Friday, August 26, 2016

Piper PA-11 Cub Special, N4910M: Fatal accident occurred September 14, 2016 in Arcanum, Ohio

PETER H. HEINS: http://registry.faa.gov/N4910M 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cincinnati FSDO-05


AIRCRAFT CRASHED IN A FIELD, THE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE FATALLY INJURED, NEAR ARCANUM, OHIO.


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA370
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 14, 2016 in Arcanum, OH
Aircraft: PIPER PA 11, registration: N4910M
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 14, 2016, about 0915 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-11 airplane, N4910M, impacted terrain while maneuvering near Arcanum, Ohio. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident. The local flight departed without a flight plan from a private grass strip about 0800. 


According to onboard video posted by the passenger to his Facebook page, the airplane was maneuvering near the grass strip, with the student pilot in the front seat and the passenger in the rear seat. The airplane subsequently impacted into a cornfield about 300 yards north of the grass strip, which damaged both wings and fuselage. The airplane came to rest about 100 feet from the initial ground impact point.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Clayton Heins

Jacob Turner

The plane being removed by accident investigators, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016.



ARCANUM, Ohio (WDTN) – The Darke County Sheriff’s Office and the National Transportation Safety Board will be giving an update on the investigation into the plane crash that killed two men Wednesday.

Chief Deputy Mark Whittaker released the names of the victims. The men who died were friends, according to Whittaker. Clayton Heins, 20 and Jacob Turner, 19 were in the plane and Whittaker said Thursday Heins was at the controls.

The NTSB said the crash site is about 100 yards wide and would not characterize the crash as a forced landing. Investigators will look at all of the factors that could have affected the flight of the aircraft.

Heins said Heines had a student pilot’s license and should not have been flying with anyone else in the plane.

On Wednesday, a plane was found crashed in a cornfield in the 7100 block of Dull Road near Arcanum.

Two people were killed in the accident.

Authorities say it appears the men took off around 8 in the morning from a private landing strip close to where it crashed.

The men and plane were missing until a family member flew over and found the scene, hundreds of feet deep in the field, just before 2PM.


Story and video:  http://wdtn.com

























ARCANUM, Ohio (WDTN) – Two young men were killed when a small, single engine plane went down in a cornfield near Arcanum on Wednesday.

The crash happened about a mile south of Arcanum north of Dull Road.

Authorities say it appears the men took off around 8 in the morning from a private landing strip close to where it crashed.

The men and plane were missing until a family member flew over and found the scene, hundreds of feet deep in the field, just before 2PM.

“We do not know the amount of time that this plane has been down and crashed prior to being reported,” said Chief Deputy Mark Whittaker with the Darke County Sheriff’s Office.

According to the Darke County Sheriff’s Office the bodies of those two men have been taken to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office, but the coroner for Darke County won’t release their identities until both bodies are positively identified.

The site is being secured by deputies until officials with the NTSB come to investigate on Thursday.

Once the FAA and NTSB arrive on scene, they’ll consider a variety of different factors to determine the cause of the crash.

Investigators will look at everything from the weather at the time of the accident to the pilot’s medical history.

They will also conduct witness interviews and obtain any communication between the plane and air traffic control to get a better understanding of what happened.

Those investigators will be on site reviewing the wreckage of the plane to see if that gives them any insight into what may have happened.

Investigations like these often take several weeks, or even months to complete. A preliminary report could be released in the next several months, but a final report might not be released until 2017.

Story and video:   http://wdtn.com



ARCANUM, Ohio (WRGT) -- The Darke County Sheriff's Office says a plane that crashed Wednesday had gone missing Wednesday morning and was spotted this afternoon in a cornfield by another pilot who was searching the area from the sky.

Chief Deputy Mark Whittaker of the Darke County Sheriff's Office said they were notified of a yellow Piper Cub single-engine plane that was missing, possibly since about 8 a.m. Sept. 14. About the time the Sheriff's Office was notified, Whittaker said, the pilot searching for the missing plane reportedly spotted the crash site.

The two occupants of the crashed plane have died, Whittaker said; however, as of Wednesday afternoon, the Sheriff's Office was not releasing any details to identify the victims or the plane. He said more information would be released, when it was appropriate to do so. Also, Dr. Tim Kathman, Darke County coroner, said he wasn't releasing the names until a forensic examination and positive identification was made.

