Monday, December 07, 2020

Pilatus PC-12/45, N324AC: Incident occurred December 06, 2020 at Broadus Airport (00F), Powder River County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aircraft gear collapsed on landing. 

Air Methods Corporation


Date: 06-DEC-20
Time: 02:36:00Z
Regis#: N324AC
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AMBULANCE
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BROADUS
State: MONTANA

Piper PA-24-260, N9198P: Incident occurred November 25, 2020 at Linden Airport (KLDJ), Union County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft lost control departing and struck the Visual Approach Slope Indicator with the tail and wing. 


Date: 25-NOV-20
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N9198P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: LINDEN
State: NEW JERSEY

Landing Gear Not Configured: Aero Adventure Aventura II, N366RC; Accident occurred January 14, 2020 in East Palatka, Putnam County, Florida






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: East Palatka, FL
Accident Number: ERA20CA081
Date & Time: 01/14/2020, 1826 EST
Registration: N366RC
Aircraft: Pereyra AVENTURA
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

According to the pilot, he took off from a river behind his home and proceeded to a local airport where he lowered the landing gear and performed three touch-and-go landings. The pilot said he was preoccupied during the return flight to the river for a water landing and "forgot" to retract the landing gear for the pontoon-hull landing. At touchdown, the airplane immediately flipped over and came to rest inverted. The fuselage forward of the landing gear sustained substantial damage.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to properly configure the amphibious airplane for a water landing, which resulted in it flipping over.

Findings

Aircraft Wheel/ski/float - Not used/operated
Personnel issues Forgotten action/omission - Pilot
Personnel issues Task monitoring/vigilance - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Landing gear not configured (Defining event)
Landing-flare/touchdown Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age:65, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:Left 
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/08/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  388 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40.4 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pereyra
Registration: N366RC
Model/Series: AVENTURA II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:2005 
Amateur Built:Yes 
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number:AA2A0125 
Landing Gear Type: Amphibian
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/26/2019, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1232 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 43 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 344.66 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series:912ULS 
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 28J, 48 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 2335 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4300 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: East Palatka, FL
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: East Palatka, FL
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 29.655278, -81.618333 (est)

From Pilot to Truck Driver — Airline Careers Grounded by Pandemic

The aviation industry’s most prestigious and lucrative career path is no longer a sure thing


Pilot Sharon Preszler, at home in Arizona, is changing careers.


Greg Harper, left, and a colleague after completing a flight from Japan to Australia in November 2019.


Furloughed commercial pilot Greg Harper at one of his new jobs at a local supermarket chain.


Furloughed American Airlines pilot Collis Wagner's caps.


The Wall Street Journal 
By Benjamin Katz, Mike Cherney and Alison Sider
December 7, 2020 1:52 pm ET


Instead of buying a car in college, Collis Wagner got his private pilot’s license.

When he lost his job as an industrial engineer during the financial crisis, he pursued his hobby full time—spending years accumulating flight hours and landing a pilot job at a regional carrier. Last year, he was snapped up by American Airlines, where he flew Embraer E190 jets.

Now, Mr. Wagner, 44 years old, is driving trucks near Dayton, Ohio, after being furloughed in October. He keeps his airline caps tucked neatly in a bedroom drawer: “Proof I was a pilot for real,” he says.

The pandemic has changed few professions as profoundly as that of the airline pilot. For now, the aviation industry’s most prestigious and lucrative career path is no longer a sure thing.

Young pilots with little seniority are being let go. Older ones are taking early retirement. A generation of aspiring airliner captains is being told not to bother for now.

The British Airline Pilots’ Association recently published a video on Instagram warning would-be pilots to put off flight school. “It was probably one of my worst days of work in 23 years,” says Wendy Pursey, the union’s head of membership and careers services.

The pain is especially acute as neighbors and friends in other highly paid, technical jobs are mostly getting by—working from home or slowly going back to the office.

Greg Harper, a pilot who has worked at Australia’s Qantas Airways Ltd. for 25 years, has two kids and mortgage payments on five investment properties. After getting furloughed from the airline, he is now working 70 hours a week at two jobs: one at his local grocery store and the other managing traffic at construction sites.

