Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Travel Air 4D, N476N: Accident occurred November 30, 2021 at Riverside-Flabob Airport (KRIR), Riverside County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Location: Riverside, California
Accident Number: WPR22LA051
Date and Time: November 30, 2021, 11:50 Local
Registration: N476N
Aircraft: Travel Air 4-D
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Travel Air
Registration: N476N
Model/Series: 4-D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.5703,-117.2647 (est)







A pilot was hospitalized with minor injuries Tuesday, November 30, after his plane flipped upside down while taxiing on the runway at Riverside Flabob Airport in Jurupa Valley, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Firefighters were dispatched at 11:34 a.m. and found the pilot outside the Travel Air 4D after he got out on his own. The Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson said she did not know whether the pilot was taxiing before takeoff or after landing.

The plane is registered to an address in Rancho Santa Margarita.

Van's RV-4, N456MC: Fatal accident occurred December 08, 2021 near Spanish Peaks Airfield (4V1), Walsenburg, Huerfano County, Colorado

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado


Location: Walsenburg, Colorado
Accident Number: CEN22FA064
Date and Time: December 8, 2021, 10:13 Local
Registration: N456MC
Aircraft: Vans RV-4 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 8, 2021, about 1013 mountain standard time, a Vans RV-4 airplane, N456MC, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident near Walsenburg, Colorado. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to two other pilots involved in the flight, the accident flight was a three-airplane formation flight with position changes planned during the course of the flight. The three airplanes departed the Meadow Lake Airport (KFLY), Colorado Springs, Colorado, and headed south with the accident airplane as the lead airplane. As the airplanes transitioned south past Pueblo, Colorado, they began a descent towards the Cucharas Reservoir, northeast of Walsenburg. The airplanes were in a right echelon route formation and were prepared to go to a trail formation for a low-level maneuvering flight. About 1 mile north of the reservoir, the accident pilot directed the two other pilots to “go trail”, and he executed a left turn and descent towards a river canyon that extended north of the reservoir. The pilots reported they entered a descent and encountered strong surface winds and turbulence above the canyon rim. The accident pilot’s airplane descended below the canyon rim in a steep left bank turn. The pilots observed the accident airplane’s left wing contact the edge of the canyon at a high speed. The airplane fragmented and came to a stop in the canyon. After the accident, the pilots circled the area, contacted air traffic control to report the accident location, and then returned to KFLY.

A review of the automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data revealed the flight tracks for the three airplanes were consistent with the witness reports. The accident airplane’s data ended about 1 mile west of the accident site.

Postaccident examination of the accident site revealed airplane debris consistent with the left wing and wing tip were at the initial impact area. The airplane’s forward fuselage impacted rocky terrain, and the airplane fragmented into multiple sections. The engine, fractured composite propeller blades, and the main landing gear were separated from the fuselage and came to rest between the initial impact point and main wreckage. The main wreckage consisted of the cockpit/cabin, empennage, and inboard sections of the left and right wings (see Figure 1.).


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans 
Registration: N456MC
Model/Series: RV-4
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTAD, 5743 ft msl
Observation Time: 10:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C /-12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Colorado Springs, CO (FLY)
Destination: Walsenburg, CO

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 37.792822,-104.57616 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290. 


Michael Vaughn Cranford
(February 9, 1941 ~ December 8, 2021)


Michael Vaughn Cranford was born on February 9, 1951 to Donald Christian and Marjorie Sears Cranford in Mineral Wells.

After graduating from Stephenville High School, he received and appointment to the United States Air Force Academy, fulfilling his life-long dream of becoming a pilot.  Upon completion of his service duties to the Air Force, he began his commercial flying career spending 30+ years piloting for United Airlines.  His love of flying continued until his final flight in southern Colorado on Wednesday, December 8, 2021 when he entered into the arms of his Lord and Savior.

He is preceded in death by his father, mother, and older brother, Donald Cranford.  Survivors include his younger brother, Robert Cranford, sisters, Sue Parker (Sam), Louann Cranford, Kathy Gaines (Glenn), 4 nephews, 3 nieces, 12 great nieces and nephews, and numerous extended family members.  They along with many friends and professional acquaintances worldwide, will miss Mike greatly.

