Saturday, December 3, 2016

Robinson R22 BETA, N7085K, registered to and operated by Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd: Accident occurred December 02, 2016 at Unalaska Airport (PADU), Dutch Harbor, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA011
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Unalaska, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22, registration: N7085K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot of the helicopter stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a telecommunications technician to a cattle ranch on an island. After departing from the airport, while flying overwater, the pilot observed a snow squall with near-zero visibility and decided to return to the airport. On the return trip, while flying in a mountainous valley, another snow squall moved into the area. He stated that due to the deteriorating flight conditions, he conducted a precautionary landing to remote, snow-covered terrain to wait for improved flight conditions. Once the squall passed, he continued to the airport. Several minutes later, another snow squall arrived, and the pilot decided to conduct another precautionary landing. During the landing sequence, the main rotor system downwash resulted in whiteout conditions, and the pilot was unable to recognize any topographical features. The main rotor blades impacted terrain and the helicopter rolled onto its left side. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate clearance from terrain during a precautionary landing in whiteout conditions, which resulted in an in-flight collision with terrain. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N7085K

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA011 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Unalaska, AK
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22, registration: N7085K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1200 Alaska standard time, a Robinson R-22 Beta helicopter, N7085K, collided with remote snow-covered terrain while landing, about 10 miles southwest of Unalaska, Alaska. The commercial pilot sustained no injury, the passenger sustained minor injuries, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Deteriorating visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Unalaska Airport, Unalaska, about 1100.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on December 7, the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a telecommunications technician to the Fort Glenn cattle ranch on Umnak Island. After departing from the Unalaska Airport, while flying overwater past Makushin Bay near Cape Starichkof, he observed a snow squall with near zero visibility. The pilot decided to return to Unalaska. On the return trip, while flying in a mountainous valley, a snow squall moved into the area. He stated that due to the deteriorating flight conditions, he conducted a precautionary landing to remote snow-covered terrain to wait for improved flight conditions. Once the snow squall passed, he departed to head back to Unalaska. Several minutes later, he encountered a second snow squall and decided to conduct another precautionary landing. During the precautionary landing sequence, whiteout conditions were present from the main rotor system downwash from the previous snow squall, and the pilot was unable to recognize any topographical features. The main rotor blades impacted terrain and the helicopter rolled onto its left side. Both occupants egressed from the wreckage, a personal locator beacon was activated, and the occupants were extracted from the accident site via a U.S. Coast Guard MH-65D helicopter. 

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, main rotor system, tail boom, and tail rotor system.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

In the NTSB Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot reported that he held a helicopter instrument rating in addition to instructor ratings for helicopter and instrument helicopter. He additionally reported 70 hours of simulated instrument flight time and no hours were reported for actual instrument flight time. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter had no onboard weather capability and it was not instrument flight rules-equipped and certified. The helicopter had a standard skid configuration with no emergency floatation system installed.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest official weather observation station is located at the Unalaska Airport, about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1200, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, in part: wind 220° (true) at 18 knots, gusting 25 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, broken clouds at 1,600 feet; temperature 37° F; dew point 27° F; altimeter 30.19 inHg.

SURVIVAL ASPECTS

The accident helicopter was not equipped, nor was it required to be equipped with an emergency locator transmitter. The pilot and passenger were not wearing flight helmets for the flight. The helicopter was equipped with 3-point restraint systems for the two seats.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Naval Research Laboratory has published the Forecaster's Handbook for the Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands, and Gulf of Alaska (1993). This document discusses snowfall and snow cover on the Aleutian Islands and states in part:


During winter, snow frequently covers the ground but the depth of coverage rarely exceeds 1 foot (30 centimeters). High winds, however, cause snow to drift so that depth at an individual location is highly dependent on topography. Some depressions may fill to depths exceeding 6 feet (1.8 meters), and other areas remain relatively free of snow. Because of the relatively mild temperatures, the snow is frequently of the wet, heavy type. Annual rainfall for the islands averages 40 to 50 inches (102 to 152 centimeters), and, again is heavily influenced by topography so that individual locations may have quite different rainfall amounts even though they are separated by only a short distance.

