Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Suspected drug plane has been moved to Belize Defence Force Air Wing in Ladyville Village





Friday, April 27, 2018

Police have still not issued an official report on the suspected drug plane that landed on Tuesday morning on the San Estevan road in the Orange Walk district.

By the time police arrived at the scene on Tuesday morning, the cargo, pilot (and passengers) were long gone.

Yesterday, BBN readers sent a video of the plane being flown away, but where was it heading to?

According to a report from 7 News Belize, the jet is now at the BDF Air Wing in Ladyville Village.

The jet is a Hawker Siddeley 225 twinjet usually used by rich corporations.

On Wednesday evening, after consistent media requests for information of the discovery of the suspected drug plane, the Ministry of National Security issued a statement indicating that along with its regional partners, including the United States, Mexico, and Central American neighbours, they rely on information from each other to keep informed of any airplane tracking towards Belize and the region.

The Ministry said that despite these efforts, there has been a spate of illegal airplane landings in the country as these aircraft manage to avoid detection from the available regional radars.

Last month, the United States International Narcotics Control Strategy Report cited Belize as a major drug transit country.











…over twelve and a half million dollars invested by government for its Approach Control Center at the Philip Goldson International Airport, which was officially launched in early December of 2017. The state-of-the-art equipment featured an upgraded radar head, which provides information on aircrafts flying over Belize and guides them to land. But even with the advanced technology, five planes, believed to have been carrying illicit cargo, were able to successfully land in Belize undetected. 

BELIZE CITY, Wed. Apr. 25, 2018– The transshipment of drugs through Belize has entered a new phase of sophistication after a twin engine jet plane landed on the San Estevan / Progresso Village Road, located about 3 miles out of San Estevan village, Orange Walk District, early yesterday morning, Tuesday.

The Hawker Siddeley 225 jet (wing span: 14.32m (47 ft 0in), length: 14.42m (47 ft 5in) (It has also been classified by some experts as a British Aerospace 125 — which is a twin-jet business class aircraft.)   has presented Belizean law enforcement officials with a major challenge: how to move the mid-sized jet from the village road, where it is now under the guard of Belize security forces. Although it is most likely still airworthy, reportedly, there are no pilots in Belize who could fly it from its present location.

The passenger seating for the jet has been removed, which suggests that the space was used for loading cargo—in this case, drugs, most likely cocaine that is bound for the United States’ illegal drug market.

A jet plane is not a quiet aircraft; its landing is noisy because of its propulsion engines. Yet this plane not only landed, but its cargo was offloaded, before it disappeared without a trace.

An attempt was obviously made to set it on fire, but it appears that whoever thought about setting it ablaze had a change of mind, for the possible reason that setting fire to such a large aircraft would bring authorities to the area more quickly.

The Orange Walk Police formation, in whose jurisdiction the plane landed, has not issued any report to the media concerning the aircraft, and the officer in charge did not return our phone calls, so the country has been left in the dark, as far as this particular drug plane is concerned.

Did the plane land here in an attempt to refuel? Did it drop off its cargo here? Were any traces of illicit drugs found on the plane? Who was involved in facilitating its landing? How long after the plane had landed did the police find out about it? What actions did they take? All these questions need answering.

Belize Civil Aviation has the expertise to trace the origin of the aircraft, but everything has been left in the hands of the police, because the plane was apparently involved in illegal activities and its landing here was an illegal landing, making it a police matter.

This particular jet was manufactured in the United States, in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1983, and last year, 2017, it was certified.

Belizean authorities therefore have to determine if the aircraft was stolen and brought here, and what are the legal rights of the owner to reclaim it from the Belize government, which technically now owns it.

According to a report on 7News, police had intelligence that the plane would land, and they had deployed a number of officers in the Orange Walk area in an attempt to intercept it. It’s been reported, however, that it took a couple hours for them to find the site on which the landing took place.

7News also reported that engineers were brought in to assess the airworthiness of the jet, and to figure out a way to remove it from the village road.

