Saturday, December 3, 2016

Robinson R22 BETA, Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd., N7085K: Accident occurred December 02, 2016 at Unalaska Airport (PADU), Dutch Harbor, Alaska

The NTSB did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

BERING PACIFIC RANCHES LTD: http://registry.faa.gov/N7085K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ANC17LA011

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Unalaska, AK
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22, registration: N7085K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1200 Alaska standard time, a Robinson R-22 Beta helicopter, N7085K, collided with remote snow-covered terrain while landing, about 10 miles southwest of Unalaska, Alaska. The commercial pilot sustained no injury, the passenger sustained minor injuries, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Bering Pacific Ranches Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Deteriorating visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Unalaska Airport, Unalaska, about 1100. 

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on December 7, the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a telecommunications technician to the Fort Glenn cattle ranch on Umnak Island. After departing from the Unalaska Airport, the pilot stated that while flying overwater via the Umnak Pass prior to reaching Umnak Island, he observed a snow squall. The pilot decided to return back to Unalaska and while flying in a mountainous valley, a snow squall moved into the area. He stated that due to the deteriorating flight conditions, he conducted a precautionary landing to remote snow-covered terrain to wait for improved flight conditions. During the precautionary landing sequence, white out conditions were present from the main rotor system downwash, and the pilot was unable to recognize any topographical features. The main rotor blades impacted terrain and the helicopter rolled onto its left side. Both occupants egressed from the wreckage, a personal locator beacon was activated, and the occupants were extracted from the accident site via a U.S. Coast Guard MH-65D helicopter. 

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor system.

The pilot stated that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The closest official weather observation station is located at the Unalaska Airport, about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1200, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, and stated in part: Wind 220 degrees (true) at 18 knots, gusting 25 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, broken clouds at 1600 feet; temperature 37 degrees F; dew point 27 degrees F; altimeter 30.19 inHg. 
=========

The U.S. Coast Guard rescued two people Friday afternoon after their helicopter crashed about nine miles southwest of the Dutch Harbor Airport.

Petty Officer Bill Colclough said the small rotorcraft went down during whiteout conditions in a mountainous area on Unalaska Island.

"They apparently encountered some heavy weather and crashed," said Colclough. "Fortunately, we were able to locate them in time because they activated their personal locator beacon."

The air station in Kodiak sent a rescue helicopter crew to find the pilot and the passenger, who were taken to Unalaska's clinic with minor cuts and bruises.

Coast Guard officials did not release information about who the two people are or if they're from Unalaska.

Although the helicopter crashed in heavy snow, Colclough said it's possible something else brought the rotorcraft down.

"There will most likely be an investigation into the cause of the crash," he said. "The Coast Guard may be a part of it, and it could entail the Federal Aviation Administration and some other state and federal agencies."

At the time of the crash, officials said there was less than one mile of visibility and winds blowing at nine miles per hour. 

Source:   http://kucb.org

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) The Coast Guard says one of its aircrew rescued two people after a helicopter crash near the Dutch Harbor Airport on Unalaska Island Friday afternoon.

The 17th Coast Guard District Command Center received a personal locator beacon activation from a Robinson R22 helicopter. The beacon was plotted in a position approximately nine miles south-southwest of the Dutch Harbor Airport in mountainous terrain, according to a Coast Guard press release.

An aircrew on the Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley was called in for the rescue. The MH-65 Dolphin rescue helicopter crew located both crash victims and transported them to the medical clinic in Dutch Harbor.

The Coast Guard says both survivors were reported to have minor cuts and bruises. The Robinson R22 helicopter reportedly entered whiteout conditions and then crashed.

Weather on scene was heavy snow with less than one mile of visibility and 9-mph winds, according to the Coast Guard.

Source:  http://www.ktuu.com

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N2367R: Accident occurred December 02, 2016 at Thomson-McDuffie County Airport (KHQU), Georgia

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA089
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Thomson, GA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N2367R

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

http://registry.faa.gov/N2367R

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK APPROACH LIGHTS, THOMSON, GEORGIA

Date: 03-DEC-16
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N2367R
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: THOMSON
State: Georgia




AUGUSTA, Ga. (CNN) - A single-engine plane in pieces just short of the runway at the Thomson McDuffie Regional Airport one day after a crash.