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA011
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Unalaska, AK
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22, registration: N7085K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1200 Alaska standard time, a Robinson R-22 Beta helicopter, N7085K, collided with remote snow-covered terrain while landing, about 10 miles southwest of Unalaska, Alaska. The commercial pilot sustained no injury, the passenger sustained minor injuries, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Deteriorating visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Unalaska Airport, Unalaska, about 1100. 

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on December 7, the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a telecommunications technician to the Fort Glenn cattle ranch on Umnak Island. After departing from the Unalaska Airport, the pilot stated that while flying overwater via the Umnak Pass prior to reaching Umnak Island, he observed a snow squall. The pilot decided to return back to Unalaska and while flying in a mountainous valley, a snow squall moved into the area. He stated that due to the deteriorating flight conditions, he conducted a precautionary landing to remote snow-covered terrain to wait for improved flight conditions. During the precautionary landing sequence, white out conditions were present from the main rotor system downwash, and the pilot was unable to recognize any topographical features. The main rotor blades impacted terrain and the helicopter rolled onto its left side. Both occupants egressed from the wreckage, a personal locator beacon was activated, and the occupants were extracted from the accident site via a U.S. Coast Guard MH-65D helicopter. 

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor system.

The pilot stated that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The closest official weather observation station is located at the Unalaska Airport, about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1200, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, and stated in part: Wind 220 degrees (true) at 18 knots, gusting 25 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, broken clouds at 1600 feet; temperature 37 degrees F; dew point 27 degrees F; altimeter 30.19 inHg.  The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N7085K

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA011 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Unalaska, AK
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22, registration: N7085K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1200 Alaska standard time, a Robinson R-22 Beta helicopter, N7085K, collided with remote snow-covered terrain while landing, about 10 miles southwest of Unalaska, Alaska. The commercial pilot sustained no injury, the passenger sustained minor injuries, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Deteriorating visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Unalaska Airport, Unalaska, about 1100.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on December 7, the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a telecommunications technician to the Fort Glenn cattle ranch on Umnak Island. After departing from the Unalaska Airport, while flying overwater past Makushin Bay near Cape Starichkof, he observed a snow squall with near zero visibility. The pilot decided to return to Unalaska. On the return trip, while flying in a mountainous valley, a snow squall moved into the area. He stated that due to the deteriorating flight conditions, he conducted a precautionary landing to remote snow-covered terrain to wait for improved flight conditions. Once the snow squall passed, he departed to head back to Unalaska. Several minutes later, he encountered a second snow squall and decided to conduct another precautionary landing. During the precautionary landing sequence, whiteout conditions were present from the main rotor system downwash from the previous snow squall, and the pilot was unable to recognize any topographical features. The main rotor blades impacted terrain and the helicopter rolled onto its left side. Both occupants egressed from the wreckage, a personal locator beacon was activated, and the occupants were extracted from the accident site via a U.S. Coast Guard MH-65D helicopter. 

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, main rotor system, tail boom, and tail rotor system.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

In the NTSB Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot reported that he held a helicopter instrument rating in addition to instructor ratings for helicopter and instrument helicopter. He additionally reported 70 hours of simulated instrument flight time and no hours were reported for actual instrument flight time. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter had no onboard weather capability and it was not instrument flight rules-equipped and certified. The helicopter had a standard skid configuration with no emergency floatation system installed.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest official weather observation station is located at the Unalaska Airport, about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1200, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, in part: wind 220° (true) at 18 knots, gusting 25 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, broken clouds at 1,600 feet; temperature 37° F; dew point 27° F; altimeter 30.19 inHg.

SURVIVAL ASPECTS

The accident helicopter was not equipped, nor was it required to be equipped with an emergency locator transmitter. The pilot and passenger were not wearing flight helmets for the flight. The helicopter was equipped with 3-point restraint systems for the two seats.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Naval Research Laboratory has published the Forecaster's Handbook for the Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands, and Gulf of Alaska (1993). This document discusses snowfall and snow cover on the Aleutian Islands and states in part:


During winter, snow frequently covers the ground but the depth of coverage rarely exceeds 1 foot (30 centimeters). High winds, however, cause snow to drift so that depth at an individual location is highly dependent on topography. Some depressions may fill to depths exceeding 6 feet (1.8 meters), and other areas remain relatively free of snow. Because of the relatively mild temperatures, the snow is frequently of the wet, heavy type. Annual rainfall for the islands averages 40 to 50 inches (102 to 152 centimeters), and, again is heavily influenced by topography so that individual locations may have quite different rainfall amounts even though they are separated by only a short distance.