According to some reports, residents of nearby communities in Orange Walk had indicated that, prior to the landing of the plane, they had heard sounds of a low-flying aircraft. There have also been reports that a few hours before residents heard these sounds, persons who use the road on which the landing took place had observed strange markers on the ground.

Since last November, a total of 7 planes have landed in Belize, but no one has been detained and none of the cargo from the planes has been found.

Our research indicated that jets of this type, with a similar date of manufacture, are valued in the region of US$500,000. Government will have to decide what to do with the jet, because Belize lacks the expertise to make use of it.

Late this evening, the Ministry of National Security issued a press release entitled, “Statement on recent spate of illegal airplane landings.”

The release explains that Belize relies on regional partners, including the United States, Mexico and Central American neighbors, to inform “of any airplane tracking toward Belize and the region.”

The release said that “Despite these efforts, there has been a spate of illegal airplane landings in the country as the aircraft manage to avoid detection from the available regional radars.”

The release explains that by the time the illegally flown airplanes enter Belize’s airspace, the information changes.

The release added, “These aircraft actively avoid radar detection; therefore, Belizean authorities must rely principally on actual sightings and the most recent intelligence received locally, or from our regional partners, to try to anticipate the landing areas for the planes.”

“The Ministry of National Security, in conjunction with regional partners, continues to seek ways to improve detection capabilities to prevent the illegal landings. In the meantime, the Ministry encourages the public to immediately report suspicious aircraft sightings to law enforcement agencies (Police, Belize Defence Force, Belize Coast Guard); doing so can aid in a timelier response by the authorities,” the release ends saying.

It is noteworthy that the Ministry of National Security release said nothing about the most recent plane, the jet, which landed in Orange Walk.

It appears that as long as Belize continues to rely on a radar system which requires that airplane pilots turn on their transponders, we will never be able to detect, by radar, illegal flights of drug planes.

At the inauguration of the new Belize Civil Aviation building last December, air traffic control officer Marsha Hinkson explained how the new, multi-million dollar radar works.

“The aircraft need to be equipped with what we call a transponder. It is a secondary surveillance radar; therefore, it has to have that equipment on board. Apart from that, they have to turn on the equipment. If they do not turn on the equipment, then they would not be able to be detected by the radar,” she said.

http://amandala.com.bz

A drug plane landed on the San Estevan/Progresso Road yesterday morning - and that's where it remains tonight, on the shoulder of the road.

But, 7News has learned tonight that preparations are being made to fly it from there to a secure location. As we told you it is a Hawker Siddeley 225 jet, which local pilots are not qualified to fly. But, the police department did find a qualified pilot in the PG area, and we are told he went to the site today to assess the aircraft. If all goes as planned, he is expected to fly it out of there early tomorrow. We'll wait and see.

And while the government will now have to decide what it plans to do with the jet - which does have a fair market value - the bigger issue is - what's up with all these planes? Since November of last year - this is the seventh suspected drug plane that has landed in Belize. Most of them were burnt, one was left damaged, and this one is the first jet - and it was left intact - after the crew tried to burn it and failed.

Today we asked Minister of State in Ministry of National Security Elodio Aragon for his view on the flurry of drug planes - and if there is a plan to stop them:

Reporter:  "We've had 7 drug planes since November. We just had another one. What can you tell us about this? Obviously it seems we're trafficking a lot in terms of drugs."

Hon. Elodio Aragon Jr., Minister of State in Ministry of National Security:   "That has always been a part of our history of Belize, if you look way back in the 1980's Belize ranked in the 4th biggest drug trafficking country in terms of marijuana. In the area, cocaine, we've had all of these incidences still here and it will always continue to be an issue. We at the ministry of national security have to be concerned about these things so it is a concern to us for national security reasons. The ministry is definitely looking into the situation."

Reporter: "Is this the most you've ever heard of in this small timeframe? Seven different planes landing in various parts of Belize?"