Many drivers on Washington road drove slow to get a good look of the scene.

McDuffie County Fire and Rescue say a man and a woman were onboard the Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee when it crash landed Friday night.

McDuffie County dispatchers say the call came in around 6:30.

The pilot ran out of fuel as they were approaching the runway.

The plane was flying low and hit a tall tower at the end of the runway.

It crash landed in a field between the runway and highway-78.

Firefighters say both wings broke away from the aircraft when it hit the ground, but the center of the plane stayed in one piece.

The passenger and pilot are both okay. First responders called the two very lucky.

The FAA is investigating.


Story and video:   http://www.ozarksfirst.com



THOMSON, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) -- A pilot and passenger walk away from a plane crash unharmed near Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport.


McDuffie County Dispatch says they responded to a call regarding a plane crash at the airport around 6:30 p.m. Friday night. Dispatch says the pilot was a citizen with a pilot's license flying a private plane. McDuffie Emergency Services say the pilot and passenger were a man and a woman.


A spokesperson with McDuffie County's Engine Company 2 says the plane ran out of fuel and was flying in low when he approached the runway.


During his approach, the pilot struck an instrument-landing system (ILS) at the end of the runway. An ILS is a small tower that enables planes to land if the pilots are unable to establish visual contact with the runway through radio signals.


Upon impact, both wings and the landing gear broke away and there was significant damage to the outer parts of the plane. The center was still in tact with only small damage to the front. The damaged plane remains near the runway.


Both the pilot and passenger were evaluated at the scene and released with no injuries. The runway remained open as firefighters responded to the scene. 


Source:  http://www.wrdw.com 





A small plane crashed just short of the runway Friday night at the Thomson-McDuffie County Airport.

No one was injured in the incident that officials are calling a hard landing.

According to authorities on the scene, the plane crash-landed in the field just beyond the airport along Washington Road around 6:45 p.m.

It is believed that the plane ran out of gas. The impact sheared off a wing and damaged the landing gear of the aircraft. McDuffie fire rescue squads stationed at the airport were on the scene quickly and McDuffie EMS evaluated the pilot, who refused to be taken to a hospital.

Authorities on the scene said that traffic at the airport — and along Washington Road —was not affected by the accident. Federal aviation authorities are looking in to the crash.

Story and comments: http://chronicle.augusta.com

THOMPSON, Ga. - A pilot and passenger out of St. Augustine were unharmed in an emergency landing at the Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport, according to a report from WRDW/WAGT in Augusta, Georgia.

At around 6:30 p.m. Friday, McDuffie County officials responded to a single-engine plane crash at the regional airport.

The Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee was flying low on its final approach to the runway when it ran out of fuel, officials said.

During the final approach, the pilot struck the instrument landing system (ILS) at the end of the runway. The ILS system is used to help pilots land when visibility is low.

The pilot and passenger of a Piper Archer out of St. Augustine were unharmed in a crash on final approach at the Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport

According to the report, both of the airplane’s wings and landing gear broke off during impact, and there was extensive damage to its exterior.

The fuselage of the airplane remained intact, with only minimal damage to its front.

The pilot and the passenger were evaluated at the scene and released without injuries.

Source:  http://www.news4jax.com

Diamond DA-20, Platinum Aviation, N992CT: Accident occurred December 02, 2016 in Payson, Utah County, Utah

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

VERSI SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N992CT

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Salt Lake City, Utah


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA088
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Payson, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2017
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA-20, registration: N992CT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that, while on a cross-country flight, the weather deteriorated at the destination airport. He decided to complete a touch-and-go landing at an airport along the route and then return to the departure airport. The student pilot further reported that, when he began the flight back to his original point of departure, the airplane had about 3/4 tank of fuel remaining, and a headwind was present. About 10 to 15 nautical miles from the original departure airport, the fuel supply was exhausted, and the student pilot made a forced landing in a field. During the forced landing, the right wing struck a tree and was substantially damaged.
The student pilot did not report any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's improper in-flight fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion.