The Darke County Sheriff's Office reported Wednesday evening that the plane had taken off sometime in the morning of Sept. 14, 2016, from a private air strip near the crash site. The plane had been spotted earlier in the day flying around the Arcanum area.

An investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board was on the way to the scene and the FAA had been notified, which are standard procedures after a plane crash.

Whittaker said a farmer who owns the field where the plane crashed volunteered to use his tractor to clear corn in the area to allow easier access to the site.

Story and video:   http://abc22now.com



DARKE COUNTY — Two men have been identified in a fatal plane crash Wednesday in Darke County.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are continuing their investigation into the crash of a small plane in Darke County on Wednesday that left two men dead:


  • The single-engine Piper Cub PA-11 went down in a cornfield off Dull Road, near Arcanum


  • The plane was removed from the site after 2 p.m. Thursday


  • The men took off about 8 a.m. Wednesday, according to the Darke County Sheriff’s Office


  • Clayton Heins, 20, and Jacob Turner, 19, identified as the fatalities

Michael Folkerts, an investigator with National Transportation Safety Board, said Heins only had a student pilot certificate and was not allowed to fly a passenger.

The cause of the crash is still under investigation, and Folkerts did not want to speculate on the speed of the aircraft. He did say the crash did not look like a forced landing.

UPDATE @ 4:40 p.m. (Sept. 15):

Clayton Heins and Jacob Turner were friends, “known to each other for quite some time,” said Mark Whittaker, chief deputy, Darke County Sheriff’s Office.

Heins was flying the aircraft owned by his father around 8 a.m. Wednesday. The crash happened sometime in the morning, according to witnesses interviewed.

NTSB investigator Michael Folkerts said the cause of the crash is still under investigation and he did not want to speculate on the speed of the aircraft.

UPDATE @ 4:27 p.m. (Sept. 15):

The two deceased men have been identified Clayton Heins, 20, and Jacob Turner, 19, according to the Darke County Sheriff’s Office.

UPDATE @ 2:19 p.m. (Sept. 15):

Investigators with NTSB removed the downed plane from the cornfield after 2 p.m. Thursday.

The identifications of two men killed in the plane crash Wednesday are expected to be released this afternoon.

UPDATE @ 7 p.m. (Sept. 14):

The male victims have been taken to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office. According to the Darke County Sheriff’s Office, the sheriff’s office will not release the names of the victims tonight.

The single-engine, two-seater Piper Cub PA-11 went down “under unknown circumstances,” Tony Molinaro, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration, said in an email earlier in the afternoon.

Molinaro also said the FAA does not have information about the names of the occupants or the flight plan.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration have been to the crash site and investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board are expected on Thursday.

The wreckage was found in a cornfield, about 150 yards east of a railroad bed and north of Dull Road by a family member in a search plane, which had been sent up because the victims had been reported as missing and unaccounted for, a deputy said.

The plane was believed to have taken off about 8 a.m. from a private landing strip on Dull Road, deputies said, and witnesses reported seeing the plane in the Arcanum area in the morning.

According to sheriff’s officials, a family member of one or both of the victims contacted the sheriff’s office after failed attempts to make contact with the two in the aircraft.

Deputies and emergency crews were dispatched to the cornfield about 1:45 p.m. and discovered the wreckage and the victims. When the crash occurred is not known, according to the preliminary investigation by the sheriff’s office.

Frank Brown, of West Carrollton, identified himself as the best friend of one of the victims. He said they were flying from Darke County to West Carrollton to meet him because they were planning to surprise a female friend of theirs and take her up for a ride.

Story and video:  http://www.daytondailynews.com

Ercoupe 415-C, N93949: Accident occurred August 21, 2016 in Tamiami, Miami-Dade County, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N93949

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED DURING LANDING, TAMIAMI, FLORIDA.  

Date: 21-AUG-16
Time: 18:39:00Z
Regis#: N93949
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TAMIAMI
State: Florida

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, Big Q Aviation Corp., N66898: Incident occurred August 25, 2016 at USAF Academy Airfield (KAFF), Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado

BIG Q AVIATION CORP:   http://registry.faa.gov/N66898

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT GROUND LOOPED DURING GLIDER TOW OPERATIONS, USAF ACADEMY AIRPORT, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO.