Hon. Elodio Aragon Jr:  "I've highlighted anytime we've had these aircraft incidents so of course it is a concern to us and we would like to know that they are not using Belize as a transshipment country. The reality is that people are using Belize as a transshipment country. It is more work now for the security forces to double up, put it the security strategies to ensure that we are able to deter that."

Reporter: "What kind of strategies will be used to help avoid this in the future?"

Hon. Elodio Aragon Jr: "Those things cannot be discussed to the public because if we do that then it won't help, but they're definitely looking at that and we're going to see how we can curb that situation. We're asking the community out there, if you hear or you're out there in your community, especially those rural communities, and you hear a low flying aircraft, you can call that in. That will assist us and that information is channeled so we can have a better response. This is all about timing, in dealing with these situations."

Reporter: "I know you can't really comment on who it is, where they're from but you guys kind of have an idea of this or you're still trying to figure it out?"

Hon. Elodio Aragon Jr: "This is an old profession in terms of people using this country as a transshipment area, this has been with us from a long time. As a matter of fact we're seeing an increase so it's definitely something that is a concern to us and definitely we have to do a response in terms of how to best curb the situation. I am confident that now we're under the ministry of national security, where there's a more cohesive coherent communication between the military, the coast guard and the police, I think we're now best able to do better as one ministry to deal with this problem."

And today, The Ministry of National Security sent out a statement on the rash of drug planes dropping in Belize. It says, quote, "The local law enforcement response is based primarily on initial tracking information and intelligence provided by regional partners. In the case of illegally flown airplanes, that information changes by the time the plane enters Belize's airspace. These aircraft actively avoid radar detection, therefore, Belizean authorities must rely principally on actual sightings and the most recent intelligence received locally, or from our regional partners, to try to anticipate the landing areas for the planes. Although law enforcement authorities try to cover multiple possible landing sites, the pilots also have several landing options and are therefore able to elude authorities." End quote. The Ministry encourages the public to immediately report suspicious aircraft sightings to law enforcement.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.7newsbelize.com

The San Estevan Road in the Orange Walk District is currently being monitored by police officers and BDF personnel who are on the scene of another suspected drug plane landing.

The discovery was made just after 5:00 a.m. on April 24th on a feeder road leading from San Estevan Village to Progresso. In an amateur video, the aircraft was abandoned on the side of the feeder road and appears to be intact, without any cargo.

Police have not issued any details or confirmation on this latest find, which is now recorded as the fifth incident since the beginning of the year.

A week ago, residents of Hattieville, Belize District also reported a low flying aircraft in their area, and according to reports, the aircraft landed and unloaded unidentified cargo. When asked about the incident, the police department was stumped and said they did not have information on that incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.reporter.bz

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort responds to Lowcountry woman's threat to 'shoot down' planes

BEAUFORT, SC (WCSC) -  The Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort responded Tuesday to a report that a Colleton County woman threatened to shoot at military planes.

Deputies say the woman complained about what she described as low-flying aircraft flying over her property in Yemassee.

She said the planes were frightening her horses and causing them to run off, telling deputies she would have to shoot the planes down, an incident report states.

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort released the statement Tuesday afternoon: 

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort recently received two inquiries regarding aircraft noise in which an individual threatened to shoot at our aircraft. We take threats to aircraft and personnel seriously which is why we contacted the Colleton County Sheriff's Office to request their assistance in responding to the threat. We appreciate their assistance in communicating with the individual.

Our jets have been operating over the skies of Beaufort and the surrounding area since 1960. It is imperative that our training be conducted to certify that we are the most prepared to defend our country when the nation calls on us. We apologize for any inconvenience that our training causes but it's what ensures mothers, fathers, husbands, wives and children all over this country that their family member in uniform comes home.

The Colleton County Sheriff's Office says the case was turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the military.

The woman was not charged, according to Colleton County Sheriff's Lt. Tyger Benton.

