Monday, June 11, 2018

Piper PA-28R-200, N32665: Incident occurred June 08, 2018 at Skylark Field Airport (KILE), Killeen, Bell County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

Landing gear collapsed.

http://registry.faa.gov/N32665

Date: 08-JUN-18
Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N32665
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KILLEEN
State: TEXAS

American Airlines, Boeing 777-200, N750AN: Incident occurred June 10, 2018 near Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW), Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas

Flight AA-60:  Aircraft encountered moderate turbulence resulting in several injuries.

American Airlines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N750AN

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 20:43:00Z
Regis#: AAL60
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 777-200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL60
City: DALLAS
State: TEXAS

Air Ambulances Are Flying More Patients Than Ever, and Leaving Massive Bills Behind: Rising prices, billing disputes, and a quirk in federal law are creating a new health-care headache

A bill sent from Air Methods to the family of Michel Roth following his death. 
Source: Erin Roth


When three-year-old West Cox’s fever hit 107 degrees, doctors called a helicopter. 

Hours earlier, the toddler, who’d been prescribed an antibiotic for a suspected ear infection, was at home in Princeton, West Virginia, watching cartoons and eating chips and salsa. Then, during a nap, he started to have convulsions, and his mother, Tabitha Cox, a physician’s assistant, drove him to the emergency room, stripped to his shorts to cool.

Tabitha remembers the triage nurse’s eyes widening when she took West’s temperature at Princeton Community Hospital, the only medical center in the small town on the southern edge of the state. Nurses covered him in ice packs to try to keep his temperature down.

Patients running a fever that high can suffer permanent brain damage. Within an hour of his arrival at the emergency room, an air ambulance was on the way to take West to the CAMC Women and Children’s Hospital in Charleston. Flying would cut a 90-minute drive in half.

During four nights in the pediatric intensive-care unit, West recovered from apparent encephalitis. Three years later, his parents are still reckoning with the aftermath of his 76-mile flight: a bill for $45,930 from for-profit helicopter operator Air Methods. 

At the heart of the dispute is a gap between what insurance will pay for the flight and what Air Methods says it must charge to keep flying. Michael Cox, West’s father and a track coach at Concord University, had health coverage through a plan for public employees. It paid $6,704—the amount, it says, Medicare would have paid for the trip. 

Air Methods billed the family for the rest. 

The U.S. air-ambulance fleet has doubled in size in the past 15 years to nearly 900 helicopters making 300,000 flights annually, according to data compiled by Ira Blumen, a professor of emergency medicine and director of University of Chicago Aeromedical Network. 

That rapid growth has made stories such as the Cox family’s more common. The air-ambulance industry says reimbursements from U.S. government health programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, don’t cover their expenses. Operators say they thus must ask others to pay more—and when health plans balk, patients get stuck with the tab.

“I was angry and I felt like we were being taken advantage of,” said Tabitha Cox. The family sued Air Methods in August 2017, seeking certification for a class-action lawsuit against the company on behalf of other patients in West Virginia who received similar bills. 

Air Methods has defended its billing and disputed other allegations in the complaint in court filings. The case is pending.

“The fundamental problem is that the current reimbursement rates by Medicare, Medicaid, and some of the private insurance companies fall well short of what it actually costs to provide this lifesaving service,” Air Methods Executive Vice President JaeLynn Williams said in an interview. She declined to comment on specific patients’ cases.

Favorable treatment under federal law means air-ambulance companies, unlike their counterparts on the ground, have few restrictions on what they can charge for their services. Through a quirk of the 1978 Airline Deregulation Act, air-ambulance operators are considered air carriers—similar to Delta Air Lines or American Airlines—and states have no power to put in place their own curbs. 

Prices for emergency medical flights have increased dramatically, as air-ambulance operators expanded their networks and responded to a wider set of emergencies, including traumas, strokes and heart attacks.

The median charge to Medicare for a medical helicopter flight more than doubled to almost $30,000 in 2014, from $14,000 in 2010, according to a report last year by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Air Methods’ average charge ballooned, from $13,000 in 2007 to $49,800 in 2016, the GAO said. Medicare, the federal health program for people 65 and older, pays only a fraction of billed charges; Medicaid, the state-federal program for the poor, pays even less.

