Monday, November 23, 2020

Flying on Two Wings and a Prayer: You can’t buy a ticket on the ‘world’s first Christian airline’—at least, not yet

 



The Wall Street Journal
By Spencer Jakab
November 23, 2020 1:41 pm ET

While it could make for a particularly effective loyalty program, devout fliers won’t be able to earn elite status or even rack up frequent flier miles on Judah 1. “The world’s first Christian airline” has been flying for years, but in smaller planes and without that official status from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Now that it is about to be certified and will take delivery of its first wide-body airplane, a Boeing 767-200 ER, with plans to add five more aircraft next year, founder Everett Aaron says he gets 50 or 60 emails a day asking if he will be flying to certain destinations. The nonprofit, which undertakes Christian missionary work, was most recently transporting supplies to hurricane-ravaged Central America and has no plans to add scheduled flights. The interest is there, though.

“It’s a bit overwhelming,” says Mr. Aaron.

However tempting, it is probably wise to keep prayer out of the business. There have been attempts to mix religion and commercial aviation, such as a sharia-compliant airline based in Malaysia that quickly folded. Alaska Airlines for years handed out “prayer cards” with meals but finally stopped in 2012 because of passenger complaints.

The Lord can be your co-pilot, but not your flight attendant.

Lancair Legacy FG, N3UH: Fatal accident occurred November 23, 2020 at North Perry Airport (KHWO), Pembroke Pines, Broward County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida 
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Ottawa 
Aero Sport Power; Kamloops, British Columbia


Location: Hollywood, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21LA052
Date & Time: November 23, 2020, 15:23 Local
Registration: N3UH
Aircraft: Lancair Legacy FG
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On November 23, 2020, about 1523 eastern standard time, an amateur-built Lancair Legacy FG airplane, N3UH, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at North Perry Airport (HWO), Hollywood, Florida. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The airplane was based at HWO.

Prior to takeoff, the pilot established communication with the ground controller at HWO; he reported that he had the current automated terminal information service “Bravo” and requested to taxi to the active runway for a westbound departure. The ground controller then instructed the pilot to taxi to Runway1L via Taxiway B, cross Runway 10L, and hold short of Runway 10R, at Taxiway B. The pilot then established communications with the local controller who cleared the airplane for takeoff from Runway 1L at Taxiway M and instructed the pilot to make a left turn westbound. Track data indicated that the airplane departed Runway 1L about 1522. When the airplane was about 0.5 miles from the departure end of Runway 1L, the pilot reported that the airplane’s engine was running rough and he requested to return to the airport to land. The airplane then made a right turn towards the airport and the local controller cleared the pilot to land on any runway. The pilot then requested and was cleared to land on Runway 28R. The airplane subsequently impacted the ground about 200 ft before Runway 28R.

According to witnesses, just prior to impact the airplane was nearly parallel to the extended centerline of Runway 28R in a 45° nose-down attitude.

Examination of the wreckage revealed damage consistent with the airplane impacting in a nose and right-wing low attitude. The nose section, canopy, and both the left and right wings had separated during the impact sequence. The aft fuselage and empennage had remained intact. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevators, and rudder, to breaks in the flight control system, and then from the breaks to the control stick and rudder pedals. Both wing fuel tanks were breached and devoid of fuel. The electric fuel pump was “ON.” The fuel selector valve was in the “RIGHT” tank position, it moved freely and did not contain any blockages. Two of the three composite propeller blades were separated at the blade root, and the third blade was separated about 12 inches outboard of the blade root. 

Examination of the engine revealed that fuel was present in the fuel manifold and fuel servo. The electronic ignition system for the top sparkplugs was impact damaged and non-functional. The magneto for the bottom sparkplugs did not produce spark. Internal examination of the magneto revealed that the points had been impact damaged but there was no evidence of any preimpact failures or malfunctions of the magneto. Examination of the spark plugs revealed that all of the plugs were secured in their respective sparkplug holes with the exception of the top spark plug on the No.1 cylinder, which was not in its hole. The No.1 cylinder top sparkplug was still attached to its high tension lead and displayed thread damage on its two lower threads. Thumb compression and suction was attained on all cylinders, oil was present in the rocker boxes, and oil sump, and drivetrain continuity was established from the front to the back of the engine.