Story and video ➤ http://www.live5news.com

Mosquito XE, N911CY, owned and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred April 24, 2018 at Gaines Valley Aviation Airport (NY06), Albion, Orleans County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N911CY

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Albion, NY
Accident Number: ERA18LA135
Date & Time: 04/24/2018, 1403 EDT
Registration: N911CY
Aircraft: HEARD ALAN E MOSQUITO XE
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 24, 2018, about 1403 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Mosquito XE helicopter, N911CY, was destroyed by a postimpact fire after a hard landing shortly after takeoff from Gaines Valley Aviation Airport (NY06), Albion, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured. The helicopter was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the pilot advised him while hospitalized that after takeoff, while flying about twice the height of powerlines in a westerly direction over a field, the helicopter experienced a partial loss of engine power. He began looking for a place to land, and then the engine experienced total loss of power. He indicated that the helicopter did not have adequate main rotor rpm to autorotate, and as a result it impacted hard.

A witness who was driving on Gaines Road near NY06 reported observing the helicopter hovering approximately 6 ft above ground level adjacent to hangars. He then observed the helicopter ascend "straight up" to about twice the height as nearby powerlines, and then proceeded in a westerly direction crossing Gaines Road. He observed a "small piece" separate and then heard a popping sound that was immediately followed by a grinding sound. The helicopter then began a steep descent during which time a "second piece" separated from the helicopter. The helicopter impacted the ground and immediately burst into flames. He called 911, then responded to the accident site and rendered assistance to the pilot until first responders arrived.

The helicopter, which was equipped with an Innovator Technologies Inntec 800 two-stroke, two cylinder, 85 horsepower engine, was retained for examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: HEARD ALAN E
Registration: N911CY
Model/Series: MOSQUITO XE NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ROC, 559 ft msl
Observation Time: 1354 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 26 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Albion, NY (NY06)
Destination: Albion, NY (NY06)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 43.296389, -78.222500 (est)



A man is recovering after his small helicopter crashed in Orleans County Tuesday.

Emergency responders tell News10NBC the pilot, 64-year-old Alan Heard of Waterport, could have died if it wasn't for a good Samaritan. 

Investigators say the Mosquito XE model helicopter ran into engine trouble and went down in flames Tuesday afternoon near the Gaines Valley Aviation Airport in Gaines. News10NBC is told it was a helicopter built from a kit. 

Deputies say Mark Bennett, also of Waterport, was driving by and saw the helicopter preparing to take off so he stopped to watch. After lifting off to an altitude of approximately 100 to 200 feet, the helicopter began experiencing mechanical problems.

Popping and grinding sounds were heard by witnesses, deputies say, as the helicopter traveled west over Gaines-Waterport Road. At this point, the aircraft was on fire and Heard performed a hard landing on the skids in a field.

Bennett climbed over an electric fence and ran to the crash site. He helped Heard get out of the aircraft and away from the wreckage. Deputies say Heard's clothes were on fire and Bennett was able to roll Heard and cut his shirt off with a knife to extinguish the flames. 

"The Lord had me come by just at that time," Bennett said. "To God be the glory. All I did was what anyone else would've done, I guess."

Heard was taken to Strong Hospital with burns and a back injury. As of Wednesday afternoon, Heard is in the ICU in guarded condition.

The Albion Fire Department and Carlton Fire Company also assisted at the scene. F.A.A. investigators secured parts of the aircraft along with a Go-Pro camera for analysis as they work to determine the cause of the crash.


Story and video ➤ http://www.whec.com



Carlton, N.Y. (WHAM) - The pilot of a homemade helicopter was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital Tuesday afternoon after crashing in a field across a small airport in Orleans County.

This happened at the Gaines Valley Airport in Carlton around 2 p.m.

The Gaines Valley Airport is located on State Route 279, approximately 40 miles northwest of Rochester.

Orleans County Sheriff Randy Bower said the helicopter was a small, private chopper called a "mosquito." It was reportedly flying for about 10 minutes before crashing and only went as high as power lines.

Sheriff Bower said the pilot was maybe 100 feet up in the air when a witness heard a pop and the helicopter came down, immediately catching fire.