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA011
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Unalaska, AK
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22, registration: N7085K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1200 Alaska standard time, a Robinson R-22 Beta helicopter, N7085K, collided with remote snow-covered terrain while landing, about 10 miles southwest of Unalaska, Alaska. The commercial pilot sustained no injury, the passenger sustained minor injuries, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Deteriorating visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Unalaska Airport, Unalaska, about 1100. 

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on December 7, the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a telecommunications technician to the Fort Glenn cattle ranch on Umnak Island. After departing from the Unalaska Airport, the pilot stated that while flying overwater via the Umnak Pass prior to reaching Umnak Island, he observed a snow squall. The pilot decided to return back to Unalaska and while flying in a mountainous valley, a snow squall moved into the area. He stated that due to the deteriorating flight conditions, he conducted a precautionary landing to remote snow-covered terrain to wait for improved flight conditions. During the precautionary landing sequence, white out conditions were present from the main rotor system downwash, and the pilot was unable to recognize any topographical features. The main rotor blades impacted terrain and the helicopter rolled onto its left side. Both occupants egressed from the wreckage, a personal locator beacon was activated, and the occupants were extracted from the accident site via a U.S. Coast Guard MH-65D helicopter. 

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor system.

The pilot stated that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The closest official weather observation station is located at the Unalaska Airport, about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1200, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, and stated in part: Wind 220 degrees (true) at 18 knots, gusting 25 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, broken clouds at 1600 feet; temperature 37 degrees F; dew point 27 degrees F; altimeter 30.19 inHg. 
=========

The U.S. Coast Guard rescued two people Friday afternoon after their helicopter crashed about nine miles southwest of the Dutch Harbor Airport.

Petty Officer Bill Colclough said the small rotorcraft went down during whiteout conditions in a mountainous area on Unalaska Island.

"They apparently encountered some heavy weather and crashed," said Colclough. "Fortunately, we were able to locate them in time because they activated their personal locator beacon."

The air station in Kodiak sent a rescue helicopter crew to find the pilot and the passenger, who were taken to Unalaska's clinic with minor cuts and bruises.

Coast Guard officials did not release information about who the two people are or if they're from Unalaska.

Although the helicopter crashed in heavy snow, Colclough said it's possible something else brought the rotorcraft down.

"There will most likely be an investigation into the cause of the crash," he said. "The Coast Guard may be a part of it, and it could entail the Federal Aviation Administration and some other state and federal agencies."

At the time of the crash, officials said there was less than one mile of visibility and winds blowing at nine miles per hour. 

Source:   http://kucb.org

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) The Coast Guard says one of its aircrew rescued two people after a helicopter crash near the Dutch Harbor Airport on Unalaska Island Friday afternoon.

The 17th Coast Guard District Command Center received a personal locator beacon activation from a Robinson R22 helicopter. The beacon was plotted in a position approximately nine miles south-southwest of the Dutch Harbor Airport in mountainous terrain, according to a Coast Guard press release.

An aircrew on the Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley was called in for the rescue. The MH-65 Dolphin rescue helicopter crew located both crash victims and transported them to the medical clinic in Dutch Harbor.

The Coast Guard says both survivors were reported to have minor cuts and bruises. The Robinson R22 helicopter reportedly entered whiteout conditions and then crashed.

Weather on scene was heavy snow with less than one mile of visibility and 9-mph winds, according to the Coast Guard.

Source:  http://www.ktuu.com

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N2367R, Baxnav Flight LLC: Accident occurred December 02, 2016 at Thomson-McDuffie County Airport (KHQU), Georgia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Baxnav Flight LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2367R

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA089
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Thomson, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N2367R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, while on a cross-country flight, he diverted from his destination to a nearby airport due to low fuel. He added that the right fuel tank “went dry” and that the engine lost power on downwind, so he switched to the left fuel tank, and the engine momentarily restarted before it experienced a total power loss of power on base. Subsequently, the airplane impacted the instrument landing system lights, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He reported that he miscalculated the fuel and “ran out of gas.” A postaccident examination found about 1 cup of fuel in one of the tanks.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper preflight planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and the total loss of engine power. 