Donations in memory of Mike may be made to:

United States Air Force Academy Endowment
3116 Academy Dr., Suite 200
USAF Academy, CO 80840
*Checks should be payable to the Air Force Academy Fund

American Cancer Society
250 Williams Street NW
Atlanta, Georgia  30303-1002

Any charity of your choice.


HUERFANO, COUNTY, Colorado — The Huerfano County Sheriff’s Office has identified the pilot who died during a helicopter crash that happened earlier this week.

A death investigation revealed the pilot to be Michael Vaughn Cranford, 70, of Peyton, Colorado.

According to a recent press release, the crash happened on Wednesday, December 8 at 11:50 a.m. when the helicopter went down in the Cuchara River Canyon area, which is in a rural part of Huerfano County.

Initial reports indicated the aircraft was military and there were multiple fatalities. Further investigation revealed the information was incorrect. The actual reporting parties were two other aircraft that were flying with the downed helicopter.

When deputies arrived, they found a Van's RV-4 aircraft at the bottom of the Cuchara River Canyon. The pilot was found dead inside.

Due to dangerous wind conditions, rugged terrain, failing light, and the remote publicly undisclosed location of the crash site, it was determined that recovery operations be resumed the following morning.

On Thursday, December 9, an updated recovery plan was initiated. Deputies, along with Search and Rescue personnel and an NTSB aircraft accident investigator, hiked down into the canyon. Once they arrived, they began an investigation.

Flight for Life was activated after the determination of a safe landing zone in the area. Helicopter Lifeguard 4 landed and the pilot’s body was taken into the custody of the Spanish Peak Hospital Coroner. He was then transported to the El Paso County Medical Examiner’s Office for autopsy.

The manner and cause of death is pending. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.




DENVER, Colorado – An experimental aircraft crashed in a remote area northeast of Walsenburg around 10:30 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Van's RV-4 crashed northeast of Spanish Peaks Airfield around 10:30 a.m., which is just northeast of Walsenburg and south of Pueblo.

Only the pilot was onboard the plane, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Emma Duncan.

A spokesperson for Fort Carson confirmed it received a call for mutual aid in the Model area.

The Huerfano County Sheriff’s office and Las Animas County Sheriff’s Office did not immediately respond to requests for more information on the crash or the status of the pilot on Wednesday.

Huerfano County officials confirmed they are responding to a reported aircraft down off County Road 122.

Duncan said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash and that the NTSB will lead the investigation and provide further updates.

Cessna 310Q, N310CC: Incident occurred December 07, 2021 at Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aircraft landed gear up. 


Date: 07-DEC-21
Time: 18:35:00Z
Regis#: N310CC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CORONA
State: CALIFORNIA

Cozy III, N22AZ: Incidents occurred December 07, 2021, October 01, 2020; August 15, 2020 and June 07, 2019

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

December 07, 2021:  Aircraft landed and gear collapsed at General Wm J Fox Airfield (KWJF), Lancaster, Los Angeles County, California


Date: 07-DEC-21
Time: 19:35:00Z
Regis#: N22AZ
Aircraft Make: AIRCRAFT SPRUCE AND SPECIALTY
Aircraft Model: COZY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LANCASTER
State: CALIFORNIA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine 

October 01, 2020: Aircraft veered off the runway on landing at Sanford Seacoast Regional Airport (KSFM), York County, Maine. 

Date: 01-OCT-20
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N22AZ
Aircraft Make: AIRCRAFT SPRUCE
Aircraft Model: COZY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SANFORD
State: MAINE

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida 

August 15, 2020: Aircraft aborted takeoff on the runway and nose gear collapsed; Punta Gorda Airport (KPGD), Charlotte County, Florida

Date: 15-AUG-20
Time: 23:28:00Z
Regis#: N22AZ
Aircraft Make: AIRCRAFT SPRUCE
Aircraft Model: COZY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PUNTA GORDA
State: FLORIDA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

June 07, 2019: Aircraft landed and nose gear broke off; Trenton-Mercer Airport (KTTN), Mercer County, New Jersey

Date: 07-JUN-19
Time: 22:18:00Z
Regis#: N22AZ
Aircraft Make: DUBOIS ROBIN
Aircraft Model: COZY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TRENTON
State: NEW JERSEY

Beechcraft S35 Bonanza, N80YD: Accident occurred December 07, 2021 near Tallahassee International Airport (KTLH), Leon County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

