Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Piper PA-32RT-300 Lance, N3046H: Accident occurred January 19, 2016 at Accomack County Airport (KMFV), Melfa, Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N3046H

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Richmond FSDO-21

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA110 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 19, 2016 in Melfa, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/14/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA32RT, registration: N3046H
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while landing in crosswind conditions, a wind gust "forced" the airplane to drift to the right of the runway. The pilot initiated a go-around, but further reported that a "sudden drop" in the wind led to an aerodynamic stall. 

After the airplane stalled, it impacted a structure adjacent to the runway. A postimpact fire ensued and the airplane was destroyed. 

The pilot reported that there were no pre-impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate compensation for a gusting crosswind during landing, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall, impact with a structure, and subsequent postimpact fire.




ACCOMACK CO., Va. -  Authorities are investigating a small plane crash in Accomack County.

Virginia State Police say just after 3:00 PM, they were alerted to a small plane crash at the Accomack County Airport. 

The pilot and passenger were apparently able to escape the wreckage.

Troopers responded to the scene to investigate.

The Federal Aviation Administration tells 47 ABC that the plane was a Piper PA32, that was attempting to land at the airport. 

The pilot reportedly told the FAA that a strong gust of wind caused the aircraft to stall and go off course and crash into a building.

The FAA says it will investigate, and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident.

An employee of the airport tells 47 ABC that they will be shut down until VSP clears the scene.

Story and video:  http://www.wmdt.com


MELFA, Va. (WVEC) -- Virginia State Police are investigating a plane crash on the Eastern Shore.

A small plane crashed at the Accomack County Airport around 3 p.m. Tuesday.

According to police, the 1979 Piper Lance plane caught a gust of wind during a landing attempt, causing it to run off the runway and across a grassy area where it struck a storage shed and light pole, causing the plane to catch fire.

Smoke and wreckage was visible near the northwest side of the airport property.

The pilot and passenger, the only occupants in the plane, were able to escape the wreckage without injuries.

The Accomack County Sheriff's Office, Virginia State Police, Accomack County Department of Public Safety were at the scene, along with Onley and Melfa Volunteer Fire Department first responders.

Story and photo gallery: http://www.13newsnow.com


Emergency personnel responded to a report of an airplane crash at the Accomack County Airport in Melfa, Virginia shortly after 3 p.m. Tuesday.

Smoke was visible near the northwest side of the airport property minutes after the crash, according to an eyewitness.

The pilot and passenger were able to escape the wreckage unharmed, Virginia State Police spokeswoman Michelle Anaya said.

Their names were not immediately released.

The airplane ran off the runway during a landing attempt and struck a building, causing the aircraft to catch fire, Anaya said.

The scene was secured and officials were awaiting the arrival of Federal Aviation Administration personnel as of 6 p.m., she said.

Personnel from the Accomack County Sheriff's Office, Virginia State Police and the Accomack County Department of Public Safety were at the scene Tuesday afternoon, along with first responders from Onley and Melfa Volunteer Fire Departments.

The crash remains under investigation, Anaya said.

Story and photos: http://www.delmarvanow.com





Eurocopter EC130, N11VQ: Accident occurred January 17, 2016 in Hanalei, Hawaii

http://registry.faa.gov/N11VQ 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA055 
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, January 17, 2016 in Hanalei, HI
Aircraft: AIRBUS EC130, registration: N11VQ
Injuries: 4 Serious, 3 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 17, 2016, about 1430 Hawaii standard time, an Airbus EC130 T2, N11VQ, landed hard on a beach 2 miles west of Hanalei on the Hawaiian island of Kauai after a reported loss of engine power. The commercial pilot and 2 passengers sustained minor injuries, and 4 passengers were seriously injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tailboom and airframe. The helicopter was registered to Nevada Helicopter Leasing LLC, operated by Blue Hawaiian Helicopters under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135, and was conducting an air tour flight at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a company visual flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated in Lihue at 1406.

The pilot reported that he was about 1/4 mile off shore northwest of Honopu Sea Arch at 1,300 feet mean sea level (msl) when he heard the low rotor rpm aural warning horn. He immediately entered an autorotation and turned towards the beach. He transmitted over the radio that he had an engine failure. As he approached the shoreline he made a right turn to the south and landed hard on the beach. He applied the rotor brake to slow the rotor, and at that time he noted that the engine was not running. The passengers began to exit and he pulled the engine fuel cutoff.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Honolulu FSDO-13

Self-made engineer builds yet another aircraft

BUT CAN IT FLY? George Tumuti with his latest plane, which he built using scrap metal bought with his car-washing savings.




A self-made engineer in Waguthu village, Kiambaa constituency, has built an aircraft to get sponsorship to pursue his engineering dream.

In 2013, George Tumuti built a microlight plane using scrap metal and got recognition for a significant contribution and dedicated service to the community by the Kiambu government.