The pilot reported that while on a cross country flight he diverted from his destination to a nearby airport due to low fuel. He added that the right fuel tank "went dry" and the engine lost power on downwind, so he switched to the left fuel tank and the engine momentarily restarted before it experienced a total power loss on base. Subsequently, the airplane impacted the instrument landing system lights, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA089
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Thomson, GA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N2367R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while on a cross country flight he diverted from his destination to a nearby airport due to low fuel. He added that the right fuel tank "went dry" and the engine lost power on downwind, so he switched to the left fuel tank and the engine momentarily restarted before it experienced a total power loss on base. Subsequently, the airplane impacted the instrument landing system lights, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.





AUGUSTA, Ga. (CNN) - A single-engine plane in pieces just short of the runway at the Thomson McDuffie Regional Airport one day after a crash.

Many drivers on Washington road drove slow to get a good look of the scene.

McDuffie County Fire and Rescue say a man and a woman were onboard the Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee when it crash landed Friday night.

McDuffie County dispatchers say the call came in around 6:30.

The pilot ran out of fuel as they were approaching the runway.

The plane was flying low and hit a tall tower at the end of the runway.

It crash landed in a field between the runway and highway-78.

Firefighters say both wings broke away from the aircraft when it hit the ground, but the center of the plane stayed in one piece.

The passenger and pilot are both okay. First responders called the two very lucky.

The FAA is investigating.


Story and video:   http://www.ozarksfirst.com



THOMSON, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) -- A pilot and passenger walk away from a plane crash unharmed near Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport.


McDuffie County Dispatch says they responded to a call regarding a plane crash at the airport around 6:30 p.m. Friday night. Dispatch says the pilot was a citizen with a pilot's license flying a private plane. McDuffie Emergency Services say the pilot and passenger were a man and a woman.


A spokesperson with McDuffie County's Engine Company 2 says the plane ran out of fuel and was flying in low when he approached the runway.


During his approach, the pilot struck an instrument-landing system (ILS) at the end of the runway. An ILS is a small tower that enables planes to land if the pilots are unable to establish visual contact with the runway through radio signals.


Upon impact, both wings and the landing gear broke away and there was significant damage to the outer parts of the plane. The center was still in tact with only small damage to the front. The damaged plane remains near the runway.


Both the pilot and passenger were evaluated at the scene and released with no injuries. The runway remained open as firefighters responded to the scene. 


Source:  http://www.wrdw.com 





A small plane crashed just short of the runway Friday night at the Thomson-McDuffie County Airport.

No one was injured in the incident that officials are calling a hard landing.

According to authorities on the scene, the plane crash-landed in the field just beyond the airport along Washington Road around 6:45 p.m.

It is believed that the plane ran out of gas. The impact sheared off a wing and damaged the landing gear of the aircraft. McDuffie fire rescue squads stationed at the airport were on the scene quickly and McDuffie EMS evaluated the pilot, who refused to be taken to a hospital.

Authorities on the scene said that traffic at the airport — and along Washington Road —was not affected by the accident. Federal aviation authorities are looking in to the crash.

Story and comments: http://chronicle.augusta.com

THOMPSON, Ga. - A pilot and passenger out of St. Augustine were unharmed in an emergency landing at the Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport, according to a report from WRDW/WAGT in Augusta, Georgia.

At around 6:30 p.m. Friday, McDuffie County officials responded to a single-engine plane crash at the regional airport.

The Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee was flying low on its final approach to the runway when it ran out of fuel, officials said.

During the final approach, the pilot struck the instrument landing system (ILS) at the end of the runway. The ILS system is used to help pilots land when visibility is low.

The pilot and passenger of a Piper Archer out of St. Augustine were unharmed in a crash on final approach at the Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport

According to the report, both of the airplane’s wings and landing gear broke off during impact, and there was extensive damage to its exterior.

The fuselage of the airplane remained intact, with only minimal damage to its front.

The pilot and the passenger were evaluated at the scene and released without injuries.