AeroMed Transport Company LLC


Location: Tallahassee, Florida
Accident Number: ERA22LA082
Date and Time: December 7, 2021, 07:57 Local
Registration: N80YD
Aircraft: Beech S35
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 7, 2021, about 0757 eastern standard time, a Beech BE-35, N80YD, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Tallahassee, Florida. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, a preflight inspection of the airplane was conducted with no anomalies noted. He stated, “I checked the oil quantity and found 11 quarts.” During the run-up, the pilot reported “everything looked normal, nothing out of range” then departed for Columbus Airport (CSG), Columbus Georgia, on an instrument flight rules flight plan about 0624. About 1 hour and 30 minutes into the flight, at 6000 ft, the pilot reported smelling something burning in the cabin and within about 30 seconds, “the smell increased with a distinct smell of oil.” The pilot radioed the controller and requested the nearest airport that was not covered in fog. The pilot continued to monitor the gauges, stating, “everything was normal, why am I smelling smoke.” Then, he watched as the oil pressure decreased to zero and he declared an emergency, then opened the side window to evacuate the smoke in the cabin. He was instructed to turn southeast towards Tallahassee International Airport (TLH), Tallahassee, Florida, and descend to 3000 ft to set up for an ILS 27 approach into TLH. As he continued southeast, the engine began to “sputter” and then quit. As the airplane descended through the fog, the piloted stated, “I saw trees and didn’t believe I would make it over them, so I pointed the airplane between two large trees and pulled the nose up.” The airplane impacted trees about 4 miles east of TLH; the pilot self-evacuated the airplane and received minor injuries.

Postaccident photographs of the airplane provided by Tallahassee airport operations personnel revealed substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and the left ruddervator. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N80YD
Model/Series: S35
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TLH, 55 ft msl 
Observation Time: 07:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C /14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 0.25 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: St Petersburg, FL (PIE)
Destination: Columbus, GA (CSG)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 30.37251,-84.229476 (est)

Globe GC-1B Swift, N80999: Incident occurred December 04, 2021 at Wauchula Municipal Airport (KCHN), Hardee County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft landed and ground looped. 


Date: 04-DEC-21
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N80999
Aircraft Make: GLOBE
Aircraft Model: GC-1B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WAUCHULA
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-28-140, N2898T: Incident occurred December 07, 2021 at Chicago Midway International Airport (KMDW), Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greater Chicago

Aircraft on landing appeared to catch the wind and spin out into the grass.  

RPM Flying Club Inc 


Date: 07-DEC-21
Time: 14:31:00Z
Regis#: N2898T
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CHICAGO
State: ILLINOIS

Airbus A319, N808AW: Incident occurred December 07, 2021 at Des Moines International Airport (KDSM), Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aircraft struck birds on departure damaging left engine, right wing and bottom of fuselage. 

American Airlines


Date: 07-DEC-21
Time: 12:50:00Z
Regis#: N808AW
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL2854
City: DES MOINES
State: IOWA

Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, N7357C: Incidents occurred December 07, 2021 and September 27, 2017

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska 

December 07, 2021:  Aircraft experienced engine issues and landed in a field. 


Date: 07-DEC-21
Time: 23:12:00Z
Regis#: N7357C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: T210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: COLUMBUS
State: NEBRASKA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

September 27, 2017:  Aircraft landed gear up at Lincoln Airport (KLNK), Lancaster County, Nebraska.

https://registry.faa.gov/N7357C

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 20:40:00Z
Regis#: N7357C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LINCOLN
State: NEBRASKA

Beech 58 Baron, N358Y: Incident occurred December 07, 2021 at Asheville Regional Airport (KAVL), North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aircraft taxiing for departure and struck an airport gate control panel. 

Juliett Air LLC


Date: 07-DEC-21
Time: 19:20:00Z
Regis#: N358Y
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: ASHEVILLE
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Cessna 182 Skylane, N5776B: Fatal accident occurred December 07, 2021 near Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport (KTBR), Bulloch County, Georgia

Catherine L. Kloess
Cathy doing what she loves, flying.
~



This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

TJP@JAX Inc


Location: Statesboro, Georgia 
Accident Number: ERA22FA083
Date and Time: December 7, 2021, 21:24 Local
Registration: N5776B
Aircraft: Cessna 182 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 7, 2021, at 2124 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182 airplane, N5776B, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Statesboro, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to a family member who spoke with the pilot the evening of the accident, she had flown from Florida into the Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport (TBR), Statesboro, Georgia, for a meeting in the local area and planned to return that night.