He said he would build a more advanced plane.

“With the microlight plane, which on a good runway could fly 20 metres high, I had hoped to get sponsorship to join college, but I didn’t. So I went back to the drawing board as it is my dream to be an engineer and a pilot,” Tumuti said.

The 23-year-old, who is interning with General Motors, said he cannot take his plane for a test flight because the government thinks it is too risky and has prohibited it.

Tumuti dropped out of the Kenya Polytechnic University College for lack of fees.

“If I could get sponsorship I know I can become an engineer. It has been my dream since I was a small boy,” he said.

Tumuti used scrap metal, motorcycle and vehicles’ parts and local materials bought using savings from his car wash business.

Joseph Itibu, Tumuti’s father, said he was amazed.

“We quarrelled often as I did not understand him, but I must support him. He has proved he has the brains and can go far if given the chance and finances,” he said.

Story and photo:  http://www.the-star.co.ke

Piper PA30, N68X: Accident occurred January 18, 2016 in Dublin, Laurens County, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/N68X 

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA092 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, January 18, 2016 in Dublin, GA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 30, registration: N68X
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 18, 2016 about 1145 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-30, N68X, was substantially damaged when the landing gear collapsed during landing rollout at W H "Bud" Barron Airport (DBN), Dublin, Georgia. The flight instructor and private pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the private pilot, he was receiving multi-engine flight instruction from the flight instructor when the accident occurred. The weather was windy but clear with the temperature in the low 40s [Fahrenheit]. They departed DBN at approximately 1015 after allowing about 15 minutes runtime for the engines' temperatures to warm up. Their intent was to remain in the local area to perform practice maneuvers in preparation for his check ride for a multi-engine rating. Due to severe low-level turbulence, they operated at an altitude from 4,500 to 5,500 feet above mean sea level.

They performed several maneuvers including 30- and 45-degree banking turns while maintaining assigned altitude, low-power stalls and recovery while maintaining heading, power-on stalls and recovery while maintaining heading, single engine power failure recognition and flight control procedures including emergency engine failure checklist application. They also practiced single-engine flight with the landing gear retracted and extended, as well as with the wing flaps retracted and extended. After 45 to 50 minutes of flight, they performed a practice emergency descent from 4,500 feet msl to pattern altitude with the landing gear and wing flaps extended, and the throttles at idle. They then entered the traffic pattern for runway 32 on the left downwind leg at approximately 1,200 feet msl and performed a normal full stop landing.

After taxiing back to beginning of runway 32, they then reviewed procedures for a short field obstacle takeoff, and for a short field obstacle landing. The short field takeoff was normal per the Piper PA-30 POH recommendations, with the landing gear retracted upon indication of a positive climb, followed by retraction of the wing flaps from the takeoff position. After takeoff, they once again joined the traffic pattern for another landing. When they were at 1,200 feet on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, power was reduced to approximately 20 inches of manifold pressure on both engines to slow the airplane below 150 mph for landing gear extension. Abeam the numbers for runway 32, they completed the pre-landing checklist and ensured that the fuel pumps were on, landing gear extended to the down and locked position, mixtures set to full rich, and power reduced to 24 inches of manifold pressure. The private pilot further reduced power to approximately 15 inches of manifold pressure while turning on to the left base leg of the traffic pattern. He then verbally called out the "GUMP" check (gear, undercarriage, mixture, props) with acknowledgment from his flight instructor, and then turned onto the final at approximately 800 feet msl, with his speed at 110 mph to compensate for the wind gusts.

When he crossed the threshold of runway 32 at approximately 400 feet and 100 mph, he further reduced power and closed the throttles. He then descended towards the runway, and commenced his flare as the airspeed decreased. All indications of touchdown were normal with weight on wheels, for approximately 50 yards or so when it felt as if the aircraft was "shimmying," followed shortly thereafter by the "sandpaper sound" of the propellers striking the runway. The airplane then settled completely on its belly and slid to right of centerline where it came to a stop. The flight instructor said he smelled smoke so the private pilot moved the fuel tank valves to off position and they both departed the airplane.

Examination of the runway and wreckage revealed that approximately 2,000 feet from the approach end of runway 32, propeller strike marks were visible that corresponded to the location of the left and right propellers on the accident airplane. At the approximately the same location scrape marks were also visible on the runway centerline which corresponded the airplane's belly. The scrape and propeller strike marks continued from this point, approximately 700 feet to the location where the airplane came to rest.