The airplane’s electronic flight instrumentation system was retained by the NTSB for examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Lancair 
Registration: N3UH
Model/Series: Legacy FG NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHWO,9 ft msl
Observation Time: 15:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C /19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hollywood, FL
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 26.002833,-80.234444 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Steven Mitchell Fontenot
1955 - 2020

It is with great sadness that we announce the unexpected passing of Steve Fontenot, 65, on Monday, November 23, 2020 in Broward County Florida. The plane that he was flying developed engine trouble and crashed during an emergency landing. He was a devoted, loving, proud father and grandfather. Steve is survived by his son Mitchell and his wife, Chelsea of Kalispell Montana; grandson Hayden Frederick; sister Debbie Blackwell and husband Claude; Nephews and nieces; Tripp and Halley Blackwell, Jamie and Tony Langford) of Gonzales. He is preceded in death by Frederick and Dorothy Fontenot and grandparents; Clarence and Rose Fontenot, Homer and Nannie Monk. Steve was born in San Antonio, Texas on October 6, 1955. A resident of Hollywood Florida, Steve loved flying, fishing, boating, and traveling. He was a regional representative for Ridgid Tools. Steve will be greatly missed by family and friends. A memorial service will be held at a later date.

Steven Mitchell Fontenot

PEMBROKE PINES, Florida (WSVN) - Authorities have released the identity of the pilot who died following a plane crash at North Perry Airport.

On Wednesday, Pembroke Pines Police identified the pilot as 65-year-old Steven Mitchell Fontenot.

Investigators said Fontenot attempted to land the experimental aircraft shortly after takeoff, Monday afternoon.

According to fire officials, the plane experienced engine trouble and crashed when attempting to return and land on Runway 28R.

Fontenot was the only person on board the aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration continue to investigate the crash.






PEMBROKE PINES, Florida (WSVN) - A pilot has died after a plane crashed shortly after takeoff at North Perry Airport in Pembroke Pines.

Pembroke Pines Fire Rescue crews responded to the airport in the area of Pines Boulevard and South University Drive at around 3 p.m., Monday.

Pilot Cesar Quintana said when he spotted the aircraft, it a few feet off the ground.

“We basically saw it about a second before impact, and it just hit the ground and a white puff of smoke,” he said. “It was too fast to see it, too fast to really understand what took place. We heard a loud bang. That’s what we saw. I actually contacted the tower to make sure they knew about it, that they were working on the emergency vehicles.”

According to fire officials, the plane experienced engine trouble on takeoff and attempted to return and land on Runway 28R.

Only one person was on board the Lancair Legacy FG. The pilot was pronounced dead at the scene, officials said.

“It’s a home-built, and I just quickly looked at it,” Ed, a pilot who has been flying out of the airport for over 30 years, said. “When it’s experimental, you can do almost anything you want as long as it’s safe to fly.”

Ed, who did not provide his last name, added that pilots are taught not to return to the airport if they encounter trouble after takeoff.

“We’re taught from the beginning you don’t try to turn and go back,” he said. “You’re not going to make it. As soon as you start that turn, you’re going to lose altitude quickly.”

The identity of the pilot is not yet known, but the crashed aircraft is registered to a person in South Florida.

Pembroke Pines Police Monday night were dispatched to an address linked to the aircraft’s owner, and neighbors said they are waiting for more information.

“He’s an amazing guy, wonderful guy,” a neighbor said.

“We’re pilots,” Quintana said. “I mean, it’s a human being. It’s a close community, and it’s tough to see this.”

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash.



A pilot was killed when a light plane crashed Monday at North Perry Airport in southern Broward County, aviation officials said.

The crash occurred at 3:25 p.m. as the single-engine aircraft sought to land due to engine trouble. A short time before, it had taken off from the airport, which is near University Drive and north of Pembroke Road in Pembroke Pines.

