Thursday, July 26, 2012

Beech F33A Bonanza, N334DH: Accident occurred July 26, 2012 in Fairbanks, Alaska

 http://registry.faa.gov/N334DH 

NTSB Identification: ANC12FA079
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Fairbanks, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/12/2013
Aircraft: Beechcraft F33A, registration: N334DH
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was the group leader of 12 airplanes flying on an aerial tour of Alaska. On the day before the accident, the airplane had been fueled by a commercial vendor, and a preflight inspection was completed for the flight the following day. The pilot stated that his preflight inspection and the airplane start, taxi, and before-takeoff checks revealed no anomalies. However, just after takeoff, as the airplane climbed through about 400 feet above ground level, the engine lost all power. The pilot made about a 90-degree right turn to avoid obstacles located off the end of the runway and landed in an adjacent field. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

A postaccident examination, including an engine run in a test cell, revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies with the airplane’s engine or systems.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The total loss of engine power reason that could not be determined because postaccident examination and test run did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.



On July 26, 2012, about 1015 Alaska daylight time, a Beechcraft F33A “Bonanza” airplane, N334DH, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Fairbanks International Airport, Fairbanks, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross country flight under the provisions of Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The certificated airline transport pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Fairbanks International Airport at approximately 1015, destined for Homer, Alaska.

At the time of the accident, the pilot owned and operated a tour group business called “Let’s Fly Alaska”, in which pilots provide their own airplanes, and traveled as a group on a guided tour from Washington throughout Alaska, before returning to their respective bases. He was leading a group of 12 airplanes on an aerial tour, when the accident occurred.

The pilot stated that the day before the accident the airplane had been fueled by a commercial vendor, and a preflight inspection was completed for the planned flight the following day. He arrived at the airplane the day of the accident, sumped the fuel drains, and prepared the airplane for departure. Start, taxi, and the before takeoff checks were all normal with no anomalies noted. Just after takeoff, as the airplane climbed through about 400 feet above ground level, the engine suddenly lost all power. Unable to land straight ahead, because of a fire fighter training area that consisted of a derelict McDonnell Douglass DC-6 airplane, and an active firing range located approximately 1075 feet off the end of the runway, the pilot elected to make a 90 degree right turn, and land the airplane in an adjacent field.

The airplane was outfitted with four video cameras, mounted at various locations on the exterior of the airplane. The audio portion of the video footage captured the airplane start, taxi, takeoff, and the loss of engine power. Approximately 3 minutes 36 seconds after engine start the airplane began its taxi to the hold short lines of runway 20L at Fairbanks. The aircraft held short of runway 20L for approximately 5 minutes, 30 seconds. During this hold short period the audio did not record any sounds consistent with the accident airplane operating at higher RPM’s. Approximately 10 minutes, 24 seconds after engine start the airplane began its takeoff roll, and about 41 seconds later the airplane lost all engine power. A complete brief of the video footage is available in the public docket.

In the Safety Recommendations section of the pilots written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board he noted, that the airport training areas located off the departure end of runway 20L, should be relocated, so that a pilot in the event of emergency could land straight ahead.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was southwest of runway 20L, and remained on Fairbanks International Airport property. Examination of the accident site by two Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) safety inspectors the day of the accident revealed that the airplane came to rest on a heading of about 285 degrees magnetic.

The fuselage, forward of the cockpit, was crushed aft. The cockpit was intact, and relatively free of impact damage. Both wings remained attached to the fuselage, and the flight control surfaces remained connected to their respective attach points. The right wing sustained upward bending from approximately midspan outboard. The left wing was relatively free of impact damage. The horizontal and vertical stabilizer, elevators, and rudder remained attached to the empennage, and were free of impact damage.

The landing gear was in the retracted position.

The engine remained attached to its mounts, was intact and relatively free of impact damage.

The fuel pump’s drive gear and shear shaft were intact. Fuel was noted in the pump upon hand rotation.

Disassembly of the fuel manifold revealed fuel in the housing, the fuel appeared clear, with no impurities, water, or other contaminates.

The propeller assembly remained attached to the crankshaft. All three propeller blades had aft bending.

The aircraft was equipped with a JPI Fuel Scan 450, fuel computer. The fuel computer when powered on indicated “1.0” gallons of fuel used, and “73.0” gallons of fuel remaining.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 60, held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane multi-engine land, and rotorcraft-helicopter rating. Additionally, he held commercial pilot privileges for airplane single-engine land, and single-engine sea. He also held a type rating for a Bell 206 helicopter, and a certified flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, instrument airplane, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument helicopter. His most recent third-class medical was issued on February 10, 2012, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1975, and was registered to the owner in October 2003. At the time of the accident, it was equipped with a Continental IO-550 engine, capable of producing 300 horsepower, and a Hartzell PHC-C3YF-1RF three-blade propeller. The airplane had accumulated approximately 5036 total flight hours at the time of the accident. Its most recent annual inspection had been completed on January 1, 2012.

The airplane had been modified under a supplemental type certificate(STC) for installation of a Continental IO-550 engine by D’Shannon Products LTD, Buffalo, Minnesota. The engine was installed under STC SA2200SW, on November 12, 2010, about 165 hours before the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather reporting facility is Fairbanks International Airport. About 10 minutes after the accident, at 1025, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at Fairbanks, Alaska, reported in part, wind calm, visibility, 10 statute miles, few clouds at 20,000 feet, temperature, 64 degrees F; dew point 50, degrees F; altimeter, 29.93 inHG.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Fairbanks International Airport is a public airport in Class Delta airspace, located 3 miles southwest of Fairbanks, Alaska, at a surveyed elevation of 439 feet. The airport had three open runways (2L/20R, 2R/20L, and Ski 2/20), and one open waterway (2W/20W) at the time of the accident.

The Don Bennett firing range is an outdoor shooting range used by all interior Alaska law enforcement agencies. This secured “law enforcement only” training facility is located on Fairbanks International Airport Property, approximately 1075 feet from the departure end, on the extended centerline of runway 20L. The firing range is not depicted in the FAA Airport Facilities Directory, Alaska Supplement, and Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) are only issued when the range is active.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Engine

The engine was removed from the airframe and transported to Alaskan Aircraft Engines Inc., Anchorage Alaska. On, August 2, 2012 the engine was examined externally and place on an engine test stand. The engine was successfully started and run for about 10 minutes with no anomalies noted. The engine was set to a speed of approximately 1700 RPM, and a magneto check was performed. A drop of 75 rpm was noted for the left magneto, and 100 RPM for the right magneto. A series of power adjustments from idle to full power were conducted with no hesitation in engine operation noted.

Fuel
The airplane was fueled the night before the accident by line personnel at Alaska Aerofuel Inc. A fuel sample was drawn from the fuel truck, by a FAA safety inspector the day of the accident, and revealed no anomalies.

Ignition System

The ignition switch was examined under the supervision of the IIC, all wire bundles and connections appeared to be intact. The ignition switch was removed and bench tested for function, and no anomalies were found.

Fuel System

The fuel system was examined, no anomalies were found with the fuel and vent systems, and the fuel selector functioned normally.

Engine Analyzer

The aircraft was equipped with a JPI 700 engine analyzer. The JPI engine analyzer was removed and sent to the NTSB Research and Engineering laboratory for download. The parameters recorded in this unit were exhaust gas temperature (EGT), cylinder head temperature (CHT), oil temperature, outside air temperature, and battery voltage. The unit recorded data at an interval of once per every 6 seconds. A review of the taxi and takeoff portion of the flight, before the engine lost all power, did not indicate any anomalies with the engine or electrical system.


NTSB Identification: ANC12FA079 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: BEECH F33A, registration: N334DH
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2012, about 1015 Alaska daylight time, a Beech Bonanza, F33A airplane, N334DH, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Fairbanks International Airport, Fairbanks, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The certificated airline transport pilot, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Fairbanks International Airport at approximately 1015, destined for Homer, Alaska.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) on July 27, the pilot said he was the lead airplane for a group of 12 airplanes touring Alaska. Just after takeoff, as the airplane climbed to approximately 400 feet above ground level, the engine suddenly lost all power. He made a right turn to avoid obstacles, followed by a forced landing to a field.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, and fuselage during the accident.

The airplane was equipped with a 300 horsepower, Continental Motors, IO-550-B, engine. A postaccident engine and airframe examination is pending.



FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 334DH        Make/Model: BE33      Description: 33 Debonair, Bonanza (E-24)
  Date: 07/26/2012     Time: 1838

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: FAIRBANKS   State: AK   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY, FAIRBANKS, AK

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER

  FAA FSDO: FAIRBANKS, AK  (AL01)                 Entry date: 07/27/2012




ANCHORAGE, Alaska— Two people were injured in Fairbanks after their small plane crashed Thursday morning at Fairbanks International Airport.

Authorities responded at about 11 a.m. to Runway 20R at the south end of the airport. Officials say the Beechcraft Bonanza 33 had just taken off when it apparently began to lose power.

Airport police chief Moses Villalobos says the pilot radioed in that he was having trouble, and was attempting to return to the airport when the plane crashed into a grassy area near the runway.

Villalobos says the two passengers were alert and conscious as they were being taken to the hospital. The extent of their injuries was unknown as of Thursday afternoon.


Source:   http://www.ktuu.com

 

 

Ministry of Defence announces special investigation into crash

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN:The Ministry of Defence (MinDef) has announced a special investigation into the Bell 212 helicopter crash that claimed the lives of 12 Royal Brunei Armed Forces personnel last Friday, Borneo Bulletin reported. 

 International investigators from the US and Canada will provide support, said the Ministry of Defence in a press release yesterday.

The helicopter was carrying 14 personnel when it crashed in Ulu Belait. Two personnel survived the crash and are now recovering at RIPAS Hospital.

Following is the full text of the press release:

In the aftermath of the recent military aircraft crash that claimed the lives of 12 Royal Brunei Armed Forces personnel, the Ministry of Defence announces that a special investigation is currently carried out to ascertain the cause of the crash.

An aircraft accident investigation team from the Royal Brunei Air Force (RBAirF) has been established to oversee the investigation.