The solo student pilot reported that while on a cross-country flight, the weather deteriorated at the destination airport. He decided to complete a touch-and-go landing at an airport along the route and then return to the departure airport. The student pilot further reported that when he began the flight back to his original point of departure, the airplane had about ¾ tank of fuel remaining and a headwind was present. About 10 to 15 nautical miles from the original departure airport, the fuel supply was exhausted and the student pilot made a forced landing in a field. During the forced landing, the right wing struck a tree and was substantially damaged.

The student pilot did not report any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.



PAYSON, Utah -- You know that nervous feeling you get when you're driving down the highway, the fuel light is on, and there isn't a gas station in sight? Well, imagine that same feeling, only in an airplane.

A student pilot had to make an emergency landing in Payson Friday after running out of gas.

"Plane crossed over the power lines probably 100 feet up," said witness Mark Dehart.

Dehart was riding his ATV behind the LDS Temple in Payson around 1 p.m. when he saw the single-engine airplane falling from the sky over his home.

"I noticed his prop wasn't spinning, knowing he was going to go down," Dehart said. "He was kind of heading straight for the house."

Dehart held his breath, hoping the pilot could avoid the crash.

"Lifted up the right wing so it wouldn't clip the gazebo, and then he lifted the left wing, struck the tree," Dehart said. "He took off about half a dozen branches about three-feet long."

The plane eventually came to a hard landing in the middle of a sod farm. The pilot walked away uninjured, while the plane hardly had a scratch on it.

"He was fairly calm but he just said, 'I did a stupid thing,'" Dehart said.

The stupid thing was not checking the fuel gauge before taking off.

"From what my understanding is, he was out of fuel so he thought he had enough fuel to get back to Spanish Fork where he took off from, but I guess he didn't estimate that very well," said Officer Noemi Sandoval of the Payson Police Department.

The pilot declined an interview. Dehart hopes he doesn't beat himself up too much. He said the pilot made the best of a bad situation and that this could have been deadly.

"He did an amazing job, he was in control of the aircraft, he did great," Dehart said. "I hope he continues flying."

Story and video:  http://fox13now.com

Gordon Pegazair P 100, N129LZ : Fatal accident occurred December 02, 2016 in Mount Vernon, Posey County, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11

http://registry.faa.gov/N129LZ 

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA046
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 02, 2016 in Mt Vernon, IN
Aircraft: Gordon PEGAZAIR P 100, registration: N129LZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 2, 2016, about 1237 central standard time, a Gordon Pegazair P 100, N129LZ (deregistered N-number), impacted a field near Mt Vernon, Indiana. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Carmi Municipal Airport (CUL), Carmi, Illinois about 1150.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email  assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Duane Daws
November 08, 1952 - December 02, 2016


Duane Alan Daws, 64, of Mt. Vernon, IN lost his life Friday, December 2, 2016, doing what he loved most, flying. He was born November 8, 1952 to Edwin Lee Daws and Lois Daws Blackburn.

Duane retired from CountryMark Refinery. His life passions were found in flying, skydiving, hang gliding, motorcycles, scuba diving, wind surfing, snowboarding, water skiing, and horseback riding, to name a few. Duane loved sharing these passions with others and was known to take many people for flights and parachute jumps.

Duane’s goal in life was to experience life to the fullest, to live each day with total involvement. He believed that life needs to be challenged at all levels; the mental, the spiritual, and the physical. He actively pursued life because he was not afraid to fail.

He was preceded in death by his father.

He is survived by his daughters, Heather (Matt) Pugh of Princeton, IN and Hana Daws (fiancé Austin Denning) of Chandler, IN; his mother, Lois Daws Blackburn; siblings, Luonna (Steve) Uhde, Wayne Eddie (Donna) Daws, Nancy (Tom) Rivers, Mike Summers, Melinda Summers, and Melissa Summers; grandchildren, Adriana and Madalynn Pugh; the mother of his children, Lisa Thomson; along with aunts, cousins, nieces, and nephews.

Private funeral service will be held on Wednesday, December 7, 2016.

A celebration of life will be held at the American Legion Owen Dunn, Post #5, 203 Walnut St., Mt. Vernon, IN 47620 on Wednesday, December 7, 2016, from 3:30 pm until 8:00 pm.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Riley Children’s Foundation, 30 S. Meridian St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46204 or the Carmi Municipal Airport in Memory of Duane Daws, 1379 County Road 1500 N, Carmi, IL 62821

Duane Daws




POSEY CO., IN (WFIE) -   One Tri-State man says his friend who died in a plane crash on Friday taught him how to live life to the fullest.