The plane was a Lancair Legacy FG, which had departed the airport and crashed while on approach to Runway 28 Right, said Maria Njoku, spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration in Atlanta.

All but one of the airport’s four runways were closed, said Arlene Satchell, spokeswoman for the Broward County Aviation Department. No one on the ground was injured.

The pilot, who has yet to be identified, was the only person aboard. The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate along with the FAA, Njoku said.

The Lancair Legacy FG is a two-seat light plane marketed in kit form, according to Lancair International, the plane’s manufacturer based in Texas. According to the company website, it is a “low-winged monoplane of composite construction, with side-by-side seating in an enclosed cockpit.”

“The family of aircraft are designed with speed as the primary focus,” the website says.

The plane has a top speed of 215 miles per hour and a range of slightly more than 1,000 miles. More than 2,100 Lancairs are owned and operated in 34 countries on 5 continents, according to the company.

 


PEMBROKE PINES, Florida – A pilot was killed after a small plane crashed a North Perry Airport in Broward County.

It happened at approximately 3:30 p.m. Monday, at the airport located off University Drive and Pembroke Road in Pembroke Pines.

Sky10 was over the crash, where first responders inspected the wreckage and were seen placing a yellow tarp over the damaged aircraft.

According to a spokesperson from the airport, the plane was attempting to take off and reported engine trouble before trying to turn around and land. At least one person has died as a result of the crash.

It is unknown if there were any other passengers on board.

According to records, the plane is a fixed wing, two seat, single engine aircraft built in 2007.




PEMBROKE PINES (CBSMiami) – The pilot of a small plane died Monday afternoon when the plane crashed on North Perry Airport property in Pembroke Pines.

According to a spokesperson for North Perry Airport, the pilot reported an engine issue shortly after taking off and asked to return back.  While attempting to land, the plane went down while approaching the runway, at 3:25 p.m.

In video from Chopper 4, there was a yellow tarp draped over the wreckage of the single-engine Lancair Legacy FG aircraft.

The FAA confirms the pilot was the only person aboard.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Cessna TU206G Turbo Stationair II, N878AH: Accident occurred November 21, 2020 near Twentynine Palms Airport (KTNP), San Bernardino County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

TV Specialists Inc


Location: Twentynine Palms, CA 
Accident Number: WPR21LA059
Date & Time: November 21, 2020, 12:50 Local
Registration: N878AH
Aircraft: Cessna TU206
Injuries: 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On November 21, 2020, about 1250 Pacific standard time, a Cessna, TU206, N878AH, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident in Twentynine Palms,
California. The private pilot and the five passengers onboard were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that this was the first flight after the annual inspection had been completed. About two hours into the flight, the aircraft engine began to run roughly. The pilot noticed that exhaust gas temperatures (EGT) were operating within normal parameters, except for a lower than-expected temperature in the No. 2 cylinder. Additionally, the pilot recalled that he was unable to sustain normal cruise flight.

While troubleshooting the rough running engine, the pilot moved the fuel selector from the “Left” tank to the “Right” tank position and a total loss of engine power occurred. The pilot stated that typically, when he moves the fuel selector from one tank to the other, the engine will momentarily lose power, which he estimated to be about 3 seconds, because the selector must travel through the “Off” position. However, during this cross-country flight, there was nearly a 45 second loss of power before the engine surged back to full power.

The pilot elected to continue the flight to his destination. About 45 minutes later, the pilot felt the engine roughness return, and he performed a precautionary power-on landing to the nearest airport. After an uneventful landing with the engine running, the pilot attempted to locate a maintenance facility, to no avail. With no mechanical assistance in sight, the pilot performed an engine runup to 1,700-rpm. The pilot reported that he began a takeoff from runway 08 and when the airplane reached mid-runway, again the engine roughness returned, and he aborted the takeoff.

After observing the windsock, he decided to takeoff from runway 26, and taxied to the departure end. He performed another engine run-up, which indicated normal operating parameters. During the initial takeoff, with the airplane about 300ft above ground level, the pilot heard a change in engine noise, and he could not maintain the initial climb. The pilot reported the diminishing performance as a total loss of engine power and performed a forced landing to an available clearing. During the landing roll, the airplane encountered uneven terrain and the airplane nosed over coming to rest inverted.

