Saturday, October 15, 2016

Zenith CH-701, N3701M: Accident occurred October 15, 2016 in Albrightsville, Penn Forest Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania
Jabiru USA; Shelbyville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N3701M

Location: Albrightsville, PA
Accident Number: ERA17LA016
Date & Time: 10/15/2016, 1540 EDT
Registration: N3701M
Aircraft: HATCHER RODERICK R CH701
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 15, 2016, about 1540 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zenith CH701, N3701M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Albrightsville, Pennsylvania. The private pilot sustained serious injuries and one passenger had minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Benton Airport (PA40), Benton, Pennsylvania about 1455, and was destined for Pegasus Air Park (50PA), Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

The pilot reported that he was about 8 minutes from landing and preparing to descend from 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl) to 1,400 feet msl. The airplane made a "slight lurch" and the engine rpm dropped, followed by a complete loss of power. He placed the carburetor heat to the high setting and established best glide airspeed of 50 to 55 mph. The fuel selector valve was checked, and an engine restart was attempted. The engine initially started; however, it would not develop power and shut down after a few seconds. A second restart was attempted with the same results. A third restart was attempted, and the engine would turn over but not start. The pilot slowed the airplane as much as possible and prepared for a forced landing into trees. The airplane settled into the trees and came to a stop on its left side. The pilot and passenger exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage was confirmed. An examination of the engine and fuel system did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction, fuel blockage, or fuel contamination.

The pilot reported that the airplane's fuel tanks were topped off earlier that day with about 20 gallons of fuel, and there were about 15 gallons on board the airplane when the accident flight began.

The airplane was equipped with a Dynon FlightDEK D-180 electronic flight information system (EFIS) and a Garmin GPSMap196, both of which captured the accident flight. According to recovered data, the flight began at 1454 and terminated at 1539. A review of the Dynon engine monitor data showed that engine parameters were normal and stabilized until a decrease in rpm, oil pressure, cylinder head temperature, oil temperature, and exhaust gas temperature simultaneously occurred about 1535:30. The EFIS also confirmed there was fuel in both wing tanks when the loss of engine power occurred.

The airplane was a high wing, tricycle landing gear, short takeoff and landing (STOL) design. It was equipped with a Jabiru 3300A engine and a Sensenich fixed pitch propeller. The total aircraft time at the time of the accident was about 60 hours. The engine was sent to the Jabiru USA facility at Shelbyville, Tennessee for further examination and a test run.

There was some impact damage to the engine. The engine mounts were bent and the propeller flange had a very slight deformation. The carburetor was filled with oil due to the engine being shipped inverted. The carburetor was removed and the oil was cleaned out. There was no water and no contaminants inside the carburetor other than the engine oil. The carburetor was then reinstalled. The No. 3 cylinder rocker cover was dented from impact and was replaced with a spare for the run. Dried blue residue with the appearance of fuel staining was observed on the outside of the carburetor bowl; however, the carburetor did not leak.

The engine started on the first attempt after engaging the starter for about 2 seconds. The engine initially emitted oily smoke (a light blue/gray color) which cleared after about 8 seconds of operation. The engine was run for about 6 minutes and 30 seconds with no anomalies noted. The engine was run to a peak rpm of 2,670 and oil temperature and pressure were within the green bands. The run was subsequently terminated by the investigation team.

Pocono Mountains Municipal Airport (MPO) was located about 12 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1553, about 14 minutes after the accident, the temperature and dew point were 57° and 36° F, respectively. According to the carburetor icing probability chart in FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, dated June 30, 2009, the temperature/dew point conditions were conducive to serious icing at glide power.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/25/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/04/2015
Flight Time:  530 hours (Total, all aircraft), 56 hours (Total, this make and model), 403 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HATCHER RODERICK R
Registration: N3701M
Model/Series: CH701 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 7038
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/18/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 65 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 65 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: JABIRU
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 3300
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 120 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MPO, 1915 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 30°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.34 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Benton, PA (PA40)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Stroudsburg, PA (50PA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1454 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.975000, -75.536667 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA016
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 15, 2016 in Albrightsville, PA
Aircraft: HATCHER RODERICK R CH701, registration: N3701M
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 15, 2016, at 1535 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zenith CH701, N3701M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Albrightsville, Pennsylvania. The private pilot sustained serious injuries and one passenger had minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Benton Airport (PA40), Benton, Pennsylvania about 1450 and was destined for Pegasus Air Park (50PA), Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

The pilot reported that he was about 8 minutes from landing and preparing to descend from 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl) to 1,400 feet msl. The airplane made a "slight lurch" and the engine rpm dropped, followed by a complete loss of power. He placed the carburetor heat to the high setting and established best glide airspeed of 50 to 55 mph. The fuel selector valve was checked and an engine restart was attempted. The engine initially started; however, it would not develop power and shut down after a few seconds. A second restart was attempted with the same results. A third restart was attempted and the engine would turn over but not start. He slowed the airplane as much as possible and prepared for a forced landing into trees. The airplane settled into the trees and came to a stop on its left side. The pilot and his passenger exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage was confirmed. A cursory examination of the engine and fuel system did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction. 