International investigators from the United States and Canada will also provide their support and jointly conduct the investigation with the RBAirF investigation team.

Investigation on the crash has begun since last Saturday. A preliminary report has been produced by the aircraft accident investigation team that has been submitted to the highest level of Board of Inquiry led by First Admiral Dato Seri Pahlawan Haji Abdul Halim bin Haji Mohd Hanifah, Commander of the Royal Brunei Navy

Read more: http://www.theborneopost.com/2012/07/27/mindef-announces-special-investigation-into-crash/#ixzz21mXk8CIC

Jeffko Glasair, N743CA: Accident occurred July 23, 2012 in Tonasket, Washington

NTSB Identification: WPR12FAMS1
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 23, 2012 in Tonasket, WA
Aircraft: JEFFKO ED & CLAIRE GLASAIR, registration: N743CA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On July 23, 2012, an experimental amateur-built Jeffko Glasair, N743CA, did not arrive at its planned destination of Sequim Valley Airport, Sequim, Washington. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor was presumed to have sustained fatal injuries. The cross-country flight departed Tonasket Municipal Airport, Tonasket, Washington, about 0830. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the departure airport, and no flight plan had been filed.

On July 23, at 1520, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice (ALNOT) for the missing airplane after family members reported that it had not arrived at its planed destination. A search and rescue mission was subsequently initiated by the Washington State Department of Transportation.

The search and rescue mission was called off at 1700 on July 29, after 100 sorties had been completed in the area of the Cascade Mountains, utilizing fixed wing and rotorcraft assets.

FAA records indicated that the airplane was issued its airworthiness certificate in October 2008.



 WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - The Washington state Aviation Division continues to search Thursday for a plane that failed to arrive Monday on a flight from Tonasket to Sequim. 

Spokeswoman Nisha Marvel says if there are no developments officials will have to decide when to call off the search.

Eight planes with the Civil Air Patrol and Washington Air Search and Rescue flew Wednesday out of Wenatchee's Pangborn Airport to check the route that missing pilot Ed Jeffko of Tonasket would have flown.

Jeffko was the only person aboard the home-built single-engine kit plane. Marvel says there's no emergency beacon signal, radar track or flight plan.

The Wenatchee World reports Jeffko is a former Tonasket city councilman who has been active in the civil service board and economic development committee.

He left Tonasket on Monday and was heading for Sequim to pick up a family member. However, family members called for help when Jeffko didn't arrive as scheduled. 


Story and photo:   http://www.kimatv.com/news/local/3rd-day-of-search-for-missing-home-built-plane--163884056.html

Cessna 182P, N640AM: Accident occurred July 20, 2012 in Corona, California

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA316 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 20, 2012 in Corona, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N640AM
Injuries: 2 Serious.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On July 20, 2012, about 1815 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N640AM, collided with power lines during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Corona, California. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as an aerial observation flight. The certificated commercial pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence, and was subsequently consumed by post impact fire. The local flight departed Riverside Municipal Airport, Riverside, California, about 1800, with a planned destination of Corona Municipal Airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that he was a traffic reporter, and the flight was a traffic-watch mission for a local radio station. They initially departed from Corona at 1450, and for the next 3 hours, the flight proceeded uneventfully. While returning to Corona, the engine speed dropped twice from 2,200 to approximately 1,000 rpm, and as such, the pilot elected to land at Riverside as a precaution. After landing, he taxied to the departure end of the runway, and performed an engine run-up, which included cycling the propeller, checking the carburetor heat, and both magnetos. All checks were normal, and he was unable to replicate the problem. After discussing the anomaly with his passenger, he elected to proceed to Corona.

The departure and climbout were normal, and after about 5 minutes, the engine speed again began to oscillate, followed by a loss of power sufficient to prevent the airplane from maintaining altitude. The pilot began troubleshooting procedures, and having deduced that he would not be able to reach Corona Airport, prepared for a forced landing. As the descent progressed, and they passed over a housing development, he realized he would not be able to reach his intended landing point. He subsequently turned the airplane towards a field adjacent to the houses. During the final approach, the airplane struck a set of power lines, and collided with the ground.

The airplane came to rest on a heading of 280 degrees magnetic, at the end of a dirt field, about 6,500 feet east of the arrival end of runway 25. Fire consumed the entire cabin from the empennage, through to the firewall, along with the inboard wing sections. The engine sustained minimal damage, and was recovered with the airframe remnants for further examination.


STUDIO CITY (CBS) —KFI traffic reporter Mike Nolan is speaking out for the first time since his fiery plane crash in Corona last week.

“All things considered, I feel very good,” he said.

Nolan and a passenger survived the July 20 crash that later erupted in flames in a field about two miles east of the Corona Airport.

The reporter was nearing the end of a traffic watch flight in a single engine Cessna 182 when the engine lost power. Nolan avoided homes on the way down, but clipped some power lines.

“Basically what the wires did was slow me down sufficiently, where the airplane would no longer sustain a flight, and then I came and fell out of the sky and down to the ground,” Nolan said.

Nolan is now recovering from cracked ribs and a broken clavicle.

His wife, Laura, was amazed by the amount of well-wishes on Nolan’s Facebook page.

“I didn’t realize how many people were out there who cared,” she said.

Nolan, who has been a pilot for 40 years, has reported on plenty of bad accidents and never thought he’d make the news himself.

“I guess I can’t say I never crashed,” he said.

As soon as he’s healed, he said he’ll go right back into an airplane.

The FAA is still trying to figure out why the plane crashed.


Story and video:  http://losangeles.cbslocal.com

FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 640AM        Make/Model: C182      Description: 182, Skylane
  Date: 07/21/2012     Time: 0122

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: CHINO   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. CHINO, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: RIVERSIDE, CA  (WP21)                 Entry date: 07/23/2012 

Cessna 182P, N640AM: Accident occurred July 20, 2012 in Corona, California

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA316 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 20, 2012 in Corona, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N640AM
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On July 20, 2012, about 1815 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N640AM, collided with power lines during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Corona, California. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as an aerial observation flight. The certificated commercial pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence, and was subsequently consumed by post impact fire. The local flight departed Riverside Municipal Airport, Riverside, California, about 1800, with a planned destination of Corona Municipal Airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that he was a traffic reporter, and the flight was a traffic-watch mission for a local radio station. They initially departed from Corona at 1450, and for the next 3 hours, the flight proceeded uneventfully. While returning to Corona, the engine speed dropped twice from 2,200 to approximately 1,000 rpm, and as such, the pilot elected to land at Riverside as a precaution. After landing, he taxied to the departure end of the runway, and performed an engine run-up, which included cycling the propeller, checking the carburetor heat, and both magnetos. All checks were normal, and he was unable to replicate the problem. After discussing the anomaly with his passenger, he elected to proceed to Corona.

The departure and climbout were normal, and after about 5 minutes, the engine speed again began to oscillate, followed by a loss of power sufficient to prevent the airplane from maintaining altitude. The pilot began troubleshooting procedures, and having deduced that he would not be able to reach Corona Airport, prepared for a forced landing. As the descent progressed, and they passed over a housing development, he realized he would not be able to reach his intended landing point. He subsequently turned the airplane towards a field adjacent to the houses. During the final approach, the airplane struck a set of power lines, and collided with the ground.

The airplane came to rest on a heading of 280 degrees magnetic, at the end of a dirt field, about 6,500 feet east of the arrival end of runway 25. Fire consumed the entire cabin from the empennage, through to the firewall, along with the inboard wing sections. The engine sustained minimal damage, and was recovered with the airframe remnants for further examination.



 
FAA  IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 640AM        Make/Model: C182      Description: 182, Skylane
  Date: 07/21/2012     Time: 0122

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: CHINO   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. CHINO, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: RIVERSIDE, CA  (WP21)                 Entry date: 07/23/2012 
 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=640AM

Van's RV-6A, Shutter Speed LLC, N611RV: Aircraft force landed in a swamp and flipped over, Clinton, Washington

FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 611RV        Make/Model: EXP       Description: RV6-A
  Date: 07/26/2012     Time: 2326

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CLINTON   State: WA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A SWAMP AND FLIPPED OVER, CLINTON, WA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER

  FAA FSDO: SEATTLE, WA  (NM01)                   Entry date: 07/27/2012
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N611RV

http://www.flickr.com/photo  


 
 Bernardo Malfitano, 30, poses with the wreckage of his RV-6A plane, which he crash landed in a marshy area on South Whidbey Thursday. Malfitano did not suffer serious injury in the crash. 






A Lynnwood man crash landed his small two-seater airplane in a marshy grassland on South Whidbey Thursday. 

 The aircraft touched down in the fields between the waterfront community on Sunlight Beach Road and the Sun Vista Circle neighborhood off Bayview Road. The crash was reported at 4:17 p.m.

Pilot Bernardo Malfitano, 30, suffered some scrapes and bruises but was otherwise unharmed. He says the cause of the accident was fuel related.

“I had a bad fuel gauge indication,” he said. “The gauge said I had about a quarter tank. I didn’t.”

Malfitano took off earlier that day from Paine Field in his RV-6A, a small kit-built plane produced by Van’s Aircraft. The 185 horsepower single-engine aircraft has a cruising speed of about 185 mph, Malfitano said.

He first noticed a problem when the plane began to lose power. When it became clear he was out of fuel, he looked around for the nearest landing field but quickly realized that he would not make it to Whidbey Airpark, a small private landing strip a few miles to the east.

His only choice was to try and land in the grasslands behind the waterfront cabins on Sunlight Beach Road. Coincidentally, Malfitano had spent time last week practicing grass landings in Arlington so his confidence was high.

“To be honest, I wasn’t that scared,” he said.

However, the area is soft and marshy and his fixed landing struts dug into the mud quickly and caused the aircraft to flip over on to its bubble-canopy roof.

The plane came to rest on Robert Swaffield’s property. Although he didn’t witness the accident directly, his grandson, Steffan Swaffield, was working at his house at the time and went out to help Malfitano.

Steffan and several other bystanders braved thick blackberry bushes and made their way out to the crash site.

“The pilot was still inside but he seemed OK,” Steffan said.