Source:  http://www.news4jax.com

Diamond DA-20, N992CT: Accident occurred June 16, 2018 at Spanish Fork-Springville Airport (KSPK) and accident occurred December 02, 2016 in Payson, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City

Aircraft experienced a possible stall on takeoff.


http://registry.faa.gov/N992CT


Date: 16-JUN-18

Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N992CT
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA20 C1
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: SPANISH FORK
State: UTAH

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Payson, UT
Accident Number: GAA17CA088
Date & Time: 12/02/2016, 1307 MST
Registration: N992CT
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA-20
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis 

The solo student pilot reported that, while on a cross-country flight, the weather deteriorated at the destination airport. He decided to complete a touch-and-go landing at an airport along the route and then return to the departure airport. The student pilot further reported that, when he began the flight back to his original point of departure, the airplane had about 3/4 tank of fuel remaining, and a headwind was present. About 10 to 15 nautical miles from the original departure airport, the fuel supply was exhausted, and the student pilot made a forced landing in a field. During the forced landing, the right wing struck a tree and was substantially damaged.

The student pilot did not report any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's improper in-flight fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid level (Cause)

Personnel issues
Fuel planning - Student pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute
Other weather encounter
Fuel exhaustion (Defining event)

Landing
Off-field or emergency landing 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/26/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 50 hours (Total, all aircraft), 47 hours (Total, this make and model), 21 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 46 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC
Registration: N992CT
Model/Series: DA-20 C-1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: C0092
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/24/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1764 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4720.7 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-240-B
Registered Owner: VERSI SERVICES LLC
Rated Power: 125 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPVU, 4497 ft msl
Observation Time: 1858 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 340°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -6°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CEDAR CITY, UT (CDC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SPANISH FORK, UT (U77)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1122 MST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.064444, -111.726667 (est)



PAYSON, Utah -- You know that nervous feeling you get when you're driving down the highway, the fuel light is on, and there isn't a gas station in sight? Well, imagine that same feeling, only in an airplane.

A student pilot had to make an emergency landing in Payson Friday after running out of gas.

"Plane crossed over the power lines probably 100 feet up," said witness Mark Dehart.

Dehart was riding his ATV behind the LDS Temple in Payson around 1 p.m. when he saw the single-engine airplane falling from the sky over his home.

"I noticed his prop wasn't spinning, knowing he was going to go down," Dehart said. "He was kind of heading straight for the house."

Dehart held his breath, hoping the pilot could avoid the crash.

"Lifted up the right wing so it wouldn't clip the gazebo, and then he lifted the left wing, struck the tree," Dehart said. "He took off about half a dozen branches about three-feet long."

The plane eventually came to a hard landing in the middle of a sod farm. The pilot walked away uninjured, while the plane hardly had a scratch on it.

"He was fairly calm but he just said, 'I did a stupid thing,'" Dehart said.

The stupid thing was not checking the fuel gauge before taking off.

"From what my understanding is, he was out of fuel so he thought he had enough fuel to get back to Spanish Fork where he took off from, but I guess he didn't estimate that very well," said Officer Noemi Sandoval of the Payson Police Department.

The pilot declined an interview. Dehart hopes he doesn't beat himself up too much. He said the pilot made the best of a bad situation and that this could have been deadly.

"He did an amazing job, he was in control of the aircraft, he did great," Dehart said. "I hope he continues flying."

Story and video:  http://fox13now.com

Gordon Pegazair P 100, N129LZ: Fatal accident occurred December 02, 2016 in Mount Vernon, Posey County, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N129LZ 

Location: Mt Vernon, IN
Accident Number: CEN17FA046
Date & Time: 12/02/2016, 1237 CST
Registration: N129LZ
Aircraft: Gordon PEGAZAIR P 100
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 2, 2017, about 1237 central standard time, an experimental amateur-built Pegazair P 100 airplane, N129LZ, impacted a field near Mt Vernon, Indiana. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Carmi Municipal Airport (CUL), Carmi, Illinois, about 1150.

A witness stated that the airplane was flying overhead at about 400 - 500 feet above ground level, westbound, when he heard the engine quit running. The airplane then initiated a descending right turn, north bound, and then the engine started running again. The airplane maintained a northerly heading, for about ¼-1/2 mile, and then the engine quit a second time, started a decent, pitched up, rolled right, and then pitched nose down impacting the ground. The witness said that he went the accident site and there was a strong odor of gasoline and immediately called 911.