The airplane was a high wing, tricycle landing gear, short takeoff and landing (STOL) design. It was fitted with a Jabiru 3300A engine and a Sensenich fixed pitch propeller. The total aircraft time at the time of the accident was about 60 hours.

The engine was retained for further examination.



PENN FOREST TOWNSHIP — Two people were taken to the hospital after a small plane crashed in Carbon County.

State police said the plane went down behind a home along Pawnee Trail in Penn Forest Township near Albrightsville around 3:15 p.m.  Saturday.

The pilot and a passenger were taken to the hospital. There is no word on the extent of their injuries.

Troopers said the plane was headed to Saylorsburg when the pilot said there were engine troubles.

NTSB and FAA investigators will investigate what led to the crash.

Source:  http://wnep.com

Captain Doron: Direct crosswind landing in Luscombe

Video by Captain Doron
Published on October 15, 2016

Cirrus SR22, N176CF: Iowa State University may have no use for plane if Leath can't fly it




Iowa State University officials continue to answer "no" when asked whether the university purchased a used single-engine plane in 2014 just so the university president could fly it.

The latest "no" came in a FAQ that ISU officials released Wednesday along with many other documents related to the operation of ISU Flight Service and ISU President Steven Leath's use of the university's Cirrus SR22.

"The Cirrus was purchased to replace an existing older aircraft," the FAQ states. "The Cirrus was primarily purchased because it was safer, faster and more efficient than the small aircraft previously owned by the university."

Yet Leath, who has a pilot's license, told the ISU Student Government Senate earlier this month that, if he doesn't fly the Cirrus himself, the plane might not get enough use in the future to make it cost effective for the university to keep it.

He also told the student government that he has more training on Cirrus planes than the university's other three professional pilots combined.

The university president pledged to stop piloting state-owned aircraft after university officials confirmed last month he had damaged the Cirrus last year during a hard landing in Bloomington, Ill. The original estimate for the repairs was $12,591.70, but the actual cost was at $14,050.26, according to documents ISU released Wednesday.

The incident has raised questions about Leath's use of the Cirrus during at least four times in which mixed personal and professional business. Leath said he repaid the costs of the flight for each trip in question.

The incident also has raised questions about Leath's passenger use of the university's larger plane, a Beechcraft King Air.

Officials with the Iowa Board of Regents, which oversees Iowa's three public universities, have said no regent or university policies were violated by Leath's use of university aircraft. But the board's internal audit staff is conducting a review to ensure that university policies on travel and equipment comply with state law.

Both planes were purchased in 2014 to replace older aircraft used by ISU Flight Service. Since the purchase, Leath received additional training to be licensed to fly the smaller plane. The university's insurance policy required that some of that training be done on plane that will be flown.

"We'll still use the Cirrus for short inexpensive flights even if the King Air is available," Leath told reporters Oct. 5, "but if I’m not flying it, it may not get enough use to justify it."

The university released a flight log Wednesday for both the Cirrus and King Air planes. The information for the Cirrus, however, did not include who was piloting each flight.

Because the King Air requires two pilots to fly, there might not be another pilot available at the times Leath needs the Cirrus for a flight for university business.

"We’ll have to see how much total demand it gets," he said.

Being able to fly the smaller plane on his own, Leath said, allowed him to work more effectively on regents business. It also allowed him to meet more frequently with prospective donors to the university.

"Sometimes I would cut it close for a regents meeting in Council Bluffs because I could work almost right to the meeting, jump in the Cirrus, fly right to Council Bluffs and be in the meeting — as opposed to spending hours in the car," Leath said.

Source:   http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Aviation Officials Step Up Cybersecurity Checks of Older Messaging System: Concerns that decades-old data-transmission network is vulnerable to hacking fuel movement to modernize



The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
Oct. 15, 2016 2:36 p.m. ET


U.S. and European aviation authorities are focused on cybersecurity threats that could affect a basic data-transmission system widely used by airlines around the world.