In order to examine the airplane, it was moved to a hangar on the airport and placed on aircraft jacks. Examination of the two-blade propellers revealed that the tip on one propeller blade of both the left and right propellers was bent forward with the tip of the other blade of each propeller bent aft. Examination of the airplane's fuselage revealed that its belly was substantially damaged from the aft end of the nose landing gear wheel well, aft through the mid-section of the fuselage, with numerous areas that were ground down into the frames and longerons. The landing gear system was also examined and no damage to the landing gear system or wheels was observed. A complete operational check of the landing gear system was performed and the landing gear was extended and retracted several times with no discrepancies noted.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and pilot records, the flight instructor held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land, commercial privileges for airplane airplane single-engine land, and a type rating for the BE-300. He also possessed a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, multi-engine, and instrument airplane. He also held a ground instructor certificate with ratings for advanced and instrument, and a control tower operator certificate. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on August 11, 2015. He reported that he had accrued 5,001total hours of flight experience, 25 of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA and pilot records, the private pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 21, 2014. He reported that he had accrued 689 total hours of flight experience, 10 of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1963. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on October 23, 2015. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued approximately 5459.7 total hours of operation, and the engines had accrued approximately 1834.5 total hours of operation since major overhaul.

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

Pegasus Quik, G-CBYE: Fatal accident occurred July 03, 2015 at Enstone Airfield, Oxfordshire, UK

Investigators suggest microlight which crashed into Enstone Airfield was carrying too much weight during flight

Investigators suggest microlight trike which crashed into Enstone Airfield was carrying too much weight during flight.



A microlight trike that crashed last July, killing its pilot and passenger, might have been carrying too much weight, it has been discovered.

Keith Poulton, 59, and Dr. Connor Morris, known as Edward, aged 62 and from Witney, died on July 3 when the light aircraft they were flying crash-landed at Enstone Airfield, smashed through a fence and collided with a lorry trailer.

The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) last week released its report on the investigation into the crash.

The report said it was thought the aircraft was carrying 30kg more weight than advised.

Owner of Enstone Flying Club Paul Fowler said he knew “experienced pilot” Dr Morris for 10 years through flying together.

Mr. Fowler said: “ I have known Ed for a long time through flying.

“It was a very sad and tragic accident and a great loss.”

Mr. Fowler did not wish to comment on the contents of the report, nor did Dr Morris’s family.

Investigators for the AAIB stated the maximum take off weight for the aircraft was 409kg, with the maximum weight limit for each seat being 110kg.

Pilots are required to carry out weight checks before flying the plane, to check it does not exceed the limit. The pilot, Dr Morris, weighed 83.8kg (11st 2lbs) and the passenger Mr. Poulton weighed 118.1kg or 18st 5lbs.

There was also a bag of equipment weighing 4.2kg and the helmets and headsets which weighed 3.4kg. A total of 38.5 litres of fuel also weighed 27.8kg.

At the time of the accident the aircraft weighed 442.3kg, about 33kg above the recommended weight.

The report stated: “The data provided by the aircraft designer indicated the distance available from the point of touchdown may have been insufficient to bring the overweight aircraft to a complete halt.

“However, even if the aircraft had not been over-loaded, there was insufficient distance remaining to take off again from the point at which power was reapplied.

“The extra weight is considered to have been a contributory factor to the accident.”

The AAIB pointed out that Dr. Morris, while being “experienced” as a pilot, had not flown a microlight with an instructor since gaining his licence in 2006 and his Microlight Rating had lapsed.

Dr. Morris worked at the Nuffield Health Centre in Welch Way from 1984 to 2012.

As well as his clinical work, he was also a community volunteer for organisations including Witney Talking News.

Story and photo: http://www.oxfordmail.co.uk

Overran the runway, Enstone Airfield, 3 July 2015.

Summary: 

The aircraft made an approach towards the upwind end of a grass runway at Enstone Airfield. It touched down approximately 145 m before the end of the runway and, after rolling for approximately 80 m, the power was increased. The aircraft, which was overweight, remained on the ground and veered to the right passing through a fence and colliding with a vehicle trailer parked beside other equipment, close to the end of the runway. The pilot and his passenger both suffered fatal injuries. The pilot had not flown with an instructor in a flex-wing microlight since gaining his license in 2006 and his Microlight Rating had lapsed. 

Accident report: https://www.gov.uk

Piper PA-34-200, N55134: Incident occurred January 16, 2016 in Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida

Date: 16-JAN-16
Time: 18:05:00Z
Regis#: N55134
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: BROOKSVILLE
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, BROOKSVILLE, FL

AIR GABRIELA INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N55134

Battle Creek, Madison County, Nebraska: Family has flying in its blood

MARV STAHL (left) passed his love of flying to his son, Matt, who is a pilot for Delta Airlines.



Marv Stahl traces his love of flying back to a childhood in South Dakota full of clouds and “Sky King.”

“I’ve always enjoyed it since I was a kid,” Stahl said. “I remember as a young child laying out in the pasture in South Dakota on my back on a summer day watching the clouds go by and wondering where those things were going.

“I always liked crawling up on the silo on the farm just so I could get a better look. I think, as I look back over the years, that it might have had to do with ‘Sky King,’ the TV show in the days of black and white.”