“It’s not about me or my ego, me feeling a bit silly cleaning shopping baskets or whatever I have to do,” says Mr. Harper, 52. “I always look back at my family and think, ‘Well, at the end of the day, it’s for them.’ ”

With a vaccine approved in the U.K. and more approvals expected, airlines are hoping travel will begin its recovery later next year once enough people have been vaccinated. But they still believe it could take years for demand to return to the highs before the pandemic and subsequent economic fallout. Bringing all their employees back could be a long, slow process. The wait will be that much longer for pilots trying to launch their careers.

Furloughed pilots will be called back eventually, but it could take months or even years. Some may opt to find a different career. Some have retired.

Other industries are trying to lure idled pilots, though typically for much lower-skilled jobs. Schneider National Inc., a trucking firm based in Green Bay, Wis., recently ran recruiting ads aimed at ex-pilots on Facebook: “Whatever vehicle you pilot, you are the ‘captain of your ship,’ ” the ad read, featuring one pilot-turned-trucker. “Switch to a stable, growing career in trucking!” In Australia, some furloughed pilots are working on farms, operating heavy machinery to help harvest crops such as wheat.

Many pilots are drawn to the job by a lifelong love of flying and see it as a way of life. Though the romance of air travel has faded in recent years, being a pilot remains a special occupation, making it hard for some to walk away.

Gary Krasnov, 62, who had been flying jets for decades, had already cut back on his hours. But when Delta Air Lines Inc. released its early-retirement program over the summer—part of an effort to persuade senior pilots to leave voluntarily amid the Covid crisis—his chest tightened and his throat closed.

“I said, ‘I can’t believe this is happening to me.’ It was incredibly overwhelming,” he says. Nine days before he retired as a pilot, his wife asked if she could finally put away the suitcase he kept ready to go. He said, “Not yet.”

The pandemic will cost some 4.8 million aviation jobs, estimates the Geneva-based Air Transport Action Group, slashing global staff at airlines, manufacturers, airports and air-traffic controllers by more than 40%. Airlines alone are forecast to shed 1.3 million jobs.

There aren’t dependable numbers for how many pilots have been affected, but union officials and aviation experts say it is already the deepest cull of the profession ever. One European trade union estimates more than 17,000 pilots have lost their jobs on that continent alone.

The scale of the job losses around the world have redrawn the battle lines between airlines and pilot unions, typically among the most powerful labor organizations in the world. Pilot skills take years to build, and in boom times, airlines struggle to recruit and train new ones fast enough. That has given pilot unions leverage to negotiate job guarantees that machinists and flight attendant unions can’t.

Today’s downturn has tested that bargaining power. “There are so many people losing their jobs, not just in aviation, but elsewhere. There are no other jobs to go to,” says Jon Horne, president of the European Cockpit Association, which represents 40,000 pilots in 33 countries. “The unions don’t have much leverage in a situation where job losses are in the offing, and airlines have been keen to take advantage of that.”

Some unions suspect pay cuts being asked for by airlines are a way of permanently lowering costs even after the pandemic has ended, said Mr. Horne.

Pilots have been forced to navigate plenty of past downturns in the notoriously boom-to-bust airline industry. Airlines know that if they let pilots go in a downturn, they will scramble to find experienced flyers when things pick back up again.

Some airlines have put off pilot cuts this time around. United Airlines Holdings Inc. struck a deal with its union to avoid 2,850 pilot furloughs until at least June. Delta pilots voted in favor of a deal to avert pilot furloughs until 2022: pilots will be guaranteed fewer hours of work, and the more than 1,700 who would have been furloughed will be paid for 30 hours a month though they aren’t obligated to fly.

For many others, though, the collapse in air travel is too sharp and forecast to extend too long. The International Air Transport Association, which represents 290 airlines in 120 countries, doesn’t expect a return to 2019-level demand for another four years at the earliest.