Date: 25-AUG-16
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N66898
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: COLORADO SPRINGS
State: Colorado

Long EZ, N1614J: Incident occurred August 25, 2016 in Moberly, Randolph County, Missouri

http://registry.faa.gov/N1614J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Kansas City FSDO-63

EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND LANDED ON A ROAD, MOBERLY, MISSOURI

Date: 25-AUG-16
Time: 15:20:00Z
Regis#: N1614J
Event Type: Incident
Damage: None
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MOBERLY
State: Missouri

Mooney M20M Bravo, Paperhouse Av Inc., N75PH: Incident occurred August 25, 2016 in Chester, Queen Anne's County, Maryland -and- incident occurred July 22, 2016 at Republic Airport (KFRG), Farmingdale, Nassau County, New York

PAPERHOUSE AV INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N75PH

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baltimore FSDO-07 

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, CHESTER, MARYLAND.  

Date: 25-AUG-16
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N75PH
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20M
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CHESTER
State: Maryland

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A TAXIWAY LIGHT, FARMINGDALE, NEW YORK.
  
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Farmingdale FSDO-11

Date: 22-JUL-16
Time: 19:54:00Z
Regis#: N75PH
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20M
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FARMINGDALE
State: New York

Eurocopter AS355, N839PA: Accident occurred August 24, 2016 at Grand Canyon West Airport (1G4), Peach Springs, Mohave County, Arizona

Monarch Enterprises Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N839PA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA450
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 15, 2016 in Peach Springs, AZ
Aircraft: AMERICAN EUROCOPTER CORP AS350B3, registration: N839PA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HELICOPTER EXPERIENCED A TAIL ROTOR STRIKE AT THE GRAND CANYON WEST AIRPORT, PEACH SPRINGS, ARIZONA.  

Date: 24-AUG-16
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N839PA
Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: AS355
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: PAPILLON HELICOPTERS
City: PEACH SPRINGS
State: Arizona

Beech B35, Greacen Associates LLC, N369RB: Incident occurred August 26, 2016 in Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona

GREACEN ASSOCIATES LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N369RB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

AIRCRAFT EXPERIENCED TOTAL ELECTRICAL FAILURE AND LANDED GEAR UP, MESA, ARIZONA.

Date: 26-AUG-16
Time: 01:44:00Z
Regis#: N369RB
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MESA
State: Arizona

Taylorcraft DCO-65, N48291: Incident occurred August 25, 2016 in Minden, Douglas County, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N48291

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT EXPERIENCED AN ENGINE FAILURE IN FLIGHT AND LANDED IN A HAY FIELD, MINDEN, NEVADA. 

Date: 25-AUG-16
Time: 15:32:00Z
Regis#: N48291
Aircraft Make: TAYLORCRAFT
Aircraft Model: DCO
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MINDEN
State: Nevada

Piper J5A Cub Cruiser, N35589: Accident occurred August 24, 2016 in Sterling, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items- https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N35589

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ANC16CA058
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 24, 2016 in Sterling, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: PIPER J5A, registration: N35589
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was returning from a local flight when he intentionally ran the right fuel tank dry. After switching fuel tanks, he attempted to restart the engine, but the attempt was unsuccessful. During an emergency landing on a narrow road, the right wing impacted brush and trees, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's improper fuel management, which led to fuel exhaustion and a subsequent forced landing on a road too narrow for the airplane.

Cessna 162 Skycatcher, N6003P: Incident occurred August 25, 2016 in San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N6003P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT DOOR OPENED IN FLIGHT AND FOLDED AFT, NEAR SAN ANGELO, TEXAS.

Date: 25-AUG-16
Time: 18:15:00Z
Regis#: N6003P
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 162
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: SAN ANGELO
State: Texas

Beech 58 Baron, N15MD, Cobra Kai Inc: Accident occurred August 26, 2016 - and- Incident occurred April 08, 2016 in Wichita County, Texas

COBRA KAI INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N15MD

NTSB Identification: CEN16CA359
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 26, 2016 in Wichita Falls, TX
Aircraft: BEECH 58, registration: N15MD

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

AIRCRAFT DIVERTED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, KICKAPOO, OK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

Date:  08-APR-16
Time:  15:30:00Z
Regis#:  N15MD
Aircraft Make:  BEECH
Aircraft Model:  58
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Minor
Activity:  Instruction
Flight Phase:  UNKNOWN (UNK)
City:  KICKAPOO
State:  Oklahoma



WICHITA FALLS, TX (KAUZ) -  A small aircraft had trouble on take off Friday morning at Kickapoo Downtown Airport (KCWC) in Wichita Falls. 