Air-ambulance operators’ special legal status has helped them thwart efforts to control their rates. West Virginia's legislature passed a law in 2016 capping what its employee-health plan—which covered West Cox—and its worker-compensation program would pay for air ambulances. Another company, Air Evac EMS, successfully challenged the caps in federal court. A judge ruled that the caps were pre-empted by the federal deregulation law and blocked the state from enforcing them. West Virginia has appealed the ruling.

The industry has used similar arguments to fight regulation in other states, winning cases in North Carolina, North Dakota, Texas and Wyoming. A lawsuit recently filed in New Mexico challenges the state’s prohibition on balance billing on the same grounds. 

Wealthy investors lured by the industry’s rapid growth have acquired many of the biggest air-ambulance operators, leaving control of the business in the hands of private-equity groups. American Securities LLC bought Air Methods for $2.5 billion in March 2017. Rival Air Medical Group Holdings, which includes Air Evac and several other brands, has been owned by New York private-equity firm KKR & Co. LP since 2015. Two-thirds of medical helicopters operating in 2015 belonged to three for-profit providers, the GAO said in its report.

Amy Harsch, a managing director at American Securities, declined to comment. Kristi Huller, a spokeswoman for KKR, declined to comment.

Seth Myers, president of Air Evac, said that his company loses money on patients covered by Medicaid and Medicare, as well as those with no insurance. That's about 75 percent of the people it flies. 

“I fly people based on need, when a physician calls or when an ambulance calls,” he said. “We don’t know for days whether a person has the ability to pay.”

According to a 2017 report commissioned by the Association of Air Medical Services, an industry trade group, the typical cost per flight was $10,199 in 2015, and Medicare paid only 59 percent that. Air-medical operators back U.S. legislation proposed by Senator Dean Heller of Nevada and Representative Jackie Walorski of Indiana, both Republicans, that would boost reimbursements by as much as 20 percent over three years. The bill would also have Medicare collect cost data from air-ambulance companies and use it to update rates to reflect “the actual costs of providing air ambulance services.” Both versions have co-sponsors from both parties.

For people with private insurance, short flights in an air ambulance are often followed by long battles over the bill. 

In 2015, Erin Roth’s father, Michael, was flown 18 miles by helicopter from Good Samaritan Hospital in Suffern, New York, to Westchester Medical Center in White Plains, after he collapsed on a work site and hit his head.

Roth, who was 55, died from his injury. After workers-compensation insurance refused to cover the flight, his Aetna Inc. medical plan paid $4,370, and Air Methods’ subsidiary, Rocky Mountain Holdings LLC, sent the family a bill for $34,495. The air-ambulance company put a lien on Roth’s estate, preventing Erin from selling her father’s house. The dispute dragged on for two years, until a TV reporter Roth contacted looked into it, and Aetna paid the rest of the claim. 

“It was just kind of like a black cloud that was over my head the whole time,” she said.

Air Methods and Aetna declined to comment on Roth’s situation.

Williams, Air Methods’ executive vice president, said the company has hired “nearly 25” patient advocates since 2016 to “help them navigate the very complex process with their insurers, and we help them get the payments for these lifesaving critical emergency services that they’re entitled to.” 

The industry says insurers put patients in the middle. “We need to hold the insurers’ feet to the fire to say we need a reasonable rate,” said Myers, the Air Evac executive. He said health plans often won't agree to network contracts that could lower costs. He declined to say how large in-network discounts are, citing nondisclosure agreements. 

Consumer groups and insurers counter that air-ambulance companies strategically stay out of health-plan networks to maximize revenue.

In response to a complaint filed with the state insurance commissioner by a West Virginia consumer last year, insurer Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield wrote that it tried to negotiate a contract with Air Methods, but the company “refuses to discount its services by more than 3% of its total charge.” The consumer was appealing a $51,209 bill for his daughter’s medical flight, of which Highmark paid $10,571.

Williams, the Air Methods executive, declined to comment on what discounts the company offers insurers, but she said it is in “active negotiation” with about a dozen insurers nationally. 

“Air Methods is 100 percent committed to going in-network,” she said. 

Air-ambulance providers are “using consumers as leverage with the insurance companies,” said Betsy Imholz, director of special projects at Consumers Union, who helped write a report critical of the industry. Patients are “terrified” when they receive a five-figure bill for an air ambulance and press insurers to pay more, she said. 

“I think there is, frankly, in many cases, price gouging going on,” Imholz said.