As a result, Stahl started flying airplanes in November 1962, but he hasn’t kept his love of flying to himself — he has passed it on to his children and grandchildren, as three generations of his family have flown, including his son, Matt Stahl, who is a pilot for Delta Airlines.

“It’s been amazing — without accident or incident, which is pretty good — kind of a milestone there,” said Marv Stahl. “I’ve been proud of my grandkids especially. The boys tend to take to flying pretty good, but my granddaughter that I soloed, she was actually an excellent pilot. She did a very good job handling an airplane, a very good job.”

Marv Stahl started out flying in a Piper PA-18 Super Cub and eventually began flying for North Central Airlines, where he flew DC-9s. He moved to Nebraska in 1975 from Minnesota and eventually began doing charter work.
However, Marv remembers his first solo flight very well.

“As my son says ... ‘You always remember your first solo by yourself. You never forget that — never,’ ” Marv Stahl said.

Marv soloed all three of his children in flying, and Matt eventually decided to follow in his father’s footsteps. After going to the University of Nebraska at Kearney to wrestle, he eventually gravitated toward flying.

“It was crazy because he had no idea he was going to go into flying when he went down to Kearney to UNK,” Marv Stahl said. “He was (part of) the second graduating class at UNK. He was a good wrestler — he took third in state in high school in Class C — so he wanted to go down there and try college wrestling, but he did not like that at all. ... They had an aviation program out there, and he got through that college with his degrees in flying in 3½ years.”

After graduating from UNK, Matt Stahl went to Wichita, Kan. — the “flying capital of the world,” as Marv calls it — but Matt found that the only job available when he got there was pumping gas for airplanes. Eventually, a chance to fly for Delta opened up, and the rest was history.

“When my son finally got to Delta, he made all the right choices,” Marv Stahl said. “He’s fairly charismatic, and that helped him a lot to get where he is. He’s really great with people. He started off as a commuter pilot when TWA was still flying — he was flying a turboprop for TWA Express. He became a captain on that, and then he got enough time and stuff that he went over to TWA, where he flew DC-9s.”

Since going to work for Delta, Matt and his family have been all over the world. He took his daughter to Paris for her ninth birthday, and Marv has had the chance to visit such locales as Rome and London.

One of Marv’s favorite memories was from the late 1990s, when he and Matt stopped in New York before visiting Israel. The Stahls had requested tickets to a taping of “The Late Show With David Letterman” and had a memorable time when they attended the taping.

“With Letterman, when they send you the tickets, you don’t get to pick the date — they pick the date — I think Jan. 18 was the day of the show,” Marv Stahl said. “(Matt) flew me, as a pilot, from Cincinnati to New York, and we went down and got tickets then and stuff. We came back later for the show, and we were standing outside and a producer looked along the line and picked out certain people, and they picked him out as one of the people (to be featured from the audience on the show). ...

“Letterman came down to talk to him, so we both stood up and stuff. Matt was wearing a jacket and a tie at the time and Letterman reached out (with his hand) and got the tie, so they shook hands and the tie was going up and down. That broke the ice right away.”

Matt now flies a Boeing 777 to such locales as Tokyo and Singapore. On those long flights, more than one pilot is on board to keep a fresh captain at the helm.

“When they go that far, they have four pilots on board,” Marv Stahl said. “They rotate them through — it depends on how long they’re going to be in the air.”

Now the third generation of the Stahl family is going into what arguably could be called the family business. Kacey Christiansen, a 24-year-old recent University of Nebraska graduate, earned his private pilot certificate last month and might be following in his Uncle Matt’s footsteps, as he, too, is eyeing a career as an airline pilot.

According to Marv, Christiansen logged the 40 hours he needed to earn his private pilot certificate in less than three months, something that often takes a year or more.

“He really went after it,” said Marv Stahl. “He spent about 2½ months in Omaha in a hotel on the weekends. I was glad when the weather was bad sometimes — it kept him home.”

In his 50-plus years of flying, two flights that Marv took as a pilot stand out, the first of which involved a dead body.

“I took a 172 from here out to near Scottsbluff to pick up a body,” Marv Stahl said. “It was just wrapped in a sheet, and that was it. It was sitting right beside me as I flew back to Norfolk over the Sandhills. That was an interesting one.”

The other flight took Marv to a dark place, in a manner of speaking.

“Another one was we came back at night one time from Casper, Wyo.,” he said. “On a Monday, we would leave Norfolk and fly out to Greeley, Colo., and drop a salesman off there. He would work Denver, then me and another guy, Roger Bauer, we’d go up into Wyoming into Casper and Rock Springs. We were coming back one night from there from the Casper area, I believe, back to Norfolk. ... It was dark before we hit the Nebraska border. We were flying long enough and all of a sudden there were no lights down there and I thought it was just a cloud layer below us, but it wasn’t — there was just nobody there, no lights.”

