called to the crash in a seed corn field farmed by Steve Smith.

    He says it was a small single-engine aircraft was occupied by a flight instructor and a student that experienced engine trouble in the area and chose the field to land their plane. Pals says they were lucky to crash in a rural area.

    “They were were trying to make it to the airport but they didn’t have enough height, well the engine quit so they didn’t have any choice but to put it down,” Pals says.

    He says it was the “best case scenario” that they walked away with just a few minor bumps and scrapes. The pilot and instructor, were identified as 65-year-old Tom Ballard of Granger and 27-year-old Geoffrey Tayner of Johnston.

    Both refused to make comments about the crash at the scene.


    PLYMOUTH, Iowa – A flight instructor and student from Des Moines emergency land their plane in a north Iowa field after their engine fails mid-flight.

    The call came in before 1 p.m. Wednesday. The Cerro Gordo County Sheriff says 65-year-old Tom Ballard of Granger, and 27-year-old Geoffrey Tayner of Johnston, were attempting to fly to the Mason City Municipal Airport. However the engine failed. The pair emergency landed about eight miles northeast of the airport.

    The sheriff says thankfully neither person was seriously hurt.

    “Just some scrapes on their legs both walked away both in very good spirits and signed off medically with Mason City fire medics,” said Sheriff Kevin Pals.

    The sheriff’s office now turns the investigation over to the Federal Aviation Administration which is standard procedure in a case like this.

    Plane Makes Emergency Landing


    IDENTIFICATION
      Regis#: 2572D        Make/Model: PA38      Description: PA-38 Tomahawk
      Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1740
    
      Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
      Damage: Destroyed
    
    LOCATION
      City: MASON CITY   State: IA   Country: US
    
    DESCRIPTION
      AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR MASON CITY, IA
    
    INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                     # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                     # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                     # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
    
    
    OTHER DATA
      Activity: Training      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER
    
    
      FAA FSDO: DES MOINES, IA  (CE01)                Entry date: 08/16/2012 




    Photo Courtesy:  Shane Delaney


    Grumman G-164B Ag Cat, Vincent Flying Service Inc., N36289: Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Kaplan, Louisiana

    http://registry.faa.gov/N36289

    NTSB Identification: CEN12CA544
    14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
    Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Kaplan, LA
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
    Aircraft: Schweizer, N36289 G-164B, registration: N36289
    Injuries: 1 Serious.

    NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

    The pilot was conducting an aerial application flight at the time of the accident. During the spray application, the airplane struck a power line. The airplane nosed over and impacted the ground. A postaccident examination of the wreckage found no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
    The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from power lines during the aerial application flight.

    According to the operator's accident report, the pilot was conducting an aerial application flight on a field about 3-1/2 miles from the airstrip. He had previously dispersed 4 loads of fertilizer on the field. During the application of the fifth load, the airplane struck an 80 to 90 foot-tall power line. The airplane nosed over and impacted the ground. The pilot was seriously injured and the airplane was substantially damaged.

    Photographs taken at the accident site revealed no markers on the power line. An FAA inspector found no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal aircraft operation.





    KAPLAN — According to Vermilion Parish Sheriff Mike Couvillon, Gary Noel of Abbeville, who was flying the crop duster, has been airlifted to a local hospital with serious injuries, following a plane crash in the Northwestern portion of Vermilion Parish.

    Sheriff Couvillon says that the Sheriff’s Office received a call from 911 at approximately 11:41 a.m. and says that the plane went down in a field located at the intersection of Wildflower Road and Ward Road in the community of LeLeux.

    Sheriff Couvillon says that the pilot was responsive when deputies and medical personnel arrived on scene, and indicated that his plane clipped a power line in the field causing the plane to crash.

    Sheriff Couvillon further stated that the Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted, to conduct an investigation as to the cause of the plane crash.

    According to witnesses the plane that went down north of Kaplan did hit power lines. According to SLEMCO, 1,500 people are without power in Vermilion Parish from the Lyons Point substation. SLEMCO does not know how long power will be out but they are working to repair the damage.


    ABBEVILLE, La. — The pilot of a crop duster has been seriously injured when his plane went down in a field in the northwestern part of Vermilion Parish.

