Tuesday, November 01, 2016

System / Component Malfunction / Failure (Non-Power): Bell OH-58C, N139RD, accident occurred November 01, 2016 in Cameron, Moore County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N139RD

Location: Cameron, NC
Accident Number: ERA17LA032
Date & Time: 11/01/2016, 1130 EDT
Registration: N139RD
Aircraft: BELL OH 58C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On November 1, 2016, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Bell OH-58C, N139RD, operated by Helicopter Applicators Inc., was substantially damaged following a main rotor blade fracture during the initial climb after takeoff in Cameron, North Carolina. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local aerial application flight. The helicopter was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137.

According to the pilot, he flew earlier in the day at a different field, spraying an herbicide and made approximately 12 landings on a truck to refill the herbicide spray. He subsequently flew to a different field and sprayed one load of herbicide, landed and waited for the loading crew to arrive at the new field. Once the loading crew arrived and loaded the helicopter with 80 gallons (720 pounds) of herbicide, he took off and climbed to about 50 ft. The helicopter traveled about 200 yards away from the staging area, when he heard a loud bang and the helicopter fell to the ground.

According to a witness, shortly after the helicopter took off, the tailboom appeared to have moved to the left and then straight up and into the main rotor blades. The helicopter then fell straight down to the ground and he ran over to help the pilot out of the helicopter.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that helicopter came to rest on its left side. The damage to the tailboom was consistent with the main rotor blades striking the tailboom about 10 ft from the main fuselage. The outboard portion of one main rotor blade was found about 1,000 ft from where the helicopter came to rest.

Further examination of the helicopter by an NTSB investigator, revealed that the "white" main rotor blade, part No. 206-011-250-3, serial No. TLK-9054 had two fractures. One fracture was inboard, near the root end, and one fracture was outboard, about 28 inches from the tip end. The inboard fracture was consistent with overload, and the outboard fracture displayed areas with curving arrest lines that were consistent with fatigue. The "red" main rotor blade, part No. 206-011-250-113, serial No. A-FS9, was generally intact. The transmission separated and the main rotor mast was bent. The right transmission mount remained attached to the transmission and the left transmission mount remained attached to the airframe; consistent with transmission separation prior to ground impact.

The fractured outboard portions of the "white" main rotor blade were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC for examination, which revealed fatigue features emanating from multiple origins in the area of the inertia weight attachment hole. The total length of the fatigue region measured at the lower surface of the blade was 1.4 inches from the leading edge of the inertia weight attachment hole to the leading boundary, and 3 inches from the trailing edge of the hole to the trailing boundary.

Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., published Military Alert Bulletin (MAB) USA-OH-58-87-1, revision B, originally dated August 12, 1987, and revised April 12, 2007. The purpose of the revised MAB was to notify military operators of model OH-58A, B, C and 206B-1 model helicopters with part numbers 206-011-250-003/113 main rotor blades to conduct initial visual inspections of the blades before returning them to service and subsequently inspect them at intervals of 8 hours or 32 flights, whichever occurred first. The inspection, to be performed with a 10x power scope was focused on the area of the inertia weight screw heads. Paint was to be removed prior to the first inspection, and a clear-coat finish was to be applied to facilitate subsequent inspections. On April 12, 2007, Bell also issued Operations Safety Notice (OSN) OSN-GEN-07-38, Revision A, to all OH-58 operators referencing the aforementioned MAB and providing a notification of changes incorporated in the revised MAB. Both the MAB and OSN noted that the inspection requirement did not apply to main rotor blades manufactured by Bell Helicopter identified with serial Nos. A-1 and subsequent.

The NTSB Materials Laboratory examination also revealed that the black paint on the lower leading edge of the main rotor blade had a tapered edge consistent with erosion wear. No evidence of a clear-coat finish was observed on the surface of the inertia weight attachment hole, as required by the MAB and OSN.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the accident helicopter, serial No. 71-20396 was manufactured in 1971. It was originally owned and operated by the U.S. Army, and issued an FAA special airworthiness certificate in the restricted category for the purpose of agriculture and pest control on May 4, 1999. According to the FAA type certificate database, the accident helicopter serial No. and registration No. were listed in the approved serial number list under type certificate data sheet No. R00006DE. The original holder of this type certificate was Garlick Helicopters, Inc., and the type certificate was transferred to Rotorcraft Development Corporation on February 2, 2009.