American Airlines Group Inc. furloughed 1,600 pilots in October. Norwegian Air Shuttle AS A, a trans-Atlantic budget carrier that entered bankruptcy protection in November, has cut or furloughed more than 1,900 pilots with a further 940 at risk. British Airways, Deutsche Lufthansa AG and Air France-KLM Group have all shed hundreds of pilots.

Just last year, carriers around the world were fighting over new pilots, poaching flight school graduates and wooing retiring military pilots. United announced in February—before the full consequences of the pandemic were clear—that it was buying a pilot training school to keep it supplied with new recruits.

“It takes five years to train up the pilot,” Mike Leskinen, United’s vice president of corporate development and investor relations said at an industry conference last month. “So if you think the industry is going to be recovered by 2025—and we passionately think it will be recovered before that—we need to start to think about how to attract those pilots of the future today.”

A senior pilot can make as much as $350,000 in the U.S. The job can also lead to well-paying gigs overseas.

That is all over now for younger pilots. The cuts are hitting the newest, least-experienced pilots first, due to union rules in much of the Western world that require furloughs to start with the last to be hired.

Two years ago, Briton Jacob Woodbridge, 22, won a pilot spot at a European discount carrier, which committed to hiring him after he completed his training. The 18-month course cost about $145,000. His parents remortgaged their house to finance the training.

“We kind of saw it more as an investment than throwing money at it,” he says. “If we knew how it panned out, would I have even considered letting my parents do this? Absolutely not.”

After the pandemic hit, his job offer was deferred and later rescinded. Mr. Woodbridge started looking for something else, including applying for work at a box factory. Eventually he found a job as a delivery driver for a frozen-food specialist. He estimates that about a third of his classmates from flight school are now working as delivery drivers.

It’s a “decent job,” he says. “But it’s not, you know, necessarily in the same league as the pilot thing.” He still hopes for a career in flying.

Older pilots, meanwhile, are looking at a quicker-than-expected end to their flying life, some with 401Ks and pensions not quite ready for retirement.

Mr. Krasnov, who took early retirement, has been flying commercial jets since he was 28. In recent years, he scaled down his hours at Delta, working more at a second job at a financial advisory for airline workers.

He spent much of the spring and summer helping other pilots decide whether to take buyout offers. Even those financially able to retire had trouble giving up a job that has become part of their identity, he said.

“For a very large number of people on the seniority list, it’s all they’ve ever done,” he says. Many pilots had pictured the traditional send-off—a water-cannon salute once their last flight lands. Instead, they flew their last flights as pilots without realizing it, Mr. Krasnov says.

A lucky few are going out in style.

Sharon Preszler decided she wanted to fly when she was four, after a visit to the cockpit on a flight. She told her mom she wanted to be a flight attendant. Her mother said to consider shooting for pilot.

She eventually joined the Air Force and was the first woman to fly the F-16 fighter jet. After retiring from the military in 2006, she joined Southwest Airlines Co.

Amid the crisis, Ms. Preszler, 55, took a Southwest early-retirement offer, seizing the chance to get a master’s degree and launch a new career.

Flying between empty airports just wasn’t the same. “I had a really hard time having fun when I went to work those last few months,” she says. “I think I’ll miss it eventually.”

Southwest flew her family to accompany her on her last flight. Pilot friends sat in the jump seat. Ms. Preszler’s husband, a Southwest flight attendant, passed out candy bars to passengers.

Southwest says it has more staff than it needs, which will cost it an extra $1 billion next year. It is seeking 10% cuts from each of its labor unions and has said it would furlough workers otherwise for the first time in its history.

The airline once touted its perfect record of avoiding cuts as a way to recruit pilots. Last week, the airline sent notices of potential furlough to over 1,200 pilots.

“It isn’t a negotiation, it’s a gun to your head,” says Jon Weaks, a captain who heads the union that represents Southwest pilots. Even without a salary cut, many pilots are bringing in much less than they normally would with so many flights grounded.

Southwest aims to preserve every job, said Vice President of Labor Relations Russell McCrady, in a written statement, but needs temporary cost reductions to offset overstaffing costs.