When air travel was deregulated, the air-ambulance business was in its infancy. A few dozen medical helicopters, mostly operated by hospitals, were in use in the early 1980s, according to data compiled by Blumen, the University of Chicago emergency-medicine professor.

Then, in 2002, a new Medicare payment formula “effectively raised the payment amounts for air ambulance service,” according to the GAO. At the same time, new treatments for strokes and heart attacks expanded the number of patients who could survive such episodes if medics got to them sooner. As rural hospitals closed, air ambulances became lifelines for remote communities. 

The number of aircraft grew faster than the number of patients flown. In the 1990s, each helicopter flew about 600 patients a year, on average, according to Blumen’s data. That's fallen to about 350 in the current decade, spreading the expense of keeping each helicopter at the ready among a smaller pool of patients. 

While adding helicopters has expanded the reach of emergency care, “there are fewer and fewer patients that are having to pay higher and higher charges in order to facilitate this increase in access,” Aaron D. Todd, chief executive officer of Air Methods, said on an earnings call in May of 2015, before the company was taken private. “If you ask me personally, do we need 900 air medical helicopters to serve this country, I'd say probably not,” he said. 

Despite the apparent glut, air-ambulance operators are profitable. Air Methods had an average annual profit margin of 9.1 percent from 2012 to 2016. Over the same period, companies in the S&P 500 Health Care Providers & Services index had margins of 7.9 percent, on average. PHI, a helicopter company that operates both medical flights and transports for oil and gas drillers, reported average operating margins of 15.7 percent from 2014 to 2017 in its medical segment, compared to 10.4 percent for the benchmark index in the same period.

Air Methods declined to comment on its current profitability or to share financial details as a private company.

If there are too many helicopters for the number of patients who need them, market forces should force less-efficient operators out of business, said Hank Perritt, a professor at the Chicago-Kent College of Law who has studied the industry.

Montana Senator Jon Tester, a Democrat, has introduced legislation that would roll back the special status of air-ambulance companies. A Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill passed by the House in April would make medical services provided by air ambulances subject to state regulation.

In West Virginia, the Cox family went through two appeals with their health plan. After they retained a lawyer, Air Methods offered to reduce their balance to $10,000 on reviewing their tax returns, bank statements, pay stubs, and a list of assets. The family decided to sue instead.

“I felt like they were screening us to see just how much money they could get out of us,” Tabitha Cox said. “I think about people that really struggle—single moms, people that don’t have the financial blessings that we have. Bottom line, it’s just not fair.”

Read more here ➤ https://www.bloomberg.com

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Aviat A-1B Husky, N352AM: Accident occurred June 10, 2018 at Will Rogers Wiley Post Memorial Seaplane Base (W36), Renton, Washington

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N352AM

Location: Renton, WA
Accident Number: GAA18CA336
Date & Time: 06/10/2018, 1430 PDT
Registration: N352AM
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A 1
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the float-equipped airplane reported that, during takeoff on a tower controlled waterway in gusting crosswind conditions, he felt the wind direction shift as the airplane started to lift off. He added that a strong gust of wind then lifted the left wing, and the right wing dipped and impacted the water. He reduced power and shut the engine off. The impact had damaged the float connecting rod. The airplane came to rest upright on both floats, but the left float then separated from the fuselage, and the airplane sank.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing lift strut.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system about 1 nautical mile from the accident site reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 170° at 7 knots with thunderstorms in the vicinity. According to the pilot, the tower had reported the possibility of gusts up to 20 knots. The pilot was departing the waterway to the east/southeast.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 77, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/03/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3103 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1088 hours (Total, this make and model), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC
Registration: N352AM
Model/Series: A 1 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2003
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2252
Landing Gear Type: Float
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1120 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRNT, 29 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2135 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 163°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4400 ft agl
Visibility:  6 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / Unknown
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / Moderate
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  Moderate - Haze; Moderate - In the Vicinity - Thunderstorms - No Precipitation
Departure Point: Renton, WA (W36)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Victoria, BC
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1436 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: WILL ROGERS WILEY POST MEMORIAL (W36)
Runway Surface Type: Water
Airport Elevation: 14 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Water--choppy
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 200 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  47.505278, -122.219444 (est)





RENTON, Wash. - The water rescue team with Renton Firefighters Local 864 are responded to a Aviat A-1B Husky that crashed into the water near Gene Coulon Park in Renton Sunday afternoon.  