DPS officials told our crew on the scene that an elevator on the aircraft got stuck which would not allow the plane to lift off the ground. 

The pilot aborted the takeoff but it was going too fast and ended up sliding off the end of the runway. 

At this time it does not appear that anyone was injured. 

Source:  http://www.newschannel10.com





A twin engine aircraft ran off the runway this morning at Kickapoo Downtown Airport (KCWC) in Wichita Falls.

Wichita County Constable Mark Brewer tells NewsTalk 1290 that the pilot was forced to abort his takeoff and the plane ran off the end of the runway.

The incident happened at around 10 AM. The plane suffered significant damage but no one was injured in the incident.

The exact reason for the aborted take off is not known at this time.

Source:   http://newstalk1290.com






Emergency crews have blocked off an area of road south of Kickapoo Downtown Airport (KCWC) where a small plane was involved in an accident Friday morning.

The incident was reported about 9:15 a.m. when a twin-engine plane apparently slid off the south end of the runway and came to rest in an access road. It appears part of the landing gear collapsed.

 No injuries were reported.

The runway was temporarily closed and a part of the roadway will be blocked until federal investigators can arrive at the scene.

The plane is a 1974 Beech owned by Cobra Kai, Inc, registered to the flight school’s Lawton location.

Source:   http://www.timesrecordnews.com

Eppley Airfield (KOMA) officials address security after man crashes truck into plane: 'I want the public to understand that the perimeter fence is just one layer of our security,' airport police chief says




Delairo Koonce, 35, parked his own pickup outside a parking garage at the airport about 9:30 p.m. and walked to the south end of a driveway in front of the terminal. There, he screamed that people were trying to kill him, said Tim Conahan, the chief of the Omaha Airport Authority Police Department. 



 
OMAHA, Neb. —Omaha police identified the man involved in Thursday's trespassing and destruction of property incidents at Eppley Airfield.

The suspect, Delairo Koonce, 35, had parked his vehicle in the airport main drive and was acting erratically, screaming and flailing his arms, police say.

An Eppley Airfield officer attempted to contact him, but police say he ran into the airport parking garage. Officers attempted to contain Koonce as he began removing his clothing.

While additional officers responded, Koonce "was able to conceal himself in landscaping shrubbery and officers lost sight of him for a short period of time," a press release said.

According to police, Koonce was then observed scaling an eight foot barbed wire fence leading to the airport south ramp.

Koonce ran from the inside of the fence into a construction area where he jumped into an unattended airline pickup truck.

For four minutes, he led airport police on a chase that ended when  struck the landing gear of a Southwest Airline plane that was boarding passengers.

"The lady who gets them on board started screaming get off the jet bridge. You've got to get off the jet bridge and then it shook,” said Shannon Hale, who witnessed the incident.

Koonce was taken into custody, and was transported to Nebraska Medicine with minor injuries.

Friday, Omaha Airport Police Chief Tim Conahan addressed the security breach.

"I want the public to understand that the perimeter fence is just one layer of our security,” Conahan said. "One of the reason our protocols work so well is because he never got close to an active runway or a taxiway where planes were landing and moving."

Koonce's father Brian says his son has been struggling with mental illness and drug addiction for around two years now.

He says he believes Thursday night's incident was a cry for help.

"That's what I believe my son was doing when he did this. It's not a good thing, it's a stupid thing -- but still, why would a person strip down to their boxers, and then go steal a car and run it into an airplane if he wasn't seeking attention?" Koonce said.

Koonce says his son has been trying to get help for at least a couple of years, bouncing from therapist to therapist to battle his meth addiction – but hasn’t been able to find the program he needs.

“He's been begging, every hospital just about around here knows his name because he's went in there asking for help, you know, and there's not a program set up that'll 'handle that,' as they put it,” Brian Koonce said.

Koonce has four children, and his father says that before his drug problems began, he had a successful lawn care business.

He was supposed to see a therapist Wednesday morning, and Brian Koonce says when he didn’t hear back from him Thursday, that's when he started to get worried.

Koonce has a lengthy criminal record -- in the past, he's been charged with assault, two counts of driving under the influence, and carrying unregistered firearms.

Charges are pending his release from the hospital.

Story and video:  http://www.ketv.com




A man in Nebraska managed to scale an airport fence, strip down to his boxer shorts, steal a pickup truck and crash it into the nose of an airliner, officials and eyewitnesses said.