Although the crash cage surrounding the cockpit helped prevent Malfitano from being crushed when the plane flipped over, he was trapped inside. Working together, Steffan and the others lifted the tail of the aircraft and Malfitano was able to crawl to safety.

Police and fire department responders were on the scene within minutes of the crash and also assisted. Langley Police Chief Randy Heston, who was a U.S. Navy aircraft electrician before getting into law enforcement, said Malfitano was fortunate to have landed where he did and that the outcome wasn’t worse.

“He’s lucky it’s a nice soft spot out there,” Heston said.

The plane did not appear to be leaking any fuel or otherwise be a danger to the area. Heston said the National Transportation Safety Board had declared dominion over the crash site and were expected to inspect the wreckage Friday.

It’s unclear how the plane will be removed from the marshy area but Swaffield wasn’t too concerned about his new lawn ornament. While this was the first, and hopefully the last time, a plane crashed on his property, he said he was just happy Malfitano was OK.

“I said a quick prayer for him,” he said.

Story and photos:  http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com



CLINTON, Wash. — A pilot landed a small plane that ran out of fuel in a marsh near Clinton Thursday afternoon, Island County authorities told KIRO 7 Eyewitness News. 

Video from Chopper 7 showed the small, experimental aircraft overturned in a grassy area.

The pilot was the only one on board the plane that landed in the 6000 block of Snapdragon Lane, said Sheriff Ed Wallace.


Story and photo:   http://www.kirotv.com

Hawker Hunter F.Mk.58, Airborne Tactical Advantage Co., N329AX: Accident occurred May 18, 2012 in Point Mugu, California

http://registry.faa.gov


NTSB Identification: DCA12PA076
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Friday, May 18, 2012 in Point Mugu, CA
Aircraft: HAWKER AIRCRAFT LTD HAWKER HUNTER MK.58A, registration: N329AX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On May 18, 2012 at 1212 pacific standard time, a Hawker Hunter Mk 58, single-seat turbojet fighter type aircraft, registration N329AX, operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC) under contract to Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) crashed while on approach to Naval Air Station Point Mugu, California (NTD). The sole occupant pilot aboard was killed, and the airplane was substantially damaged by impact forces and fire. The pilot reported a fuel transfer problem prior to the accident. The flight was conducted under the provisions of a contract between ATAC and the U.S. Navy to provide ATAC owned and operated aircraft to support adversary and electronic warfare training with Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101). The airplane was operating as a non-military public aircraft under the provisions of Title 49 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 40102 and 40125.

=========

A preliminary investigation of a recent fatal plane crash near CSU Channel Islands and Point Mugu shows the pilot reported a fuel transfer problem before going down. 

It's unclear, however, if that actually was a factor in the plane crash. The National Transportation Safety Board has released a preliminary report on the incident, but a more in-depth review and information about a probable cause likely will take at least several more months, officials said.

Along with the federal investigation, Airborne Tactical Advantage Co., a civilian contractor at Naval Base Ventura County and other military facilities, initiated its own review of the May 18 crash, said spokesman Matt Bannon.

The Virginia-based company suspended flight operations, hired an outside team to investigate and had its own safety team do a "head to toe" review, he said.

"It's inappropriate for ATAC to speculate what the cause of the accident was until the NTSB releases their report," said Bannon, business development director and a pilot for the company.

Airborne Tactical's preliminary review, however, "has not found any aircraft malfunctions that should have contributed" to the plane going down, he said.

Regarding the fuel transfer report, Bannon said it's not uncommon for such planes to have a series of different fuel tanks that transfer into a main tank. A pilot having to deal with such an issue also would not be uncommon, he said.

The crash occurred during a fighter-training mission for the military. The Hawker Hunter jet was returning to the Point Mugu airstrip at Naval Base Ventura County on May 18 when it crashed into a field near CSU Channel Islands about 12:15 p.m.

Airborne Tactical has a team of mechanics and pilots who fly out of Point Mugu to support Navy training missions. The company has its own squadron of mostly retired Navy and Air Force pilots. Their job is to stage aerial dogfights or mock attacks.

Airborne Tactical employee Thomas Bennett, 57, of Camarillo was killed in the crash. He joined the Navy in June 1976 and flew tactical jet aircraft for nearly three decades before retiring, according to the company.

Naval Base Ventura County officials declined to comment about the incident because it did not involve a Navy-owned plane.

It was the second fatal crash for Airborne Tactical. Another pilot was killed March 6 when his Israeli-built Kfir jet crashed into a building while landing in unexpectedly severe snow and wind at Naval Air Station Fallon in Nevada.

"We went 16 years without ... a fatality. Then all of a sudden we had two in a very short stretch. It's been a tough time," Bannon said.

The two accidents appeared unrelated because they involved different types of jets, different locations and different weather conditions. It was a clear day when the plane went down in Ventura County.

"We peeled back every process, from operations to maintenance ... to see where we could get better or where processes could be improved to prevent a tragedy like this from happening again," Bannon said.

The company didn't find any problems but did make some minor tweaks, he said.

"When something bad happens, you just wholesale look at every single process and try to change it for the better," Bannon said. "That's what I think we tried to do.
Read more: http://www.vcstar.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, Interstate Aviation Inc, N64182: Accident occurred July 26, 2012 in Plainville, Connecticut

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA483
 Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Plainville, CT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/25/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N64182
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During daylight in good weather conditions, the pilot was flying an approach to his home airport. After one go-around, the airplane approached the same runway a second time. During the second final approach, the airplane flew lower than normal and the nose dropped. The airplane subsequently impacted a berm 20 feet below and immediately before the runway. A postcrash fire consumed the cockpit and cabin area. Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.

The toxicological report noted that Zolpidem (a sleep aid known by the brand name Ambien among others) was detected in the blood and liver. Toxicological reports note “detected,” rather than an actual value, when the level of a substance is below the therapeutic range and, thus, is not intended to imply impairment.

According to law enforcement personnel, during the 2 years preceding the accident, the pilot had gone through a divorce, the closure of his business, and most recently was anticipating arrest on a felony charge. Additionally, about 1 month before the accident, a detective received a telephone call from a family member of the pilot, who expressed concern that the pilot was going to commit suicide based on remarks that the pilot had made; however, the family member later stated that the pilot recanted. Further investigation by law enforcement personnel did not recover a suicide note.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain the proper glidepath during final approach in visual meteorological conditions, resulting in collision with a berm.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 26, 2012, about 1910 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172P, N64182, operated by Interstate Aviation Inc., was substantially damaged during final approach, when it impacted a berm just prior to and below runway 20 at Robertson Airport (4B8), Plainville, Connecticut. The private pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Columbia County Airport (1B1), Hudson, New York, at 1739.

The airplane was based at 4B8. Several witnesses at North Canaan Aviation Facilities Inc. Airport (CT24), North Canaan, Connecticut, stated that earlier during the day, the accident airplane arrived there uneventfully about 1430 and departed about 1630. They added that it was common for the accident pilot to visit the airport and fly around the local area. They did not report anything abnormal with the pilot or the airplane.

Review of radar data, provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed primary targets that originated approximately .1 mile south of 1B1 at 1739:17. The targets proceeded to 4B8 and terminated on a left downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern to runway 20, at 1901:24. The targets then reappeared on another left downwind leg for runway 20 at 1903:47, and terminated at 1905:15. There was no record of radio contact with air traffic control. Additionally, there was no record of any contact with flight service or direct user access terminal service.

A flight instructor, who was walking to his car at the airport about 1900, saw the accident airplane approach. He reported that the pilot made one radio transmission on the local common traffic advisory frequency, regarding landing advisories. The airplane proceeded to fly a mid-field crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern, followed by a left downwind, base, and final leg of the airport traffic pattern. The witness noted that when the airplane was on final approach, its flaps were extended and it was "a bit" high. The nose then moved right, as if the airplane entered a controlled slip. The witness then left the airport in his car and did not see the impact.

Three people, who were driving their respective cars near 4B8 about 1910, witnessed the accident. The first witness stated that she observed the airplane "lower than usual" and it looked low as it crossed a street and impacted the berm below the runway. The second witness stated that the airplane looked level at first, but then the front end dropped down and she lost sight of the airplane. She subsequently saw smoke and the airplane engulfed in flames. The third witness stated that were no visible signs of engine distress prior to impact. Specifically, the airplane was not flying erratically or emitting smoke.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot, age 51, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and airplane single-engine sea. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on July 30, 2011. The pilot's logbook was not recovered. He reported a total flight experience of 1,000 hours on a "Renter Pilot Information" form he completed on June 23, 2012.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, serial number 17275530, was manufactured in 1982. It was powered by a Lycoming, O-320, 160-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade fixed pitch McCauley propeller. Review of the aircraft logbooks revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 13, 2012. At that time, the airplane had accumulated 8,690 total hours of operation. The engine had accumulated 3,784 total hours of operation, and 1,655 hours of operation since major overhaul. The airplane had flown about 9 hours since the annual inspection, until the accident flight.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Hartford-Brainard Airport (HFD), Hartford, Connecticut, was located about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. The reported weather at HFD, at 1853, was: wind from 200 degrees at 7 knots; visibility 10 miles; overcast ceiling at 9,000 feet; temperature 29 degrees C; dew point 21 degrees C; altimeter 29.62 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

The wreckage came to rest upright, with the empennage resting on top of the airport perimeter fence. An approximate 4-foot diameter by 1-foot deep impact crater was observed in the berm, about 20 feet below runway 20. The cockpit and cabin area were consumed by a postcrash fire. Both wings were observed separated from the airframe and exhibited impact damage along the leading edge. The ailerons were approximately neutral and measurement of the flap jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 30-degree full flap extended position. The horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer, rudder, and elevator remained intact and undamaged. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 5-degree tab up (nose down) trim position.

Flight control continuity was confirmed from the rudder pedal torque tubes to the rudder and from the control yoke base to the elevator. Continuity of the elevator trim was confirmed from trim wheel sprocket to the elevator trim tab. Aileron continuity was confirmed from the aileron control sprocket to their respective separation near the wing roots. The aileron balance cable remained attached to the left and right aileron bellcranks.