A second witness stated that he saw a similar flight path for the airplane but that the engine was running on impact. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/21/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/12/2012
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 118 hours (Total, this make and model) 

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He reported a total flight experience of 2,500 hours, with 0 hours in last 6 months, at the time of his last airman medical exam on March 21, 2012, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate that expired on March 31, 2014.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot did not hold an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate nor did he hold a repairman certificate for the airplane. The pilot had no FAA record of previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement actions.

The first and last entries in the pilot's logbook were dated December 2, 1978, and June 29, 2014, respectively. The logbook indicated that he received a private pilot check ride on June 22, 1980. The first logbook entry for flight in the accident airplane was dated March 18, 2012, and indicated that it was 25-minute local flight from CUL with two landings. The remarks section for this entry stated, "High speed taxi + lift (no pattern)." All the subsequent flight entries were for flights in the accident airplane.

The memoranda section of the pilot's logbook included an endorsement, dated May 12, 2012, by a flight instructor, stating that the pilot received a flight review. The only flight entry dated May 12, 2012, was for a 45-minute local flight from CUL in the accident airplane. The remarks section of this entry contained an individual's name and did not cite that a flight review was performed. There were no subsequent flight review endorsements in the pilot's logbook. Title 14 CFR 61.56 requires pilots to obtain a flight review every 2 years to act as pilot-in-command and flight reviews must include a minimum of 1 hour of flight training and 1 hour of ground training.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Gordon
Registration: N129LZ
Model/Series: PEGAZAIR P 100
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 9908108
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/15/2013, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 194.65 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Corvair
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: 190
Registered Owner: Deregistered
Rated Power: 120 hp
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was a Gordon Pegazair P 100 model, which was manufactured in 2007 and was equipped with a Corvair 190 automotive engine.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration website, FAA Registry, Aircraft Inquiry, the airplane was originally registered to the previous aircraft owner, who was also the builder of the airplane. That registration expired May 14, 2013. The pilot, who was the owner of the airplane, had not reregistered the airplane after he had purchased it, and no subsequent application was made for registration.

Aircraft records obtained during the investigation had a special airworthiness certificate issued July 14, 2007 to the aircraft builder/previous owner. There was no current airworthiness certificate or an application for an updated airworthiness certificate in the aircraft records or in the FAA aircraft records database.

The last two logbook entries of the airframe logbook were dated April 2, 2012, at a tachometer time of 26.2 hours for a "completed annual conditional inspection" and July 15, 2013, tachometer time 194.65 hours for a "completed annual inspection." There were no subsequent maintenance entries in the logbook. Both entries were signed by the same the A&P who held an inspection authorization (IA).

The engine logbook had the last two entries for an "annual inspection" by the A&P IA, dated July 15, 2013, at a tachometer time of 194.65 hours. There were no subsequent inspections entered in the engine logbook that were signed by an A&P, but there were 10 later entries dated from July 15, 2013 to November 24, 2015, that cited maintenance work involving engine oil and filter changes, engine compression check, spark plug changes, the replacement of ignition points, and engine timing checks. The last entry dated November 24, 2015 had a tachometer time entry of 489.23 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CUL, 388 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1235 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 345°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.27 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Carmi, IL (CUL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1150 CST
Type of Airspace:  Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  37.933333, 167.772500 (est)

The accident site was located in a flat dirt field about 17 nautical miles southeast of CUL. The power lines and trees adjacent to the field were undamaged.

The engine was separated from the airframe and was about 20 ft south of the airframe. A ground scar consistent in shape and length to the wing's leading edge was oriented lengthwise north/south on each side of the separated engine. [SG1] The fuselage was upright, and the tail-to-nose orientation of the airplane was approximately north/northwest. There was no evidence of fire or soot on the engine or airframe.

Examination of the flight control system revealed that the wing flaps and both leading edge wing slats were in the retracted positions. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the control surfaces to the cockpit controls.

The left- and right-wing fuel tanks were empty, and the fuel lines from the tanks to the fuel selector and from the fuel selector to the engine were broken open. The fuel selector panel was damaged by impact forces, and the fuel selector was positioned between the "LEFT" and "BOTH" positions. Both fuel tanks exhibited outward expansion consistent with hydraulic forces. There was an odor consistent with fuel present at the accident site.

