Sunday, November 19, 2017

Cessna 310R, N3291M, Dingledine Trucking Company: Accident occurred November 19, 2017 at Grimes Field Airport (I74), Urbana, Champaign County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Dingledine Trucking Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N3291M

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 19-NOV-17
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N3291M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C310
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: URBANA
State: OHIO

URBANA — UPDATE @ 12:49 p.m. (Nov. 20):

A pilot forgot to initiate his landing gear when he crashed his airplane at Grimes Field Airport in Urbana Sunday, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The airplane crashed at 3:30 p.m. and had originated from Trumbull County Airfield in northeast Ohio, troopers said.

No injuries were reported and the FAA was called to conduct an investigation, however so far no citations have been issued, the patrol said.

The airplane was a Cessna 310, OSP said.

INITIAL REPORT:

State troopers are investigating a plane crash that occurred at Grimes Field Airport in Urbana Sunday afternoon. 

Investigators were dispatched to the airport around 3:30 p.m. Sunday after the incident was reported. 

Dispatchers said the incident was ‘minor’ and no injuries were reported. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.whio.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N52492, McClelland Aviation Inc: Accident occurred November 19, 2017 near Reid-Hillview Airport (KRHV), San Jose, Santa Clara County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

McClelland Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N52492

Location: San Jose, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA034
Date & Time: 11/19/2017, 1500 PST
Registration: N52492
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P
Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On November 19, 2017, about 1500 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 172P airplane, N52492, was substantially damaged when it impacted a residence following a partial loss of engine power in San Jose, California. The private pilot received minor injuries and the passengers were seriously injured. The airplane was operated by Squadron 2 as a personal flight, conducted under the provision of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed for the local flight, which had departed Reid Hillview Airport (RHV), San Jose, California shortly before the accident.

According to the pilot, she completed a preflight inspection and taxied to runway 31R for an engine run-up, which did not reveal any anomalies. The takeoff roll was normal and the airplane lifted off the ground at approximately 55 knots. As the airplane reached an indicated altitude of about 50 feet, the pilot observed the vertical speed and rpm decrease simultaneously, while the engine began to run rough. Once the airplane was beyond the airport perimeter, the pilot started a shallow left turn, while simultaneously searching for a landing site as she had difficulty maintaining altitude. She continued the turn until she observed a grass field in front of her as the airplane was descending. Moments before impact she decreased the airplane's pitch attitude, but the airplane continued to descend until it impacted a residence.

A surveillance camera captured a portion of the airplane's initial climb and its subsequent descent. The recording showed the airplane maintain a low altitude and enter a shallow left turn and slight nose high attitude shortly after its departure from the runway. Seconds later, the airplane's bank angle increased in the turn as the airplane descended. In its final movements, the airplane's pitch attitude decreased and the airplane's wings leveled out and then the airplane disappeared behind trees.

A postccident examination of the airplane by the Federal Aviation Administration revealed substantial damage to the wings, empennage and fuselage. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N52492
Model/Series: 172P 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: MCCLELLAND AVIATION INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RHV, 1354 ft msl
Observation Time: 1455 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:  
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 330°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 18000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: SAN JOSE, CA (RHV)
Destination: SAN JOSE, CA (RHV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:



Three people were injured Sunday after a small plane crashed into a house near Reid-Hillview Airport in San Jose, according to fire officials.

The crash occurred about 3 p.m. at 2156 Evelyn Avenue, which is just across the street from the airport, San Jose fire officials said.

Two men and one woman were transported to a hospital. One person suffered a major injury, and the other two were lesser injuries, fire officials said.

The plane, a single-engine Cessna 172, crashed into the house's garage, but no one in the home was hurt. About 40 gallons of fuel spilled from the plane, and hazmat personnel were on the scene to clean up, fire Capt. Mike Van Elgort said.

The home's occupants were temporarily evacuated until the fuel was cleaned up, Van Elgort said.

The fixed-wing plane is registered to McClelland Aviation Inc. of San Jose, according to Federal Aviation Administration records.

The crash is being investigated by officials with the National Transportation Safety Board and FAA.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbcbayarea.com





SAN JOSE, Calif. (KTVU) - San Jose Police are at the scene of a plane crash.