Story and photo:  http://norfolkdailynews.com

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, N7048G: Incident occurred January 18, 2016 in Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida

Date: 18-JAN-16
Time: 19:13:00Z
Regis#: N7048G
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Birmingham FSDO-09
City: PENSACOLA
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, STRUCK THE PROPELLER, PENSACOLA, FL

CMC AVIATION SERVICES CO: http://registry.faa.gov/N7048G

Worker sacked for taking magazine from rubbish

An airline security firm employee was sacked after he admitted taking a copy of Time magazine from a rubbish bag on a stairwell serving a transatlantic jet at Shannon airport.

Tim Marks, a former employee of ICTS Ireland Ltd, was fired in 2014 after admitting he took the $5.99 magazine from a rubbish bag destined for the dump on October 22, 2014.

Mr. Marks took the magazine from two-thirds down a rubbish bag from a just-arrived flight by ICTS’s biggest customer at Shannon, United Airlines.

Mr. Marks, who spent nine years with the firm, is suing for unfair dismissal at an Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT).

At a hearing in Ennis, Audrey Wilhite, station manager at Shannon for ICTS, said the value of the item was irrelevant as Mr. Marks had brought the company into disrepute.

Ms. Wilhite said it was her decision to sack Mr. Marks, stating that he would have been aware of a company memo confirming a previous incident where a worker was sacked for taking a can of Coke from an aircraft without permission.

At peak season, ICTS Ireland employs around 100 employees at Shannon.

ICTS Shannon operations manager, Pat Dunne, said Mr. Marks explained that taking the magazine without permission “was a momentary lapse of concentration on his behalf”.

Mr. Dunne said “the item was not his to take whether it was on the back steps or on the back of the aircraft.”

Ms. Wilhite said she informed United Airlines staff representatives who were managing the aircraft.

“We explained that we had an incident where an item was removed from the aircraft and we were dealing with it,” she said.“It was embarrassing saying it to them and they looked a bit shocked and they asked what was the item.”

Mrs. Wilhite said she showed them the Time magazine: “I apologized and I asked could I retain the magazine and pay them compensatory value. I was told that I could retain it and they would not seek compensatory value unless the passenger requested its return.

“Our company is a security company and any removal of any item from an aircraft or surrounding area that we are responsible for shows a serious breach in what our company does and what we are employed for in the first place.”

On the seriousness of the incident, Ms Wilhite said United Airlines “are our highest source of revenue and most important customer and that is why I would be very worried if they got the opinion that we weren’t operating with integrity and that we weren’t monitoring security in a satisfactory manner in what is a very competitive environment”.

She told the tribunal: “Anything that is on the aircraft that does not belong to us cannot be removed from the aircraft, anything at all. It creates a very negative impression for our company should anyone assume that our staff are rooting through rubbish bags to see if there are items they can take them away with them. It is completely inappropriate.”

Ms. Wilhite said she considered lower sanctions but decided to sack Mr Marks. The hearing was adjourned until April.

Source:  http://www.irishexaminer.com

Socata TBM700, N602MA: Accident occurred January 19, 2016 at Jabara Airport (KAAO), Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA093 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 19, 2016 in Wichita, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/03/2016
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM700, registration: N602MA
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting an instrument flight rules business flight to an uncontrolled airport with forecast and reported moderate icing conditions. The pilot reported that he activated the deice systems and then executed an instrument landing system approach to the airport with the autopilot connected. While descending through about 1,200 ft above ground level, the pilot extended the landing gear and lowered the flaps to the takeoff setting and subsequently noticed the airplane shudder. Flight data from the airplane’s avionics display revealed that the pilot continued the approach, and while on short final, he retarded the throttle toward idle and then disconnected the autopilot. While approaching the runway threshold, the pilot allowed the airspeed to decrease below the Pilot’s Operating Handbook’s (POH) minimum-recommended approach speed for icing conditions. The airplane’s descent rate then increased, and the airplane banked left. The pilot subsequently applied full throttle, and the airplane impacted the ground 1,463 ft short of the runway threshold, skidded 460 ft, hit a hole, and nosed over. 

At the accident site, significant ice accumulation was noted on both of the wings and the stabilizer, including ice buildup aft of the deice boots. Weather data indicated that the flight encountered areas of freezing drizzle and supercooled liquid water. Given this evidence, the airplane likely encountered severe (rather than the forecast moderate) in-flight icing conditions during the approach that exceeded the airplane’s anti-ice systems’ capabilities and led to the pilot’s loss of airplane control. Given the icing conditions, the pilot should have maintained the POH’s minimum recommended approach speed for icing conditions.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain the minimum-recommended approach airspeed in icing conditions, which resulted in a loss of airplane control. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 19, 2016, about 1231 central standard time, a Socata TBM 700 airplane, N602MA, was substantially damaged after landing short at the Colonel James Jabara Airport (AAO), Wichita, Kansas. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Premier Furnace Specialists, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the flight, which departed on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan from the Schenck Field Airport (ICL), Clarinda, Iowa, about 1137. 