Hong Kong’s Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. gave pilots 14 days to agree to new contracts in October, but those who agreed within seven days got a better deal. Those that didn’t agree to the terms were fired, though the airline said those pilots would get packages beyond what is legally required.

“The short timeline denied them the opportunity to have a meaningful conversation with their families of a career-changing or life-changing decision,” says Chris Beebe, the general secretary of Cathay’s biggest pilot union. “What has happened here is something that was unilateral, imposed, permanent and draconian.”

The new contracts cut compensation for pilots by up to 58%, Mr. Beebe says. There is also no clause in the contract that allows pilots to return to their previous pay when the air-travel market rebounds, he said.

Despite those terms, Cathay Pacific said in a news release that about 2,600 pilots, or 98.5% of those asked, agreed to the new contracts and that requesting pilots to accept reduced pay ultimately protected jobs. The airline said later that the pay cut will depend on hours flown, and that for most pilots the reduction will be less than the figure provided by the union, particularly when flying resumes to normal levels.



Robinson R44 Raven II, N371MP: Accident occurred December 05, 2020 in Marietta, Cass County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas 
Location: Marietta, TX 
Accident Number: CEN21LA077
Date & Time: December 5, 2020, 13:30 Local 
Registration: N371MP
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY
R44 II Injuries: 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY
Registration: N371MP
Model/Series: R44 II II 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.194025,-94.526083 (est)





MARIETTA, Texas (KTAL/KMSS) – At least three men were uninjured when the helicopter they were flying in clipped a powerline, damaging its main rotor and forcing a hard landing on Highway 77 about a mile east of Marietta, Texas.

When the Robinson R44 Raven II clipped the powerline, it went on to shave the top of the electrical pole across the street, which in turn caused power to go out in the area.

According to FlightAware live flight tracking, the helicopter left Texarkana at 10:16 Saturday morning and listed its destination as “near Atlanta Texas” on its flight plan. The flight plan, which ordinarily lists an arrival time, instead lists “result unknown.”

The men told Marietta resident Jeffrey Taylor who was at the scene within minutes that they flew over from Texarkana to attend Saturday church services at Marietta-New Hope, a Seventh Day Adventist Church in Marietta.

Taylor, who lives nearby, said as soon as the power went out, he decided to go to the laundromat to do his laundry and came onto the scene. He saw a group of people trying to move the aircraft off the highway, but said there were emergency vehicles or law enforcement at the scene.

When informed of the crash, KTAL called the Cass County Sheriff’s Office, who said they knew nothing about a helicopter crash, but Bowie-Cass Electric Cooperative responded and told residents they hoped to restore power sometime Saturday afternoon.

A pickup truck with a trailer showed up later in the afternoon and loaded the helicopter to be taken to an undisclosed place for repairs.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration registry, the helicopter was manufactured by the Robinson Helicopter Co. in 2019. Its registered owner is to a company called N371MP Inc. out of Middletown, Delaware.

Loss of Control in Flight: Vans RV-9, N235LS; Accident occurred January 15, 2020 at Freeflight International Airport (2FA6), Coleman, Sumter County, Florida







Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Coleman, Florida
Accident Number: ERA20CA075
Date & Time: January 15, 2020, 12:18 Local
Registration: N235LS
Aircraft: Vans VANS RV 9 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 67,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: April 22, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: December 11, 2019
Flight Time: 376 hours (Total, all aircraft), 11 hours (Total, this make and model), 307 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans 
Registration: N235LS
Model/Series: VANS RV 9 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental light sport (Special)
Serial Number: 90866
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: December 11, 2019 Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1000 Hrs as of last inspection 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-235 C1
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 118 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KINF,50 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 12:15 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 272°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  7 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 150° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Coleman, FL (2FA6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Coleman, FL (2FA6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 12:30 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Freeflight Intl 2FA6 
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 55 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: 02
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4100 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 28.809444,-82.06639(est)

Cessna 152, N4853B: Incident occurred December 06, 2020 in Angleton, Brazoria County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aircraft lost engine power and made a forced landing in a marshy field. 