Review of preliminary Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data found that the airplane departed runway 14 at 2121. Shortly after takeoff, the flight track turned south, climbed to about 1,000 ft mean sea level (msl), and then about 1.8nm south of TBR, the airplane entered a left turn. 

The airplane continued in a left 360° tightening turn where a maximum altitude of about 1,800 ft msl was reached, which was subsequently followed by a rapid descent. The final position recorded at 2124:32 was about .10-mile from the initial impact which showed the airplane headed east at an altitude of 575 ft msl. Figure 1 displays the ADS-B flight track, main wreckage area, and witness locations. 

Multiple witnesses reported observing and/or hearing the airplane in-flight. An witness located at the TBR airport parking lot saw the takeoff. The airplane’s lights were on, and it sounded as if the airplane was climbing “steeply”, and the engine noise was loud.

Two additional witnesses who were together, located near the airplane’s final few seconds of flight, reported seeing the airplane while outside in a driveway. One witness reported, she heard a low flying airplane that sounded like a “crop duster” and “got louder.” She then saw the right side of the airplane and it appeared to be flying in a “curved” descent that continued into a “rapid descent.” 

When the airplane first came into view, she could not recall observing lights or a glow from the airplane, however, as it flew away from her position, she saw a “sparkler glow” before it impacted the ground. The other witness also reported observing the airplane fly nearby in a descent that continued into a rapid descent into a field just beyond his view. He added that when the airplane flew by, he could see “lights on the bottom” of the airplane. When asked specifically if he recalled seeing the airplane on fire in the air, he stated “No. It was not.”

Two additional witnesses heard the airplane while in their houses. One of these witnesses was a private pilot and reported that due to the proximity of his house to the airport, he was accustomed to hearing airplanes, but this airplane was “unusually low.” He added that the sound dissipated, but a few minutes later, he heard the airplane again where it sounded like “the engine was screaming” as if the “throttle was through the panel.” The other witness located near the accident site in her home reported that she heard an engine noise until a “thud” was heard.

According to Federal Aviation Administration airman records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, with instrument airplane. She was issued a second-class medical certificate on December 3, 2020, at which time she reported a total of 4,000 flight hours and 200 hours within the last 6 months of the exam.

The wreckage was highly fragmented and was oriented on a debris path of about 110° magnetic. The initial impact ground scar was located about 220 ft from the main wreckage final resting location and the elevation was about 175 ft msl. Evidence of thermal damage was observed at the main wreckage. Figure 2 provides an overview of the major components of the airplane located at the accident site.

All major components of the airplane were located in the debris path. Debris located in the initial impact scar indicated that the airplane impacted terrain in a descending left bank which was evident due to the co-location of the left-wing tip and additional left-wing fragment.

Partial flight control continuity was established from the respective flight control surfaces to the flight controls. The flight control cables that had separated were observed to be consistent with overload and impact related separation. 

The fuel selector had separated from its attach point. Its valve position was found set the BOTH position. The elevator trim jack screw was observed to be in a position near the takeoff setting.

The instrument panel was heavily fragmented, but several instruments were located in the debris path. A turn coordinator was found displaying a left turn, beyond a standard rate turn.

The heading indicator displayed 090°. The attitude indicator displayed a 50° left bank and a 30° pitch up attitude. The altimeter was found to display 480 ft with an altimeter setting of 30.07. An oil pressure gauge was found indicating 30 psi, which was in the green range. The oil temperature gauge indicated 150°F.

The engine sustained heavy impact and thermal damage. Its underside displayed significant damage that allowed the core of the engine to be visible without disassembly. The camshaft was continuous from the forward and rear section of the engine. Each cylinder displayed varying degrees of impact damage. The top spark plugs were examined and displayed combustion signatures ranging from normal to worn-out normal when compared to the Champion Aerospace Aviation Check-A-Plug chart.

Each cylinder was examined with a borescope. Each valve displayed varying degrees of carbon deposit build-up, however, no cylinder or piston head displayed mechanical damage and each cylinder was free from any large debris.