The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and was canted right. The propeller remained attached to the engine. One propeller blade exhibited s-bending and melting, while the other blade was bent aft and exhibited leading edge gouges. The engine was separated from the airplane and the propeller was removed from the propeller flange to facilitate further examination of the engine. The valve covers were removed and oil was noted throughout the engine. The top spark plugs were also removed for inspection; their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. When the crankshaft was rotated by hand, camshaft, crankshaft, and valvetrain continuity were confirmed and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. Both magnetos sustained fire damage and could not be tested. Inspection of the carburetor revealed that the floats, needle valve, and venturi were consumed by fire.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on July 28, 2012, by the State of Connecticut Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Farmington, Connecticut. Review of the autopsy report revealed that the cause of death was "multiple blunt traumatic injuries" and the manner of death was "accident."

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Review of the toxicology report revealed:

"Zolpidem detected in Liver
Zolpidem detected in Blood"

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to law enforcement personnel, during the 2 years preceding the accident, the pilot had gone through a divorce, a closure of his business, and most recently was anticipating arrest based on a warrant being processed, which included the charge of sexual assault in the first degree. Additionally, on June 22, 2012, a detective received a telephone call from a family member of the pilot, who expressed concern that the pilot was going to commit suicide based on remarks that the pilot had made. The family member later stated that the pilot recanted; however, on the day after the telephone call (June 23), the pilot went to Interstate Aviation and completed a "checkout" flight in order to rent their airplanes. Further investigation by law enforcement personnel did not recover a suicide note.

==============

 TORRINGTON >> James E. Seaver, Sr. the Torrington man killed in a Plainville plane crash in July, had a drug used to treat insomnia running through his veins when his Cessna 172P crashed into a berm near Robertson Airport.
 
Seaver, who was also being investigated by Torrington Police on allegations of sexually assaulting a 12-year-old girl years prior, had zolpidem detected in his liver and bloodstream, according to a toxicology report released by the National Transportation Safety Board. The brand name of zolpidem is Ambien, a sedative-hypnotic designed to slow brain activity, allowing a person to sleep easier.

Seaver’s fatal plane crash occurred on July 26 shortly after 7 p.m. in Plainville, after the private pilot departed from North Canaan Aviation Facilities, Inc. Airport at 6:20 p.m. He was 51.

Weeks following the fatal accident, Torrington Police released an unsigned arrest warrant indicating Seaver was under investigation for allegedly assaulting a 12-year-old girl in 2010. The girl, now 14, reported the incident to her mother in June and was given a forensic interview which proved consistent with her testimony of alleged sexual activity, the warrant states.

The warrant application relays an exchange between Seaver and the girl’s mother, with Seaver admitting he had “only touched her” three to four times, requesting the mother not to report him. 
“Can’t we find a therapist that doesn’t have to report,” Seaver said, according to the report.

Seaver’s toxicology report, finalized on Aug. 29 by the U.S. Department of Transportation, examined specimens from the decedent’s vital organs, blood and urine. The one-page summary states that no carbon monoxide or cyanide was detected in his blood, nor was any ethanol — indicating alcohol use — found in Seaver’s urine. The report additionally tested for amphetamines, opiates, marijuana, cocaine, and other drugs, including anti-depressants.

Medical information states that consumers of zolpidem — whether in its pill form, like Ambien, or its oral spray version — should expect to sleep shortly after taking the drug. The drug makes consumers sleepy, and consumers should expect to sleep a minimum of seven hours, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

The National Library of Medicine states that zolpidem should only be taken for seven to 10 days; not to exceed two weeks of consumption.

A recent study released by BMJ Open, a British-based medical publication, found drugs like zolpidem are more likely to cause cancer and consumers have a greater risk of death than people who don’t use sleep aid medication.

“When starting Ambien, do not do anything that requires complete alertness, such as driving, operating machinery, or piloting an airplane,” the drug’s user precautions read.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration has yet to finalize a report from the July 26 incident, although preliminary investigation by the NTSB claims weather was not an issue during the crash. The initial report additionally states that Seaver never made radio contact with flight service, nor were there records of contact with air traffic control.

The Cessna 172, the same model Seaver flew, is a four-seat single engine aircraft and according to the company, its best seller. Seaver’s crash marks the second fatality in the 172 model in Plainville since 2002. There have been two other crashes investigated by the NTSB near Robertson Airport since that time, although neither caused death.

Seaver was the only victim in the crash.

Source: http://www.registercitizen.com

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA483
Nonscheduled
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Plainville, CT Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N64182 Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2012, about 1910 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172P, N64182, operated by Interstate Aviation Inc., was substantially damaged during final approach, when it impacted a berm just prior to and below runway 20 at Robertson Airport (4B8), Plainville, Connecticut. The private pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed North Canaan Aviation Facilities Inc. Airport (CT24), North Canaan, Connecticut, about 1820.

Review of preliminary radar data, provided by the Federal Aviation Administration, revealed primary targets that originated approximately 3 miles southeast of CT24 at 1825:57. The targets proceeded to 4B8 and terminated on a left downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern to runway 20, at 1901:24. There was no record of radio contact with air traffic control. Additionally, there was no record of any contact with flight service or direct user access terminal.

A flight instructor, who was walking to his car at the airport, saw the accident airplane approach. He reported that the pilot made one radio transmission on the local common traffic advisory frequency, regarding landing advisories. The airplane proceeded to fly a mid-field crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern, followed by a left downwind, base, and final leg of the airport traffic pattern. The witness noted that when the airplane was on final approach, its flaps were extended and it was “a bit” high. The nose then moved right, as if the airplane entered a controlled slip. The witness then left the airport in his car and did not see the impact.

The wreckage came to rest upright, with the empennage resting on top of the airport perimeter fence. An approximate 4-foot diameter by 1-foot deep impact crater was observed in the berm, about 20 feet below runway 20. The cockpit and cabin area were consumed by a postcrash fire.


http://registry.faa.gov/N64182


NTSB Identification: ERA12FA483 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation  
 Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Plainville, CT
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N64182
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On July 26, 2012, about 1910 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172P, N64182, operated by Interstate Aviation Inc., was substantially damaged during final approach, when it impacted a berm just prior to and below runway 20 at Robertson Airport (4B8), Plainville, Connecticut. The private pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed North Canaan Aviation Facilities Inc. Airport (CT24), North Canaan, Connecticut, about 1820.

Review of preliminary radar data, provided by the Federal Aviation Administration, revealed primary targets that originated approximately 3 miles southeast of CT24 at 1825:57. The targets proceeded to 4B8 and terminated on a left downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern to runway 20, at 1901:24. There was no record of radio contact with air traffic control. Additionally, there was no record of any contact with flight service or direct user access terminal.

A flight instructor, who was walking to his car at the airport, saw the accident airplane approach. He reported that the pilot made one radio transmission on the local common traffic advisory frequency, regarding landing advisories. The airplane proceeded to fly a mid-field crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern, followed by a left downwind, base, and final leg of the airport traffic pattern. The witness noted that when the airplane was on final approach, its flaps were extended and it was "a bit" high. The nose then moved right, as if the airplane entered a controlled slip. The witness then left the airport in his car and did not see the impact.

The wreckage came to rest upright, with the empennage resting on top of the airport perimeter fence. An approximate 4-foot diameter by 1-foot deep impact crater was observed in the berm, about 20 feet below runway 20. The cockpit and cabin area were consumed by a postcrash fire.


PLAINVILLE — The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner is waiting on dental records to positively identify the man who died in a plane crash while trying to land at Robertson Airport Thursday night. 

A spokesperson for the medical examiner said they have determined a tentative identity of the pilot but the office still needs to locate and compare dental records to make a positive ID.

The plane burst into flames after crashing into a fence in front of a berm at the intersection of Johnson Avenue and Northwest Drive around 7 p.m. Thursday. Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are still looking into the cause of the crash. The Cessna was rented from a company at the airport around 1 p.m. the day of the crash, investigators said.

Police said they would not release the identity of the pilot until his name is confirmed by the medical examiner’s office.




PLAINVILLE, Conn. (WTNH) - A man was killed Thursday night when his plane suddenly took a nose dive into the ground and caught fire, just feet below the runway. 

Around 7 p.m. Thursday night, the Cessna 172 plane crashed just 20 feet below the runway at Robertson Airport in Plainville.

Bob Gretz, a Senior Air Safety Investigator with the NTSB, told reporters during a news conference that a lone man was inside the single engine airplane.

The man has not yet been identified.

NTSB officials were at the scene Friday morning to document the crash site. According to Gretz, the crash is being investigated by both the NTSB and the FAA. They are looking at three factors, the pilot, the machine, and the environment, including if the weather was a contributing factor.

An official from Cessna is expected to arrive Friday afternoon to examine the plane.

Gretz said investigators are trying to determine where the pilot stopped before heading back to Robertson Airport. According to reports, the man rented the plane for two to three days. Paperwork he filled out to rent the plane indicated he had 1,000 hours of flight experience.

The investigation is expected to take between six and 12 months.




FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 64182        Make/Model: C172      Description: 172, P172
  Date: 07/26/2012     Time: 1915

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: PLAINVILLE   State: CT   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING CRASHED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, PLAINVILLE, CT

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: WINDSOR LOCKS, CT  (EA63)             Entry date: 07/27/2012 



PLAINVILLE — At least one person died in an airplane crash Thursday night near Robertson Airport around 7 p.m. 

 Police Capt. Brian Mullins said one person was found in the airplane and was declared dead at the scene. It was not known whether there were any others on board.

The crash occurred on an embankment at Northwest Drive and Johnson Avenue, an area defined as the airport’s runway approach zone.

A woman at the scene, who wished not to be identified, said she saw the plane take “a nosedive” into the embankment as it apparently approached the runway for a landing.

Police said they are unsure whether the plane was ascending or descending or what caused the crash.

The small aircraft caught on fire, but firefighters quickly extinguished the blaze, officials reported. The smoke could be seen from the center of town.

An early report over the police radio advised that the scene was a “fully involved” fire. Later at the scene, the severely charred wreckage of the rear of the plane could be seen sticking up out of an embankment near the end of the runway.

Dozens of firefighters with equipment were on the scene as were multiple ambulances. Police blocked off Northwest Drive on both sides of the scene swarming the area.