Police say the aircraft crashed into a home at Evelyn Avenue and Karl Street in San Jose just after 3 p.m.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.ktvu.com




SAN JOSE — Two people were injured when a plane crashed into a garage in South San Jose Sunday afternoon, according to authorities. 

One person is listed as having major injuries and another with minor injuries. 

There was no word on the condition of a third person on the plane. 

Authorities are reporting that all three were onboard the plane.

A Cessna 172 crashed reported into a converted two-car garage in the 2100 block of Evelyn Avenue, not far from Reid-Hillview Airport.

One eyewitness, who declined to be named, said he saw the plane take off, struggle and then turn around heading back to the airport before it crashed.

Four ambulances are headed to the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mercurynews.com 


A plane crashed this afternoon into a structure near Reid-Hillview Airport in San Jose, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman and fire officials said.

The crash of a Cessna 172 was reported at 3:01 p.m. in the 2100 block Evelyn Avenue about 300 yards northwest of the airport, FAA spokesman Ian Gregor and San Jose fire Capt. Mike Van Elgort said.

Two men and one woman were in the Cessna and all were taken to a hospital.

The plane crashed into the structure's garage. Van Elgort said no one inside the structure was injured.

As of 3:51 p.m. firefighters had the situation under control.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.sfgate.com

Mr. Chan Wing Keong: Veteran air accident investigator is still living his dream of working in aviation

Mr. Chan Wing Keong became the first Asian to be awarded the Jerome F. Lederer Award, which is presented by the International Society of Air Safety Investigators, this year. Mr Chan has been in aviation safety for more than three decades, setting up the Air Accident Investigation Bureau of Singapore in October 2002.



Mr. Chan Wing Keong is most at home sitting among airplane parts like the jagged edge of a wing, black boxes and an underwater locator.

The 64-year-old has been in aviation safety for more than three decades, setting up the Air Accident Investigation Bureau of Singapore in October 2002, an independent investigation body under the Ministry of Transport. In August last year, the bureau was restructured to become the Transport Safety Investigation Bureau to include marine safety investigation.

For his work in promoting aviation safety in Singapore and the region, Mr Chan became the first Asian to be awarded the Jerome F. Lederer Award, which is presented by the International Society of Air Safety Investigators, this year.

For about 15 years, he has been the "Sherlock Holmes" of airplane investigations, piecing together evidence in plane accidents to find out what happened.

"An accident is defined as the events that occur from when people board an aircraft, to the time they disembark," he said. "Anything untoward that leads to fatality, serious injury or serious damage to the plane, counts as an accident."

He also looks at incidents, which are events that could potentially become accidents, such as a clipped aircraft wing.

"It is important to investigate every single case so we can learn from it," Mr. Chan told The Straits Times. "It's not about assigning blame, but it is about looking at the safety measures so we can make recommendations on how to prevent such incidents from occurring."

He said "safety is a system" and not about a single individual.

"We must see it in a wider, organizational context. Airplane investigations used to focus on the pilot, but in the last 20 years or so, people have learnt to look at the bigger picture," he added.

Mr. Chan said it was vital to have an independent body to investigate airplane incidents, separate from the regulatory organisation, in this case, the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). "The perspective is that when the regulation unit also conducts investigation, it might not be completely objective," he said.

Mr. Chan, who studied aeronautical engineering at university, worked in CAAS' Airworthiness and Flight Operations Department before 2002. Through his hard work, the investigation bureau has gone from having just two people in 2002 to 17 today.

One of his first assignments was at Changi Airport in December 2002, barely 21/2 months after he started the unit.

"The night before, there was a collision between an aircraft and maintenance vehicle," he recalled.

"I had planned to visit the site at a similar time to see the lighting conditions and wetness of the ground, as it was during a rainy period. But about 6pm, I received a call about a plane over-running the runway, and I asked if they were joking."

With two incidents in less than 22 hours, Mr. Chan got down to work.

The team would usually visit the site of the incident, securing it and taking photographs, just as security personnel would at a crime scene.