    Sheriff Mike Couvilon said his office received a call about 11:41 a.m. Wednesday about a plane crash in a field at the intersection of Wildflower Road and Ward Road in the community of LeLeux.

    Couvilon says the pilot was responsive when deputies and emergency medical personnel arrived. The sheriff says the pilot indicated his plane clipped a power line in the field, causing the crash.

    Couvilon says the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and will conduct its own investigation into the crash.

    Beechcraft A36TC Bonanza 36, N800G LLC, N678DR: Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, New York

    ALBANY — The family of a developer killed in a private plane crash in Clifton Park in 2012 is suing the company he owned and the owners of the aircraft for $10 million. 

    The children of the late Walter Uccellini are suing The United Group of Companies Inc., the company that Uccellini founded, as well as the Albany-based Hildt Aviation and several other defendants, according to a summons filed Aug. 14 in state Supreme Court in Albany.

    At the time of his death on Aug. 15, 2012, Uccellini , 67, was the president of the The United Group. The vice-president, fellow developer James Quinn, 68, who was piloting the plane, died from his injuries two weeks after the crash.

    The single-engine Beechcraft, headed for Plattsburgh, crashed shortly after takeoff from Albany International Airport at 7:27 a.m.

    Last year, the National Transportation Safety Board determined the probable cause of the crash to be "total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during the post-accident investigation and testing."

    The NTSB also said a corroded magneto found in the wreckage could have contributed to "a partial loss of power and/or perceived rough engine operation."

    Uccellini's son and daughter, Michael J. Uccellini and Jessica F. Steffensen, executors of his estate, are suing for negligence that they allege caused personal injury and wrongful death to Uccellini. The summons alleges Quinn was negligent and that the plane had negligent servicing and maintenance.

    The suit was filed by attorney John P. Calareso, who could not be reached Friday.

    The defendants could not be immediately reached.


    - Source:  http://www.timesunion.com

    NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
    14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
    Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/13/2013
    Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
    Injuries: 2 Fatal.

    NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

    The pilot and passenger were departing on an instrument flight rules business flight. During the initial climb, at an altitude of about 800 feet above the ground, the pilot advised air traffic control that the airplane had lost engine power. The pilot subsequently performed a forced landing; however, the airplane struck several trees about 1,000 feet short of an open field. Examination of the airframe revealed no deficiencies of the fuel or fuel system, and a test run of the engine showed that it was capable of producing power. However, during the test run, the right magneto was found to be non-functional, and further disassembly of the component revealed that its contact points were corroded. Once the corrosion was cleaned away, the magneto functioned normally on a test bench.

    The investigation was unable to determine a definitive cause for the reported total loss of engine power, although a non-functional right magneto could result in a partial loss of power and/or perceived rough engine operation. According to the airframe manufacturer’s procedure for a loss of engine power immediately after liftoff, the auxiliary fuel pump should only be placed in the “HI” position in the event of an engine-driven fuel pump failure. With the engine-driven fuel pump operating, the engine would “run rich and may quit depending on throttle setting, temperature and altitude.” Due to the extent of the damage surrounding the auxiliary fuel pump switch, its preimpact position could not be determined.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
    A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during the postaccident investigation and testing.

    On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The business flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

    Review of air traffic control (ATC) information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot contacted ATC about 0720 and requested clearance to taxi for departure. The controller initially advised the pilot to taxi to runway 1 via taxiway D and A. The pilot subsequently advised the controller that he could accept an intersection departure from runway 1 at D, and was subsequently issued that clearance. At 0722, the pilot requested to depart from runway 1 at D, but was advised that there would be a 3 minute delay due to wake turbulence from a previously departed Boeing 737. The pilot then requested to “waive” the delay, and was issued a takeoff clearance about 1 minute later. In addition to a warning of wake turbulence, the pilot was issued a departure heading of 040 degrees.