The engine was attempted to be rotated by hand. It could not be rotated through a full engine cycle due to impact damage, however, a small degree of rotation resulted in the movement of valves on both sides of the engine.

The vacuum pump remained attached to the accessory section of the engine with safety wire and screws firmly secured to its casing. It rotated normally when its drive gear was rotated by hand. The fuel manifold remained intact and the respective fuel lines were continuous to the cylinders. The propeller had separated from the propeller hub. Its blades exhibited varying degrees of blade polishing, leading edge gouging, chordwise scratches, and torsional twisting.

According to FAA contract Flight Service Station provider Leidos, there was no record that the pilot filed a flight plan or requested an official weather briefing via telephone or online. There was also no record of the pilot contacting FAA air traffic control before or during the flight.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5776B
Model/Series: 182 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC 
Condition of Light: NightDark
Observation Facility, Elevation: TBR,187 ft msl
Observation Time: 21:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C /13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 150°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft AGL
Visibility: 7 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Statesboro, GA (TBR) 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.444496,-81.734249 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.


Update 8:37 p.m. 12/8/21: According to the National Transportation Safety Board, the plane was only in the sky for three minutes before it crashed.

The plane crashed about two miles from the Statesboro/Bulloch County Airport where it took off.

The NTSB says it's going to take some time for them to determine exactly what caused the crash.

"The purpose of this investigation is not only to figure out what happened, but why the accident happened so we can issue safety recommendations to prevent future accidents," said Adam Gerhardt, a Senior Air Safety Investigator for the NTSB.

We're told at this point, the NTSB has not been able to track down any kind of flight plan from the pilot.

"We don’t have any information right now if there was a flight plan, however, there are several different entities within the FAA to see where the flight plan existed. We don’t have information that the pilot contacted Air Traffic Control, but that doesn’t mean the flight plan isn’t perhaps out there," Gerhardt said.

We asked if weather could have been a factor in the crash.

Gerhardt said, "Preliminary data suggests there was an overcast cloud layer, but we have a lot more information to delve into when it comes to what the weather conditions were and that is a standard component of every NTSB investigation."

The NTSB said they plan on publishing their initial findings within the next ten days.

It will likely be another 12 to 16 months before the final report is published.

Update 1:30 p.m. 12/8/21: The Bulloch County Coroner has identified the victim as Catherine Kloess, owner of The Jumping Place.

The Jumping Place is a skydiving business based at the Statesboro Airport.

Their website lists Kloess at the top of their staff page.

According to her biography, Kloess made her first jump in 1986 and has made more than two thousand skydives to date.

The Jumping Place was involved in another deadly plane crash back in 2018. Four people died in that crash.

Initial report: The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating after a deadly plane crash Tuesday night in Bulloch County.

Officials say the single-engine Cessna 182 crashed near the 150o block of Jones Mill Road around 9:30 p.m. after the pilot departed from Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport.


 Adam Gerhardt, Senior Air Safety Investigator for the NTSB.


Catherine (Cathy) Kloess, 61, owner and operator of The Jumping Place Skydive Center in Statesboro, has been identified by Bulloch County Coroner Jake Futch. She was the pilot killed in the Tuesday, December 7, 2021 plane crash in Bulloch County. Ms. Kloess was piloting The Jumping Place blue and white Cessna plane at the time of the crash.

Ms. Kloess was a resident of Zephyrhills, Florida but also had a temporary residence in Statesboro. The plane crash was very close to her Statesboro residence.

The crash occurred around 9:30 pm in a wooded area within eyesite of the Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport by air.

Aline Davis, owner of Aline Printing was a friend of Cathy’s. She lived beside her business and the crash site is behind her business on Jones Mill Road. She spoke fondly of her friend.

“Cathy was a feisty lady, so full of energy and life. She was a pleasure to be around and the only thing she loved more than flying was her children and grandchild. She really enjoyed sharing stories about them,” said Davis. “She lived in Florida, but would travel up here weekly to operate The Jump Place. She was our neighbor while in town and was a loyal customer of our printing business. We will miss her and send our condolences to her family.”



Sounds of Distress

In a statement from the FAA, they said the single engine Cessna 182 had departed from the Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport prior to the crash. They confirmed the pilot was the only person on board the plane at the time of the crash.