During recovery of the airplane, several gallons of fuel were drained from both the left and right tanks.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N878AH
Model/Series: TU206 G 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PSP,476 ft msl
Observation Time: 12:50 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 33 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C /-2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 3004 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Twentynine Palms, CA
Destination: Palm Springs, CA (UDD)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 5 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 34.134311,-115.95868 (est)


TWENTYNINE PALMS, California  — A private plane, a 1978 Cessna 206 Stationair, tail number N878AH, with six people on board crashed shortly after takeoff at about noon Saturday, November 21st, at the Twentynine Palms Airport.

David Bailey of Bailey’s Auto Repair, towed the plane, which flipped onto its roof after hitting the ground near Francis Road south of Twentynine Palms Highway and west of the airport.

Outside of some scratches, he said, there were no injuries because of the crash, he reported.

“The guy flew in from Salt Lake City,” Bailey said, adding that the party was on its way to La Quinta.

The pilot, he said, reported that the plane’s cylinder head gauge indicated it was cold but the pilot thought the gauge might have been malfunctioning so he tried a takeoff but was not able to get airborne.

“He barely cleared the fence going west,” Bailey said. “He couldn’t get enough altitude.. He put it down in the weeds.”

As far as he knew, Bailey said, the flying party found another way to continue its journey to La Quinta.

Boeing 737-700, N910WN: Incident occurred November 21, 2020 near Sacramento International Airport (KSMF), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aircraft struck several birds damaging engine cowl. 

Southwest Airlines Company 


Date: 21-NOV-20
Time: 18:22:00Z
Regis#: N910WN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: SOUTHWEST
Flight Number: SWA2400
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CALIFORNIA

J & J Ultralights Seawing, N947RC: Accident occurred November 22, 2020 in Placida, Charlotte County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Location: Placida, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21LA051
Date & Time: November 22, 2020, 16:33 Local
Registration: N947RC
Aircraft: J&J Ultralights Sea-Wing 
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: J&J Ultralights
Registration: N947RC
Model/Series: Sea-Wing Aircraft 
Category: Weight-shift
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPGD,30 ft msl 
Observation Time: 17:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C /19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 10°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 26.858904,-82.250228 (est)

Beech N35 Bonanza, N9431Y: Incident occurred November 20, 2020 at Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft landed gear up and damaged propeller and fuselage. 

Kore Group Inc


Date: 20-NOV-20
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N9431Y
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Beech N35 Bonanza, N9417Y: Incident occurred November 20, 2020 at Caldwell Industrial Airport (KEUL), Canyon County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aircraft landed gear up.


Date: 20-NOV-20
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N9417Y
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CALDWELL
State: IDAHO

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N99HV: Accidents occurred November 20, 2020 and June 10, 2017 at Lawrence Municipal Airport (KLWC), Douglas County, Kansas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aerohawk LLC


Location: Lawrence, KS 
Accident Number: CEN21LA066
Date & Time: November 20, 2020, 14:50 Local 
Registration: N99HV
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On November 20, 2020, about 1450 central standard time, a Cessna 172S, N99HV, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lawrence, Kansas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

According to the student pilot, he planned a solo flight. The instructor checked the plane out from the flight school, and indicated that he would be with another student, but would be available on the radio, if the student needed anything.

The student pilot reported that he didn't notice anything unusual during the pre-fight inspection and proceeded through the checklist for obtaining weather and runway information. The pilot added that that he finished the runup and magneto checks, manipulated the control yoke through its full range of motion, and set the radio frequency before takeoff.

The pilot reported the nose pitched up and airplane climbed much faster than expected which he attributed to the weight difference from being solo rather than with an instructor in the airplane. He added it felt like he had to apply a lot of forward pressure on the yoke to keep the nose down, more than he was used to, so he double checked the trim wheel, adding that it felt like I was out of trim, but the wheel was centered where he set it during pre-flight.