“I came around the corner of the back of my house and looked out and saw the fire," said Irene Drennen who lives next to the airport. “It was way high. I said, oh my God. That’s a crash."

After calling 911, Dirk Climenhaga, who lives next to the field where the crash happened, ran to the scene to help.

"The fire started getting worse and worse, and all I could see was a ball of fire and smoke rising up," said Climenhaga.

Climenhaga said his friend Mark arrived on scene right before him and helped to put the fire out on the pilot's back.

"He grabbed him out of the helicopter and put him on the ground," he said. "That’s when I got to Mark and the person in the helicopter and looked to see what his condition was."

The pilot of the helicopter, a man in his 60s, suffered burns to his back, according to Orleans County Sheriff's deputies. There was no one else on board the helicopter at the time of the crash.

A small, white pile of debris is all that is left of the private helicopter in a farmer's field.

There is no word on what might have caused the crash, but the FAA is investigating and is reportedly looking into whether there was an issue with the engine.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://13wham.com





ALBION, N.Y. — A man in his 60s crashed his homemade helicopter at the Gaines Valley Aviation Airport in Albion just before 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to the Orleans County sheriff.

He says the pilot normally flies the helicopter but doesn't go too high. Today, he did, heard a bang and the chopper starting going down. It crashed into a field and caught fire.

Witnesses say they saw the pilot roll over, putting out flames from his back.

The FAA says it is investigating.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://spectrumlocalnews.com




GAINES, N.Y. (WKBW) - The man who was operating a homebuilt helicopter that crashed Tuesday afternoon at the Gaines Valley has been hospitalized.

The crash happened at the Gaines Valley Airport just before 2 p.m.

According to ABC affiliate WHAM, the Orleans County Sheriff said the small helicopter, known as a "mosquito," was reportedly in the air for about 10 minutes before crashing. The sheriff told WHAM that the aircraft got no higher than power lines.

Deputies told WHAM the pilot and sole occupant was a man in his sixties, who suffered burns on his back. He was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester for treatment.

Investigators are now looking into what caused the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wkbw.com

Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket, N9281E, registered to and operated by the pilot, accident occurred April 24, 2018 (and) Maule M-5-180C, N56552, accident occurred March 02, 2017 in Roxbury, McPherson County, Kansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9281E

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Roxbury, KS
Accident Number: CEN18LA148
Date & Time: 04/24/2018, 1355 CDT
Registration: N9281E
Aircraft: MAULE M 5-235C
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 24, 2018, about 1355 central daylight time, a Maule M 5-235C airplane, N9281E, impacted a ground object and terrain during takeoff from a roadway near Roxbury, Kansas. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane received substantial wing damage during the impact with terrain. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and the destination is unknown.

At 1353, the recorded weather at the Salina Regional Airport, near Salina, Kansas, was: Wind 320° at 21 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 11,000 ft; temperature 20° C; dew point 9° C; altimeter 30.16 inches of mercury. Remarks peak wind 320° at 27 kts at 1341. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MAULE
Registration: N9281E
Model/Series: M 5-235C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSLN, 1289 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 11000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 21 knots, 320°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Roxbury, KS
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 38.551111, -97.427222 (est)


ROXBURY -- A Wabaunsee County man was hurt in a plane crash in McPherson County on Tuesday.

The Kansas Highway Patrol says 57-year-old Shannon Randal Scot of Alma was piloting a Maule M5 235C, a single-propeller plane, when he had troubles during takeoff shortly before 1:45 pm. Scot's plane hit a sign and lost control, ending up in a grove of trees about half a mile east of the small town of Roxbury, about 15 miles east of Lindsborg and approximately 30 miles south-southeast of Salina.

Scot was taken to Salina Regional Hospital for treatment. His condition has not been released, although the Kansas Highway Patrol says injuries were not life-threatening.