Factor 22 Aviation LLC


Date: 06-DEC-20
Time: 21:35:00Z
Regis#: N4853B
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: ANGLETON
State: TEXAS

For Airlines, Dry Ice in Vaccine Transport Demands Special Attention

The refrigerant needed to maintain some doses during distribution is regulated as a dangerous good for aviation transport

 

The Wall Street Journal 
By Jennifer Smith
Dec. 7, 2020 2:52 pm ET

The large amounts of dry ice needed to speed Covid-19 vaccine candidates to pandemic-weary populations will call for special attention from airlines and safety regulators.

Dry ice, the solid form of carbon dioxide, is a critical part of plans to transport the vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE, which must be kept at ultracold temperatures. Pfizer expects to ship 50 million doses world-wide by the end of the year. The vaccine was the first to be authorized in the West, receiving clearance for emergency use in the U.K. last week. It is under review by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States.

Widely used as a refrigerant, dry ice is classified as a dangerous good by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the United States Department of Transportation because it changes to gas form as it breaks down, a process called sublimation. Shippers must use ventilated containers that allow the gas to release, to prevent pressure from building up and rupturing the packaging.

The gas can also displace oxygen in confined spaces with poor ventilation, creating a suffocation hazard, though the risk is minimal under normal cabin ventilation, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

“If oxygen levels get down below 19%, that could cause a hazard to people and animals,” said Delmer Billings, technical director for the Dangerous Goods Advisory Council, a nonprofit trade group that promotes safe transportation of hazardous materials. “If you deplete oxygen sufficiently, it could cause unconsciousness, even death,” he added.

Air carriers involved in vaccine transport efforts are asking aviation regulators to increase the amount of dry ice they are allowed to carry on flights hauling vaccines as they work with drugmakers and governments to set up distribution channels. Restrictions on the amount of the material on planes are typically based on aircraft ventilation rates and factors such as the size of the plane and whether it is used for passenger or cargo flights, said Robert Coyle, senior vice president of pharma and healthcare strategy at freight forwarder Kuehne + Nagel International AG.

On Thursday, Delta Air Lines Inc. said it had received Federal Aviation Administration approval to double the allowed load of dry ice on its Airbus A330 and A350 wide-body jets, and six times the prior allowed load for shipments using a special suitcase-sized storage container that Pfizer designed.

Delta has done trial runs with vaccine cargoes from Europe and to Latin America, and within the United States, all on cargo-only flights.

United Airlines Holdings Inc. secured Federal Aviation Administration approval last month to boost its dry-ice allowance to 15,000 pounds from 3,000 pounds, for chartered cargo flights between Brussels International Airport and Chicago O’Hare International Airport to support distribution of the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine. A United spokeswoman said the airline “has effective procedures in place to ensure we safely handle all the hazardous materials we are permitted to carry on board our aircraft.”

Extremely cold with a surface temperature of about minus-78 degrees Celsius, dry ice has long been used to ship medicine, pharmaceutical products and perishable food such as meat or ice cream.

“When packaged and stored properly, it poses no risk,” said Rafael Teixeira, president of World Courier and ICS, a specialty logistics provider owned by drug distributor AmerisourceBergen Corp.

The scale of the Covid-19 vaccine distribution effort is unprecedented, involving billions of doses with strict temperature-control requirements that are expected to strain cold-chain shipping networks.

The Pfizer and BioNTech shots must be kept at minus-70 degrees Celsius—colder than the average annual temperature at the South Pole and lower than some other vaccine candidates require. Moderna Inc.’s shot, the other leading front-runner, must be shipped and stored at a below-freezing temperature that most home or medical freezers can accommodate.

Makers of dry ice are bracing for an expected demand surge. Logistics providers have been building “freezer farms” with hundreds of portable units that store pharmaceuticals at ultralow temperatures.

Plymouth, Minn.-based Pelican BioThermal LLC, which makes packaging that typically uses engineered materials to maintain temperatures, has tested and approved the use of dry ice in its systems to provide the sub-frozen temperatures needed to maintain the efficacy of Covid-19 vaccines. The company is also ramping up global production of its large shipping containers that can hold full pallets of goods on rising demand from pharmaceutical companies looking to ship vaccines.