Gene Coulon Park is located at 1201 Lake Washington Blvd., near The Landing shopping mall and south of the VMAC.

The plane crashed under unknown circumstances and the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, according to Allen Kenitzer of the Federal Aviation Administration.

Rescuers made contact with the pilot, the sole occupant of the aircraft, and officials say the pilot is uninjured. 

Responders are now switching their efforts to "mitigate any fuel leaks or other hazards into Lake Washington," according to Renton Fire. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.kiro7.com

Cessna T210N Centurion, N91HC: Accident occurred November 19, 2015 at Brackett Field Airport (KPOC), La Verne, Los Angeles County, California


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N91HC

Location: La Verne, CA
Accident Number: WPR16LA030
Date & Time: 11/19/2015, 1335 PST
Registration: N91HC
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation

Analysis 

The commercial pilot was performing an aerial survey flight and departed with the fuel tanks filled to maximum capacity. After performing the survey, he began his return to the destination airport with about 40 minutes of fuel on board. While en route, he determined the fuel quantity was lower than he expected and opted to divert to a nearby airport. Before landing, the pilot switched the fuel selector to the fullest fuel tank (left side), which showed about 6-7 gallons; the right side showed about 4-5 gallons. While on final approach, the engine suddenly experienced a total loss of power, and the pilot was unable to restart it. With the propeller windmilling, the pilot aligned the airplane with the closest runway and configured the airplane for best glide. As the airplane neared the ground, the left wing collided with a sign and the airplane impacted the ground. The airplane erupted in flames and was partially consumed by fire.

The left wing was separated from the airframe and mostly consumed by fire. The right wing was partially burned and remained loosely attached to the airframe. Wreckage retrieval personnel recovered about 2 1/4 gallons of fuel from the right wing and stated that there was water in the sample; however, foam had been used to extinguish the fire, and the source of the water could not be determined. Due to the severe damage to the fuel system, continuity of the system could not be established. The examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunction or failures of the airframe or engine that would have prevented normal operation. Fuel consumption calculations revealed that, if the airplane departed on the flight with full fuel tanks, then there should have been about 21 gallons of fuel on board at the time of the accident. Due to the damage and postimpact fire, which precluded thorough examination of the fuel system and determination of the amount of fuel on board, the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.

Findings

Environmental issues
Sign/marker - Contributed to outcome

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Landing-landing roll
Off-field or emergency landing

Post-impact
Fire/smoke (post-impact) 



On November 19, 2015, about 1335 Pacific standard time, a Cessna T210N Centurion, N91HC, experienced a loss of engine power and collided with a sign while the pilot was making an emergency approach to land at Brackett Field, La Verne, California. Aircraft Guaranty Corp was the registered owner and was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was seriously injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerial surveying personal flight originated from Camarillo Airport, Camarillo, California about 0910 and the pilot had intended to land back at that airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed.

The pilot stated that he was an airplane mechanic for his profession, but had been down in southern California for the previous two days helping doing an aerial surveying job. Earlier in the morning he had the fuel tanks filled to maximum capacity and flew his intended route down in the San Diego area. As he began to return back to the destination airport, he recalled having 15 gallons of fuel on board, which the JP Instrument (JPI) gauge indicated equated to about 40 minutes of flight time. About 1325 he began to descend from his en route altitude of about 13,500-14,000 feet mean sea level (msl) and opted to land at Brackett due to the airplane's low fuel quantity.

Before landing, the pilot switched to the fullest tank (left side) which showed about 6-7 gallons and the right side had about 4-5 gallons. While on final approach, the engine suddenly lost power and despite his attempts, he was unable to successfully have it restart. With the propeller wind milling he aligned with the closest runway and configured the airplane for the best glide. The left wing suddenly impacted a sign that he did not previously observe and the airplane dove toward the ground. The pilot egressed through the windshield and shortly thereafter, the airplane erupted in flames. The airplane came to rest about 620 feet east of runway 26R.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provided the audio recording of the Brackett Air Traffic Control (ATC) communication with the pilot. The pilot made his initial radio call about 1330 stating that he was inbound to land and had the current ATIS (Automated Terminal Information System) information. The tower instructed him to enter the right base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 26L. After reading back the controller's instructions, the pilot stated that he was "quite low on fuel." The tower cleared the pilot to land on runway 26L at 1335 and he acknowledged. After about one minute and 15 seconds, the pilot transmitted that he was now requesting to land on runway 26R. About 5-10 seconds after the pilot made a radio call reading back his amended clearance, the airplane impacted the sign. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/03/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/28/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 85 hours (Total, this make and model), 1450 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N91HC
Model/Series: T210N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 64441
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/29/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10863 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motor
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520-RCM
Registered Owner: Aircraft Guaranty Corp
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: Aircraft Guaranty Corp
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The airplane, a Cessna Aircraft T210N, serial number 64441, was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520-R engine, serial number 512148. The operator provided excerpts from the engine logbooks that included the last maintenance performed. The records indicated that the last annual inspection was recorded as being completed in May 2015 at a tachometer time of 6,788.6 hours and a total airframe time of 10,862.5 hours; the tachometer time at the time of the accident was 5,435 hours, or about 35 hours after the maintenance.