The pilot stated after his departure from ICL, he was in and out clouds at his cruising altitude of flight level 200. He was advised of icing conditions along the route of flight and activated the de-ice boots to automatic, turned on the propeller heat, and the heated windshield, each of which appeared to be operating normally. On his descent into AAO, the pilot observed ice accumulating on the leading edges of the wings, but the de-ice boots appeared to be operating to keep the leading edges of the wings clear.

The pilot flew an instrument landing system (ILS) approach to Runway 18 at AAO with the autopilot connected. After exiting IMC conditions on final about 1,200 ft agl, the pilot stated that he lowered flaps to the takeoff setting and extended the landing gear. Descending through about 1,000 ft agl, he noticed the airplane shudder, with an immediate increase in sink rate. The pilot stated he applied full engine power while on final, but the airplane continued to sink and subsequently touched down 1,463 ft short of the Runway 18 threshold. The airplane skidded 460 ft, during which the landing gear impacted a ground hog hole and the airplane nosed over, which damaged the firewall and wing spar. 

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) personnel responded to the accident site about 1500 and noted approximately 1/8 to 1/4 inch of ice on both wings. The ice accumulation was aft of the deice boot and continued aft to the trailing edge of each wing. The vertical stabilizer had similar amounts of ice buildup, which included ice accumulation aft of the stabilizer de-ice boot.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The AAO airport lists an elevation of 1,421 ft, with a single runway 18/36 at 6,101 ft long by 100 ft wide. The airport does not have an air traffic control tower. The airport had a federally installed and maintained Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS).

WEATHER INFORMATION

At 1239, the weather observation station at AAO reported the following conditions: wind 050 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 2 ½ miles in mist, broken clouds at 700 ft agl, overcast clouds at 1,100 ft agl, temperature minus 2 degrees C, dew point minus 3 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.13 inches of mercury.

At 1233, the weather observation station at Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport (ICT), Wichita, Kansas, located about 12 miles southwest of AAO, reported the following conditions: wind 020 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 2 miles in light drizzle and mist, overcast clouds at 800 ft agl, temperature minus 1 degrees C, dew point minus 3 degrees C, altimeter setting 30.13 inches of mercury.

The terminal aerodrome forecast (TAF) for ICT issued at 0854 and used by the pilot for preflight planning expected minimum visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions at the estimated time of arrival with wind 110 degrees at 12 knots, visibility unrestricted, and overcast clouds at 1,500 ft agl. Light freezing drizzle was forecast between 1300 and 1900.

At the time of the accident, the National Weather Service had an Airmen's Meteorological Advisory (AIRMET) covering the route for moderate icing conditions from the freezing level to 18,000 ft msl. The freezing level was identified from the surface to 7,000 ft msl across the region. A review of the forecast icing products from 4 hours prior to the accident also indicated a high probability of encountering icing conditions over the route and the Wichita, Kansas area, with moderate intensity, and with some potential of supercooled large drop (SLD) conditions over the region. 

During the period surrounding the accident there were 14 pilot reports of icing along the route ranging from a trace to moderate intensity, with light intensity the most frequent (10 reports). The type of ice varied from rime type ice (5 reports), clear (4 reports), and mixed type icing (3 reports). No severe icing events were reported in the system.

The official observations disseminated from the ASOS at AAO noted a rapid decrease in visibility between 1154 and 1239, with visibility decreasing from 8 miles down to 2 ½ miles in mist. The ASOS system did not detect any measureable precipitation during this period. 

Current ASOS systems utilize a Light Emitting Diode Weather Identifier (LEDWI) optical sensor to report precipitation falling through the sensor volume to determine rain or snow. The sensor is unable to detect very light precipitation at less than 0.01 inch per hour, which often occurs with mist or freezing drizzle. Currently, ASOS systems do not report freezing drizzle.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

On January 28, 2016, the FAA and aircraft manufacturer personnel performed an examination and operational test of the aircraft de-ice systems. The de-ice boots, pitot/stall vanes, and windshield de-ice systems all performed normally. No anomalies were noted with the de-ice systems. The flaps were observed to be near the 'takeoff' position. 

The airplane was equipped with a Garmin G1000 system. Downloaded flight data revealed the following information from the last 20 seconds of the flight:

1230:59 to 1231:11 – Airspeed decreased from 102 KIAS to 92 KIAS and engine torque decreased from 20% to 8%. 

1231:11 - Autopilot was disconnected.

1231:14 – Airspeed decreased to 89 KIAS, descent rate increased, and the airplane banked 10 degrees to the left.

1231:16 – Engine torque increased to 110% (all engine data showed a normal engine response for increased throttle input) and the airplane banked 24 degrees to the right.