“The FAA will investigate the scene,” Mullins said at 8 p.m., as rain began to fall with the onset of a thunderstorm. “We are not going to touch it any more until then. The firefighters will secure the scene for the evening.”

Mullins said he was unsure when the investigation would begin today.

Town Manager Robert Lee said that since fuel had spilled from the aircraft, the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection has been notified to assess the degree of hazard as soon as possible.

Lee said this was the first time he had seen a plane crash at the airport since he arrived in town eight years ago. Other first responders recalled a plane crash that occurred a decade ago.

There have been eight crashes at Robertson since August 1992, one of those involving fatalities, according to the National Transportation Safety Board records available online.

On Aug. 17, 2002, a Cessna 172S crashed immediately after takeoff, killing the pilot and passenger. Several witnesses reported hearing the plane’s engine either sputter or cut out just before the crash, according to the reports.

The NTSB determined that the cause of the crash was a fire, of unknown origin, in the engine compartment that caused a loss of power. The plane, which was bound for Montauk, N.Y., fell from about 400 feet, according the the NTSB’s report.


 

 

PLAINVILLE -- One person was killed when a plane crashed at Robertson Airport in Plainville Thursday night. 

Officials said a Cessna 172 aircraft was making a southerly approach to the airport when it suddenly took a nose dive into the fencing around the runway.

After hitting the fence, parts of the plane completely separated from the fuselage and scattered around the ground.

The plane was on fire for a short period of time.

The victim's identity has not yet been released.

It was not immediately known if inclement weather was to blame for the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration is en route to the scene to investigate, officials said.



Terri Mongeon 

Fire engulfs a plane that crashed just short of the runway at Robertson Airport in Plainville Thursday.




 Terri Mongeon

Fire engulfs a plane that crashed just off the runway at Robertson Airport in Plainville Thursday.





 

A small plane crashed into an embankment and burned near Robertson Airport in Plainville.

Photo by WTIC’s Matt Dwyer







Fire engulfs a plane that crashed at the end of the runway


 

A small plane crashed and burned at Plainville’s Robertson Airport shortly after 7 p.m. Thursday evening.

Firefighters poured water onto the wreckage near Northwest Drive.


At the scene,  WTIC’s Matt Dwyer reported the small white plane appears to have flown into an embankment.


He says the tail section was hanging on one side of the fence,  the wings spread out over the embankment.


Crews were positioning a tarpaulin to block the view of bystanders.


After the burning wreckage was extinguished, lightning could be seen, and thunder heard in the area.


One man who lives nearby said it sounded like something was wrong withe the plane’s engine, when it passed over his house.


Another man said he saw the small, white plane crash into an embankment near the airport, at the intersection of Johnson Avenue and Northwest Drive.


The berm is about two stories tall.


After the plane caught fire.  smoke could be seen in parts of Plainville and Farmington.


 The fuselage was blackened, and badly damaged.

Two people escape injury after plane destroyed by fire - Hartford Municipal Airport (KHXF), Wisconsin

Hartford - A fire destroyed a single-engine plane at the Hartford Municipal Airport about 9:45 a.m. Thursday, but no one was injured, Hartford Fire Chief Paul Stephans said. 

The fire started shortly after the plane had been refueled. The plane was on a taxiway and two Michigan men who were aboard got out safely, Stephans said.

The plane was valued at $70,000, he said.

Source:  http://www.jsonline.com

 HARTFORD, WI (WTAQ) - A single-engine plane was destroyed by fire Thursday morning, soon after it landed at the Hartford Municipal Airport in Washington County.


Fire Chief Paul Stephans said the aircraft had just been re-fueled when the pilot and his passenger went back inside – and both got out safely when the fire started.

The plane was on a taxiway at the time. Both people in the plane were men from Michigan.

The fire broke out around 9:45 a.m. 


Source:  http://wtaq.com

Piper PA-12, N4361M: Accident occurred July 26, 2012 in Green Creek, New Jersey

http://registry.faa.gov/N4361M

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA482 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Green Creek, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/09/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-12, registration: N4361M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was returning to land after an uneventful banner-towing flight. He dropped the banner, added full engine power, climbed to traffic pattern altitude, and maneuvered to enter the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. During the climb, the engine sputtered and then lost total power. The pilot was not able to restart the engine and performed a forced landing into trees. Postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Both fuel tanks were intact; the right fuel tank was found empty and the left fuel tank contained about 1.75 gallons of fuel. The airplane had been operated for more than 4 1/2 hours since its last refueling. It is likely that the airplane's low fuel state, combined with the maneuvering associated with the banner drop and the airplane’s subsequent pitch-up and airport traffic pattern operations resulted in an interruption of fuel flow to the engine.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's inadequate fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation while maneuvering.

On July 26, 2012, about 1615 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-12, N4361M, operated by Paramount Air Service Inc., was substantially damaged when it impacted trees after experiencing a total loss of engine power while maneuvering near Green Creek, New Jersey. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed the Paramount Airport (JY04) about 1145. The local banner tow flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported that he had topped off the airplane's fuel tanks (38 gallons total capacity) earlier in the day. He started the engine about 1135, and departed on a banner towing flight about 1145. The flight had been uneventful, and he was returning to land at JY04 after flying for about 4.5 hours. He dropped the banner, added full engine power, climbed to traffic pattern altitude, and maneuvered to enter the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. During the climb, the engine momentarily sputtered and then lost all power shortly thereafter. The pilot checked both fuel selectors, magnetos, and applied carburetor heat with no effect. He was not able to restart the engine and performed a forced landing to trees.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left side of the nose section, wing leading edges, and a buckled firewall.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Both the left (main) and right (auxiliary) fuel tanks were intact. The right fuel tank was empty and the left fuel tank contained about 1.75 gallons of fuel.

The airplane was manufactured in 1947, with a Lycoming O-235C, 100-horsepower engine, and was equipped with a Lycoming O-320-A2B, 150-horsepower engine at the time of the accident. Fuel was supplied to the engine via a gravity feed fuel system through the left, or both the left and the right fuel tanks. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was performed on May 17, 2012, and the airplane had been operated for about 200 hours since. In addition, at the time of the inspection, the engine had been operated for about 750 hours since it was overhauled.


 NTSB Identification: ERA12LA482 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Green Creek, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-12, registration: N4361M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On July 26, 2012, about 1615 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-12, N4361M, operated by Paramount Air Service Inc., was substantially damaged when it impacted trees after experiencing a total loss of engine power while maneuvering near Green Creek, New Jersey. The certificated commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed the Paramount Airport (JY04) about 1135. The local banner tow flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot was returning to land at JY04. He dropped the banner, added full engine power, and climbed to traffic pattern altitude. During the climb, the engine momentarily sputtered and then lost all power shortly thereafter. The pilot was not able to restart the engine and performed a forced landing to trees. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

Examination of the airframe and engine by an FAA inspector was pending recovery from the accident site.





A small plane crashed into trees after missing the runway at the Jersey shore late Thursday afternoon. 

The banner plane came down near Route 47 in Green Creek, Middle Township. A company called Paramount Air Service is headquartered in the area. But it is unclear where the plane is based.

The pilot escaped injury. No one else was hurt.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.
GREEN CREEK — An banner-towing airplane from Paramount Air Service crashed about 4:25 p.m. Thur., July 26. The pilot was reportedly uninjured, but was stuck in a tree about 40 feet off the ground on a branch, according to police radio reports.

Green Creek Fire Department and Middle Township Emergency Medical Services and Middle Township Police responded to the call as did AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center paramedics, as a precaution.

Paramount's airfield is located on the west side of Route 47 between the highway and Delaware Bay. It is there that advertising banners are created and then picked up by planes. 


MIDDLE TWP. -- Officials are on the scene of a banner plane crashed in Middle Township.

It happened Paramount Airpark at around 4:45 p.m., where Middle Township Police say the plane landed in a tree after missing the runway. Police say there are no major injuries.

One person is on the plane, which is about 40 feet off the ground.

Super Puma AS 532 AL crash

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2178933/Six-employees-helicopter-firm-Eurocopter-killed-aircraft-crashes-French-mountain-test-flight.html

http://www.news.com.au/world/six-dead-as-chopper-hits-mountain/story-fndir2ev-1226435285975


Helicopter was brand new on a test flight, due to be delivered shortly to the Albanian Army.

http://www.shephardmedia.com/news/rotorhub/eurocopter-test-flying-albanian-super-pumas/



Thank you, Rob "Biz Jets",  greatly appreciated. 

Beech BE60 Duke, N880LY: Fatal accident occurred July 26, 2012 in Sedona, Arizona

National Transportation Safety Board - Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N880LY

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA326 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Sedona, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/19/2014
Aircraft: BEECH B60, registration: N880LY
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Several witnesses observed the airplane before and during its takeoff roll on the morning of the accident. One witness observed the airplane for the entire event and stated that the run-up of the engines sounded normal. During the takeoff roll, the acceleration of the airplane appeared a little slower but the engines continued to sound normal. Directional control was maintained, and at midfield, the airplane had still not rotated. As the airplane continued down the 5,132-foot-long runway, it did not appear to be accelerating, and, about 100 yards from the end of the runway, it appeared that it was not going to stop. The airplane maintained contact with the runway and turned slightly right before it overran the end of the runway. The airplane was subsequently destroyed by impact forces and a postaccident fire. The wreckage was located at the bottom of a deep gully off the end of the runway. 

Postaccident examination of the area at the end of the runway revealed two distinct tire tracks, both of which crossed the asphalt and dirt overrun of 175 feet. A review of the airplane’s weight and balance and performance data revealed that it was within its maximum gross takeoff weight and center of gravity limits. At the time of the accident, the density altitude was calculated to be 7,100 feet; the airport’s elevation is 4,830 feet. For the weight of the airplane and density altitude at the time of the accident, it should have lifted off 2,805 feet down the runway; the distance to accelerate to takeoff speed and then to safely abort the takeoff and stop the airplane was calculated to be 4,900 feet. It is unknown whether the pilot completed performance calculations accounting for the density altitude.