Then they would take all the evidence gathered to the lab, where investigators analyse things bit by bit. This could involve taking apart the engine and most importantly, finding the black box and listening to the recordings from the cockpit.

"It is just like detective work," Mr. Chan said with a smile. "From all the evidence, we form a hypothesis of what happened and then we prove it. For instance, it could be that the pilot had issues, in which case we would look at his background such as his drinking habits. If it was an engine problem, we would look at the history of such engines and other issues they might have."

Listening to the black box cockpit recordings is done in a room accorded the highest level of privacy protection. "Imagine hearing the last words of a pilot," Mr. Chan said.

One of the big cases that put the investigative team under the spotlight was that of AirAsia Flight QZ8501, which crashed into the Java Sea on Dec 28, 2014, killing all 155 passengers and seven crew members on board. Singapore offered to assist, and sent a team of four out to find the black boxes.

The team had to sail in dinghies through bad weather to find the two black boxes, which they finally retrieved by Jan 13, 2015, using hydrographic equipment that can detect the items underwater.

One member of the team then was Mr. Ng Junsheng, a senior air safety investigator in the bureau.

"We were out there, very far away, but we knew we had support back home," said the 36-year-old.

Mr. Chan was coordinating all the information back in Singapore, including keeping the team's families in the loop. He also had to see if more equipment was needed or if the team needed backup.

Singapore has not had major aircraft accidents on its soil, but Mr. Chan hopes that overall aviation safety internationally could be improved.

"Even small cases are worth investigating," he said. "No small matter is too small. Incidents can be precursors to accidents. We cannot ignore an issue or it will just snowball."

For Mr. Chan, he is living the dream of working in aviation. In his office at Changi Airport overlooking the runway, he watches airplanes take off and land. "I just look out at the aircraft and hope nothing happens," he said with a laugh.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.straitstimes.com

Why is airport expansion necessary?

Dear Editor:

I understand that during the recent Republican municipal election forum that a Walterboro resident expressed concern about the low-flying aircraft over her home near the Lowcountry Regional Airport. The candidates apparently tried to pass responsibility to the FAA, stating that the takeoff/landing altitudes are regulated by that federal agency.

What these candidates did not explain (and some may not have known) is that the FAA usually requires an airport to conduct an environmental assessment when it lengthens and strengthens a runway, as was done between 2001-2003. Runway 5/23 (which is the runway closest to the residential areas near the intersection of North Lemacks Street and Robertson Boulevard) was lengthened to 6,002 feet, which made it the longest runway at the airport. The FAA granted the airport a “categorical exclusion” and did not require an assessment, which would have studied, among other things, the impact of the jets and planes taking off and landing so close to residential areas.

In a letter dated May 1, 2017, a group of concerned citizens petitioned the Walterboro-Colleton County Airport Commission to investigate alternate flight paths that would require aircraft traffic to avoid flying over residential areas, and to use other runways aside from Runway 5/23. We have never received a reply, and in my requests for information from the FAA, I have never been advised that an environmental assessment has been ordered.

The residents of the North Lemacks Street Neighborhood are bearing the brunt of the noise and safety concerns. In addition, two historic districts containing approximately 200 houses, churches and other structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places are being negatively impacted.

By the time this letter is published the municipal elections will have been held. Do the city council members and mayor have any intention of addressing this problem? How about the county council members? The airport commission is comprised of members of both, as well as the county treasurer, the county auditor and other officials.

I first went to an airport commission meeting to complain about the problem in April 2016. I did not know at the time that a new business, Lowcountry Aviation, was trying to lease approximately six acres of airport property adjacent to a runway. The lease was approved on Jan. 3, 2017, and the company is now seeking approval for a “fuel farm.” The language in the ordinance stated that the company was going to handle “aircraft management; aircraft maintenance/repair/overhaul, including electronic/avionic components; aircraft modifications and upgrades; engineering design; aircraft paint; charter airline services; flight training and simulation; aircraft brokerage; aircraft rentals; aircraft on-ground services; and aircraft storage services.” A sign posted at the airport terminal advertises that the company offers “general maintenance; aircraft weighing; engine borescope; interior refurbishment; electronic propeller balancing; helicopter main rotor track and balance; and annual and phase inspections.” How many more jets and planes will be taking off and landing at the airport once this company starts conducting business?