1231:19 – Approximate time of ground impact.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The pilot operating handbook (POH) contains the following information and guidance for the aircraft, which was certified for flight into known icing conditions: 

When ice has accumulated on the unprotected surfaces of the airplane, aerodynamic characteristics may be changed. Particularly, stall speeds may increase by up to 15 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS) at 'Flaps-Takeoff' and up to 10 KIAS at 'Flaps-Landing'. For flight into known icing conditions, minimum recommended speed (for the airplane's weight at the time of the accident) is 110 KIAS at 'Flaps-Takeoff' and 90 KIAS at 'Flaps-Landing'.

Severe icing may result from environmental conditions outside of those for which the airplane if certificated. Flight in freezing rain, freezing drizzle, or mixed icing conditions (supercooled liquid water and ice crystals) may result in ice build-up on protected surfaces exceeding the capability of the ice protection system, or may result in ice forming aft of the protected surfaces. This ice may not be shed using the ice protection systems, and may seriously degrade the performance and controllability of the airplane. 

FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 91-47B, 'Pilot Guide: Flight in Icing Conditions,' contains the following guidance for approach and landing in icing conditions: 

Determine if freezing drizzle or freezing rain are being reported and avoid flying into these areas. A ground observation of any type of precipitation when temperatures are near freezing may indicate freezing precipitation aloft, so be vigilant for severe icing conditions.

In accordance with the POH, use a higher approach speed into the landing when carrying an accumulation of ice. Carry some power on flare and flare slightly faster than normal if carrying ice.

A Piper PA-46, operating northeast of Wichita during the timeframe of this accident, also encountered significant icing conditions and made an emergency off field landing. This PA-46 was also certified for flight into known icing conditions, but the pilot was unable to maintain altitude and encountered a stall buffet that required him to make a forced landing. The NTSB case number for this accident is GAA16CA107.

Premier Furnace Specialists, Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N602MA 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA093
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 19, 2016 in Wichita, KS
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM700, registration: N602MA
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 19, 2016, about 1238 central standard time, a Socata TBM 700 airplane, N602MA, was substantially damaged after landing short at the Colonel James Jabara Airport (AAO), Wichita, Kansas. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Premier Furnace Specialists, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the flight, which departed on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan from the Schenck Field Airport (ICL), Clarinda, Iowa about 1137.

The pilot stated that after departure from ICL, he was in and out clouds at his cruising altitude of flight level 200. He was advised of icing conditions along the route of flight and activated the de-ice boots on automatic, the propeller heat, and the heated windshield, each of which appeared to be operating normally. During the descent into AAO, the pilot observed ice accumulating on the leading edges of the wings, but the de-ice boots appeared to be operating to keep the leading edges of the wings clear.

The pilot flew an instrument landing system (ILS) approach to Runway 18 at AAO with the autopilot connected. After exiting IMC conditions on final about 1,200 feet agl, the pilot lowered flaps to the takeoff setting, extended the landing gear, and disconnected the autopilot. Descending though about 1,000 feet agl, he noticed the airplane shudder, with an immediate increase in sink rate. The pilot stated he applied full engine power while on final, but the airplane continued to descend and subsequently touched down 1,463 feet short of the Runway 18 threshold. The airplane skidded 460 feet, during which the landing gear impacted a ground hog hole and the airplane nosed over, which damaged the firewall and wing spar.

At 1239, the weather observation station at AAO reported the following conditions: wind 050 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 2 ½ miles in mist, broken clouds at 700 feet agl, overcast clouds at 1,100 feet agl, temperature minus 2 degrees C, dew point minus 3 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.13 inches of mercury.

At 1233, the weather observation station at ICT, located about 12 miles southwest of AAO, reported the following conditions: wind 020 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 2 miles in light drizzle and mist, overcast clouds at 800 feet agl, temperature minus 1 degrees C, dew point minus 3 degrees C, altimeter setting 30.13 inches of mercury.

The terminal aerodrome forecast (TAF) for ICT issued at 0854 and used for preflight planning expected minimum visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions at the estimated time of arrival with wind 110 degrees at 12 knots, visibility unrestricted, and overcast clouds at 1,500 feet agl. Light freezing drizzle was forecast between 1300 and 1900.

At the time of the accident, the National Weather Service had an Airmen's Meteorological Advisory (AIRMET) covering the route for moderate icing conditions from the freezing level to 18,000 feet msl.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64




Wichita, KAN. - Update - 2:55 pm: Emergency officials say one person suffered minor injuries in the crash. That person did not want to go to the hospital for treatment. 
The plane was coming from Iowa.

Authorities aren't sure if weather played a role in the accident.

The plane leaked approximately 140 gallons of fuel.  Fire crews and environmental officials were called to help with the cleanup.

One person has minor injuries in a plane crash at Jabara Airport.