All flight control components were accounted for at the accident site. Although three witnesses indicated that the engines did not sound right at some point during the runup or takeoff, examination of the engine and airframe revealed no evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Propeller signatures were consistent with rotational forces being applied at the time of impact. No conclusive evidence was found to explain why the airplane did not rotate or why the pilot did not abort the takeoff once reaching the point to safely stop the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The airplane’s failure to rotate and the pilot’s failure to reject the takeoff, which resulted in a runway overrun for reasons that could not be undetermined because postaccident examination of the airplane and engines did not reveal any malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 26, 2012, about 0830 mountain standard time, a Beech B60, N880LY, serial number P-524, was destroyed during a runway overrun following takeoff roll at the Sedona Airport (SEZ), Sedona, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the planned personal cross-country flight, and no flight plan was filed. The destination was reported to be the Double Eagle II Airport (AEG), Albuquerque, New Mexico. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

During the investigation four individuals provided the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) with written statements relative to their observations of the accident sequence:

Witness #1, a retired Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) operations supervisor, stated that he was located about 200 feet north of the parallel taxiway and about 1,000 feet southwest of the approach end of Runway 21; he had an unobstructed view of the entire runway. The witness reported that he initially observed the airplane doing a run-up in the run-up area adjacent to Runway 21, that the engines sounded normal, and that the time it took the pilot to complete the run-up was normal. The airplane then took Runway 21 for departure, and the acceleration during the takeoff roll appeared a little slower than normal. The witness added that the engines sounded normal, that directional control was normal, and at mid-field the airplane was still moving on the ground and had not rotated. The witnesses opined, "At that time I began to be concerned." The witness stated that as the airplane continued down the runway it appeared that it wasn't accelerating. The witness further stated that about 100 yards from the departure end of Runway 21 it appeared that the airplane wasn't going to stop. During this time the airplane maintained runway contact and directional control. The witness added that as he observed the airplane go off the end of Runway 21, it appeared to turn slightly to the right, and at the same time he heard a mild bang and the airplane went out of sight. About 30 seconds after losing sight of the airplane, a very large black mushroom cloud, about 200 to 300 feet high, appeared. 

Witness #2, who resided at the north end of the departure runway, stated that on the morning of the accident he was sitting outside when he heard an airplane start its takeoff roll, seemingly losing power for a moment and then regaining it; it was not a "run-up". The witness reported that the airplane was definitely taking off, that the drone of the engine was lowered for an instant, and then regained what he thought was a "normal" sound for an engine at full operating power.

Witness #3 reported that while driving along the airport ramp on the north side of the airport, he observed the accident airplane stationary and on the numbers of Runway 21, apparently preparing to take off. The witness further reported that it appeared to him that the left engine was turning at a slower revolutions per minute (rpm) than the right engine, "…as I could see the prop blades on the left engine." The witness stated that the airplane seemed to be holding in the takeoff position for what he considered to be a longer than normal amount of time. The witness opined that he estimated that from the time he first observed the airplane holding on the runway to the start of the takeoff [roll], at least 1 minute had elapsed. He added that it was his impression at the time that there was some type of an abnormal situation with the airplane due to the slow rpm of the left engine and its extended hold time on the runway. The witness revealed that he then heard the airplane power up to what sounded like full power and start its takeoff roll; the witness stated that he was about 200 to 250 feet from the numbers of Runway 21 at this time. The witness stated that in his opinion both engines sounded normal, with a slight out-of-sync beat, and no different from other twin-engine airplanes of this type at full takeoff power. As the accident airplane passed by his position it accelerated on its takeoff roll, and out of the witness's sight, in what appeared to be a normal takeoff. He subsequently looked around the hangars, and saw the large black plume of smoke.

Witness #4, the Airport Operations Manager, reported that while driving to the north end of the airport to perform maintenance, he entered the taxiway at A-3 behind the accident airplane, which was taxiing to the run up area for Runway 21. On returning via the taxiway, he passed the accident airplane that was on its takeoff roll between A-2 and A-3, and exchanged a hand wave, with whom he believed was the pilot, but could not be entirely certain that it was actually the pilot with whom he exchanged the wave. The witness stated that he subsequently observed the smoke plume coming from the southwest end of the airport, and immediately responded to the accident site, where he observed that the airplane had been consumed by the post-impact fire.

During the investigation local law enforcement personnel provided the NTSB IIC with two additional statement of individuals who had witnessed the accident. Their statements revealed the following:

Witness #5 reported that while towing a helicopter in close proximity to taxiway A-4 he observed the twin-engine airplane taxi into position for departure on Runway 21. As he reached taxiway A-3, he observed the airplane pass his position at a fairly fast rate of speed; the engines were at takeoff throttle and running normal. The witness continued to watch the airplane as it proceeded past taxiways A-5 and A-6, at which time he began to wonder why the pilot had not started to rotate. The witness stated that it appeared to him that the airplane was going at a high rate of speed as it passed [taxiway] A-8. At this time, the witness was at taxiway A-4 and could not detect any engine sound or deceleration [of the airplane]. He continued to watch the airplane as it went off the end of the runway and disappear from sight.

Witness #6 reported that on the morning of the accident she was hiking on the airport loop trail east when she heard the airplane start its takeoff. Shortly thereafter she observed the airplane approaching the end of the runway, and it appeared that it was going to hit the [airport's perimeter] fence. The witness stated that she could hear the engines cutting out before it hit the fence, and that they were cutting out more when the airplane crashed into some big trees.

The airplane wreckage was consumed by the postcrash fire, and was located at the bottom of a steep drop-off at the end of Runway 21. 

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 53, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. The pilot's most recent third-class FAA airman medical certificate was issued on January 5, 2011, without limitations. 

A review of the pilot's computerized logbook records, which were supplied to the NTSB IIC by a family member, revealed that as of July 14, 2012, the pilot had accumulated a total flying time of 663 hours, of which 545 hours were in single-engine airplanes, and 118 hours were in multiengine airplanes. The logbook review further revealed that the pilot had accumulated a total of 62 hours in the accident airplane make and model. It was also noted that the pilot had completed 6 flights into SEZ between March 29, 2011 and May 28, 2012, each in the accident airplane. In the previous 90 days, 30 days, and 24 hours prior to the accident, the pilot had flown a total of 23.2 hours, 5.1 hours, and 0 hours respectively, both in single-engine and multiengine airplanes. Additionally, the pilot had flown the accident airplane 9 hours and 3 hours respectively in the preceding 90 days, 30 days, and 24 hours prior to the accident.

A review of the pilot's training records provided by the SIMCOM Training Center, Scottsdale, Arizona, indicated that the pilot had satisfactorily completed the B60 initial training course on March 6, 2011. Additionally, the pilot had completed his most recent B60 recurrent training on March 23, 2012. In an interview conducted with the accident pilot's simulator instructor on August 15, 2012, the instructor revealed that the pilot was very attentive during training, knew the airplane well, was very disciplined, and was a very good student.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Beechcraft model B60, six seat, low-wing, retractable gear airplane, serial number P-524, which was manufactured in 1979. The airplane was powered by two Lycoming TIO-541-E1B4, 380-horsepower engines that were equipped with Hartzell constant-speed, full-feathering, three-bladed propellers. 

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent documented annual inspection was performed on April 9, 2012, at a total airframe time of 3,915.23 hours,and a Hobbs time of 437.3 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had been operated about 11 hours since its most recent annual inspection.

Maintenance records also revealed that on September 18, 2008, at an airframe total time of 3,740.5 hours and a Hobbs time of 262.5 hours, Midwest Aviation Services, Inc., Oskaloosa, Iowa, installed a TIO-E1B4 Lycoming engine, serial number L-192-59C in the left position, and a TIO-E1B4 Lycoming engine, serial number L-196-59C in the right position. At the time of installation, both engines had a total time of 2,716.8 hours, a total time since major overhaul of 45.5 hours, and a Hobbs time of 262.5 hours. At the time of the accident, each engine had accumulated about 220 hours since the most recent overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0835, the SEZ Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS) reported wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 26 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.17 inches of mercury. The density altitude at the time of takeoff was calculated to be 7,100 feet.

WEIGHT AND BALANCE

During the investigation, a Beechcraft air safety investigator provided the NTSB IIC with computed weight and balance data that revealed at the time of the accident the airplane was within its center of gravity limits, and was below its maximum gross takeoff weight for the planned flight.

PERFORMANCE

During the investigation, a picture of the airplane on its takeoff roll was provided by an unidentified visitor standing on the south side of the airport restaurant looking south toward the runway. An examination of the photograph revealed that the accident airplane was just approaching taxiway A5, or about 2,500 feet from the start of Runway 21. A Beechcraft air safety investigator calculated that the airplane would liftoff at 2,805 feet, and that a takeoff distance of 3,550 feet would have been required to have cleared a 50 foot obstacle. The normal takeoff and initial climb speed would have been 94 knots. Additionally, it was noted that the Accelerate Stop Distance would have been about 4,600 feet from the start of the takeoff roll to a full stop. The length of Runway 21 is 5,132 feet. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane traveled the length of Runway 21, then across the asphalt and dirt overrun of 175 feet before impacting the top of an airport perimeter fence and descending into a deep gully. The airplane impacted the bottom of the gully, and was destroyed as a result of impact forces and a postaccident fire. 

Two distinct tire tracks were observed on the departure end of Runway 21, both of which travelled across the asphalt surface of the Runway 03 displaced threshold and the dirt overrun. The measured tire tracks were about 11 feet apart, with the left-most track aligned with the runway centerline; the B60 wheel span is 11 feet 3 inches when sitting on the ground and in a stationary position. A black contact mark, which resembled a mark made by the tire sidewall, was observed on the left side of a bent-over fence post. The left-most tire track ended just prior to the bent-over fence post. 

The entire airplane wreckage was located at the bottom of the gully. The drop in elevation from the airport perimeter fence to the bottom of the gully was 273 feet. The horizontal distance travelled was 672 feet. The vegetation observed on the slope was disturbed at a point about 50 feet above the wreckage location, but no airplane parts were found at that location, nor were there any ground scars that could be evaluated. 