Grice Connect received multiple messages from people who lived in the area of the crash. They all reported hearing a small plane in obvious distress. Then moments later they heard the impact of the crash and saw flames coming from the wooded area.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be in town on Wednesday, December 8, 2021 to begin the investigation into the crash.

The 1956 Cessna 182, 4 seater, single engine plane was owned by TJP@Jax Incorporated based in Zephyrhills, Florida.

The Jumping Place Fatal Crash in 2018

On August 25, 2018 a Cessna 182A, N4785D also operated by The Jumping Place Skydiving Center was involved in a fatal crash in Swainsboro.

Andrew “Drew” Swenson, Aliaksandr “Alex” Bahrytsevich, Christopher Eldridge and Justin Duff were killed in the 2018 crash.

William Middlebrooks was rescued from the wreck and spent almost five weeks in ICU before he was released in September, 2018.

Grice Connect extends our condolences to Ms. Kloess’s family, friends and co-workers.




BULLOCH COUNTY, Georgia — A woman died in a plane crash Tuesday night, according to Bulloch County emergency crews.

Bulloch County coroner, Jake Futch says Catherine Kloess, 61, of Zephyrhills, Florida died in the crash. Futch said Kloess attended the Bulloch County Commission meeting Tuesday night in hopes to reopen her skydiving school in Statesboro.

The 61-year-old moved to Florida — after her shutting down the skydiving school in Statesboro — to reopen the business. After the meeting, she took off from the Statesboro airport back home to Florida when her plane later crashed.

According to the Bulloch County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO), the small single engine aircraft went down in the area of Jones Mill Road and Sandy Hill Lane. BCSO says they responded to the scene around 9:30 p.m. Tuesday.

BCSO and the FAA continue to investigate the crash.

Cessna 182L Skylane, N182NS: Fatal accident occurred December 03, 2021 Bonnerdale, Hot Spring County, Arkansas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Jefferson Aircraft LLC


Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Location: Bonnerdale, Arkansas
Accident Number: CEN22FA058
Date and Time: December 3, 2021, 18:23 Local
Registration: N182NS
Aircraft: Cessna 182L
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 3, 2021, about 1823 central standard time, a Cessna 182L, N182NS, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Bonnerdale, Arkansas. The non-instrument rated private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The accident airplane was the lead airplane in a flight of two that departed Mendin, Louisiana (MNE), about 1738, destined for Clarksville, Arkansas (H35).

The non-instrument rated pilot of the second airplane stated that before departure from MNE, they both reviewed the enroute weather and he recalled the cloud layers were reported scattered at 1,500 ft with an overcast ceiling at 2,000 ft. Together, they decided to climb to 1,500 ft mean sea level (MSL) for the flight and agreed that the Ralph C Weiser Field Airport (AGO) in Magnolia, Arkansas, would be their alternate airport if the clouds were too low. AGO was located about 35 nm northwest of MNE.

The pilot stated that he took off behind the accident pilot and described the weather as “already sketchy.” He was able to see the ground, but there was no forward visibility. About 20 minutes into the flight and before reaching AGO, they were in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). Both pilots were communicating via radio transmissions while in flight and they decided not to divert to AGO because the accident pilot stated that he thought the clouds would clear up and they should continue to the destination airport. 

According to the pilot, as the two airplanes neared Hot Springs, Arkansas, they “were in full IMC” and both were flying at 1,600 ft MSL, 140 kts, and on a 351° heading. He stated that he glanced down at his phone to check his flight path and saw that the flight track from the accident airplane turned and was on a southeast heading. Unable to reach the accident pilot on the radio, he continued ahead. About 30 seconds later, he received a 500 ft altitude warning from ForeFlight and initiated an immediate climb with full power. He continued the flight at 3,500 ft MSL and did not exit IMC until the Danville, Arkansas, area. 

A review of Federal Aviation Administration Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that after the accident airplane departed MNE, it climbed to about 1,600 ft GPS altitude and flew a relatively straight flight path north. About 1.5 nm south of Trap Mountain, the airplane began a gradual descent. About ½ nm south of Trap Mountain, the airplane began a shallow right turn. ADS-B data ceased over Trap Mountain at an altitude of 1,175 ft. Although not labeled as Trap Mountain on the sectional chart, the mountain is denoted with an altitude of 1,095ft MSL.