He stayed in the traffic pattern and on final he pitched the nose of the airplane for airspeed while monitoring power and elevation. He reduced the engine throttle and prepared to land. He stated he was centered on the runway and pulled back on the yoke for the flare. The yoke suddenly came back, and the nose pitched very high. The pilot added that he didn't expect this sudden pitch change and was preparing to add full throttle for a go-around when the airplane stalled and landed hard.

After landing the pilot moved the yoke through the full range forward and backward to check the functionality. He stated that he did not notice the same "pop" forward and backward like he did during the previous landing, so he taxied back for another takeoff. He stated that during the initial climb there was a noticeable change in the yoke pressure, and it was difficult to apply enough forward pressure to keep the nose down.

He then turned from base to final and lined up for the landing. The pilot again reported that it was very difficult to control the pitch and airspeed and the yoke seemed to push either forward or backward over some type of "stuck" point, so he selected full flaps on final. After he initiated the landing flare, there was again a noticeable "snap" back of an inch or two of the yoke. The main gear landed first, however; the nose wheel came down very fast. The pilot reported that the yoke was as far back as it he could hold it, but the airplane didn't seem to be responding to the control input.

An inspection of the airplane noted damage to the airplane’s nose gear and substantial damage to the firewall and fuselage.

An examination of the airplane’s flight controls is pending.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N99HV
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLWC 
Observation Time: 13:52 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C /4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 70°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.31 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lawrence, KS (LWC) 
Destination: Lawrence, KS

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.009273,-95.212902 (est)



Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Location: Lawrence, Kansas
Accident Number: GAA17CA351
Date & Time: June 10, 2017, 11:00 Local 
Registration: N99HV
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The flight instructor reported that, during a simulated engine failure in the traffic pattern, with gusting wind conditions, the student pilot entered a forward slip on final approach. He added that 10 to 20 ft above the runway surface, "the wind gust we were riding suddenly halted wherein the aircraft began a rapid downward descent." The flight instructor reported that he "went for the flight controls to take command," but the student pilot at that same time applied back pressure on the flight controls. Subsequently, the airplane touched down hard, bounced, and the flight instructor performed a go around. The flight instructor completed the subsequent traffic pattern and landing without further incident.

The engine mounts and firewall sustained substantial damage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

An automated weather observation station at the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 170° at 16 knots, gusting to 24 knots. The flight instructor reported that the landing was on runway 15.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's incorrect control application during landing after a simulated engine failure, which resulted in a hard, bounced landing, and the flight instructor's delayed action to perform a go-around in gusting wind conditions.

Findings
Personnel issues Incorrect action performance - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Aircraft Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Student/instructed pilot
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Simulated/training event
Landing Other weather encounter
Landing Loss of control in flight
Landing Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing Hard landing (Defining event)

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 22,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 20, 2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: March 11, 2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 605 hours (Total, all aircraft), 312 hours (Total, this make and model), 450 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 168 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Student 
Age: 53,Male
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: August 18, 2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 71 hours (Total, all aircraft), 71 hours (Total, this make and model), 6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N99HV
Model/Series: 172 S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2005 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S10090
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: February 3, 2017 AAIP 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5813.9 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s)  Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLWC,833 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 15:52 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 16 knots / 24 knots 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LAWRENCE, KS (LWC ) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: LAWRENCE, KS (LWC )
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:50 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: LAWRENCE MUNI LWC 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 833 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5700 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop;Go around;Simulated forced landing;Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.011112,-95.216392(est)

Czech Sport Aircraft SportCruiser, N130BF: Incident occurred November 21, 2020 at Skypark Airport (KBTF), Bountiful, Davis County, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aircraft landed hard and nose gear collapsed. 

Skywest Leasing Inc


Date: 21-NOV-20
Time: 00:55:00Z
Regis#: N130BF
Aircraft Make: CZECH SPORT
Aircraft Model: SPORTCRUISER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BOUNTIFUL
State: UTAH

Cirrus SR22T, N22AB: Incident occurred November 22, 2020 in Miami, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed hard and nose gear collapsed.