The fuselage, cabin, and center wing section was at rest in an upright orientation on a measured magnetic heading of 165 degrees. A postimpact fire had consumed the majority of the airplane, leaving only some of the heavier aluminum structure and steel components identifiable. Both engines remained connected to their respective nacelles. Both propellers were separated from their respective engines. 

The roof and sidewalls of the cabin and the rear fuselage were observed to have been partially consumed by fire; the rear fuselage was separated from the cabin area. The nose area forward of the front pressure bulkhead was crushed and partially consumed by fire. The instrument panel and center console were partially consumed by fire. 

An examination of the fuel selector panel revealed that the left fuel selector knob was positioned to the six o'clock position, which is not a selectable position; it was rotated with finger force. The right fuel selector knob was positioned to the twelve o'clock position, which is the ON position; it would not rotate with finger force. The cable control attached to the left fuel selector knob was separated. The cable control remained attached to the left fuel selector valve mounted on the aft side of the front spar in the left wheel well; the valve had been exposed to thermal damage. The right fuel selector cable remained attached to the fuel selector valve assembly and the fuel selector knob.

The left wing was partially consumed by fire and lay forward of the cabin area. It was also partially separated from the front and aft carry-through spar. The left engine was partially separated from the left wing and was lying inverted and forward of the wing. The engine had been damaged by thermal activity. The propeller was separated from the engine crankshaft. The left flap actuator was separated from the wing structure mount. The actuator body and nut had been consumed, which prevented the flap actuator position from being determined. An inboard section of the flap was partially consumed by fire, and was in a retracted position.

The right wing was partially consumed by fire, and remained partially attached to the carry-through spar. The flap actuator body and nut had been consumed preventing the flap actuator position from being determined. The right engine was partially attached to the right wing, and had sustained fire damage.

The empennage was mostly consumed by fire. The elevator trim actuator and rudder trim actuator were located, and the actuator extension measured. The rudder trim actuator extension was 3-3/8 inches, which corresponds to a neutral tab position. The elevator trim actuator extension was 4-11/16 inches, which corresponded to a neutral tab position. The aileron actuator extension indicated that the left aileron trim tab was positioned 2 degrees trailing edge down. 

The flight control cables controlling pitch, yaw and roll were examined. The examination revealed that all cables had continuity from the cabin control assemblies to the respective flight control bellcranks; all bellcranks were partially consumed by fire. Trim cables had continuity from the cabin area to the elevator and rudder control surface areas.

The nose landing gear and strut assembly had impact and fire damage and remained partially attached to the cabin area. The main landing gear wheel and strut assemblies had separated, and were found in the area of the main wreckage. The landing gear extension rods separated from the landing gear actuator drive bellcrank. The landing gear extension housing was partially consumed by fire, which exposed the interior gear mechanism. The relative position of the extension rod ends at the landing gear actuator bellcrank was consistent with the landing gear being in the extended position. The main landing gear wheels, tires, and brake assemblies remained attached to the damaged lower struts. One of the brake rotor disks showed uneven wear, with debris observed in each of the vents. The wheels moved freely on their respective axels.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On July 28, 2012, an autopsy was performed on the pilot at the Office of The Medical Examiner, Yavapai County, Prescott, Arizona. The results of the examination revealed that the cause of death was attributed to blunt force trauma and thermal injury.

Toxicological testing was performed by the FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Cyanide and carbon monoxide were detected in blood. The volatile concentrations revealed 13 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol detected in blood, 11 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol detected in urine, no ethanol detected in brain, N-Propanol detected in urine, N-Propanol detected in blood. 

The results were negative for tested drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A postaccident examination of the airplane was overseen by the NTSB IIC. The results of the examination revealed the following:

The rudder gust lock pin and the control column gust lock pin were found in the cabin area. The interconnecting cable for the three gust lock components that interconnect the rudder pin, control column pin, and throttle lock plate together was found only attached to the rudder gust lock pin. The interconnecting cable had two undamaged loops in the cable with nothing attached to those loops. The throttle lever gust lock plate was not located. An examination of the control column gust lock pin holes revealed that none of the holes were deformed, which is consistent with the gust lock pin not being in place during the accident sequence.

Engine Examinations

Both engines were examined under the supervision of the NTSB IIC by a Lycoming representative at the facilities of Air Transport, Phoenix, Arizona. The results of the examinations revealed the following:

Left Engine

The left engine was a Lycoming model TIO-541-E1B4, serial number L-192-59C. The engine remained attached to the engine mount and exhibited thermal damage and impact damage. All engine accessories, including the left and right magneto, vacuum pump, starter, and fuel pump were consumed by fire. The oil pump and oil sump were consumed by fire. The accessory housing was partially consumed by the postimpact fire. All cylinders remained attached to the crank case and exhibited thermal damage.

The oil suction screen appeared to be fire damaged and clear of contaminants. The intake system was consumed by fire. Fuel injectors one, three, and five sustained fire damage. Fuel injectors two, four and six were observed open. The fuel control unit and throttle body exhibited thermal damage. The throttle plate would not move freely by hand. The fuel inlet fuel screen was recovered and observed to be unrestricted. The crankcase exhibited thermal damage. The engine exhaust system remained attached to all cylinders.

The ignition harness was consumed by fire. The top and bottom spark plugs were removed and exhibited various degrees of coloration in the electrode area but were free of oil residue or mechanical damage. All spark plugs exhibited normal wear signatures.

The engine crankshaft could not be rotated due to thermal damage sustained in the postimpact fire. The upper and lower portions of the crankcase were mostly consumed by fire, which allowed for internal component examination. All six connecting rods remained attached to the respective pistons and crankshaft. The camshaft was intact, and the lobes were unremarkable. All intake and exhaust lifters and pushrod assemblies were unremarkable. All intake and exhaust rocker arms were intact. Using a lighted borescope, all six cylinders were examined internally, and were unremarkable. All intake and exhaust valves were unremarkable. All pistons were unremarkable. The turbo charger remained attached to the engine mount. The compressor shroud and associated compressor turbine were consumed by fire. The turbine side of the compressor was intact, and all exhaust clamps were in place. The propeller governor remained attached to the engine at the mounting pad. The governor control rod remained attached to the control arm, and was situated about 1/2 inch from the low pitch, high rpm stop.

The propeller was separated from the engine. All three blades remained attached to the propeller hub.

No evidence of any mechanical or internal failure that would have precluded normal operation was observed during the engine examination.

Right Engine

The right engine was a Lycoming model TIO-541-E1B4, serial number L-196-59. Examination of the recovered engine revealed that the engine remained attached to the engine mount structure. The engine exhibited thermal damage. All of the engine accessories, including the left and right magneto, vacuum pump, starter, and fuel pump were consumed by fire. The oil pump was fire damaged, and the oil sump was consumed by fire. The accessory housing was partially consumed by the postimpact fire. All cylinders remained attached to the crank case and exhibited thermal damage.

The oil suction screen was not observed. The intake system was consumed by fire. All six fuel injectors were not observed. The fuel control unit and throttle body exhibited thermal damage. The throttle plate would not move freely by hand. The fuel inlet fuel screen was recovered, and observed to be unrestricted. The crankcase exhibited thermal damage. The engine exhaust system remained attached to all cylinders.

The ignition harness was consumed by fire. The top and bottom spark plugs were removed, and exhibited various degrees of coloration in the electrode area, but were free of oil residue or mechanical damage, with the exception of top and bottom number four spark plugs. Top and bottom spark plugs of the number four cylinder sustained damage when removed from the cylinder due to molten aluminum damage. All remaining spark plugs exhibited normal wear signatures.

The engine crankshaft could not be rotated due to fire and thermal damage sustained in the postimpact fire. The lower portion of the crankcase was mostly consumed by fire, which allowed for internal component examination. All six connecting rods remained attached to the respective pistons and crankshaft. The camshaft was intact, and lobes were unremarkable. All intake and exhaust lifters and pushrod assemblies were unremarkable. All intake and exhaust rocker arms were intact.

Using a lighted borescope, all six cylinders were examined internally. Cylinders number one, two, three, five and six were unremarkable. Cylinder number four exhibited molten aluminum debris within the combustion dome. The cylinder was removed and the number four piston appeared to be melted. The cylinder barrel was cut from the cylinder head. All piston rings were intact. The majority of the piston was melted and pooled within the cylinder combustion dome. The remaining pistons were unremarkable. All intake and exhaust valves were unremarkable.

The turbo charger remained attached to the engine mount. The compressor shroud and associated compressor turbine were consumed by fire. The turbine side of the compressor was intact, and all exhaust clamps were in place. 

The propeller governor was not observed.

The propeller was separated from the engine. All three blades remained attached to the propeller hub.

No evidence of any mechanical or internal failure that would have precluded normal operation was observed during the engine examination.

Propellers Examinations

Both propellers were examined under the supervision of the NTSB IIC, by a Hartzell Propeller Inc. Air Safety Investigation Manager. The results of the investigations revealed the following:

Both propellers were rotating and not feathered at the time of impact. An estimate of power output could not be determined aside from evaluation of blade damage. Blade damage to the left propeller suggested impact with low to moderate power. Blade damage to the right propeller suggested impact at low power.

There were no discrepancies noted with either propeller that would preclude normal operation. All damage was consistent with impact damage. (Refer to the Hartzell Propeller examination report, which is included in the public docket for this accident.)

The postaccident examination of the airframe's structure and engines revealed no preimpact failures or malfunctions, which would have precluded normal operation.



 NTSB Identification: WPR12FA326 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 26, 2012 in Sedona, AZ
Aircraft: BEECH B60, registration: N880LY
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On July 26, 2012, about 0830 mountain standard time, a Beech B-60, N880LY, was substantially damaged during a runway overrun following takeoff roll at the Sedona Airport (SEZ), Sedona, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the proposed personal cross-country flight, and no flight plan was filed. The destination was reported to be the Double Eagle II Airport (AEG), Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Multiple witnesses located at or near the airport, stated that they observed or heard the airplane experience abnormal engine anomalies, while others reported the airplane performed a normal takeoff roll on runway 21. The airplane continued down the runway, exited the departure end, and impacted a fence before it disappeared from view down a ravine.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) revealed that the airplane sustained substantial damage after it impacted sloping terrain and came to rest in a deep wash. The wreckage, which was mostly consumed by fire, was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

At 0835, the SEZ Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS) reported winds calm, sky clear, visibility 10 miles, temperature 26 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.16 inches of mercury. The density altitude at the time of the accident was calculated to be 7,100 feet.