KVOE's television partner KWCH in Wichita says the pilot is the same individual who crashed another plane in the same area of McPherson County last year, although his name at that time was listed as Randal Shannon of Drexel, Mo. After the crash in March 2017, Scot apparently walked away from the plane and went to a meeting at a Roxbury bank without calling 911. He told media afterward he didn't make the call because he wasn't hurt and the crash didn't damage somebody else's property.

http://www.kvoe.com



A 57-year-old pilot of a small airplane was injured when he crashed while trying to take off  on a rural McPherson County road on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, Shannon Scot from Alma was attempting to take off in a Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket headed east on Smoky Valley Road. The plane hit a sign, lost control, and ended up in trees on the north side of the road.

Scot was transported to Salina Regional Health Center with non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened at 1:40 in the afternoon Tuesday, a half-mile east of Roxbury just north of Smoky Valley Road.

ORIGINAL: The pilot of a small airplane was injured when he crashed while trying to take off in rural McPherson County on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, the pilot was attempting to take off when the aircraft hit a sign and crashed into a tree line.

The pilot was transported to Salina Regional Health Center with non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened at around 2:00 in the afternoon Tuesday, east of Roxbury in McPherson County.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ksal.com



Maule M-5-180C, N56552: Accident occurred March 02, 2017 in Roxbury, McPherson County, Kansas 

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N56552



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Roxbury, KS
Accident Number: GAA17CA170
Date & Time: 03/02/2017, 1315 CST
Registration: N56552
Aircraft: MAULE M5
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, while landing on a road in gusting crosswind conditions, the right wing lifted to about a 60° angle. He immediately initiated a go-around and added full power and right aileron and lowered the nose. The airplane had drifted off the center of the road to the left heading toward power lines, and the pilot chose to go under them. After the airplane cleared the power lines, the left wing tip struck the ground, and the airplane cart-wheeled. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during a go-around.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on operation
Tower/antenna (incl guy wires) - Decision related to condition

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Other
Attempted remediation/recovery
Abrupt maneuver
Low altitude operation/event
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Dragged wing/rotor/float/other
Roll over 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/20/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/09/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 367 hours (Total, all aircraft), 153 hours (Total, this make and model), 326 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MAULE
Registration: N56552
Model/Series: M5 180C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1984
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 8080C
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/19/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1115.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-CIF
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSLN, 1289 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 1°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -6°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.44 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CAMDENTON, MO (OZS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Roxbury, KS
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1010 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.550833, -97.652778 (est)

By the time emergency personnel arrived at the site of a Kansas plane crash this week, the uninjured pilot already had:

Cleaned his personal belongings out of the plane.

Walked to a nearby bank.

Attended a business meeting.

Called federal aviation and transportation officials.

And caught a ride out of town.

The pilot, Randy Shannon, had no idea that local authorities considered him “missing” after a passerby spotted the crumpled plane Thursday afternoon in a field near Roxybury, Kansas, and called 911.

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com

Authorities say a pilot went missing for several hours after a small plane crash-landed in a central Kansas field.

Kansas Highway Patrol Trooper Ben Gardner says the plane went down around 3:30 p.m. Thursday in a rural area near the small town of Roxbury. The Federal Aviation Administration says wind caught the Maule M-5 and that the left wing struck the ground during the landing.

Gardner says troopers tried reaching out to hospitals in the area in an effort to locate the pilot but were unsuccessful. Gardner says the patrol didn’t hear from the pilot until he called dispatchers about six hours later.

Gardner says the pilot’s plane was disabled and that it’s unclear how he left the scene. Gardner says investigators are trying to determine what happened.

A pilot was able to walk away when his  small plane crashed near the McPherson County community of Roxbury Thursday afternoon.

The Maule M-5-180C plane went down at around 3:30 in a field.

A witness told KSAL News at the scene that she heard the crash. A few minutes later when she approached it the pilot was gone, presumably headed to seek medical treatment.

Kansas Highway Patrol Trooper Craig Davis told KSAL News at the scene that McPherson County law enforcement were the first to arrive. He says that the pilot was not at the crash site when law enforcement arrived. They were still in search of the pilot late in the afternoon.