Digitavis LLC


Date: 22-NOV-20
Time: 23:25:00Z
Regis#: N22AB
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Thunder Gull Odyssey, N562TB: Fatal accident occurred November 19, 2020 near Arlington Municipal Airport (KAWO), Snohomish County, Washington

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Location: Arlington, WA 
Accident Number: WPR21FA057
Date & Time: November 19, 2020, 17:09 Local 
Registration: N562TB
Aircraft: Blevins Kamron Odyssey 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On November 19, 2020, about 1709 Pacific standard time, a Blevins Kamron Odyssey, N562TB, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Arlington, Washington. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. 

Preliminary ADS-B radar data indicated that the airplane departed Tacoma Narrows Airport (TIW), Tacoma, Washington, about 1556, and turned westbound followed by a turn and a north-northeast track for about 50 nm until it reached an area near Lake Cavanaugh where track data discontinued briefly. After track data was reacquired, it showed the airplane in a tight 360° right turn, then it continued southwest for about 5 nm before turning right to the west and then north. The airplane then entered a right spiral type turn until track data was lost at 1709.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Blevins Kamron 
Registration: N562TB
Model/Series: Odyssey
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAWO,137 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C /5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.32 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 48.2979,-122.1021 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Ronald Borovec

ARLINGTON, Washington — A Bothell aviation enthusiast died in a small-plane crash Thursday north of Arlington, according to the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

Ronald Borovec, 73, was identified as the deceased. He was flying an amateur-built, single-engine Odyssey aircraft.

A friend of the pilot first notified the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office around 8:30 p.m. that Borovec was overdue.

According to FlightAware, a database that tracks flights, the plane departed Tacoma Narrows Airport around 4 p.m. Thursday. The northbound two-seat plane was tracked until after 5 p.m., after traveling about 100 miles.

The friend gave deputies an approximate location of the plane — a patchwork of logged forest east of Highway 9. Around 10 p.m., the sheriff’s office helicopter SnoHawk1 located wreckage and the deceased pilot off N Cedarvale Loop Road.

Borovec died of blunt-force trauma, the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed Friday. The cause of the crash was not immediately known.

The pilot was a longtime advocate of experimental aviation. In the early 1990s, he published bi-monthly Roadable Aircraft Magazine. He was a past president of an Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) chapter in Seattle.

Fellow EAA chapter member Ron Wanttaja knew Borovec for 35 years. He said Borovec was meticulous and excelled at understanding the mechanical side of aircraft. Wanttaja recalled annual seminars Borovec gave at the national EAA convention on “roadable” aircraft, which can also be driven on a street — essentially a flying car.

“He never built one himself, but he was a real aficionado of that,” Wanttaja said.

In a 1994 Christian Science Monitor article, Borovec discussed the conveniences and challenges of the futuristic automobile.

“’Landing in a driveway is very appealing, (but) these things just don’t land any place,” he said.

As the article explained, the downdraft would wreak havoc on debris below.

“The grass might survive, but the flowers won’t,” Borovec quipped.

There are risks inherent in flying such planes.

“Homebuilt aircrafts are built by amateurs, maintained by amateurs and quite often even designed by amateurs, so that is all part of the sport,” Wanttaja said. “We try to reduce the accident rate as well as we can, but it is going to be higher than production airplanes.”

Just before the accident, Wanttaja said, Borovec was getting a transponder installed in Tacoma.

The National Transportation Safety Board described the plane that crashed as an “experimental” aircraft. NTSB investigators were arriving on scene Friday.

An NTSB official said a preliminary report should be available within a few weeks. The full investigation could take more than a year.

Borovec was public in his support for Democratic candidates in recent elections. He sent The Daily Herald occasional letters to the editor encouraging engagement with elected officials and supporting worldwide action to fight diseases.

In May, he wrote The Herald urging representatives to favor a global health approach during COVID-19 recovery.

On social media, he wrote that he worked as an engineer for a dental equipment manufacturer in Bothell.

“As the United States and the world face the COVID-19 threat, we must not forget our partners in low-income countries,” he said.