The South Carolina legislature passed job tax credit incentives to cover this new business. Readers have expressed excitement at the prospect of new jobs, but businesses that qualify for these job tax credits do not have to hire workers from Colleton County — the jobs only have to be created in Colleton County. How many local residents have this type of training or experience? Lowcountry Aviation has represented it is going to invest $3.2 million and hire 127 full-time employees. Isn’t it more likely that former Boeing employees who have been laid off from their jobs in North Charleston would be among the obvious candidates? (Boeing announced a layoff of 200 employees last June.) Should Colleton County residents have their health and safety threatened, their peace and quiet ruined and their homes devalued in favor of out-of-county workers who would simply drive to and from Walterboro for work?

Who is looking out for the best interests of those who are bearing the negative impacts? Why won’t the airport commission take action now before the situation gets worse? Why are taxpayers underwriting the cost of a $1.6 million expansion of the airport terminal — and why was this expansion even necessary?

Carol Black
Los Angeles, Calif.
and Walterboro

Original article can be found here ➤ http://walterborolive.com

Pratt Regional Airport (KPTT) seeks grant to replace underground fuel system

The Pratt Regional Airport is seeking a grant to replace its underground aviation fuel system.

The Pratt Airport Board Authority is hoping for a Christmas present in time for Thanksgiving.

The airport has applied for a Kansas Department of Transportation grant to replace the underground fuel storage tanks with an above ground system on skids.

Airport Manager Reid Bell told the Board of Directors at their monthly meeting on Nov. 9 that the decision on who gets grants should be made by Thanksgiving.

“We’re waiting to see if we make the cut this year,” Bell said.

The estimated cost of the new fuel system is $594,000. The grant would cover most of the cost but still leaving $82,000 for the airport share of the expense, Bell said.

The current tanks are underground and are 70 years old. They are still in compliance but they won’t last forever so Bell wants to get them replaced before they become an issue.

Most fuel tanks at airports are above ground now and are on skids so they can be moved when necessary. Bell wants the fuel system on skids because in the far future, the terminal area will undergo a renovation and he wants to move the system across the runway from its present location to the opposite side of the taxiway.

The grant money comes through the Federal Aviation Administration and goes through the KDOT Aviation division.

Getting the grant money is very important to the airport because the downturn in the oil and gas industry has resulted in a drop in the number of businesses at the airport and the revenue from those businesses.

“We’re having a problem with cash flow right now. We’re having trouble balancing the budget. We’re still working on that,” Bell said.

Although the cash flow is an issue, Bell said the financial statement for the airport was still good.

There are no new leases on the horizon but the city is working on a solar energy business that would locate at the airport. But that venture has a long way to go, including the price per acre and a lot has to be worked out before that happens, said Pratt City Manager Roy Eckert.

A transaction that is under consideration is BTI wants to purchase the ground they are now leasing at the airport. However, the federal government still has authority over selling land at the airport and they have to approve the sale and it’s a hassle to do that. The FAA prefers airports don’t sell ground because that is selling off the airport’s revenue generating ability, Bell said.

There are 25 acres involved at BTI and Bell said the sale doesn’t look like its going to happen.

The airport continues to look for other businesses an hopes to find more sources of revenue from land leases. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.pratttribune.com

Fuel Related: Rockwell International 112A, N1401J; accident occurred November 19, 2017 near Clearwater Airpark (KCLW), Pinellas County, Florida

Fuel Servo Debris 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1401J

Location: Clearwater, FL
Accident Number: ANC18LA010
Date & Time: 11/19/2017, 1030 EST
Registration: N1401J
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL 112A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 19, 2017, about 1030 eastern standard time, a Rockwell International 112 airplane, N1401J, impacted trees during a forced landing on a city street about one mile northeast of Clearwater Air Park (KCLW), St. Petersburg, Florida, following a total loss of engine power. The private pilot and sole passenger sustained no injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Zephyrhills Airport (KZPH), Zephyrhills, Florida about 1008 for the roughly 35 nautical mile flight to KCLW.