Such concerns about the decades-old system, called Acars and primarily used for air-traffic purposes and to provide information about the status of various aircraft components during flights, have surfaced in the past few months on both sides of the Atlantic. The issue has been raised in U.S. government contracting documents, as well as in comments by industry officials and high-level European safety regulators.

The information sent by the Acars network from planes to the ground isn’t considered safety critical, nor does the system handle any data that could immediately imperil safe operation of flights. No specific hacking attempts or intrusions have been detected, government and industry officials said.

But as the industry moves to revise 1980s-vintage transmission protocols and methods, including use of new frequencies and expanded messaging formats, experts have expressed heightened worries about the vulnerabilities of Acars to hackers or other types of outside intrusions. Because of its age, the system lacks some of the safeguards embedded in newer onboard messaging networks.

Disruptions of Acars could result in major problems for airline scheduling, maintenance or other operational functions, experts interviewed over the past few months said. Acars stands for Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System, originally designed to send short air-to-ground messages. Future uses envision dramatically greater capacity and a wider range of messages.

In September, the Federal Aviation Administration awarded a first-of-a-kind contract to Milwaukee-based Astronautics Corp. to develop comprehensive risk-assessment tools to pinpoint cybersecurity vulnerabilities of aircraft electronics. Acars is slated to be the first onboard system that will be examined using those tools.

At the time, Astronautics said it planned to devise an “efficient, timely and repeatable process” to identify cyberthreats and risk-mitigation strategies.

FAA officials have declined to comment specifically about Acars or details of the contract. In an email on Thursday, the agency said it “will continue to further strengthen its capabilities to defend against new and evolving” cyberthreats.

Earlier, a top official of the European Aviation Safety Agency singled out Acars as a prime example of the need for stepped-up cybersecurity reviews of onboard data systems. Luc Tytgat told an FAA-EASA conference in Washington in June that work was under way “to see if we should not go back to certification” studies of Acars vulnerabilities.

Mr. Tytgat indicated Acars was at the top of the list for cybersecurity reviews, but added that EASA also planned to screen newer air-traffic-control technologies ready for deployment as part of a “total systems approach” that is “not something which is easy to implement.”

Since then, several industry officials familiar with the details confirmed that the agency is specifically delving into such matters.

An EASA spokesman this month said the Acars studies are part of a broader effort to update certification requirements for new aircraft, anticipated to take effect starting next year. He said the agency also is looking at possible enhanced safeguards for Acars and other existing systems on today’s fleet of commercial aircraft.

The activity comes amid escalating worries about cyberthreats to commercial aviation in general. Those threats have prompted a variety of government and industry responses, including devising future standards to ensure that any successful hacks will be detected and neutralized.

In addition, the FAA’s top outside technical advisory group in September agreed to pay greater attention to cybersecurity threats across the full range of onboard equipment, internet connections and air-traffic-control communications. The updated guidelines are intended to affect areas including aircraft design, flight operations and maintenance practices, among others.

As airlines, business jets and even small private aircraft become more connected to more ground and satellite links, the FAA also is considering separate recommendations from a joint industry-government panel to tighten federal oversight of cyber-related protections.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wsj.com

British Aerospace BAe-125-700A, Rais Group International NC LLC -- operated by Execuflight, N237WR: Fatal accident occurred November 10, 2015 near Akron Fulton International Airport (KAKR), Summit County, Ohio

Akron, Ohio Charter Plane Crash Subject of NTSB Meeting 

What: The National Transportation Safety Board is scheduled to meet Tuesday to determine the probable cause of a Nov. 10, 2015, charter flight that crashed into an apartment building in Akron, Ohio.

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. ET

Location: NTSB Board Room and Conference Center

Address: 429 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC

Participants: NTSB Board members

Live Webcast: A link to the webcast will be available at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/ shortly before the start of the meeting.

NTSB Docket and Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov

AKRON, Ohio — A former employee of the Florida-based charter jet company Execuflight told investigators that company officers destroyed or altered records in the aftermath of a fatal crash that killed nine people in Akron last year. 

In depositions released by the National Transportation Safety Board earlier this month, former Execuflight pilot Donnie Shackleford said the company's executives filed paperwork that showed they fixed planes without actually performing maintenance and that they falsified the weights-and-balances measurement for the plane that crashed.

He went on to say that the pilot flying the doomed plane had expressed reservations about flying with the co-pilot — stating that the pair did not have enough collective experience, and that "we're going to get ourselves killed."