Authorities are now investigating how the suspect allegedly managed to get onto the runway of Omaha's Eppley International Airport on Thursday night and ram the Southwest Airlines aircraft at high speed.

Tim Conahan, chief of police at the Omaha Airport Authority, said the suspect's behavior possibly indicated "some type of drug overdose or that he has mental issues."

Conahan said that an officer first noticed the suspect " acting in a bizarre manner" and saying "someone was trying to kill him" at around 9:30 p.m. local time (10:30 p.m. ET).

The man bolted through a parking garage and into bushes on the perimeter of the airport — before scaling a barbed-wire fence — according to the officer.

He then found a pickup truck owned by Southwest Airlines that had its engine running and climbed in. After police cut him off as he was going under a jet bridge used to board the aircraft, the suspect crashed the truck into the plane's nosecone, Conahan said.

The aircraft was about to take off for Denver and had 18 passengers on board at the time, according to a statement from Southwest Airlines.

Passengers Beth and Tom Lantry — who were flying to Denver — said they felt "a big jolt." David Postier, a 23-year-old from Littleton, Colorado, said he heard a "loud boom and crash."

Police said the pilot suffered a slight knee injury and a flight attendant bumped an elbow.

The suspect was taken into police custody, according to the airline's statement. Police chief Conahan said the FBI had been notified and the NTSB were also flying out Friday to investigate.

Source:   http://www.nbcnews.com

Airline employees are getting huge pay raises

Wages have been stagnant for years -- but that's not so in the airline industry.

Pilots and ground crews at the major U.S. airlines are winning huge raises and have locked in more hikes in the years to come.

American Airline pilots got a 23% pay hike last year, and United Airlines pilots won a 16% pay hike in January of this year. Both are slated for smaller annual raises going forward.

But some employees are fighting for even more.

Delta pilots are picketing the company's headquarters Friday to demand a 37% raise over the course of three years, while Southwest pilots demonstrated earlier in the week for a 32% hike through 2019.

And its not just pilots who are getting fatter paychecks.

American Airlines reached a deal earlier this month to give 30,000 ground workers raises ranging from 15% to 55%. United ground workers (except the mechanics) ratified a deal earlier this year that gave them a 30% wage increase over five years.

In separate negotiations, United mechanics rejected an offer of a 33% wage hike over seven years. The Teamsters, who represent the mechanics, report it is now close to a tentative agreement.

The hefty pay raises are coming after employees at all the major U.S. carriers endured years of pay cuts, layoffs and bankruptcies. Of the nation's four major airlines, only Southwest has avoided a trip through bankruptcy at some point since 2000.

But the tide has since turned, and industry profits hit record levels in 2015.

"In last 15 years labor has pretty much taken it on the chin," said Michael Boyd, an industry consultant. Even with these big pay increases, wages will only return to just about where they were before the bottom fell out of the airline business. "This just brings some equilibrium back," he said.

The wage hikes probably won't push airfares higher in the near term, but ticket prices are expected to start climbing soon, says Standard & Poors airline analyst Philip Baggaley.

And that's giving airlines the confidence to offer pay raises.

"They're banking on the assumption that ... they will be able to recover most or all of this in the form of higher fares," he said. "That may work in a reasonably healthy economy when fuel is low, but that's not necessary true for all time."

Source:  http://money.cnn.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N17SK: Accident occurred August 25, 2016 near Sky King Airport (3I3), Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana

http://registry.faa.gov/N17SK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA333
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 25, 2016 in Terre Haute, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N17SK
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 25, 2016, about 1910 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 172N single-engine airplane, N17SK, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees and a house while on final approach to runway 26 at the Sky King Airport (3I3) located near Terre Haute, Indiana. There were two private pilots onboard. One pilot sustained fatal injuries and the other serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight that departed 3I3 about 1816.

A witness, who was a flight instructor providing ground instruction at the airport, reported that the accident airplane approached from the north and entered the traffic pattern for runway 26 (3,557 feet by 50 feet, asphalt). He then observed the airplane touchdown between the half-moon runway turnoff and the runway 18/36 intersection. After landing, the airplane was observed to back-taxi on runway 26 before it departed again. The witness described the next landing approach as being "high and fast" and that a go-around was performed before the airplane crossed over the displaced threshold. The witness did not observe the subsequent landing approach or the crash.