According to the coroner's office, 64-year-old Duane Daws of Mt. Vernon was the only person on board when his aircraft took a nosedive and crashed in a field off Gun Club Road.

The FAA and NTSB are still trying to figure out what caused the crash. Meanwhile, his loved ones are left mourning and remembering the good times they shared with Daws.

Duane Daws' friend, Neal Schroeder, says they met years ago and formed a strong bond. Neal says he learned a lot from his friend who put 110 percent into everything he did.

Now, he's dealing with losing Duane, who died doing what he loved.

"There's a litany of people out there today who are still, like me, in mourning."

The news that Neal Schroeder's good friend, Duane Daws, died in a crash hit him hard. Neal says they were partners in crime. They were so close that Duane was in his wedding years ago.

They flew planes together for 20 years. Neal says there was so much more to him than that.

"There wasn't anything he wasn't good at and didn't excel at 200%."

From parachuting, skydiving, snorkeling, and canoeing, Neal says Duane gave everything his all. On Friday, he drove by that crash not knowing his friend was involved.

Neal says Duane was a good pilot with 30 years of flying under his belt.

According to the coroner's office, Daws was the only person on board when the aircraft took a nosedive and crashed in a field off Gun Club Road.

Afterward, his loved ones posted online and shared their memories amid their shock.

Neal says what he'll remember most about his Daws is his ability to enjoy every single moment.

"There's nothing more noble than dying doing what you love. If he were to chose, how he wanted to exit this world, that would've been it. So, there's a lot of peace in that."

There is no word on when a memorial and a funeral will be held. We will keep you updated once we find out that information.

Story and video:   http://www.14news.com


Investigators are working to figure out what caused a fatal plane crash in Posey County.

Authorities say 64-year-old Duane Daws crashed around noon, near Highway 62 and Gun Club Road.

The sheriff’s office says it was a small plane the crashed into a field.

Daws was the only person on board.

Authorities are now trying to figure out what caused the crash.

Indiana State Police were on scene investigating, with the FAA and NTSB.

Story and video:   http://44news.wevv.com




One person died after a small aircraft crashed in Posey County, according to Indiana State Police officials.

Indiana State Police Sgt. Todd Ringle said a small aircraft crashed about a half of a mile south of Indiana 62 and 500 feet west of Gun Club Road. Emergency crews were notified of the crash at about 12:15 p.m. Friday.

The pilot, identified Friday night as 64-year-old Duane Daws of Mount Vernon, was the only person in the plane.

The type of plane is still unknown as of Friday afternoon.

"It was damaged to the point where — unless you know aircraft — you're not going to even remotely identify it," Ringle said.

Ringle said the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were expected to arrive Friday evening to the crash site.

Source: http://www.courierpress.com



UPDATE: 

The Posey County Coroner has identified the victim in as 64-year-old Duane Daws of Mt. Vernon.

PREVIOUS:

Indiana State Police say a small aircraft has crashed south of S.R. 62 and east of Gun Club Road in Posey County.

Posey County Coroner Jay Price says the pilot of a single-engine fixed plane died in the crash just after noon. The pilot's identity has not been released. 

Authorities are in the early stages of determining how it went down. Price says the single-engine fixed aircraft went down in the field just south of Highway 62. We still have no official word yet on the type of plane it was, where it took off from, or where it was headed. Gun Club Rd. was blocked off since first responders arrived. Price says dispatchers didn't receive any calls from the pilot before it crashed.

"There's nothing that we have found on that. Nothing came in to our 911 center. Witnesses that had seen the plane go down said it just took a nose dive in to the field,” he says.

Authorities say the FAA and NTSB are on their way to the scene. Gun Club Rd. will be closed off for several hours.

Story and video:   http://www.tristatehomepage.com



POSEY CO., IN (WFIE) - The name of the pilot who died in a plane crash in Posey County has been released.

According to the coroner's office, Duane Daws, 64-year-old, of Mt. Vernon, was the only person on board when the aircraft took a nosedive and crashed in a field off Gun Club Road.

The FAA and NTSB are trying to figure out what caused the plane to crash.

Story and video:  http://www.14news.com