The patrol is investigating to determine what caused the plane to go down.

The plane ended upright, and was not leaking fuel.

The small community of Roxbury is located in the northeast corner of McPherson County, between Salina and McPherson, or 18 miles east of Lindsborg.

Source: http://www.ksal.com

Beech G58 Baron, N485BB: Accident occurred April 13, 2018 at Easton Airport (KESN), Talbot County, Maryland

WPMCO LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N485BB

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA226
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, April 13, 2018 in Easton, MD
Aircraft: TEXTRON AVIATION INC G58, registration: N485BB

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Scamp experimental, N964TA: Accident occurred April 22, 2018 in Raymond, Pacific County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N964TA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA223
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 22, 2018 in Raymond, WA
Aircraft: KEN OLSON SCAMP, registration: N964TA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee 180, N83LM: Incident occurred April 23, 2018 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft damaged runway light.

Airshot Video LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N83LM

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: N83LM
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 737-700: Incident occurred April 23, 2018 - Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Flight 366: Encountered moderate turbulence.

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 366
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Air India Boeing 787-800, VT-ANI: Incident occurred April 19, 2018 near Amritsar, India

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New Delhi, India 

Flight 462:  Encountered severe turbulence. 

Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 02:52:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B787
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AIR INDIA
Flight Number: 462
City: NEW DELHI
State: INDIA




NEW DELHI:  The pilot commanding the Air India Boeing 787 Dreamliner that hit severe air turbulence between Amritsar and New Delhi on Thursday reportedly had "never seen anything like this ever". The incident has been described as a "freak kind of severe turbulence". Three passengers were injured when flight AI-462, a 6-year-old Boeing 787, one of the most modern jets in civil aviation, carrying 236 passengers and six crew members, encountered an extended period of turbulence lasting approximately 15 minutes. A video shot by a passenger on board shows terrified passengers being consoled and assisted by the cabin crew.

One of the injured passengers received stitches after the jet landed safely at Delhi's Indira Gandhi International Airport. The video shows the inner layer of a passenger window having come loose while two overhead oxygen masks appear to have fallen when the Dreamliner hit turbulence. The strengthened outer passenger window at the same seat was not dislodged or damaged.

NDTV has learnt that preliminary data indicates that passengers on the airliner encountered upto three times the force of gravity, during the extreme turbulence which took place when the plane was climbing from 8, 000 feet to 21,000 feet, shortly after take off from Amritsar. So strong was the turbulence that the auto-pilot systems in the cockpit tripped after exceeding their design tolerances forcing the pilots to take manual control of the airliner.

The Dreamliner is also fitted with a state-of-the-art turbulence dampening system which is designed to counteract the effects of instability during a flight. Accelerometers in the nose of the jet register an unexpected change in the altitude of the aircraft and instantly (in nanoseconds) order the wing flaps to making adjustments to minimise the impact of unexpected turbulence. It is not known if the system was overloaded by the violent and unsteady movement of air that the 787 experienced.

Senior Air India air safety experts looking into the incident say "clear air turbulence appears to the preliminary cause". Meteorological reports are being collected. No weather phenomenon of this sort was predicted on the charts." India's aviation watchdog, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) is part of the investigations and the Boeing 787 involved in the incident has been grounded. A preliminary engineering analysis suggests there is no structural damage to the aircraft.

"We want to get to the bottom of the severe turbulence to try and understand what happened.  An investigation is looking at this.  It appears that the actions taken by the pilots and the cabin crew in handling the situation were correct under the circumstances they encountered," said Harpreet AD Singh, the Head of Flight Safety at Air India.

In October 2014, a Singapore Airlines Airbus A-380 encountered a similar situation while descending to land at Mumbai's Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport. Sudden turbulence resulted in injuries to 22 passengers and crew members. Ten of them need to be hospitalised but were subsequently released. All the 3 passengers injured in the Air India incident chose to continue their onward flights from Delhi after being treated at Medanta hospital in Gurgaon, near the Delhi airport.

Story and video: https://www.ndtv.com