Another witness, located near the accident site, reported that he heard an airplane pass over his house and that it was much louder than typical. He then saw the airplane traveling at a low altitude and slow speed before he heard it collide with a tree. The witness reported that, following the collision with the tree, he heard the airplane increase engine power before it crashed into the house.

According to preliminary information, the current owner of the accident airplane was attempting to sell the airplane and that the accident flight was with a potential buyer. The pilot who survived the accident was unable to provide a written statement or to be interviewed before the release of this preliminary report. According to fire department personnel, following the accident, the potential buyer was recovered from the left cockpit seat and the current airplane owner was recovered from the right cockpit seat.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the current airplane owner, age 63, held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land airplane rating. His last aviation medical examination was completed on May 16, 2016, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. His last flight review, as required by FAA regulation 61.56, was completed upon the issuance of his private pilot certificate dated July 14, 2015. The pilot's flight history was reconstructed using logbook documentation. His most recent pilot logbook entry was dated July 31, 2016, at which time he had accumulated 135.5 hours total flight time, of which 48.6 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. All of his flight time had been completed in a Cessna model 172N single-engine airplane. He had accumulated 5.0 hours in actual instrument meteorological conditions, 12.9 hours in simulated instrument meteorological conditions, and 3.4 hours at night. He had flown 24.7 hours during the prior 12 months, 4.4 hours in the previous 6 months, 2.4 hours during prior 90 days, and 1 hour in the 30 day period before the accident flight. The pilot's logbook did not contain any recorded flight time for the 24 hour period before the accident flight.

According to FAA records, the potential buyer, age 60, held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land airplane rating. His last aviation medical examination was completed on November 6, 2014, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not recovered during the on-scene investigation; however, on the application for his current medical certificate, he reported having accumulated 120 hours of flight experience.

The accident airplane was a 1980 Cessna model 172N, serial number 17273809. A 160-horsepower Lycoming model O-320-H2AD reciprocating engine, serial number L-495-76T, powered the airplane through a fixed-pitch, two blade, McCauley model 1C160/DTM7557 propeller, serial number 82011. The airplane had a fixed tricycle landing gear, was capable of seating four individuals, and had a certified maximum gross weight of 2,300 pounds. The airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate on February 13, 1980. According to an airplane utilization logbook, the airplane's HOBBS hour meter indicated 3,903.7 hours before the accident flight. The airplane's HOBBS hour meter indicated 3,904.6 hours at the accident site. The airframe had accumulated a total service time of 15,073 hours. The engine had accumulated a total service time of 9,554.6 hours since new. The engine had accumulated 378.6 hours since being overhauled on August 1, 2013. The last annual inspection of the airplane was completed on December 9, 2015, at 15,025.1 total airframe hours. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 42 gallons (40 gallons usable) distributed between two wing fuel tanks. A review of fueling records established that the airplane fuel tanks were topped-off on July 31, 2016. According to available information, the airplane had flown 1.8 hours since the last refueling.

The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Terre Haute International Airport (HUF), Terre Haute, Indiana, about 7 miles south-southeast of the accident site. At 1853, the HUF automated surface observing system reported the following weather conditions: wind 280 degrees true at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 31 degrees Celsius, dew point 23 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting 30.03 inches of mercury.

The initial point-of-impact was the top of a large 50-foot tall oak tree located about 190 feet east of the house where the main wreckage came to rest. The oak tree was located along the extended runway 26 centerline about 1,355 feet from the runway displaced threshold. There were numerous small limbs and leaves distributed between the initial point-of-impact and the house. Based on the orientation of the wreckage in the house, the accident airplane descended through the roof of the house in a near vertical flight path. A postaccident examination of the airplane confirmed flight control cable continuity from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The wing flaps were found extended 10-degrees. The throttle and mixture controls were full open and full rich. The magneto switch was found in the BOTH position. The carburetor heat control was found ON. The fuel selector was positioned to draw fuel from both wing fuel tanks. No fuel was recovered from either wing tank; however, there was a significant odor of aviation fuel at the accident site beneath the wreckage. Additionally, a witness reported seeing fuel drain from the wreckage immediately following the accident. The airframe fuel strainer contained a blue fluid consistent with 100 low lead aviation fuel. The fuel recovered from the strainer did not contain any water or particulate contamination.