The engine did not exhibit any evidence of mechanical failure. Engine control continuity to the cockpit was confirmed through overstress separations of the controls. The cockpit engine control positions could not be determined due to impact damage. Both propeller blades were broken off at the blade roots and displayed features consistent with overstress.

The airplane was equipped with an MGL Avionics EFIS display that contained an SD memory card. The display and memory card were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorder Division for download. No data pertinent to the event were recovered due to the extent of the damage to the SD card. 

Medical And Pathological Information

On his most recent medical certificate application, the 64-year-old pilot reported a history of a neurology evaluation in September 2011 for memory issues, but no records of the evaluation were contained in the FAA records. On that application, he denied any other medical concerns or the use of medications.

The pilot's personal medical records documented a history of a progressive neurodegenerative disease beginning in 2011. His symptoms included significant visual-spatial and language dysfunction, and he was diagnosed with alterations of consciousness and encephalopathy. In August 2015, he was prescribed the Alzheimer's treatment medication donepezil. His most recent record of altered consciousness was April 2016 when the pilot reported transient episodes of altered mental status, loss of balance, slurred speech, and weakness. At that time, he was no longer using any medications. No records of a detailed neurologic evaluation after April 2016 were located.

The Posey County Coroner's Office, Mt Vernon, Indiana, performed an autopsy of the pilot and determined that his cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. No natural disease was identified.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing and detected ethanol at 0.070 gm/dl in vitreous and 0.038 g/dl in blood. No carbon monoxide or tested-for-drugs were detected. Ethanol is the intoxicant commonly found in beer, wine, and liquor. It acts as a central nervous system depressant. After ingestion, at low doses, it impairs judgment, psychomotor functioning, and vigilance; at higher doses it can cause coma and death. Title 14 CFR 91.17(a) prohibits any person from acting or attempting to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft while having 0.040 gm/dl or more ethanol in the blood. Because ingested alcohol is distributed throughout the body, levels from different postmortem tissues are usually similar. Ethanol may also be produced in body tissues by microbial activity after death. However, vitreous humor from an intact eye and urine do not suffer from such production to any significant extent in relation to blood.

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA046
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Mt Vernon, IN
Aircraft: Gordon PEGAZAIR P 100, registration: N129LZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1237 central standard time, a Gordon Pegazair P 100, N129LZ (deregistered N-number), impacted a field near Mt Vernon, Indiana. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Carmi Municipal Airport (CUL), Carmi, Illinois about 1150.

Duane Daws
November 08, 1952 - December 02, 2016


Duane Alan Daws, 64, of Mt. Vernon, IN lost his life Friday, December 2, 2016, doing what he loved most, flying. He was born November 8, 1952 to Edwin Lee Daws and Lois Daws Blackburn.

Duane retired from CountryMark Refinery. His life passions were found in flying, skydiving, hang gliding, motorcycles, scuba diving, wind surfing, snowboarding, water skiing, and horseback riding, to name a few. Duane loved sharing these passions with others and was known to take many people for flights and parachute jumps.

Duane’s goal in life was to experience life to the fullest, to live each day with total involvement. He believed that life needs to be challenged at all levels; the mental, the spiritual, and the physical. He actively pursued life because he was not afraid to fail.

He was preceded in death by his father.

He is survived by his daughters, Heather (Matt) Pugh of Princeton, IN and Hana Daws (fiancé Austin Denning) of Chandler, IN; his mother, Lois Daws Blackburn; siblings, Luonna (Steve) Uhde, Wayne Eddie (Donna) Daws, Nancy (Tom) Rivers, Mike Summers, Melinda Summers, and Melissa Summers; grandchildren, Adriana and Madalynn Pugh; the mother of his children, Lisa Thomson; along with aunts, cousins, nieces, and nephews.

Private funeral service will be held on Wednesday, December 7, 2016.

A celebration of life will be held at the American Legion Owen Dunn, Post #5, 203 Walnut St., Mt. Vernon, IN 47620 on Wednesday, December 7, 2016, from 3:30 pm until 8:00 pm.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Riley Children’s Foundation, 30 S. Meridian St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46204 or the Carmi Municipal Airport in Memory of Duane Daws, 1379 County Road 1500 N, Carmi, IL 62821

Duane Daws




POSEY CO., IN (WFIE) -   One Tri-State man says his friend who died in a plane crash on Friday taught him how to live life to the fullest.