Review of the maintenance records revealed that the helicopter's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on September 29, 2016. At that time, the helicopter's total airframe time was noted as 12,604.5 hours. The engine total time was noted as 2,690.3 hours since new. The helicopter had been operated about 52 hours since the inspection. The operator indicated that they were unaware of the MAB and immediately initiated a campaign to implement and inspect the rest of their OH-58 helicopter fleet.

Garlick Helicopters, Inc. preventive maintenance services inspection program, publication No. GHI-OH58-PMS, contained recurrent inspection requirements for Garlick Model OH-58A, OH-58A+, and OH-58C helicopters. The daily inspection criteria included an inspection of the main rotor blade for nicks, scratches, dents, security, and delamination of the bonded areas. Additionally, the blade finish was to be inspected for bare spots, blistered paint, and evidence of corrosion. A 25-hour inspection required inspection of the main rotor blades' protective coating, and to clean and wax the blades as required. No inspections of the main rotor blade tip area, specifically of the area of the inertia weight, was found in GHI-OH58-PMS. Rotorcraft Development Corporation stated that in a search of documents pertaining to OH-58 helicopters, they did not have the aforementioned MAB and OSN.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/09/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/24/2016
Flight Time:   3731 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2888 hours (Total, this make and model), 3639 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 323.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 76 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELL
Registration: N139RD
Model/Series: OH 58C NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 71-20396
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/29/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 52 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 12604.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: T63A720
Registered Owner: HELICOPTER APPLICATORS INC
Rated Power: 420 hp
Operator: HELICOPTER APPLICATORS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137); Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SOP, 461 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1156 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 214°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 70°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.36 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Cameron, NC
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Cameron, NC
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1130 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 35.350833, -79.295833

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA032
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 01, 2016 in Cameron, NC
Aircraft: BELL OH 58C, registration: N139RD
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 1, 2016, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Bell OH-58C, N139RD, operated by Helicopter Applicators Inc., was substantially damaged following a tailboom separation during the initial climb after takeoff in Cameron, North Carolina. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned local aerial application flight. The helicopter was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. 

According to the pilot, he stated he flew earlier in the day at a different field, spraying a herbicide and made approximately 12 landings on a truck to refill the herbicide spray. He subsequently flew to a different field and sprayed one load of herbicide, landed and waited for the loading crew to arrive at the new field. Once the loading crew arrived and loaded the helicopter with 80 gallons (720 pounds) of herbicide, he took off and climbed to about 50 feet. Approximately 200 yards away, he heard a loud bang and the helicopter fell to the ground. 

According to a witness, the tailboom moved to the left and then went straight-up into the main rotor system. He further stated that the helicopter then fell straight down to the ground and he ran over to help the pilot out of the helicopter. He added that it looked like the tailboom became loose at the main frame attachment points. 

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the tailboom separated and made contact with the main rotor blades. 

The helicopter was retained for further investigation.













CAMERON, N.C. (WNCN) — A helicopter crashed Tuesday in Moore County, injuring the pilot.

The chopper was an agricultural helicopter that was spraying the area. Helicopters of that type actually land on service trucks to load fuel and chemicals, said Frank Staples of Cypress Pointe Fire.

“I was told that it had just taken on a load of chemical and circled off the truck and apparently had a mechanical malfunction and crashed about three hundred feet from the road in a field that was a cutover with broken limbs and pieces of trees,” he said.

The craft was about 30 feet in the air when the problem happened, the pilot said.

“Crash, bang, boom, the thing just came apart,” said Andrew Stephen, the pilot. “They’re looking it right now, trying to figure out what happened, but I don’t know, I can’t say what happened to it right now.”

He said it was a marvel he was able to walk away from the crash.

“I got lucky, plain and simple,” he said.

The pilot suffered only a few bruises and is doing fine. He was the only person on board the helicopter, a 1971 Bell OH-58C the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The helicopter is registered to Helicopter Applicators Inc. of Gettysburg, Pa.

Story and video:  http://wncn.com

Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six, personal flight operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N3941X: Accident occurred October 31, 2016 near Bartow Municipal Airport (KBOW), Polk County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3941X

Location: Bartow, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA034
Date & Time: 10/31/2016, 1502 EDT
Registration: N3941X
Aircraft: PIPER PA32
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 31, 2016, at 1502 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Piper PA-32-300, N3941X, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Bartow, Florida. The pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated at Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida, and was destined for Bartow Municipal Airport (BOW), Bartow, Florida.