The engine remained attached to the firewall by its mounts. Mechanical continuity was confirmed from the engine components to their respective cockpit controls. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The single-drive dual magneto provided spark on all leads as the engine crankshaft was rotated. A borescope inspection revealed no anomalies with the cylinders, valves, or pistons. There were no obstructions between the air filter housing and the carburetor. The carburetor fuel bowl contained residual liquid that had the odor of 100 low-lead aviation fuel. The propeller had separated from the engine crankshaft flange. Both propeller blades exhibited S-shape bends, blade twisting, and chordwise burnishing.

Todd Fox with the NTSB and Donald Shipman III and William Schneider of the FAA look over the propeller of the single- engine Cessna that crashed Thursday evening north of Terre Haute. The two government entities as well as representatives of insurance companies and manufacturers were at the scene most of the day Friday.

Todd Fox, inspector with the NTSB gave a brief press conference mid-day Friday before the actual work of removing the plane from the house and inspecting it began.

Todd Fox of the NTSB points to a section of the tail of the single-engine Cessna on Friday, the day after it crashed into a house north of Terre Haute. Donald Shipman and Jeff Holtz of the FAA listen in.




Two doctors, both on staff at Terre Haute Regional Hospital, were identified Friday as the men extricated from an airplane that crashed into a home Thursday near Sky King Airport in northern Vigo County.

Pathologist Patrick O’Neill and anesthesiologist John Trump were both airlifted from the crash scene to receive trauma care for critical injuries.

Trump was listed in critical condition Friday at Regional Hospital. Information on O’Neill, who was reportedly transported to Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis, was not available Friday afternoon.

“We ask for your continued thoughts and prayers for both physicians, their loved ones, and colleagues as they navigate this difficult time,” the hospital said in a statement released Friday.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration arrived on the scene Friday to collect evidence and examine the crash site.

NTSB investigator Todd Fox said checking the experience level of the pilot is part of the normal protocol for the crash investigation, as is looking into the maintenance history of the airplane.

Sheriff Greg Ewing said the owner of the house, Matt Fox, was at the scene most of the morning watching as investigators examined both the plane and the house. Several parts from the airplane, including a propeller, could be seen scattered across the lawn of the home.

A large crane was brought to the scene to remove the plane from the house. By early afternoon, the plane had been lifted and set nearby for continued access by investigators.

Ewing said it was unknown when a report on the accident would be released by the NTSB.

The plane, a single-engine Cessna registered to O’Neill, struck the house in the 3100 block of East Rosehill Avenue in North Terre Haute shortly after 7 p.m. Thursday.

The doctors were the only casualties reported. No people were inside the house when the plane hit, and Matt Fox’s dog later emerged uninjured.

Responders included the Vigo County Sheriff’s Department, Otter Creek Fire Department, Indiana State Police, State Excise Police, Trans-Care Ambulance and LifeLine.


http://www.tribstar.com


North Terre Haute, IN   --   Crews removed the wreckage Friday afternoon from a plane that crashed into a home.

The accident happened Thursday night on East Rosehill Avenue in North Terre Haute.

A statement released by Terre Haute Regional Hospital says both occupants were part of their medical staff.

Dr. Patrick O'Neill is a pathologist and Dr. John Trump is an anesthesiologist.

Dr. O'Neill is in stable condition at a hospital in Indianapolis and Dr. Trump is in critical condition at Regional Hospital.

According to FAA records, O'Neill owned the plane that crashed into the home at 3112 East Rosehill Avenue.

The home is near the Sky King Airport and that's where the Vigo County Sheriff's Office says the personal plane was headed for landing, before disaster.

"I heard the plane coming in and then I heard him rev up real hard, and I could hear when he smacked the tree on top. Then he revved up so hard, it sounded like it stalled and then he clipped the tree right here next to the house. Then, it just nosedived over the wires and straight into the house," a neighbor told NBC 2 News.

Fortunately, the homeowner wasn't there when it happened.

A neighborhood resident tells NBC 2 News that he's lived in the area for about 16 years and has never been concerned about the planes that fly overhead.

"They do come in here awfully low," he described. "It's really surprising with a lot of the trees and wires that we haven't had an incident before now."

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating what caused the plane to crash. Key things they'll be looking at are the pilot's level of experience, the engine of the plane, which is a Cessna 172 N Model, and its maintenance.

"A Cessna 172 aircraft is a very common aircraft, been in production for decades and decades. As for their safety record, it's been in production in a variety of models for decades," says Andrew Fox with the NTSB.