According to the coroner's office, 64-year-old Duane Daws of Mt. Vernon was the only person on board when his aircraft took a nosedive and crashed in a field off Gun Club Road.

The FAA and NTSB are still trying to figure out what caused the crash. Meanwhile, his loved ones are left mourning and remembering the good times they shared with Daws.

Duane Daws' friend, Neal Schroeder, says they met years ago and formed a strong bond. Neal says he learned a lot from his friend who put 110 percent into everything he did.

Now, he's dealing with losing Duane, who died doing what he loved.

"There's a litany of people out there today who are still, like me, in mourning."

The news that Neal Schroeder's good friend, Duane Daws, died in a crash hit him hard. Neal says they were partners in crime. They were so close that Duane was in his wedding years ago.

They flew planes together for 20 years. Neal says there was so much more to him than that.

"There wasn't anything he wasn't good at and didn't excel at 200%."

From parachuting, skydiving, snorkeling, and canoeing, Neal says Duane gave everything his all. On Friday, he drove by that crash not knowing his friend was involved.

Neal says Duane was a good pilot with 30 years of flying under his belt.

According to the coroner's office, Daws was the only person on board when the aircraft took a nosedive and crashed in a field off Gun Club Road.

Afterward, his loved ones posted online and shared their memories amid their shock.

Neal says what he'll remember most about his Daws is his ability to enjoy every single moment.

"There's nothing more noble than dying doing what you love. If he were to chose, how he wanted to exit this world, that would've been it. So, there's a lot of peace in that."

There is no word on when a memorial and a funeral will be held. We will keep you updated once we find out that information.

Story and video:   http://www.14news.com


Investigators are working to figure out what caused a fatal plane crash in Posey County.

Authorities say 64-year-old Duane Daws crashed around noon, near Highway 62 and Gun Club Road.

The sheriff’s office says it was a small plane the crashed into a field.

Daws was the only person on board.

Authorities are now trying to figure out what caused the crash.

Indiana State Police were on scene investigating, with the FAA and NTSB.

Story and video:   http://44news.wevv.com




One person died after a small aircraft crashed in Posey County, according to Indiana State Police officials.

Indiana State Police Sgt. Todd Ringle said a small aircraft crashed about a half of a mile south of Indiana 62 and 500 feet west of Gun Club Road. Emergency crews were notified of the crash at about 12:15 p.m. Friday.

The pilot, identified Friday night as 64-year-old Duane Daws of Mount Vernon, was the only person in the plane.

The type of plane is still unknown as of Friday afternoon.

"It was damaged to the point where — unless you know aircraft — you're not going to even remotely identify it," Ringle said.

Ringle said the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were expected to arrive Friday evening to the crash site.

Source: http://www.courierpress.com



UPDATE: 

The Posey County Coroner has identified the victim in as 64-year-old Duane Daws of Mt. Vernon.

PREVIOUS:

Indiana State Police say a small aircraft has crashed south of S.R. 62 and east of Gun Club Road in Posey County.

Posey County Coroner Jay Price says the pilot of a single-engine fixed plane died in the crash just after noon. The pilot's identity has not been released. 

Authorities are in the early stages of determining how it went down. Price says the single-engine fixed aircraft went down in the field just south of Highway 62. We still have no official word yet on the type of plane it was, where it took off from, or where it was headed. Gun Club Rd. was blocked off since first responders arrived. Price says dispatchers didn't receive any calls from the pilot before it crashed.

"There's nothing that we have found on that. Nothing came in to our 911 center. Witnesses that had seen the plane go down said it just took a nose dive in to the field,” he says.

Authorities say the FAA and NTSB are on their way to the scene. Gun Club Rd. will be closed off for several hours.

Story and video:   http://www.tristatehomepage.com



POSEY CO., IN (WFIE) - The name of the pilot who died in a plane crash in Posey County has been released.

According to the coroner's office, Duane Daws, 64-year-old, of Mt. Vernon, was the only person on board when the aircraft took a nosedive and crashed in a field off Gun Club Road.

The FAA and NTSB are trying to figure out what caused the plane to crash.

Story and video:  http://www.14news.com