“There are a lot of investments being made right now to get this done,” said Ira Smith, director of Pelican’s rental program in the Americas.

Magni M-24 Plus, N327JD: Accident occurred January 15, 2020 at Boire Field Airport (KASH), Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine


Location: Nashua, NH
Accident Number: ERA20LA076
Date & Time: January 15, 2020, 14:50 Local 
Registration: N327JD
Aircraft: MAGNI M-24 PLUS 
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On January 15, 2020, about 1450 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Magni M-24 Plus gyroplane, N327JD, was substantially damaged during takeoff from Boire Field Airport (ASH), Nashua, New Hampshire. The sport pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to a witness, the gyroplane was using more runway than typical to become airborne before it began to drift toward the left edge of runway 32. About 3,000 ft down the runway, the left main gear departed the runway. The witness stated that he saw nothing to indicate that the pilot was attempting to slow down or correct the left deviation from centerline. He stated that the gyroplane was completely on the grass about 750 ft prior to taxiway Charlie. The gyroplane "popped up and bounced over taxiway Charlie, landed once on the other side, bounced, porpoised and nosed-in on the second impact."

According to the pilot, he had no recollection of the flight after he received takeoff clearance and he believed that he experienced a medical event during the takeoff. The pilot further stated that he had built the gyroplane in Italy and had flown it fewer than 7 hours, and that everything was working properly prior to the initiation of the flight.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot held a sport pilot certificate with an endorsement for gyroplane, and a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued August 1, 2016, and his most recent FAA BasicMed was issued on November 18, 2018.

The gyroplane came to rest inverted about 340 ft to the left of the runway edge, about 3,400 ft down the 6,000 ft-long runway. The front of the gyroplane was impact crushed aft and the fuselage was fractured in multiple areas.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MAGNI 
Registration: N327JD
Model/Series: M-24 PLUS 
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ASH,200 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C /-3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Nashua, NH (ASH)
Destination: Nashua, NH (ASH )

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 42.782775,-71.516944 (est)

Piper PA-46-600TP, N282ST: Incident occurred December 06, 2020 at Leesburg Executive Airport (KJYO), Loudoun County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

Aircraft blew a tire on landing and veered off runway striking a sign. 

Avenge Holdings LLC 


Date: 06-DEC-20
Time: 19:10:00Z
Regis#: N282ST
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA46
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LEESBURG
State: VIRGINIA

Ground Collision: Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N536ND and Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N550ND; Accident occurred January 08, 2020 at Flagler Executive Airport (KFIN), Palm Coast, Florida






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Phoenix East Aviation 



Location: Palm Coast, Florida 
Accident Number: ERA20CA140
Date & Time: January 8, 2020, 07:47 Local 
Registration: N536ND (A1); N550ND (A2)
Aircraft: Cessna 172 (A1); Cessna 172 (A2) 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial (A1); Minor (A2)
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 1 None (A1); 1 None (A2)
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional (A1); Part 91: General aviation - Instructional (A2) 

Student pilot Information (A1)

Certificate: Student Age: 24
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: Lap only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 12, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 54 hours (Total, all aircraft), 54 hours (Total, this make and model), 6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 54 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 19 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information (A2)

Certificate: Student 
Age: 24
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap only
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information (A1)

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N536ND
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2009 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility 
Serial Number: 172S10932
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: December 20, 2019 100 hour Certified
Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 63 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8920.7 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information (A2)

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N550ND
Model/Series: 172 S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2009 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility 
Serial Number: 172S10992
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FIN,33 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 07:50 Local
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Palm Coast, FL (FIN) (A1); Palm Coast, FL (FIN ) (A2)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None (A1); None (A2)
Destination: Palm Coast, FL (FIN) (A1); Palm Coast, FL (FIN) (A2)
Type of Clearance: None (A1); None (A2)
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class D (A1); Class D (A2)

Airport Information

Airport: Flagler Executive FIN 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 33 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information (A1)

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 29.465278,-81.207778(est)

Wreckage and Impact Information (A2)

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 29.465278,-81.207778(est)