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management was also on the scene Friday, collecting fuel samples to assess clean up after the plane's removal.

Fox says the NTSB should have the engine investigation wrapped up by Sunday.

A preliminary report should be released by the middle of next week. It could take 12 to 15 months before the agency releases a probably cause determination.

Story and video:   http://www.mywabashvalley.com





Emergency responders had to extricate two men from a single-engine plane after it crashed into a home in northern Vigo County shortly after 7 p.m. Thursday.

“We had two patients who were extricated from the aircraft,” Josh Craft of the Otter Creek Fire Department told reporters. “The extent of the injuries are unknown at this time. We do not know why the aircraft crashed. There will be an ongoing investigation.”

Both men were airlifted from the site by LifeLine helicopter.

Vigo County Sheriff Greg Ewing also was at the crash site in the 3100 block of East Rosehill Avenue in North Terre Haute.

“We received a call of a plane into a house,” Ewing said. “It looks like it was coming from the east [toward Sky King Airport]. It clipped those tree limbs right over there. My assumption would be it was headed for a landing.”

The Federal Aviation Administration registry shows the plane’s tail numbers registered to a single-engine Cessna Model 172N.

Ewing and Craft said the FAA had been notified, and its investigators are expected to arrive Friday morning.

“Now this becomes their scene,” said Ewing.

No people were inside the home when the airplane struck, resident Matt Fox said.

Fox was concerned about his fox terrier, Lilly, who eventually came out barking and apparently unharmed, drawing applause from the crowd that had gathered at the site.

Getting the men out of the wreckage was not easy for authorities.

“It obviously was a difficult extrication, not something we normally would train for,” Craft said. “But we worked quickly and worked as a team and got both patients out of the aircraft and loaded into helicopters.”

“One of the main concerns initially when the fire department arrived was the fuselage and the fuel that is held in the wings leaking into the house,” Ewing added. “That’s why you saw the fire department using foam to kind of blanket the area to prevent any type of fire because aircraft fuel is very flammable.”

Despite the risk, there were no reports of flames at the scene.

Craft said he wasn’t sure how long emergency personnel would be at the house.

“It could be quite a while,” he said. “I’m not sure. We’ve never had an aircraft incident like this, at least not in recent history. So it could be an extended stay.”

The home struck by the plane is behind Fox’s Meat Market & Grocery, across Clinton Street from Sky King Airport.

Quincey and Penni Smith said they’d lived in the neighborhood for about 10 years, and this was the first time they’d seen a plane hit a house despite close proximity of homes to Sky King Airport.

Penni called 9-1-1 after the crash, the Smiths said.

“I heard the initial crash from the trees, where it hit,” Quincey Smith said. “It sounded almost like a dump truck, like when they pick up dumpsters and slam ‘em down. It sounded like that, but it had a different sound to it.”

After he realized it was a plane crash, he ran back inside the house and told his wife to call authorities.

“I didn’t see it happen, but I heard it,” Penni said.

Agencies responding to the call, which came in at 7:07 p.m., were the Vigo County Sheriff’s Department, Otter Creek Fire Department, Indiana State Police, State Excise Police, Trans-Care Ambulance and LifeLine.

Ewing said this crash was a first for him, too.

“I don’t know if in my career of 26 years [in law enforcement] — we’ve had plane crashes — but I don’t know that I’ve ever worked a plane crashing into a house,” Ewing said.

Source:  http://www.tribstar.com




























VIGO COUNTY, Ind. (WTHI) – The FAA is expected to begin their investigation Friday morning after a plane crash into a home Thursday night on the north side of Terre Haute.

When News 10’s Melissa Crash was on the scene Friday morning there was only one officer on scene.

The accident happened after 7 p.m. near Sky King Airport.

Officials told News 10 two people were removed from the plane and airlifted to hospitals.

“It’s obviously a difficult extraction. Not something we would normally train for. But we worked quickly and got both patients out of the aircraft and loaded into helicopters,” Otter Creek Fire Department Public Information Officer Josh Craft said.

There was no one inside the home at the time of the crash.

According to online records, the plane was a 1980 Cessna 172N registered to William Patrick O’Neill.

The Vigo County Sheriff’s Office tells News 10 O’Neill was on the plane at the time of the crash. We don’t know at this time if he was the pilot or a passenger.

Source:  http://wthitv.com