According to the pilot, after entering a left downwind leg for the runway 05 traffic pattern at BOW, he reduced engine power and the airplane began to vibrate and shake. The engine then lost all power, while the propeller continued to windmill. He attempted to restart the engine using the emergency checklist procedures but was unsuccessful. He determined he would not be able to reach the runway and maneuvered toward a nearby pasture for an emergency landing. During the landing rollout, the airplane struck a fence damaging the left wheel hydraulic brake line which caused a loss of brake pressure. When he applied the brakes, he lost directional control and the nose landing gear collapsed.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the firewall was damaged, and the fuselage skin aft of the firewall was wrinkled. An unmeasured amount of fuel was present in all four fuel tanks, and fuel was present at the fuel injector nozzles. Oil was present in the crankcase, and cylinder compression was attained on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. While rotating the engine, a grinding/crunching noise occurred once, but was not repeatable. The magnetos made noise consistent with rotation but were not tested for spark. The engine oil filter contained some particles.

According to the FAA inspector, the engine had accrued about 2,060 total hours since overhaul, and the airplane had flown about 25 hours since the most recent annual inspection.

The engine was examined again by a National Transportation Safety Board Investigator. After removal of the lower engine cowling, and removal of the top spark plugs, the engine's crankshaft was manually rotated. The crankshaft rotated without any signs of grinding. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. The oil "finger" screen was removed, it was clean and clear of debris. The No. 4 cylinder was removed to gain access to the case and view the crankshaft, camshaft and internal components. The push rods were clean, and no carbon or metal was present. There was no rust present in the cylinder, no scoring from rings or any signs of rubbing. The valves were seated and no traces of overtemperature. The pushrods and rockers were clean, lubricated, and no metal was observed. The piston and rings were clean and exhibited no marks. The connecting rod was clean, moved freely and was lubricated. The camshaft, crankshaft and internal components that could be seen from this opening were clean, with no corrosion and no metal particles visible.

The oil filter was cut open during the previous examination and the filter case contained carbon deposits at the bottom of the filter case. Both magnetos were removed, manually rotated and produced spark from all leads. The fuel servo was removed and inspected for debris, the servo was clean and the finger filter was clear of debris. The air and fuel diaphragms were in intact with no tears or marks. The fuel filter in the mid center section of the airplane was removed for examination. It was also clean, absent of debris, and contained aviation gasoline. All fuel injectors were removed and inspected. They were all clean and absent of debris. The flow divider "spider" was opened for examination, it was clean and clear of debris and the diaphragm was intact. The air filter was removed and was also found clean and clear of debris. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/05/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/14/2016
Flight Time:  2411 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1770 hours (Total, this make and model), 2284 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 13 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N3941X
Model/Series: PA32 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 32-7640001
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/20/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 25 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3968 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-K1A5D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBOW, 125 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1448 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 3°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 60°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ORLANDO, FL (SFB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Bartow, FL (BOW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1430 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: BARTOW MUNI (BOW)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 124 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None

Latitude, Longitude: 27.964722, -81.786944 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 31, 2016 in Bartow, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA32, registration: N3941X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 31, 2016, at 1502 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Piper PA-32-300, N3941X, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Bartow, Florida. The pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated at Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida, and was destined for Bartow Municipal Airport (BOW), Bartow, Florida.

According to the pilot, after entering a left downwind leg for the runway 05 traffic pattern at BOW, he reduced engine power and the airplane began to vibrate and shake. The engine then lost all power, while the propeller continued to windmill. He attempted to restart the engine using the emergency checklist procedures, but was unsuccessful. He determined he would not be able to reach the runway, and maneuvered toward a nearby pasture for an emergency landing. During the landing rollout, the airplane struck a fence damaging the left wheel hydraulic brake line which caused a loss of brake pressure. When he applied the brakes, he lost directional control and the nose landing gear collapsed.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the firewall was damaged, and the fuselage skin aft of the firewall was wrinkled. An unmeasured amount of fuel was present in all four fuel tanks, and fuel was present at the fuel injector nozzles. Oil was present in the crankcase, and cylinder compression was attained on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. While rotating the engine, a grinding/crunching noise occurred once, but was not repeatable. The magnetos made noise consistent with rotation, but were not tested for spark. The engine oil filter contained metallic particles and when tested with a magnet, the metal particles were attracted to it.