It was reported around 12:45 Tuesday afternoon. Dispatch tells us they think the plane is off the runway but aren't sure.

Wichita Fire Dept. says crews are trying to control a fuel leak.

The plane is registered to a Premiere Furnace Specialists in Farmington Hills, MI according to Flightaware.com. An employee of the company tells us the company's owner and another man were on board. She says the two were on a business trip.

The plane is a TBM 700. The tail number is N602MA according to Flightaware.com.

Flighaware.com reports it was flying to Jabara Airport from Clarinda, Iowa.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.kwch.com



WICHITA, Kansas – A small plane carrying two people onboard crashed at Wichita’s Jabara airport, but no one was seriously hurt. 

A witness said the plane, a Socata TBM-700, appeared to have engine trouble and landed short of the runway.

Wichita Fire Department’s battalion chief, Stuart Bevis, said the plane came down at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday on the north end of the airport runway. He says one person was treated for minor injuries at the scene, but refused transport to the hospital.

Officials say about 140 gallons of fuel leaked from one of the wings.

Flightaware.com shows that the plane is registered to Premiere Furnace Specialists of Farmington Hills, MI as of January 15, 2016.  The plane was coming to Wichita from Ohio.

The FAA says it is investigating the incident.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://ksn.com





Piper PA-42 Cheyenne III, N113WC: Incident occurred January 15, 2016 in Stockton, San Joaquin County, California

Date: 15-JAN-16
Time: 04:31:00Z
Regis#: N113WC
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA42
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27
City: STOCKTON
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY, STOCKTON, CA

SYNERGY LEASING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N113WC

Aviation groups plead for private air traffic control plan to be grounded

General aviation groups are pleading for Congress to ground a proposal to privatize privatize large portions of the nation's air traffic control system in a funding measure for the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Lawmakers are already expected to debate a proposal from House Republicans to create a new nongovernmental agency that would take over air traffic control from the FAA as Congress tries to beat a March 31 deadline for renewing the agency's funding.

A group of 15 aviation organizations who represent non-commercial flight operators in Washington said in letter to members of the House Transportation Committee on Tuesday that lawmakers should not rush to embrace the air traffic control privatization proposals, despite claims from backers about the success of similar systems in Canada and several European nations. 

"The general aviation community has very real and long-standing concerns about foreign air traffic control models, which go well beyond the user fee issue," the groups wrote. "These concerns are based on our operating experiences in foreign systems, as well as thoughtful analysis about what those systems might look like in the United States." 

The FAA's funding bill is one of the few pieces of must-pass legislation that is left on Congress' agenda after a busy 2015 that saw lawmakers pass a large spending bill for most government agencies and a multi-year highway funding package. 

GOP leaders in the House have said the proposed nongovernmental entity could better manage the commercial and private jet flights in the nation's airspace. 

"After examining various models, I believe we need to establish a federally chartered, fully independent not-for-profit corporation to operate and modernize our ATC [air traffic control] services," House Transportation Committee Chairman Rep. Bill Shuster (R-Pa. said during a speech last June at the Aero Club of Washington

Read more here:  http://thehill.com

Mooney M20, N5214B: Incident occurred January 16, 2016 in Auburn, Placer County, California

Date: 16-JAN-16
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N5214B
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25
City: AUBURN
State: California

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, AUBURN, CA

http://registry.faa.gov/N5214B

Cessna 560XLS+ Citation Excel , PR-AFA: Fatal accident occurred August 13, 2014 near Guaruj√° Airport, Brazil

Pilots blamed for crash that killed Brazil presidential hopeful

The airplane crash that killed Brazilian presidential hopeful Eduardo Campos in the midst of the 2014 electoral campaign was due to pilot and copilot errors plus extreme weather conditions, according to an official report released Tuesday.

The chief investigator, air force Lt. Col. Raul de Souza, said the aircraft was flying at a "very aggressive speed" and the pilot did a maneuver of a kind "not recommended" to avoid landing at the airport in Santos during a heavy rainstorm, which led to the crash in which all seven people aboard were killed.

The plane crashed into a building on Aug. 13, 2014, near the airport at Santos, where Campos, then third in the polls, was to take part in a campaign event.

If the pilots had followed the instructions of the navigation map, "they could have landed safely" despite the heavy rain and high winds in Santos, De Souza said.

The report suggests that pilot Marcos Martins could have been tired because of the long hours he worked in the weeks before the accident.

During the Aug. 1-5 period, the pilot and copilot violated the aviation statute by flying longer hours than allowed, though in the week before the accident they had no irregularities in their flights.

The investigators consulted a specialist who analyzed the cockpit recording and concluded that the pilot's voice was "compatible" with a situation of "fatigue and drowsiness," though that theory has not been proved.

Campos's death upset the 2014 electoral campaign, in which President Dilma Rousseff was reelected for a second term.

Source:  http://latino.foxnews.com