A fuel consumption calculation prepared by a Cessna Aircraft Company representative (contained in the public docket for this accident) showed that the airplane should have had about 21 gallons of fuel on board at the time of the accident, assuming that the airplane was filled to maximum capacity (89 gallons) prior to departure, as reported by the pilot. According to the pilot, the airplane climbed to about 14,000 ft msl and cruised at about 13,600 msl at an average speed of 165 kts. According to the Cessna Aircraft Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) for the airplane, to maintain that airspeed, the engine would be operating at 2,400 rpm and 24 inches of manifold pressure. Based on this assumption, with the airplane configured at a gross weight of 3,7000 lbs, the fuel consumption to reach the cruising altitude would be about 44.5 lbs and the consumption during cruise flight would be about 81 lbs per hour. With the engine operating about 4 hours and 20 minutes, this would equate to a total fuel consumption of 68 gallons.

The pilot stated that he was averaging about 18 gallons per hour and should have had enough fuel to make it to the runway. He estimated that he was airborne for about 4 hours and 20 minutes and he recalled that in the past, the airplane could fly for 4.7 hours. He thought there might have been a fuel starvation event but didn't know what the reason would be. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPOC, 1011 ft msl
Observation Time: 1335 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 352°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / -5°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CAMARILLO, CA (CMA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: La Verne, CA (POC)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0910 PST
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: BRACKETT FIELD (POC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1013 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3661 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  34.091667, -117.781667 (est) 

Tests And Research

A post accident examination was conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector and a mechanic. The airplane had been disassembled during the recovery process and the center fuselage section was consumed by fire. A complete examination report with accompanying photographs are in the public docket for this accident.

The left wing was separated from the airframe and only a small outboard section remained; the rest was consumed by fire. The right wing was partially burned and remained loosely attached to the airframe at the accident site; the Monarch-style fuel cap was secure. The wreckage retrieval personnel recovered 2 gallons and 1 quart of fuel from the right wing and stated that there was water in the sample. He noted that foam had been used to extinguish the fire and could not determine if the water was present because of the foam.

The fuel system had been severely compromised by the fire and investigators were unable to establish continuity from the wing through the fuselage to the engine-driven fuel pump. The fuel selector was found, and removed from the deformed cabin area; post crash fire precluded it from turning.

An external examination of the engine revealed that cylinder fins and outer cooling fins were crushed and bent on the left side of the engine. After the spark plugs had been removed the cylinder heads were bore-scoped with no internal cylinder anomalies identified during that internal inspection. The exhaust system was observed to have sustained ductile bending and crushing aft of the turbo-charger. The turbo-charger exhibited no apparent damage and rotated freely by hand.

The ignition harnesses were attached from both magnetos to their respective spark plugs. The magnetos remained securely attached to their respective mounts. Investigators removed the right magneto and tested the internal continuity via hand rotation which produced spark. The top spark plugs were removed; no mechanical damage was noted and the electrodes and posts exhibited no abnormal or remarkable color markings. Continuity of the fuel system could not be established due to the post crash fire.

The Hartzell propeller blades were observed attached to their hub assemblies, which were attached to the propeller shaft flange. The propeller blades were torsionally twisted and exhibited an "S" bend.