    The airplane departed from runway 1 at 0724, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised ATC, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the pilot, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

    PERSONNEL INFORMATION

    The pilot, age 68, held an airline transport pilot certificate with numerous ratings, including airplane single engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with numerous ratings including airplane single engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012 with the limitation, “must have available glasses for near vision.” A review of the pilot’s flight logs showed that he had accumulated 11,008 total hours of flight experience, 1,110 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model. During the 90 days preceding the accident, the pilot had accumulated 143 hours of flight experience, 34 hours of which were in the accident airplane.

    According to the pilot’s son, the pilot was a friend of the accident airplane’s owners, and was allowed to utilize the airplane anytime he needed. He further described that the pilot flew very often, and had previously flown many people in the accident airplane. While the passenger did hold a pilot certificate, he had not flown a great deal in the recent past. The purpose of the flight was for the pilot and passenger to attend a business meeting in Plattsburg, New York.

    AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

    According to airworthiness records maintained by the FAA, the airplane was manufactured in 1981 and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520-UB turbo-supercharged, fuel injected engine. Review of maintenance records showed that a factory rebuilt engine was installed on the airplane in May 1996, at an aircraft total time of 1,591 flight hours. The airplane’s most recent annual inspection was completed on October 15, 2011 at 3,190 total aircraft hours. At the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated 3,364 total flight hours, and the engine had accumulated 1,773 total flight hours since its installation.

    AIRPORT INFORMATION

    The ALB airport was comprised of two intersecting runways oriented in a 1/19 and 10/28 configuration, at an elevation of 285 feet. Runway 1 was 8,500 feet long by 150 feet wide. Taxiway A ran parallel to runway 1 and was located to the west of the runway. Taxiway D intersected runway 1 about 3,250 feet beyond the runway approach threshold. From that intersection, about 5,250 feet of runway was available for a departure.

    The airplane was most recently serviced with 85 gallons of 100LL fuel by a fixed base operator at ALB on the day preceding the accident. Following the accident, a fuel quality assurance review was conducted by the fixed based operator, and no deficiencies were noted during the inspection.

    METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

    The 0753 weather observation at ALB included calm winds, 10 statute miles visibility with patches of fog present to the west and southwest, few clouds at 100 feet, scattered clouds at 8,000 feet, a broken ceiling at 13,000 feet, and a broken ceiling at 25,000 feet. The temperature was 19 degrees Celsius (C), the dew point was 18 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.90 inches of mercury.

    FLIGHT RECORDERS

    The airplane was not equipped with any flight data recording devices, nor was it required to be; however, a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) receiver was recovered from the wreckage, and found to contain data pertaining to the accident flight. The initial data point was recorded at 0721, as the airplane taxied toward runway 1 at ALB via taxiway D. The airplane subsequently taxied onto runway 1 at 0723, at the point where the runway intersected taxiway D.

    The airplane accelerated down the runway and began climbing at 0724:26, and 8 seconds later had climbed to a GPS-derived altitude of 341 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 88 knots. At that point, the airplane began a right turn about 1,600 feet prior to reaching the runway departure end. The airplane continued to climb while on an approximate 40-degree magnetic track. At 0725:50, the airplane reached a maximum altitude of 1,115 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 111 knots, about 2 nautical miles northeast of the runway 1 departure end.

    Over the next 30 seconds, the airplane turned about 90 degrees left as it descended and slowed. By 0726:24, the airplane had established a heading of 305 degrees, descended to 627 feet, and slowed to a GPS groundspeed of 85 knots. About 25 seconds later, the airplane’s final position was recorded at an altitude of 302 feet and a GPS groundspeed of 76 knots.

    A plot of the airplane’s position for the final moments of the flight showed that an open field about 1,000 feet long, and aligned with the airplane’s final approach path, was located about 1,000 feet west of its final GPS-recorded position. Additionally, a two-lane asphalt road paralleled the airplane’s final approach path; however utility wires paralleled and crossed the road at numerous points in the vicinity of the accident site.

    WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

    The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB, at an elevation of 260 feet. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by several damaged tree limbs, at a height of about 30 feet, and was located about 45 feet west of the airplane’s final GPS-recorded position. The wreckage path about was about 150 feet long, and oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic. A ground scar, along with the outboard portion of the right wing and aileron, were located about 95 feet beyond the IIP, along the wreckage path. The main portion of the wreckage consisted of the fuselage and inboard portions of both wings, and was located about 45 feet from the ground scar. The fuselage remained upright, and was oriented on a 280-degree magnetic heading. The outboard portion of the left wing was located about 10 feet beyond the main wreckage.