According to the FAA inspector, the engine had accrued about 2,060 total hours since overhaul, and the airplane had flown about 25 hours since the most recent annual inspection.

The engine was retained for further examination.












































AIRCRAFT:   1975 Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six N3941X, s/n 32-7640001.   Current AFTT is 3,965 and Tach Time is 0055.4. 
                                
The last Annual Inspection was performed 07/20/16 at AFTT 3943 and Tach Time 30. 

ENGINE: Lycoming IO-540-K1A5, s/n L-13405-48A, Total Time Since New 3,965 and approximately 2060 TSMOH

The last Annual Inspection was performed 07/20/2016 at Engine Total Time 3,943 and TSMOH 2038.

PROPELLER:  Hartzell HC-C2YR-1BF/F8475D-Y, with TTSN 3,943 and TSMOH 897 at the last Annual Inspection on 07/20/2016 at Tach 30.

EQUIPMENT:  Equipment list - condition unknown
                                
Trimble 2000 Approach IFR GPS
Century 2000 Autopilot System with Altitude Preselect and Slaved HSI.
WX 10 Stormscope.
Electric Standby Vacuum Pump.
EDM JPI Engine Data Monitor.
PM 1000 II 6 place Intercom.
Narco MK 12D TSO Nav/Com.
Narco MK 12+ TSO Nav/Com.
Narco CP 125 TSO Audio Panel.
Narco DME 890.
King KT 76A Transponder.
FN 200 Avionics Cooling Fan.
Davtron M800 Chronometer Clock.
Sony 10CD FM/AM Cassette Stereo.
Aero Trim Aileron Trim.
External Antenna Jack for Hand Held Radio.
Miniflow Fuel Totalizer.
Kni 520 VOR/LOC Indicator with Glidescope Receiver For #2 Nav.
Knots 2U Speed Mod Kit.
Center and 3rd Seat Shoulder Harnesses.
           
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Emergency landing in a field after engine issues on 10/31/16.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:   See attached photos. Damage includes but may not be limited to the following: 
Prop blades bent
Engine experienced prop strike and was partially disassembled by the NTSB. Reason for original power loss unknown
Nose gear assembly broken and folded back
Engine Mount
Exhaust
Cowling
Fuselage buckled
Damage to both wings

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  In a hangar at Bartow Municipal Airport, Florida.

Read more here: http://www.avclaims.com/N3941X.html

Piper J3C-65 Cub, N70614: Incident occurred October 31, 2016 in Comer, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/N70614

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN THE TREES, NEAR COMER, GEORGIA.  

Date: 31-OCT-16
Time: 13:53:00Z
Regis#: N70614
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: J3C
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: COMER
State: Georgia

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating an incident in which a plane ended up in a tree after an engine cut off in midair this week.

According to an incident report, student pilot Taylor Jenkins crashed into trees Monday in Oglethorpe County after his plane’s engine cut off not long after he’d taken off from a private runway on his property.

The plane crashed about 60 feet in the air, according to the report, but Jenkins managed to get out of the plane and climb 30 feet down before authorities came to save him. He was not injured in the accident.

Jenkins said he tried to glide the plane down safely, but was unsuccessful.

The plane, which belonged to another pilot, was not up to date on its registration or annual maintenance.


Source:   http://www.ajc.com





A small, single engine plane crashed into the top of a tree Monday morning in Oglethorpe County.

“It’s in the top of a tree. I don’t know how he got out of it,” Oglethorpe County Sheriff Mike Smith said.

The pilot, whose name was unavailable, was unharmed in the crash, Smith said.

The crash occurred off Watson Mill Road in an area several miles west of Watson Mill State Park.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and an investigator is expected at the site, Smith said.

Smith said he did know yet why the plane went into the tree.

Source:   http://onlineathens.com

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, Cochran Air Service Inc., N7810P: Incident occurred October 28, 2016 in Cochran, Bleckley County, Georgia

COCHRAN AIR SERVICE INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7810P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLL, GEAR COLLAPSED, COCHRAN, GEORGIA 

Date: 28-OCT-16
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N7810P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: COCHRAN
State: Georgia

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-800, N8694E: Incident occurred October 31, 2016 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO: http://registry.faa.gov/N8694E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES FLIGHT SWA1932 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ENCOUNTERED TURBULENCE, 2 FLIGHT ATTENDANTS SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, AIRCRAFT LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 

Date: 31-OCT-16
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: SWA1932
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: SWA-Southwest Airlines
Flight Number: SWA1932
City: LAS VEGAS
State: Nevada

Cessna A185E, N7711L: Accident occurred May 04, 2019 at Porter County Regional Airport (KVPZ), Valparaiso, Indiana -and- Accident occurred October 25, 2016 at Winnemucca Municipal Airport (KWMC), Humboldt County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage 

https://registry.faa.gov/N7711L

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA244
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 04, 2019 in VALPARAISO, IN
Aircraft: Cessna A185, registration: N7711L

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Veered off runway.