The accident airplane impacted the north side of Trap Mountain and came to rest at an elevation of 1,071ft MSL. The point of initial impact was the top of an estimated 30 ft tree and a portion of the right lower wing skin remained in the tree. The main wreckage traveled about 100 ft and the left wing was located about 144 ft from the initial impact point. The airplane came to rest inverted and highly fragmented.

A post-accident examination revealed that all flight control cables, with the exception of one elevator cable, were connected at the flight control surface and the cockpit control. The disconnected elevator cable was located within the debris field and exhibited signatures consistent with overload. Flight control continuity could not be established due to the fragmented nature of the accident airplane. The engine was examined with no preimpact damage noted. The propeller separated from the engine at the propeller hub and exhibited chordwise striations and leading and trailing edge damage consistent with rotation at the time of impact.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N182NS
Model/Series: 182L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMWT,702 ft msl 
Observation Time: 16:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C /16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Wind
Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1200 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Minden, LA (MNE)
Destination: Clarksville, AR (H35)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 34.344821,-93.359793 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Vernon Lane Hampton
March 6, 1966 - December 3, 2021
~

Vernon Lane Hampton, age 55, of Clarksville, Arkansas died Friday, December 3, 2021. He was born on Sunday, March 6, 1966 to Fredrick and Patti Hampton in Mena, Arkansas.

Vernon was a good Christian man with a generous spirit. He was an incredibly hard worker, and had a passion for flying and fixing just about anything. Vernon was very intelligent and had a knack for finding solutions to any problem. He was dedicated to his work, and he loved every minute of it. Vernon took great pride in the aviation business he had built and truly loved what he did. He was a jack of all trades and always had multiple projects he was working on at any given time. Vernon was filled with compassion and could always be found helping others in need. He liked cars, planes, boats, motorcycles and could fix any of them. Vernon loved his children, family, and friends and showed that love through endless jokes and laughter. Vernon was a loving son, father, grandfather, uncle and friend and will be missed by all who knew him.

Vernon is survived by his father, Fred Hampton of Mena, mother, Patti Hampton of Smithville, Oklahoma, and step-mother Cynde Hampton; one son and daughter in law, Aaron and Katherine Hampton of Virginia; two daughters and son in law, Angela and Jordan Reece Jones of Fort Smith, and Katlyn Bryant of Nashville, Tennessee; one brother, Mark Hampton of Longview, Texas; three sisters and brothers in law, Vickie and Larry Smith of Oklahoma, Leslie and Matt Dodd of Oklahoma, Melissa and Brett Ham of Mena; two grandchildren, Kensley Jones and one granddaughter on the way; several nephews and nieces and a host of other family and friends.

A funeral service will be held Friday, December 10, 2021 at 10:30 AM at The Crossing Church in Mena with Brother Victor Rowell officiating. Interment will follow at the Pinecrest Memorial Gardens in Mena under the direction of Bowser Family Funeral Home. A visitation will be held on Thursday, December 9, 2021 from 5:00 - 7:00 PM at the Bowser Family Funeral Home Chapel in Mena.

Pallbearers will be Brad Chandler, Weldon Garrison, Brett Ham, Tray Hargraves, Frank Moore, and Robert Watkins.

Honorary Pallbearers are Danny Brickey and Eric Goss.

Online Guestbook: www.bowserffh.com


GLENWOOD, Arkansas — A pilot was found dead when searchers in Arkansas discovered the wreckage of a single-engine plane that had gone missing, officials said Sunday.

Arkansas State Police said pilot Vernon Hampton of Clarksville was the lone occupant of the plane.

State police said they were notified at about 10 p.m. Friday that an aircraft that had been expected to land at Clarksville Municipal Airport was overdue. The plane’s last known location was in the area near Trap Mountain west of Hot Springs.

The Federal Aviation Administration has said the plane took off from an airport in Minden, Louisiana.

Search crews located the crash site Saturday morning. The National Transportation Safety Board said the wreckage of the Cessna 182L Skylane was found near the unincorporated community of Bonnerdale in Hot Spring County.

The crash site between Glenwood and Hot Springs is on the southeastern edge of the Ouachita National Forest, about 65 miles (105 kilometers) southwest of Little Rock.