According to the pilot, prior to departing KZPH, he added about 30 gallons of fuel to the airplane, which filled the left fuel tank completely and the right tank was about 7/8 full. He performed a walk-around inspection, but did not sump the fuel system for contaminants prior to departure. The roughly 20-minute flight was conducted with the fuel selector on the left tank. When descending through 1,200 ft msl, the pilot conducted the before landing checklist, which included increasing the mixture to full rich, turning on the auxiliary fuel pump and switching the fuel selector to the "BOTH" position. He then reduced the throttle to slow the aircraft and felt "slight resistance" on the throttle lever. About 10 seconds after switching the fuel selector, he began to lose airspeed faster than anticipated. When he looked at the fuel flow indicator, he saw it slowly transition from 8 gallons per hour to zero and the engine subsequently lost all power. He placed the fuel selector back to the left fuel tank, but the engine would not restart. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted a tree in the median of a 4-lane street prior to impacting and coming to rest in a stand of trees adjacent to the roadway.

Video footage captured the airplane as it approached the roadway as well as the final impact. The initial impact with the tree in the median was not captured. The video depicts the airplane in a controlled, level descent. Due to the quality of the video, propeller rotation could not be determined.

The engine was examined on December 6, 2017 at the facilities of Florida Air Recovery, Jacksonville, FL under the auspices of the National Transportation Safety Board, (NTSB). The engine remained attached to the airframe by the engine mount. The engine had sustained impact damage to the underside. The exhaust system had been displaced up and aft. The fuel injection servo sustained impact damage to the underside, which resulted in a cracked and displaced mounting flange. In addition, the throttle linkage was damaged and displaced.

The engine was prepped to be test run, which included replacing the propeller, and attempting to seal the induction leaks created by the cracked and displaced fuel injection servo with metal tape. In addition, the throttle linkage was secured with tie wraps and the damaged exhaust pipe tip was removed.

Fuel was introduced upstream of the engine driven fuel pump but downstream of the electric driven fuel pump. A fuel can with 100LL Avgas was placed below the engine and the engine was primed with a separate auxiliary electric driven fuel pump. The engine was not run at full power due to impact damage to the airframe and engine, but it was operated at various idle power settings while cycling through both magnetos. At about 1600 rpm, a drop of about 50 rpm was noted for the left and right magnetos.

On May 9, 2018, a representative of the NTSB traveled to AVStar Fuel Systems, Inc. to witness operational testing of the fuel injection servo.

The fuel inlet strainer was removed and when tapped on white paper some debris was noted (figure 1). Some debris was also noted inside the strainer. Oil/dirt was noted on the exterior of the fuel servo. The mixture screw assembly was centered.

Fuel Servo

The fuel servo was placed on the test bench as received. The throttle valve was set at 0.007 inch (production units are set to 0.006 inch). The fuel servo was subjected to bench testing at calibration and service limits consisting of 4 Test Points. The fuel servo was flowed onto white paper; no contaminants or water was noted during the first fluid coming from the unit. During testing at Test Point 1, the regulator was "hanging up" at 80 pounds-per-hour (PPH), when it should have been between 22.0 and 28.0 PPH. This was likely due to air trapped inside the fuel servo. The fuel servo was then manipulated on the test bench in an effort to remove trapped air. The fuel servo was then subjected to Test Point 4, and flowed within limits. Additionally, the travel and hysteresis checks were satisfactory. The unit was then subjected to Test Point 1 and tested satisfactory. At Test Point 2 which is the idle cutoff check, 2 drops were noted in 1 minute (maximum leakage is 5 CC's in 1 minute. At Test Points 3 and 4, the unit flowed within limits and the pressure sensitivity checks at each of those test points were satisfactory. The idle fuel flow with the throttle valve where found (0.007 inch) flowed 11.0 PPH. The throttle valve was adjusted to 0.006 inch and the fuel flow was 6.5 PPH (the idle fuel flow specification is 6.0 to 7.0 PPH). The pressure sensitivity test at idle fuel flow was satisfactory.