Date: 04-MAY-19
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N7711L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: A185E
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: VALPARAISO
State: INDIANA

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N7711L

Location: Winnemucca, NV
Accident Number: GAA17CA054
Date & Time: 10/25/2016, 0900PDT
Registration: N7711L
Aircraft: CESSNA A185
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll, the airplane veered to the right and he applied left rudder to stop the veer. Subsequently, the airplane continued to the right, ground looped, and the left wing impacted the runway.

The left aileron sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 83, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/29/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2248 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2100 hours (Total, this make and model), 2248 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N7711L
Model/Series: A185 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 185-1521
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/06/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3485 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KWMC, 4307 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1556 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: WINNEMUCCA, NV (WMC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: WINNEMUCCA, NV (WMC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0830 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: WINNEMUCCA MUNI (WMC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4307 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 02
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4800 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.896667, -117.805833 (est)

Landing Gear Collapse: Cessna TR182, N4657S; accident occurred October 31, 2016 at Watertown International Airport (KART), Jefferson County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:   


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N4657S


Location: Watertown, NY
Accident Number: ERA17LA033
Date & Time: 10/31/2016, 1620 EDT
Registration: N4657S
Aircraft: CESSNA TR182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 31, 2016, about 1620 eastern daylight time, a Cessna TR182, N4657S, was substantially damaged when the main landing gear collapsed while landing at Watertown International Airport (ART), Watertown, New York. The commercial pilot was not injured. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight that originated at Massena International Airport (MSS), Massena, New York. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported that, before landing, he observed a green light indicating that the landing gear were down. During landing, the right main landing gear collapsed, followed by the left main landing gear. The airplane veered off the left side of runway 28, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage, elevator, and right horizontal stabilizer.

A review of the maintenance records revealed that both down lock switches on the main landing gear were replaced approximately 29 hours, about 5 months, before the accident. The aircraft was placed on jacks and the landing gear were tested, all checks were normal.

During a postaccident examination, the airplane was placed on jacks to facilitate inspection of the landing gear system. The landing gear was cycled normally several times, the emergency extension was also checked, and all operations were satisfactory. The landing gear warning horn was found to be inoperative due to a failure of the cabin speaker.

The circuit breaker for the electrically-driven hydraulic power pack was found popped after the accident. Further investigation revealed the landing gear solenoid would intermittently stick closed and the power pack motor would continue to run without shutting off, tripping the circuit breaker. Replacement of the solenoid corrected the problem.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-540 series, 235-horsepower engine. The airplane had been operated for about 61 hours since its most recent annual inspection, which was performed on November 17, 2015.

The pilot reported 2,490 hours of total flight experience, of which 63 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.
The weather conditions at ART reported at 1556, included wind variable at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition, broken at 3,500 ft; temperature, 6° C; dew point, -2° C; and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.26 inHg. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/28/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/15/2015
Flight Time:  2490.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 63.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 2188 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 27.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N4657S
Model/Series: TR182 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: R18201369
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/17/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1892.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KART, 333 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1556 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 273°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: MASSENA, NY (MSS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Watertown, NY (ART)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1515 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: WATERTOWN INTL (ART)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 327 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5999 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.991944, -76.020556 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA033
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 31, 2016 in Watertown, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA TR182, registration: N4657S
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 31, 2016, about 1620 eastern daylight time, a Cessna TR182, N4657S, was substantially damaged when the main landing gear collapsed while landing at Watertown International Airport (ART), Watertown, New York. The commercial pilot was not injured. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight that originated at Massena International Airport (MSS) Massena, New York. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector that before landing he observed a green light indicating that the landing gear were down. During landing, the right main landing gear collapsed, followed by the left main landing gear. The airplane veered off the left side of runway 28, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage, elevator, and right horizontal stabilizer.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.