    The left wing remained attached to the fuselage by all four of its attachment bolts. The outboard portion of the wing separated in the vicinity of the landing gear, and the left main landing gear remained stowed in its well. The right wing also remained attached to the fuselage by its attachment bolts, with the outboard portion separating near the outer portion of the flap. The right main landing gear remained stowed within its well. The landing gear actuator was in the retracted position.

    Control continuity was confirmed from the control column to the elevator and left aileron, and through a fracture of the right aileron bellcrank to the right aileron, and rudder control continuity was confirmed from both rudder pedals to the rudder. Measurement of the left and right elevator trim tab actuators revealed extensions corresponding to a 10-degree tab-down position (nose up trim). Measurement of both flap actuator rods corresponded to a flaps retracted position.

    The fuel selector was found in the left tank position. Examination of the fuel system revealed that it remained continuous from the firewall, through the selector valve, to both fuel tanks, with no breaches or obstructions noted. Residual fuel was observed in both main and both auxiliary wingtip fuel tanks. The color and odor of the fuel appeared consistent with 100LL aviation fuel, and all samples taken were absent of water or debris. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was found in the HIGH position, though the structure surrounding the switch was deformed consistent with impact.

    The pilot and copilot seats remained attached to the seat rails with no deformation noted. The mounting points and buckles for both the pilot and copilot restraints appeared intact and undamaged, and first responders reported that the pilot and passenger were wearing both lap and shoulder restraints upon arriving at the accident scene.

    The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.

    The engine was separated from the airframe and shipped to the manufacturer for a test run. The impact-related damage was generally concentrated near the aft portion of the engine. The induction system riser to the number one cylinder, the induction system “Y” pipe, and oil cooler, along with several fuel system fittings, were replaced to facilitate the test run. During preparation for the test run, a red clay/dirt-like substance was found at an impact-damaged port of the fuel metering unit. The fuel manifold valve screen, located downstream of the fuel metering unit within the fuel system, was examined and found to be absent of debris or contamination.

    The engine was subsequently placed in a test cell and started normally on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling. The engine rpm was advanced in steps to 1,200, 1,600, and 2,450 rpm for a period of 5 minutes per step to allow for warm-up. The throttle was then advanced to full power for 5 minutes before the throttle was rapidly advanced from idle to full power 6 times. The engine performed normally throughout each of the tests without any hesitation, stumbling, or interruption of power; however, testing of the magnetos showed that the right magneto was inoperative.

    Following the test run, the right magneto was removed from the engine and examined. The points of the magneto exhibited corrosion. The corrosion was subsequently cleaned from the points, and the magneto was then run on a test stand. The magneto operated normally, and further disassembly revealed no anomalies.

    MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

    The pilot sustained serious injuries during the accident and subsequently succumbed to those injuries on August 28, 2013. An autopsy and toxicological testing were not performed.

    ADDITONAL INFORMATION

    The airframe manufacturer published an emergency procedure detailing the actions pilots should take following a loss of engine power immediately after lift-off. After eliminating the possibility of fuel exhaustion, the procedure advised the pilot:

    “2. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – LOW If a Failed Engine-Driven Fuel Pump is Suspected (Indicated by zero fuel flow):

    3. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – HI”

    A warning was noted below that stated:

    “The only reason for the high (HI) boost position is to supply fuel for priming prior to starting and to supply fuel to the engine if the engine-driven fuel pump fails. DO NOT USE THIS POSITION FOR ANY OTHER REASON. If high (HI) boost is selected when the engine-driven pump is operating, the engine will run rich and may quit depending on throttle setting, temperature and altitude.”

    The checklist advised that if an ignition problem was suspected, the pilot should verify that the magnetos were selected to the “BOTH” position.

    The first step of the procedure for a rough running engine immediately after lift-off stated, “Ensure auxiliary fuel pump is not on HI.”


    NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
    14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
    Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
    Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
    Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

    This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

    On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot was seriously injured, and the certificated commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

    Review of preliminary air traffic control information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the airplane departed from runway 01 at ALB, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised air traffic control, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the flight, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

    According to FAA records, the left seat pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012, at which time he reported 10,691 total hours of flight experience. The pilot seated in the right seat held a commercial pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on December 20, 2011.

    The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB. The initial impact point was identified by several damaged tree limbs, and a wreckage path about 150 feet in length, oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic, extended through the impact area. Fragments of the airplane, including portions of right wing, right wing tip fuel tank, and ailerons were located approximately 40 feet prior to where the fuselage came to rest between two pine trees. The left wing was located approximately 20 feet beyond the fuselage along the wreckage path. The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.

     Watch the NTSB press conference in its entirety

    CLIFTON PARK, N.Y. -- "So there's one of the wings," said Waterford resident Matthew Rushkowski. "Where's the other one?" 

     A steady stream of curious onlookers made their way to Van Vranken Road in the hamlet of Vischer Ferry to see the wreckage from the deadly plane crash that killed prominent businessman Walter Uccellini and left his second in command, James Quinn, critically injured. Most were looking for answers as well.

    "It's not every day you have a plane crash in Clifton Park. It's just...I mean, it's not every day you hear of a plane crash," Rushkowski said.

    Family members of the victims were also at the crash site, seeking closure. NTSB investigators are still combing the scene for clues.

    "We have recovered three pieces of electronic equipment, electronic devices that were either handheld in nature or installed in the airplane that we hope may contain recorded data," said NTSB Air Safety Investigator Dennis Diaz.

    Quinn was named as the pilot of the Beechcraft that took off from Albany International Airport Wednesday morning for an ill-fated trip to Plattsburgh. Officials said both Uccellini and Quinn were certified as pilots. Complicating the investigation was that the plane was equipped with dual controls where both men were seated.

    Diaz said, "It can be sometimes difficult to make an exact determination of who may have been flying the plane at any one particular point."

    Though engine trouble was initially reported, NTSB officials said naming a cause will take some time. A preliminary report will be issued in 5 to 10 days. In 9 to 12 months they will release a factual report which will contain all the information they've gathered throughout the investigation. About three months after that, a probable cause will be named.

    Watch Video:   http://hudsonvalley.ynn.com



    National Transportation Safety Board to hold press conference on plane crash 

    REXFORD, N.Y. -- The National Transportation Safety Board will hold a press conference today to discuss the plane crash in Saratoga County that killed one man and left another critically injured.

    The single engine plane had taken off from Albany International Airport shortly before 7:30 a.m. Wednesday and was headed for Plattsburgh. Just a few minutes after takeoff, the pilot reported engine problems and went down off Van Vranken Road in the hamlet of Vischer Ferry.

    The passenger, Walter Uccellini, 67, died in the crash. The pilot, James Quinn, 68, was taken to Albany Medical Center and is in critical condition.

    The 3 p.m. press conference will be held at the Vischer Ferry Volunteer Fire Company in Rexford and will be led by NTSB. Other local officials who responded to the scene will also be at the press conference.  









      
     
    Walter Uccellini, a private pilot, reportedly wasn’t at the controls Wednesday when the single-engine plane apparently tried to make an emergency landing in Clifton Park after experiencing engine trouble after taking off from the Albany International Airport. The pilot, Jim Quinn of Westerlo, a business associate, was seriously injured.

     Jim Quinn was piloting a Beechcraft Bonanza six-seater when the plane crashed in Clifton Park on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012. The plane took off from Albany International Airport a few minutes earlier. Walter Uccellini, a Troy-based real estate developer, was killed in the crash. Quinn who was vice chairman of Uccellini's firm, the United Group, was critically injured. (The United Group) 

     Investigators at the scene of a fatal private plane crash at 53 Van Vranken Rd. in Clifton Park Wednesday Aug. 15, 2012.(John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

     A small single engine private plane in the yard of a home on Van Vranken Rd. after an early morning crash in Clifton Park Wednesday Aug. 15, 2012.(John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

     A small single engine private plane comes to rest between 55 (at left) and 53 Van Vranken Rd. after an early morning crash in Clifton Park Wednesday Aug. 15, 2012.(John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)