Shackleford said Execuflight ordered him to lie to investigators, and that he lost his job after he refused to do so.

In his own deposition with NTSB investigators, Execuflight owner Daniel Lewkowicz denied the accusations and said his company is committed to safety.

An ill-fated flight

Renato Marchese, the 50-year-old pilot of the flight, and his captain and co-pilot Oscar Chavez, 40, were flying seven employees from Pebb Enterprises of Boca Raton, Florida, who were on a business trip scouting shopping malls to buy. They crashed Nov. 10 into an apartment building in Akron's Ellet neighborhood while en route to Akron Fulton International Airport.

The NTSB has not said what it believes to be the likely cause of the crash. The agency is expected to complete its investigation by next month.

NTSB investigators on Sept. 7 interviewed Shackleford, who is a veteran pilot with more than 20,000 hours in the air. He was recently included in the FAA's database of pilots who have met or exceeded the administration's high safety standards, according to NTSB and FAA records.

Shackleford told investigators that the company regularly pushed pilots to fly after they surpassed their maximum on-duty time set by federal law and that the executives "made such a scramble to change records and eliminate stuff right after the accident, it would make your head spin."

Pilot may have surpassed on-duty flying limits


Shackleford told investigators that Marchese already had surpassed his limit of on-duty hours when he began a three-day trip that included five other stops.

Shackleford described Marchese as "nervous," "timid," and having a "lack of confidence" when flying planes, and he told the NTSB that he had reservations about letting Marchese fly with passengers.

Marchese told Shackleford he was uncomfortable flying with Chavez as the plane's captain, specifically in bad weather. The pilots were forced to begin their descent through low hanging clouds the day of the crash.

Execuflight owner responds

In a Sept. 22 deposition, Lewkowicz said pilots are encouraged to report if they are not feeling up to flying and that pilots are responsible for keeping track of their own on-duty hours.

Lewkowicz said he checked with Marchese to see if he was comfortable with the back-to-back flights, and Marchese assured him he was.

Lewkowicz acknowledged, however, that the weights-and-balance measurements for the doomed flight were estimations. He said pilots often use a standard weight of 200 pounds per person.

The NTSB found the plane was 600 pounds overweight when it crashed.

NTSB investigators also questioned Lewkowicz about his decision to hire Marchese and Chavez. According to NTSB records, both were fired from their previous jobs -- Marchese for overall poor performance and Chavez for missing mandatory training.

Execuflight hired them in June 2015, and Lewkowicz told NTSB investigators he was unaware of the pilots' issues at their prior jobs. Lewkowicz said both had flying experience and came highly recommended.

Lewkowicz wrote in a separate letter to the NTSB that air-traffic controllers failed to provide the pilots with accurate and timely weather information. 

The NTSB released the depositions just as as Textron, the company that manufactured the plane, released its own report blaming pilot error for the deadly crash. 

Read more here:   

http://www.cleveland.com

NTSB Docket and Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov

https://www.documentcloud.org/Textron-blames-human-error-for-crash

https://www.documentcloud.orgExecuflight-filing-with-NTSB

https://www.documentcloud.org/Deposition-of-Execuflight-owner-Augusto-Lewkowicz

https://www.documentcloud.org/Transcript-of-Interview-Donnie-Shackleford




Andres Chavez




ExecuFlight CEO Augusto "Danny" Lewkowicz 










































 






Rais Group International NC LLC - operated by Execuflight

http://registry.faa.gov/N237WR

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: CEN16MA036

Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 10, 2015 in Akron, OH
Aircraft: BRITISH AEROSPACE HS 125 700A, registration: N237WR
Injuries: 9 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On November 10, 2015, about 1452 eastern stand
ard time (EST), Execuflight flight 1526, a British Aerospace HS 125-700A, N237WR, departed controlled flight while on approach to landing at Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) and impacted a 4-plex apartment building in Akron, Ohio. The pilot, copilot, and seven passengers died; no ground injuries were reported. The airplane was destroyed by the crash and a postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to Rais Group International NC LLC and operated by Execuflight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an on-demand charter flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), Dayton, Ohio, about 1413 EST and was destined for AKR.


The airplane, which was based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, departed Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, about 1112 EST on the day of the accident and arrived at MGY about 1125 EST. The airplane remained parked on the ramp at one of the fixed-base operators until departing for AKR.


According to Federal Aviation Administration air traffic control and radar data, about 1438 EST, the Akron-Canton terminal radar approach control facility provided radar vectors to the accident airplane for the localizer runway 25 instrument approach procedure at AKR. 