There was no evidence of mechanical malfunction or failure with the airframe or engine.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA030 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 19, 2015 in La Verne, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N, registration: N91HC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 19, 2015, about 1335 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T210N Centurion, N91HC, experienced a loss of engine power and collided with a sign while the pilot was making an emergency approach to Brackett Field, La Verne, California. Aircraft Guaranty Corp was the registered owner and was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was seriously injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerial surveying flight originated from Camarillo Airport, Camarillo, California, about 0910, and the pilot had intended land back at that airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The pilot stated that he was an airplane mechanic for his profession, but had been down in southern California for the previous 2 days helping doing an aerial surveying job. Earlier in the morning, he had the fuel tanks filled to maximum capacity and flew his intended route down in the San Diego area. As he began to return back to the destination airport, he recalled having 15 gallons of fuel on board, which the JP Instrument (JPI) gauge indicated equated to about 40 minutes of flight time. About 1325 he began to descend from his en route altitude of about 13,500-14,000 feet mean sea level (msl) and opted to land at Brackett due to the airplane's low fuel quantity.

Before landing, the pilot switched to the fullest tank (left side), which showed about 6-7 gallons and the right side had about 4-5 gallons. While on final approach, the engine suddenly lost power and despite his attempts, he was unable to successfully have it restart. With the propeller windmilling he aligned toward the closest runway and configured the airplane for the best glide. Suddenly the left wing impacted a sign that he did not previously observe and dove toward the ground. The pilot egressed through the windshield and shortly thereafter, the airplane erupted in flames. The airplane came to rest about 620 feet east of runway 26R and was consumed by fire.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provided the audio recording of the Brackett Air Traffic Control (ATC) communication with the pilot. The pilot made his initial radio call about 1330 stating that he was inbound to land and had the current ATIS (Automated Terminal Information System) information. The tower instructed him to enter the right base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 26L. After reading back the controller's instructions, the pilot stated that he was "quite low on fuel." The tower cleared the pilot to land on runway 26L at 1335, and he acknowledged. After about 1 minute and 15 seconds, the pilot transmitted that he was now requesting to land on runway 26R. About 5-10 seconds after the pilot made a radio call reading back his amended clearance, the airplane impacted the sign.

Bankruptcy court approves Triple Five Aviation LLC purchase of Dowling’s Brookhaven campus for $14 million



A U.S. Bankruptcy Court this week approved the sale of Dowling College’s Brookhaven Campus in Shirley to Triple Five, the Edmonton, Canada-based international conglomerate seeking to buy Riverhead Town’s remaining vacant land at the Calverton Enterprise Park.

Triple Five Aviation LLC will pay $14 million in cash for the 105-acre property.

The Shirley campus is adjacent to and has an easement to access an operating airport with two 4,000-foot runways. The campus was home to the Dowling College School of Aviation, as well as the college’s athletic field complex featuring a multi-purpose stadium and baseball and softball fields, a 72,000-square-foot 289-bed dormitory, three buildings that comprised the National Aviation and Transportation Center, as well as classrooms, computer labs, a cafeteria and a library.

“We are looking forward to re-establishing and building upon the aviation programming prior to the Dowling College shutdown,” Triple Five spokesperson Stuart Bienenstock said.

The company anticipates closing on the deal “within 45 days,” he said.

Triple Five has not yet submitted any applications to the Town of Brookhaven for the site, according to a town spokesperson. While the site is zoned A1 Residential, which allows for single-family residential development of one house to an acre, it may continue to operate as it previously had when owned by Dowling, town spokesperson Jack Krieger said.

Triple Five sees the Shirley site as “synergistic” with the Calverton site it hopes to buy. The company sees the two sites as working hand-in-hand, with EPCAL being the “epicenter” of their plans, he said.

Triple Five’s vision for Calverton has always included an educational component, Bienenstock said.

It is essentially “plug and play,” Bienenstock told RiverheadLOCAL last month. It will give Triple Five the opportunity to develop its vision for making eastern Long Island a hub of the aviation industry once again, he said.

Triple Five was the winning bidder in an auction of the Shirley site ordered by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of New York.

A different subsidiary, Calverton Aviation and Technology, formed in partnership with Luminati Aerospace, is looking to buy 1,643 acres of vacant land in the Calverton Enterprise Park, including the site’s two runways, for $40 million.