Disassembly examination of the fuel servo revealed the regulator self-locking nut was in-place. When attempting to remove only the regulator cover, the air diaphragm, center body, fuel diaphragm and regulator cover separated from the fuel servo body. The air diaphragm and air side of the regulator were clean. A slight amount of fine residue (dust) was noted on the fuel diaphragm, but that did not affect the operation of the fuel servo. Slight contamination was noted on the fuel side of the center body, and also in the servo body regulator section. The fuel diaphragm stem was intact. The passages of the air venturi were clean but slight oily residue was noted on areas of the exterior surface.

The closest official weather observation station is St. Petersburg Airport (KPIE), St. Petersburg, Florida, which is located about 6 miles southeast of the accident site. At 0953, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 230° at 11 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling clear; temperature 79° F; dew point 64° F; altimeter 29.95 inches of Mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/15/2017
Flight Time:   450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 245 hours (Total, this make and model), 450 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL
Registration: N1401J
Model/Series: 112A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 401
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/04/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 30 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2176 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO360 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPIE, 11 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1453 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 137°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ZEPHYRHILLS, FL (ZPH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1008 EST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: CLEARWATER AIR PARK (CLW)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4108 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude: 27.983056, -82.763056 (est)

Location: Clearwater, FL
Accident Number: ANC18LA010
Date & Time: 11/19/2017, 1030 EST
Registration: N1401J
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL 112A
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 19, 2017, about 1030 eastern standard time, a Rockwell International 112A airplane, N1401J, impacted trees during a forced landing on a city street about one mile northeast of Clearwater Air Park (KCLW), St. Petersburg, Florida, following a total loss of engine power. The private pilot and sole passenger sustained no injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Zephyrhills Airport (KZPH), Zephyrhills, Florida about 1008 for the roughly 35 nautical mile flight to KCLW.

According to the pilot, prior to departing KZPH, he added about 30 gallons of fuel to the airplane, which filled the left fuel tank completely and the right tank was about 7/8 full. He performed a walk-around inspection, but did not sump the fuel system for contaminants prior to departure. The roughly 20-minute flight was conducted with the fuel selector on the left tank. When descending through 1,200 ft msl, the pilot conducted the before landing checklist, which included increasing the mixture to full rich, turning on the auxiliary fuel pump and switching the fuel selector to the "BOTH" position. He then reduced the throttle to slow the aircraft and felt "slight resistance" on the throttle lever. About 10 seconds after switching the fuel selector, he began to lose airspeed faster than anticipated. When he looked at the fuel flow indicator, he saw it slowly transition from 8 gallons per hour to zero and the engine subsequently lost all power. He placed the fuel selector back to the left fuel tank, but the engine would not restart. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted a tree in the median of a 4-lane street prior to impacting and coming to rest in a stand of trees adjacent to the roadway.

Video footage captured the airplane as it approached the roadway as well as the final impact. The initial impact with the tree in the median was not captured. The video depicts the airplane in a controlled, level descent. Due to the quality of the video, propeller rotation could not be determined.

The closest official weather observation station is St. Petersburg Airport (KPIE), St. Petersburg, Florida, which is located about 6 miles southeast of the accident site. At 0953, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 230° at 11 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling clear; temperature 79° F; dew point 64° F; altimeter 29.95 inches of Mercury.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming Engines IO-360 series engine. A detail engine and airframe examination is pending. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL
Registration: N1401J
Model/Series: 112A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPIE, 11 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 230°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: ZEPHYRHILLS, FL (ZPH)
Destination: Clearwater, FL (CLW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  27.983056, -82.763056 (est) 



17-248 
Pinellas County Deputies Investigate A Small Plane Crash Near Clearwater Airpark in Unincorporated Clearwater 

Small Plane Crash Investigation

Who:
Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office
Patrol Operations Bureau

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)

Clearwater Airpark – 1000 North Hercules Avenue Clearwater

Zephyrhills Municipal Airport – 39450 South Avenue, Zephyrhills

Marc Allen Benedict (Uninjured Pilot)
DOB:03/20/1956
Address:1972 Hastings Drive, Clearwater

Gregory Guinee (Uninjured Passenger)
DOB: 09/16/1962
Address:1972 Hastings Drive, Clearwater

What:
Pinellas County Deputies are currently assisting the FAA and NTSB with a plane crash investigation that occurred near the Clearwater Airpark Airport.  