Thursday’s crash was the second fatal aviation accident in the region this month. On Nov. 11, two men died in a small plane crash near Langley on Whidbey Island after an apparent engine failure.

The World After Covid Could Shake Up Business Flights: A smaller, more price-sensitive corporate market is likely to become a new battleground between low-cost and legacy airlines

The Wall Street Journal
By Jon Sindreu
November 22, 2020 10:18 am ET

The aviation crisis triggered by 9/11 eventually made budget carriers the undisputed leaders in leisure flights. Covid-19 could give them the keys to business travel.

Three major U.S. carriers, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and Southwest Airlines, recently warned that sales are deteriorating as the winter season approaches. But demand for cheap holiday flights could bounce back once a vaccine is distributed, as it did when lockdowns were eased this summer.

Business travel is another story. Airline executives believe that increased use of videoconferencing could take a permanent 15% bite out of the market. The battle for this shrinking pie could reshape the most profitable part of their industry.

In a recent survey, Barclays found that more than half of Americans who flew for business in 2019 expect a 20% or greater fall in such travel after the pandemic. Technology was the most commonly cited reason, with budgetary restraint in second place. Data by business-spending management firm Coupa Software shows that, among the few tickets bought by corporate accounts in the third quarter, the average fare was 45% cheaper than a year earlier.

Greater price-sensitivity in corporate bookings is an opening for budget airlines. Southwest is already increasing its presence at Chicago O’Hare, a hub claimed by both United and American Airlines. It is also threatening United at Houston and American at Miami.

“We’re positioned now in the corporate market to be a real player,” Southwest Chief Executive Gary Kelly told analysts last month.

Southwest has already spent a decade expanding in main airports, particularly after acquiring AirTran Airways in 2011. In recent years, its network connectivity has become more concentrated in top airports, including legacy hubs in Atlanta and Washington, D.C., a data analysis reveals.

“We’re positioned now in the corporate market to be a real player,” Southwest Chief Executive Gary Kelly told analysts last month.

Southwest has already spent a decade expanding in main airports, particularly after acquiring AirTran Airways in 2011. In recent years, its network connectivity has become more concentrated in top airports, including legacy hubs in Atlanta and Washington, D.C., a data analysis reveals.

Covid-19 has changed the picture by leaving even the busiest airports with plenty of space. Budget airlines are well placed to fill it because they have more cash and less debt.

Ultralow-cost carriers like Spirit, Allegiant, Ryanair and Wizz Air might be wary of assaulting business hubs, where expenses are higher. They could instead focus on their traditional tactic: squeezing hollowed-out secondary airports. But Southwest caters to a slightly higher-cost segment. It even has business fares with extra perks. In 2019, 35% of its revenue came from companies, Barclays estimates, which is in between mainline operators at 50% and Spirit and Allegiant at 10%.

JetBlue, with its successful premium Mint product, is another U.S. low-cost player well positioned to nibble away at this market.

In Europe, London-based easyJet champions this “hybrid” strategy. It combines low costs with offers such as extra legroom on certain seats and a focus on big business cities. Before Covid-19, it had increased its connectivity in hubs like Paris’s Charles de Gaulle and Amsterdam’s Schiphol, at the expense of the rest of its network. So far, though, easyJet has chosen to retrench rather than attack, because its balance sheet isn’t pristine.

A risk for hybrid players is that their own leisure business could be undercut by ultralow-cost operators. Those rivals are now waiving change fees—one of Southwest’s signature customer benefits.

Regardless, flying is no longer a two-stream market. U.S. legacy airlines themselves have spent years phasing out first-class cabins and segmenting customers into a wider range of products. The strategy made money, but may also have whetted the appetite of corporate clients for cheaper options.

“It’s a deterioration of the premium product,” said Pere Suau-S├ínchez, a lecturer in air-transport management at the U.K.’s Cranfield University. “A lot of the boost in ‘premium economy’ seats is from companies that don’t want to pay for business class.”

Even a small loss of corporate business at key airports could destroy the connectivity of legacy players’ carefully crafted networks, making some international routes unprofitable. After a lucrative period of truce, the airline industry may be ripe for a new war.