A purchase agreement between the Riverhead Community Development Agency, which holds title to the EPCAL site, and Calverton Aviation and Technology, was approved by the outgoing town board at the last meeting of 2017. The move was approved in a split vote with outgoing supervisor and councilman, Sean Walter and John Dunleavy, voting with Councilman James Wooten to support the contract, and council members Jodi Giglio and Tim Hubbard voting against it. The vote, taken during a contentious and lengthy public meeting during which civic activists and residents blasted the board for its intended approval of the contract, came just one week after it was revealed that Triple Five would partner with Luminati Aerospace in the deal. For months prior to that revelation, Luminati Aerospace had been negotiating a partnership with NYC billionaire John Catsimatidis, who announced last July he was interested in the deal. Luminati Aerospace had signed a Letter of Intent with the town in March 2017. Catsimatidis’ announcement came a few days before a deadline the town board had given Luminati to finalize the purchase agreement or face cancellation of the LOI.

The purchase agreement with CAT is subject to a determination, pursuant to N.Y. State General Municipal Law, that the purchaser is a “qualified and eligible sponsor.” The town board, which sits as the governing body of the Riverhead CDA, concluded public hearings on CAT’s “qualified and eligible” application on May 4. Board members have agreed to hold off on making a decision on the application until the Riverhead Ethics Board weighs in on complaints filed against Giglio, seeking her recusal from the vote, following a private meeting the councilwoman took with Triple Five in New York City on March 12, during the pendency of the qualified and eligible hearing.

The town board on Tuesday approved the appointment of an outside lawyer to advise the ethics board, at the ethics board’s request, on the complaints against Giglio.

Bienenstock said Wednesday, “It felt nice to be be approved and qualified by an appointed judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of New York.”

The Dowling College campus sale is a result of a public auction in which Triple Five submitted the highest of four bids. Triple Five’s bid was approved by a committee including the college’s creditors last month and on Monday was approved by the bankruptcy court judge.

Riverhead did not solicit bids for the sale of the Calverton acreage. The site is located in a designated Urban Renewal Zone, which under state law may be sold without a bidding process to a purchaser determined to be “qualified and eligible” to purchase and develop the site in accordance with the town’s adopted urban renewal plan for the development of the site. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://riverheadlocal.com

Cessna 421B Golden Eagle, registered to Blue Hansa LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N813CA: Accident occurred September 21, 2015 at Platteville Municipal Airport (KPVB), Grant County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/813CA


Location: Platteville, WI
Accident Number: CEN15LA418
Date & Time: 09/21/2015, 1040 CDT
Registration: N813CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 421B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On September 21, 2015, about 1040 central daylight time, a Cessna 421B airplane, N813CA, sustained substantial damage after a loss of engine power and runway excursion at Platteville Municipal Airport (PBV), Platteville, Wisconsin. The commercial-rated pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Blue Hansa LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported he completed a preflight inspection of the airplane per the checklist and checked the weather. He taxied to the end of runway 15 and completed the pre-takeoff checklist, which included an engine run-up for each engine. There were no anomalies noted during the pre-flight or pre-takeoff checklists. He taxied onto the runway and advanced both throttles full forward. At 85 knots, just before the runway 7/25 crossing, he started rotation and noticed the right engine manifold pressure decrease and felt a power reduction. He aborted the takeoff; he pulled back both throttles and applied the brakes "hard." The airplane continued on the runway for about 1,000 ft then off of the runway into the grass and a soybean field where it came to rest.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector documented the witness marks left from the accident airplane on the runway and grass surfaces. There were airplane tire skid marks on the last 1,000 ft of runway pavement and tire marks in the grass for 290 ft off the end of the runway where the terrain slopes downward. The tire marks were not present for about 90 ft consistent with the airplane becoming airborne until the airplane impacted the ground again and the gear collapsed. The witness marks in the grass continued for another 90 ft where the airplane came to rest in a soybean field.

Runway 15/33 at PVB is 3,999 ft in length. The intersection of runway 7/25 is about 3,000 ft from the beginning of runway 15; the remaining runway distance from the intersection to the departure end of runway 15 is about 1,000 ft. According to Cessna 421B operating manual, the distance needed during an accelerated stop with a decision speed of 85 knots is about 2,400 ft.

The right engine was sent to Continental Motors, Inc (CMI) in Mobile, Alabama for examination and an engine test run, which were completed on January 4 and 5, 2015. The right engine was received intact with no signs of significant impact damage. The cylinders were borescoped; the cylinders, piston faces, and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures. The magneto-to-engine timing was checked, the exact timing was not able to be determined because it was about 5º past the specified timing scale visible from the engine timing plug.