When:
The crash occurred at approximately 10:23 a.m. on November 19, 2017.

Where:
The plane crash occurred at 1817 North Keene Road, Clearwater.

 Near the Clearwater Airpark Airport 1000 North Hercules Avenue Clearwater.

Why/How:
Pinellas County Deputies are currently assisting the FAA and NTSB with a plane crash investigation that occurred at 1817 North Keene Road, Clearwater.

Deputies first received reports of the plane crash this morning at approximately 10:23 a.m. Two Deputies were responding to an unrelated call for service, in the vicinity and witnessed the plane crash.

According to the Pilot 61-year-old Marc Allen Benedict at approximately 9:00, the single-engine Rockwell International aircraft 112-A piloted by Benedict along with his passenger 55-year-old Gregory Guinee had taken off from Clearwater Airpark located at 1000 North Hercules Avenue Clearwater, flew to the  Zephyrhills Municipal Airport, 39450 South Avenue, Zephyrhills Florida.

Deputies say after refueling the aircraft at the Zephyrhills Municipal Airport, they attempted to return back to the Clearwater Airpark at approximately 10:00 a.m. The pilot reported to deputies he believed there to be engine trouble while in the air over the area of Sunset Point Road and Belcher Road area in Clearwater.

Benedict told investigators he did not believe he could make it back to the Clearwater Airpark and began looking for a safe place to land. Benedict said he saw a deputy near the intersection of Keene Road and Sunset Point Road. Benedict said he then observed what appeared to be an opening and attempted to land the plane on Keene Road. While landing, Benedict reported the pilot side, (left wing) caught a tree causing the plane to spin and crash at 1817 North Keene Road, Clearwater.

Investigators say both the pilot Benedict and his passenger Guinee reported no injuries and refused medical treatment.

The investigation into the cause of the crash is being conducted by the FAA and NTSB. It has not yet been determined what caused the plane to crash.

The investigation continues.  

Original article can be found here ➤  http://pcsoweb.com

Pilot Marc Benedict, left, and passenger Gregory Guinee, rest on the curb along Keene Road after walking away from the crash of a small plane on Sunday along Keene Road, south of Sunset Point Road, in Clearwater. The plane was a Rockwell Commander 112A.



CLEARWATER, Fla. (WFLA) – “We’re going down!”  😬

That’s what pilot Marc Benedict told his roommate before making an emergency landing on a busy road Sunday morning.

With an airborne engine failure, Benedict had to put the plane down right away.

Seconds later, he did just that, in the middle of Keene Road in Clearwater.

A small tree spun the plane into a fence.

“There’s a lot to do and it requires concentration, and it’s the culmination of a lot of good training,” said Captain John Cox, retired pilot and current consultant for Safety Operating Systems.

Captain Cox said take offs and landings are the most critical times.

“Based on the video I saw, he did a really good job. The airplane is under control, the landing gear is down. Clearly, he is flying the airplane. He is thinking. He’s deliberately putting it in a safe place,” said Captain Cox.

The pilot of plane that landed on the road said he and his roommate had flown to the Zephyrhills airport, topped off his fuel tanks, then made the trip back to Clearwater Airpark.

Over the “Top of the World” community, not far from the landing strip, Benedict discovered he could not climb and was losing power.

He told passenger Greg Guinee, “we’re going down.”

Seeing traffic in the southbound lanes, he headed for the northbound side.

He yelled for Greg to “brace.”

Seconds later, he hit a sapling, which made him lose control.

With the tanks ruptured, both got out. Captain Cox believes it was lucky there was not a spark to start a fire.

The pilot suspects something happened with the plane’s fuel system.

He’s very happy nobody got hurt and while he missed church yesterday, he plans to be there next Sunday.


Original article can be found here ➤  http://wfla.com



CLEARWATER — Two men walked away unhurt from a small airplane after it clipped a tree and spun around as the pilot tried to make an emergency landing on Keene Road, deputies said.