    A small single engine private plane in the yard of a home on Van Vranken Rd. after an early morning crash in Clifton Park Wednesday Aug. 15, 2012.(John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union) 


     
    CBS 6

     
    CBS 6

     
    CBS 6

     
    CBS 6

    A photograph of the six-seater Beechcraft Bonanza that crashed in Clifton Park on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, killing a passenger and leaving the pilot badly injured. 
    ( Times Union)











     
    A New York State Police helicopter over the scene of a fatal airplane accident on Van Vranken Rd. in Clifton Park Wednesday Aug. 15, 2012.
    (John Carl D’Annibale / Times Union)

     Law enforcement officials set up a road block Wednesday morning at Crescent Avenue and Van Vranken Road in Clifton Park, about a mile north of where a small plane crashed. 
    (Dennis Yusko/Times Union)


    CLIFTON PARK — A Troy developer was killed and his business-partner pilot was critically injured in a plane crash off Van Vranken Road, which is just west of the Northway near the Mohawk River. 

      Walter Uccellini, 67, of Albany, was killed and Jim Quinn, 68, of Westerlo, suffered a serious head injury, State Police said.

    The plane took off from Albany International Airport at 7:25 a.m. State Police Capt. John McCarthy Jr. said the plane's single engine stalled within four minutes and Quinn looked for a place to land.

    The plane crashed into a front yard but missed two nearby homes.

    "I think he did an excellent job in trying to avoid further injury," McCarthy said. "It appears he tried to land in the road. He ended up landing in the front yard of a home and caught some trees."

    Ucellini is the founder, chairman and president of The United Group of Companies in Troy. Quinn is the firm's vice chairman. Based in Troy and with offices in New York City and Florida, The United Group specializes in real estate development, financing and management. The company was founded in 1978.

    The plane was bound for Plattsburgh.

    Jeanne Hoffman and her husband were still in bed doing a crossword puzzle inside their Van Vranken Road home when they heard the impact. The plane's engine was dead; She said she simply heard a thump and initially though a tree had fallen.

    But she looked out the window and saw parts of the plane scattered across her front yard.

    She said she ran outside to check the condition of the two men and called police.

    She was grateful the pilot was able to keep the plane from hitting her home and other nearby houses.

    A law enforcement source said that shortly after takeoff, the pilot radioed the tower stating he was experiencing engine trouble and was going to look for a place to land.

    McCarthy said it appeared the two men were on a business trip. No drugs or alcohol are suspected, he said.

    The plane is a Beechcraft Bonanza six-seater. The owner is listed as David Leckenby of West Sand Lake.

    The United Group issued a statement Wednesday afternoon:

    "Today is a truly stunning and sad day. We have lost our father, brother, husband, grandfather, uncle, friend, partner and leader. Walter Uccellini was a giant in the world, a truly inspirational figure that we will always love and remember with great fondness. We ask that you respect our privacy during this tragic time. We are a solid team at United Group and will find a way to carry on. But today we mourn the loss of a great, great man."

    "Please send thoughts and prayers for Jim Quinn and his entire family. We are all praying he fights through this."

    Van Vranken Road from Crescent to Riverview roads is expected to remain closed until Thursday. Local residents, however, will be allowed to get to their homes.

    "It's an awful situation and we feel awful," Town Supervisor Phil Barrett said. "Our thoughts and prayers are with them."

    "We closed roads and we're working with the volunteer fire department and the security force. We're just assisting where we can. The State Police and the (Federal Aviation Administration) are the ones investigating what happened," Barrett said.

    Neighbors were startled by the sound of the impact.

    "It was a huge alarm for us," said Chloe Mincher, a 16-year-old who lives on Crescent Road.

    The crash fueled a spate of rumors. She and others said there was talk someone well-known was on the plane and that four people were on board.

    Lois Little and her sons awoke to the sounds of police sirens.

    "We knew something major had happened," she said.

    Little and Mincher said the plane crashed in nearby woods between two homes. Mincher said a firefighter told her that the plane barely missed one of the homes.

    The land where the crash occurred is on the flight path from Albany International Airport, Little said.