The right engine was mounted on a test stand for functional testing. The engine started normally, on the first attempt with no signs of hesitation in RPM. The propeller was out of track because the propeller flange was bent. Shims were placed between the propeller flange and hub to bring the propeller back in track. The engine was restarted, and the engine RPM was advanced in steps for warm-up in preparation for full power operation; the engine run time was limited due to the damage to the propeller flange. Throughout the test phase, the engine accelerated normally without any hesitation or interruption in power and demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/26/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/27/2013
Flight Time:  1478 hours (Total, all aircraft), 194 hours (Total, this make and model), 1478 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 27 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N813CA
Model/Series: 421B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 421B0894
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/01/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7449 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3844.7 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: GTSIO-520 H1B
Registered Owner: BLUE HANSA LLC
Rated Power: 375 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPVB, 1024 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1455 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 212°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Platteville, WI (PVB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: DAYTON, OH (DAY)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: PLATTEVILLE MUNI (PVB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1024 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3999 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor

Latitude, Longitude: 42.689444, -90.444444 (est)
=======

Location: Platteville, WI
Accident Number: CEN15LA418
Date & Time: 09/21/2015, 1040 CDT
Registration: N813CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 421B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On September 21, 2015, about 1040 central daylight time, a Cessna 421B airplane, N813CA, sustained substantial damage after a loss of engine power and runway excursion at Platteville Municipal Airport (PBV), Platteville, Wisconsin. The commercial-rated pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Blue Hansa LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported he completed a preflight inspection of the airplane per the checklist and checked the weather. He taxied to the end of runway 15 and completed the pre-takeoff checklist, which included an engine run-up for each engine. There were no anomalies noted during the pre-flight or pre-takeoff checklists. He taxied onto the runway and advanced both throttles full forward. At 85 knots, just before the runway 7/25 crossing, he started rotation and noticed the right engine manifold pressure decrease and felt a power reduction. He aborted the takeoff; he pulled back both throttles and applied the brakes "hard." The airplane continued on the runway for about 1,000 ft then off of the runway into the grass and a soybean field where it came to rest.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector documented the witness marks left from the accident airplane on the runway and grass surfaces. There were airplane tire skid marks on the last 1,000 ft of runway pavement and tire marks in the grass for 290 ft off the end of the runway where the terrain slopes downward. The tire marks were not present for about 90 ft consistent with the airplane becoming airborne until the airplane impacted the ground again and the gear collapsed. The witness marks in the grass continued for another 90 ft where the airplane came to rest in a soybean field.

Runway 15/33 at PVB is 3,999 ft in length. The intersection of runway 7/25 is about 3,000 ft from the beginning of runway 15; the remaining runway distance from the intersection to the departure end of runway 15 is about 1,000 ft. According to Cessna 421B operating manual, the distance needed during an accelerated stop with a decision speed of 85 knots is about 2,400 ft.

The right engine was sent to Continental Motors, Inc (CMI) in Mobile, Alabama for examination and an engine test run, which were completed on January 4 and 5, 2015. The right engine was received intact with no signs of significant impact damage. The cylinders were borescoped; the cylinders, piston faces, and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures. The magneto-to-engine timing was checked, the exact timing was not able to be determined because it was about 5º past the specified timing scale visible from the engine timing plug.

The right engine was mounted on a test stand for functional testing. The engine started normally, on the first attempt with no signs of hesitation in RPM. The propeller was out of track because the propeller flange was bent. Shims were placed between the propeller flange and hub to bring the propeller back in track. The engine was restarted, and the engine RPM was advanced in steps for warm-up in preparation for full power operation; the engine run time was limited due to the damage to the propeller flange. Throughout the test phase, the engine accelerated normally without any hesitation or interruption in power and demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/26/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/27/2013
Flight Time: 1478 hours (Total, all aircraft), 194 hours (Total, this make and model), 1478 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 27 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N813CA
Model/Series: 421B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 421B0894
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/01/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7449 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3844.7 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series:  GTSIO-520 H1B
Registered Owner: BLUE HANSA LLC
Rated Power: 375 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPVB, 1024 ft msl
Observation Time: 1455 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 212°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 170°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Platteville, WI (PVB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: DAYTON, OH (DAY)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: PLATTEVILLE MUNI (PVB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1024 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3999 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  42.689444, -90.444444 (est)