Pilot Marc Benedict, 61, and passenger Gregory Guinee, 55, of Clearwater, were not injured when the single-engine, four-seat Rockwell Commander 112 crashed about 10:25 a.m. Sunday along Keene Road at Sunset Point Road, said Pinellas County Sheriff's Office spokesman Cpl. Daniel DiFrancesco.

Benedict experienced engine trouble as he was returning to Clearwater Air Park from Zephyrhills Municipal Airport, DiFrancesco said. He had taken off for Zephyrhills about 9 a.m. and took off about 10 a.m. for the return trip.

Benedict reported engine trouble while flying southwest over On Top of the World, a 55-plus community in Clearwater, and attempted to land on Keene Road.

The left wing hit a tree in the road's median, causing the plane to spin around and come to a stop on a sidewalk.

An investigation is under way but deputies said there was no indication of impairment. The Federal Aviation Administration was scheduled to take overe the probe.

Keene Road was expected to be blocked until the plane could be towed away.

Wayne Owens, 49, heard the crash from his house on Bentley Street, just one house away from where the plane landed.

Owens, an electrician, thought it was a car crash before he noticed the downed tree and mangled plane. He's heard of other plane crashes nearby.


"I feel very uneasy about it," he said. "I didn't think about it until after I bought the place that we're right in the direct line of the airport."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.tbo.com





CLEARWATER, Fla. (WFLA) —A small plane crashed in unincorporated Clearwater Sunday morning. Fortunately, both the pilot and passenger survived without any injuries.

The crash occurred on North Keene Road near Sunset Point Road, less than one mile from the Clearwater Airpark around 10:30 a.m.

Deputies said the single-engine Rockwell International aircraft 112-A piloted by 61-year-old Marc Allen Benedict had flown from Clearwater Airpark to Zephyrhills Municipal Airport

“They refueled and spent a little bit of time there before they departed to come back to Clearwater Airpark,” said Corporal Dan DiFrancesco with the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office

Benedict told officials the plane began experiencing engine trouble while in the air over the area of Sunset Point Road and Belcher Road and he was forced to reroute the plane.

He said he worried he wouldn’t make it back to the airport and started looking for a safe place to land.

“He noticed the road was open,” said Corporal DiFrancesco. “He also noticed we had deputy in the area that was helping because he was on a traffic stop.”

While Benedict attempted a landing on Keene Road, part of the plane caught a tree, causing the aircraft to spin out of control and crash on the road. A deputy’s dash cam captured it on video.

“His words to me:  He would have made it if it had not been for that small tree,” recalled Corporal DiFrancesco.

Benedict and his passenger, 55-year-old Gregory Guinee would not speak to News Channel 8 on camera.

The chaotic scene caught neighbors by surprise.

“I could not believe that a plane actually crashed right literally a block from my house,” said Belinda Maxwell, who has lived in the area for about eight years.

“I said. ‘Oh my god, how could that be?’” another resident, Joe Pasquarella exclaimed.

“It could have been a whole lot worse,” said Maxwell. “Thank God no one lost their lives.”

Investigators do not believe impairment was a factor in the crash but an investigation is ongoing.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://wfla.com




CLEARWATER (FOX 13) - Investigators with the FAA, NTSB, and the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office are investigating a small plane that crashed in Clearwater Sunday morning. 

According to the pilot, 61-year-old Marc Benedict, just after 10:00 a.m his Rockwell International 112A took off from Zephyrhills Airport heading towards Clearwater. The pilot reported that the noticed a problem with the engine while he was over the area of Sunset Road and Belcher Road in Clearwater. 


Benedict told investigators he did not feel like the plane would make it back to the airport and began to search for a safe plane to land. Benedict spotted an area on Keene Road and attempted to land. While doing so, the plane's left wing hit a tree causing the plane to spin and crash at 1817 North Keene Road. 


Deputies say both Benedict and his passenger were not hurt in the incident. 


The investigation is being conducted by the FAA and NTSB. There is no word yet as to what caused the crash. 


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox13news.com