    "This used to be an emergency landing field before they put all of these houses in," she said.

    Read more: http://www.timesunion.com


    Walter F. Uccellini, the developer who died Wednesday morning in a plane crash in Clifton Park, had been “on a good run” with a series of successful projects in recent years, said one government official who worked with him.

     Founder, principal owner, and chairman of The United Group of Companies in North Greenbush, Uccellini had been a driving force behind the development of a 14-acre site along Congress and Ferry streets at the south edge of downtown Troy. One building had been completed in the City Station project and a second was nearing completion. On Wednesday morning, local officials were cutting the ribbon to open the latest City Station tenant, Paesan’s Pizza. The two buildings house graduate students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Uccellini’s alma mater, and one also has ground-floor retail space.

    Uccellini earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business management from RPI, and incorporated his company in 1978.

    Other projects include a $60 million university-based student housing project at the University at Albany, a multi-use building at the Saratoga Technology + Energy Park in Malta, several buildings at the Rensselaer Technology Park in North Greenbush, Diamond Rock Terrace and Monument Square Apartments for older adults in Troy, Schaffer Heights in Schenectady, and Hearthstone Village in Latham.

    Student housing includes College Suites projects at Cortland, Brockport Plattsburgh and Oswegoo, as well as University Heights in Albany and the newly completed College Suites at Washington Square in Schenectady.

    Uccellini, a private pilot, reportedly wasn’t at the controls Wednesday when the single-engine plane apparently tried to make an emergency landing in Clifton Park after experiencing engine trouble after taking off from the Albany International Airport. The pilot, Jim Quinn of Westerlo, a business associate, was seriously injured.

    Uccellini and his late wife, Sheila Ryan Uccellini, were active in the community. His wife, who died a year ago, had served on the board of Rensselaer County Hospice, the Capital District regional board for Planned Parenthood, and the Rensselaer County Historical Society, and was a volunteer with the Junior League of Troy.

    United Group issued the following statement:
    “Today is a truly stunning and sad day. We have lost our father, brother, husband, grandfather, uncle, friend, partner and leader. Walter Uccellini was a giant in the world, a truly inspirational figure that we will always love and remember with great fondness. We ask that you respect our privacy during this tragic time. We are a solid team at United Group and will find a way to carry on. But today we mourn the loss of a great, great man.”

    “Please send thoughts and prayers for Jim Quinn and his entire family. We are all praying he fights through this.”

    Local officials were stunned by the news, among them Ray Gillen, chairman of the Schenectady County Metroplex Development Authority.

    “Walter Uccellini was a great developer and a great leader in the Capital Region,” Gillen said. “He was an innovator and knew how to put together complex financial packages so that major building projects could get under way very quickly.”

    Source:  http://www.timesunion.com


    Read more: Walter Uccellini – Bethpage High, Class of 1963

    Walter F. Uccellini CPM – United Group

    James F. Quinn, Vice Chairman – United Group of Companies, Inc.

    http://registry.faa.gov/N678DR

    Watch Video – Click Here


    IDENTIFICATION
      Regis#: 678DR        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
      Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1210
    
      Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
      Damage: Unknown
    
    LOCATION
      City: CLIFTON PARK   State: NY   Country: US
    
    DESCRIPTION
      AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORTLY AFTER DEPARTURE, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 
      WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, CLIFTON PARK, NY
    
    INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                     # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                     # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                     # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
    
    
    OTHER DATA
      Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER
    
    
      FAA FSDO: ALBANY, NY  (EA01)                    Entry date: 08/16/2012 
    

    Parts of plane buried in paddock: NZ Aerospace Fletcher FU24-954, Skydive New Zealand, ZK-EUF, Accident occurred September 4, 2010 at Fox Glacier Airstrip

    Parts of a skydiving plane that crashed at Fox Glacier nearly two years ago , killing all nine on board, were buried in a paddock soon after at the direction of the Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC).

    Aviation expert Barry Payne, who was commissioned to supply an independent report on the crash, told an inquest in Greymouth today that he had concluded the two fundamental causes of the crash were an incorrectly set stabilator trim (tail flap), and the plane being out of balance due to a load shift with the passengers.