ALBUQUERQUE (KRQE) - Relatives on Friday confirmed the three people killed in an Arizona plane crash are a two-time Olympic runner from Albuquerque, his son and the son's best friend.
The three were on a guys' trip and heading for home Thursday morning when there plane crashed and burned during takeoff from the Sedona airport, Patricia "Trish" Porter said during an afternoon news conference in Albuquerque.

Porter said her husband, former Olympic distance runner Patrick Porter, 53, her son, Connor Porter, 15, and Connor's best friend, Connor Mantsch, 14, died in the crash.

The boys were classmates at the Albuquerque Academy and would have been freshmen.

The news conference was held on the track field at the Academy with Shannon Porter standing at her mother's side.

"He loved life, his friends, his school and was very, very proud to tell others how much he loved his sister Shannon," Trish Porter said.

Arizona authorities have not officially released the names of those killed, but Trish Porter said she knows the three were on board the plane registered to her husband.

Sedona police told KRQE News 13 the plane was trying to take off when it appeared to clip a fence at the end of the runway.

Police said something on the plane was knocked loose, and the craft dropped hundreds of feet into a ravine off the end of the runway before bursting into flames.

Trish Porter, an Olympic high jumper, said she met her husband during training for the 1988 Olympics and fell in love with his sense of humor.

Patrick Porter, a high school and college track star in Alamosa, Colo., competed in the 1984 and 1988 Olympics.

Connor Porter had taken up fencing and had hoped to continue the sport at Stanford University, his mother said.

A family spokesperson said Mantsch had an amazing zeal for life, loved nature over video games and had an inventive and creative mind.

The National Transportation Safety Board said the wreckage was taken from the crash site to Phoenix to find out what caused the accident.

Trish Porter comforts her daughter Shannon during a press conference at Albuquerque Academy Friday. Porter’s husband Olympian Pat Porter, and son Connor Porter, 15, died in a plane crash in Sedona, Ariz. Also on the plane was Connor Mantsch. 
Marla Brose/Journal


3:47 p.m. – Trish Porter has confirmed that her husband, Pat, and 15-year-old son, Connor, were among the three killed in an Arizona plane crash yesterday.

Her son’s friend and classmate at the Albuquerque Academy, 14-year-old Connor Mantsch, was also aboard the plane, Porter said at a news conference in Albuquerque this afternoon.

Pat Porter, 53, competed in the 10,000-meter run at the 1984 and 1988 Olympic Games.
 
11:16 a.m. – Trish Porter, wife of Pat Porter, an Albuquerque resident whose plane crashed near Sedona, Ariz., yesterday and killed all three passengers, will hold a news conference this afternoon.

The plane, a two-engine Beechcraft B-60, crashed yesterday morning after taking off from the Sedona Airport, killing all three passengers. The plane belonged to two-time Olympian Pat Porter, but officials still could not identify those who were on the plane this morning.

Authorities said yesterday that the passengers were a man and two children, but no names were released.

A spokeswoman for Trish Porter told the Journal this morning that she will hold a news conference on the crash at 3 p.m. today in Albuquerque.

Trish Porter is also an Olympian. She met Pat during a pre-Olympic training camp for the 1988 Seoul Olympics.
http://www.abqjournal.com


 
Pat Porter

 
 Former Olympians Trish and Pat Porter. The couple met at the 1988 games in Seoul, South Korea.

Pat Porter, who won a record 8 straight US cross-country championships and also went to two Olympics, died on Thursday in a plane crash in Arizona. Pat was 53 years old.

Don't know much about Porter? We highly recommend Kenny Moore's feature on Porter which appeared in Sports Illustrated in 1986: Running On A Rocky Mountain High? Colorado's Pat Porter, U.S. cross-country champ since 1982, is an athlete truly in his element.

 SEDONA, Ariz. - "It went for takeoff and then it went over the side and we saw a big explosion and black smoke," describes witness Holly McKusick. 

 A tragic sight in one of Arizona's most beautiful towns -- 3 people killed when a plane crashes off the end of a runway in Sedona.

The plane burst into flames on impact at the Sedona airport. It went down around 9 a.m. Thursday during takeoff. The plane had trouble taking off and went past the runway down a cliff.

When you see a close-up of the wreckage, you'll see why no one could've survived.

One of the victims is two-time Olympian Patrick Porter. Almost nothing is left of his plane after it burst into flames.

McKusich works at the Mesa Grill, a restaurant right next to the airport. She watched the plane try to take off and fail.

"Everybody stood up and gasped and screamed. My boss called 911 and I grabbed the fire extinguisher and ran out there."

The plane ended up about a mile down the cliff, completely engulfed in flames. The twin engine prop plane was registered to Olympic runner Patrick Porter, 53, who lives in Albuquerque. His wife confirmed he was on the plane.

There's no information on who the two others on board were. All three died.

Pilots say the Sedona airport can be very tricky when it comes to take off and landings -- that's because this airport is at such a high altitude.

The airport sits on a mesa almost 5,000 feet above sea level.

"You always have gusts here. Updrafts downdrafts it's just a predicament, all pilots have that taking off and landing here," says pilot Stephen Loftin.

The FAA and NTSB have been called in to investigate.


Story and video:   http://www.myfoxphoenix.com

http://www.trishporter.com/bio/

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SEDONA, Ariz. (KRQE) - A plane registered to a two-time Olympic athlete from Albuquerque crashed and burned while taking off an Arizona airport Thursday morning killed all three aboard.  

 Sedona, Ariz., police say three bodies were removed from the wreckage Thursday afternoon. The medical examiner is now working to confirm the identities of those killed in the crash.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the plane went off the south end of the runway and down a tree-covered slope at around 9:30 a.m. Albuquerque time.

Witnesses reported the plane then burst into flames. Kenitzer also confirmed that the plane was a two-engine Beech 60.

The plane, which refueled at the Sedona airport, is registered to Pat Porter, who was a long distance runner for the U.S. team at the 1984 and 1988 Summer Olympics.  He also was an eight-time U.S. cross country champion.

Porter's wife Trish, who was a U.S. Olympic high jumper in 1988, told KRQE News 13 her husband was supposed to be on the plane. Sources told News 13 Porter left on Sunday for a trip with his 15-year old son and his son's friend.

Family friend Chip Smith, a former University of New Mexico All-American runner who trained with Pat, said he's hoping for the best.

"He's an icon in the running community," Smith said.  "It's a sad day if this is true."

Authorities have not confirmed the identities of those killed in the crash. The investigation into what caused the plane to crash is still in the early stages.


Story, photos and videos:  http://www.krqe.com



A small plane registered to a former track and field Olympian who lives in Albuquerque crashed near Sedona, Ariz.. killing three people.
 

Sedona Police spokesman Ron Wheeler says the bodies were removed from the charred wreckage Thursday afternoon.
   
He said the Yavapai County Medical Examiner's Office will determine the victims' identities.

Authorities tell told KOB Eyewitness News 4 they have no idea who was on the plane and do not know the identities of those who were killed.

The Yavapai County Medical Examiner's Office will determine the victims' identities.

Arizona officials tell KOB that three people were killed Thursday in the crash of a plane registered to Pat Porter of Albuquerque.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating this accident. NTSB is the lead investigative agency.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer says the plane went off the south end of the runway down a tree-covered slope about 9 a.m. The Beech 60 then burst into flames and authorities say there were no survivors.

Source:   http://www.kob.com


Plane crash closes 2 Sedona trails  
Airport Loop and Table Top Trails in Sedona are temporarily closed due to the aircraft crash that occurred this morning.  Please contact the Red Rock Ranger District or the Coconino National Forest web site before planning a hike here. 
http://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/coconino/recreation/hiking/recarea/?recid=71905&actid=50

SEDONA, AZ (CBS5) -  Three people were killed when a small airplane registered to a former U.S. Olympic distance runner went off the end of a runway at Sedona Airport on Thursday morning.

A spokesman with the Sedona Fire Department confirmed the deaths, though no identities were available.
 

The Federal Aviation Administration said the airplane was a small, twin-engine Beech 60 and burst into flames after falling down a tree-covered hill at the southwest end of Runway 21.

The plane was registered to Patrick R. Porter of Albuquerque, NM. Porter, whose wife, Trish Porter, is a former U.S. Olympic high jumper, ran the 10,000 meters for the U.S. at the 1984 Summer Games in Los Angeles and 1988 Games in Seoul, South Korea.

Trish Porter was a high jumper for the U.S. in Seoul.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating this accident. NTSB is the lead investigative agency.

A witness told CBS 5 News the plane went off the end of the runway on takeoff just before 9 a.m. and burst into flames, killing the three on board.

No other information was immediately available.


Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.kpho.com

SEDONA, Ariz. -- Three people died in a plane crash at the Sedona Airport Thursday morning.

Wendy Wagner, the manager of the nearby Mesa Grill, said the small plane never took off. She said it went off the end of the runway, plunged into a ravine and caught on fire.

Joe Waters was towing a helicopter at the airport when he witnessed the crash. He said he saw the twin-engine plane go about halfway down the runway. Both engines were running and everything seemed to be fine.

"He gets down about three quarters of the way down the runway and I started to wonder why he wasn't lifting off," Waters said. "Just before he got to the end of the runway, I saw him pull the nose up just a little bit then he disappeared off the end of the runway and went down below the hill. The next thing I saw was just a ball of fire and smoke."

It is not clear what caused the crash at this time.

Gary Johnson from the Sedona Fire Department said three people were on board the plane. Sedona police said there were no survivors.

The airport is on top of a hill. 3TV's Scott Pasmore said there is a cliff on both ends of the short runway.


Story, video and photos:  http://www.azfamily.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N880LY

 Note the Olympic's on the tail:  http://www.fencecheck.com

Story, video, photos, comments:   http://www.azfamily.com

Story, video, photos, comments:   http://www.abc15.com





Firefighters extinguish hot spots after a fatal plane crash at Sedona Airport on Thursday morning.