    Four overseas tourists and five Skydive NZ staff members died in the fiery crash on September 4, 2010.

    Mr Payne was recalled to the stand today and questioned at length by Garth Galloway, who is appearing on behalf on Skydive NZ’s co-owner John Kerr.

    The other partner in the company, Greymouth man Rod Miller, died in the crash.

    Mr Galloway asked Mr Payne whether there were other possible causes, including a broken control stick, but Mr Payne said he had not physically examined the stick because TAIC investigators had directed Mr Kerr to have parts of the wreckage, including the stick, buried in a paddock at the end of the airstrip a couple of days after the crash.

    Mr Payne accepted that photographs of the wreckage showed that the stick had worked free of the block, but he put that down to the extreme heat it had been subjected to in the fire when the plane burst into flames on impact.

    The inquest also heard from Skydive NZ tandem master Dean Thomas, that a last-minute decision put Mr Miller on the fatal flight.

    Mr Thomas had made five tandem jumps that day and was going to sit out a sixth while Mr Miller and another tandem master, Greg Rowan, took up two clients who had turned up unexpectedly at the airstrip.

    However, minutes before that jump Mr Miller decided that he would sit it out and take the next flight instead. Mr Thomas battery-started the plane prior to the fatal flight but did not observe the take-off.
    An unusual motor noise caused him to look skyward.

    “It was revving high. I thought ‘far out, he’s putting the pressure on … doing something very different … radical.”

    As the pilot struggled to gain control of the machine he could hear someone saying, “no, no, no …” then the plane crashed out of his sight behind a hangar.

    Mr Thomas said the pilot, Queenstown-based Chaminda Senadhira, 33, was highly competent and trustworthy and Skydive NZ was very safety conscious and did not cut corners.

    Patrick Byrne, 26, from Ireland, Glenn Bourke, 18, from Australia, Annita Kirsten, 23, from Germany, and Brad Coker, 24, from England, and four skydive masters Adam Bennett, 47, Michael Suter, 32, Christopher McDonald, 62, and Mr Miller, 55, died in the crash, along with Mr Senadhira.
    The inquest continues.

    - By Tui Bromley of the Greymouth Star

    Naval Air Station (NAS) Wildwood Aviation Museum to Hold 16th Annual AirFest: Cape May County Airport (KWWD), Wildwood, New Jersey

     

    CAPE MAY AIRPORT – Naval Air Station (NAS) Wildwood Aviation Museum, located at the Cape May Airport, will once again partner with The Collings Foundation to host AirFest and the 2012 Wings of Freedom Tour. This year, AirFest will take place Wed., Aug. 29 through Fri., Aug. 31. Also, an all GM car and truck show will join AirFest on Fri., Aug. 31.

    As the Museum’s largest annual fundraising event, AirFest will include music, food, vendors, exhibits and much more. Stop by NAS Wildwood Aviation Museum to experience “living history.” Famous WWII aircraft will be visiting Cape May County and historic Hangar #1 for three days. The tour will feature the P-51 Mustang, B-17 Flying Fortress and B-24 Liberator. The public will be given a once in a lifetime opportunity to view, explore and even take a flight in these historic treasures. Separate fees are required for fighter and bomber flight experiences.

    For flight reservations and tour information, call 800-568-8924. 

    NAS Wildwood Aviation Museum boasts over 26 aircraft displays as well as exhibits of military memorabilia, engines, photographs, interactive exhibits that allow visitors to discover the science of flight and more. The Aviation Museum is open daily from 9:00 am to 5:00 p.m., rain or shine. Don’t forget to bring your camera! 

    Naval Air Station Wildwood Aviation Museum is located inside Historic Hangar #1 at the Cape May Airport, New Jersey. Cape May Airport was formerly Naval Air Station Wildwood, which served as a World War II dive-bomber training center. The museum is dedicated to the 42 airmen who perished while training at Naval Air Station Wildwood between 1943 and 1945.

    For more information, contact Bruce A. Fournier at (609) 886-8787 by email at aviationmuseum@comcast.net or visit the Hangar’s website www.usnasw.org.

    Source:  http://www.capemaycountyherald.com