A Piper PA-28-161 airplane performing flight training at the airport completed the localizer runway 25 instrument approach procedure at AKR before the accident airplane began its approach. According to the flight instructor on board the Piper PA-28-161, the airplane "broke out at minimums" on the localizer runway 25 approach and landed on runway 25. After the Piper PA-28-161 exited the runway, the flight instructor reported that he heard one of the pilots of the accident airplane state "Hawker Jet on a 10 mile final localizer 25" over the Unicom frequency. Subsequently, the flight instructor radioed to the accident airplane and stated "we broke out right at minimums." According to the flight instructor, one of the pilots of the accident airplane acknowledged this transmission with "thanks for the update." 


About 1452 EST, a motion-activated security camera located about 900 ft to the southeast of the accident site captured the airplane as it came in over the surrounding trees in a left-wing-down attitude about 1.8 nautical miles from the approach end of runway 25 at AKR. An explosion and postcrash fire were observed on the video just after the airplane flew out of the security camera's view.


The postcrash fire consumed most of the airplane; however, the airframe, engines, primary flight controls, and landing gear were all accounted for at the accident site. The airplane was equipped with a Fairchild GA-100 tape unit cockpit voice recorder, which was recovered and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination. 


About 1450 EST, the surface weather observation at AKR was wind from 240 degrees at 7 knots; visibility 1 3/4 statute mile in mist; ceiling broken at 600 ft above ground level (agl); overcast ceiling at 900 ft agl; temperature 11 degrees C (52 degrees F); dew point 9 degrees C (48 degrees F); and altimeter 29.95 inches of mercury. 

Friday, October 14, 2016

Klapmeier-led aviation company in line to get Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board loan

Alan Klapmeier, then president and CEO of Kestrel Aircraft, stands in March 2013 with a mockup of the aircraft in a hangar at the Bong Airport in Superior. 


A fledgling aircraft parts manufacturing company promising to establish a facility at the Grand Rapids airport is in line for a $1.5 million loan from the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board.

IRRRB staff members have asked the agency’s board to approve the loan to Albuquerque, N.M.-based ACC Manufacturing Inc., which makes composite parts for its parent company, One Aviation.

The board, which will meet Monday in Eveleth, also is being asked to approve another $293,000 to the Grand Rapids Economic Development Authority for improvements at the ACC site.

The money will buy an existing hangar at the airport to house about 20 employees of ACC, said state Rep. Tom Anzelc, DFL-Balsam Township, who is IRRRB board chairman.

The company eventually would relocate to a larger facility at the airport as part of a $9 million project.

One Aviation is the parent company producing the Eclipse jet and also hoping to produce the Kestrel turboprop aircraft. It’s headed by Alan Klapmeier, the former Duluth aviation executive who co-founded Cirrus Aircraft.

“We’re hoping this will be Phase One of a much larger project that will lead to the manufacture of the entire airplane in Grand Rapids,” Anzelc said.

The parts made in Grand Rapids would be used in the Eclipse jet, which is already in production in New Mexico, said Mark Phillips, IRRRB director. But Phillips agreed that the long-term goal is to see One Aviation build its Kestrel plant at Grand Rapids as well.

“This is a specific, standalone deal to supply the Eclipse,” Phillips said. “No one is hiding the fact we’d like to someday see them build the Kestrel on the Iron Range. But this project isn’t tied to that.”

Klapmeier originally planned to build the Kestrel in Brunswick, Maine, where the company now has a parts facility. The company then joined with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker in 2012 to announce the Kestrel would be built in Superior. State and local agencies pledged some $100 million in loans, grants, tax breaks and tax credits. The company said it would create up to 600 jobs at the plant in Superior’s industrial park, with Walker celebrating the project as part of his effort to create jobs in the state.

But Klapmeier said that while Kestrel remains based in Superior, the state of Wisconsin never came through with the package of incentives promised and has muddied the project for more than four years.

“Superior has been great to work with. It’s still a great community for this project. There is still some hope it could happen in Wisconsin. It’s a small possibility it could still be Superior. But the state just hasn't been there for us,” Klapmeier told the News Tribune on Thursday.

State officials, for their part, told Wisconsin Public Radio last year that Kestrel faced challenges raising money and meeting requirements to receive financing under federal programs.

The company has about 25 employees in Superior. The company also had been using some leased warehouse space from Bent Paddle Brewing Co. in Duluth but recently lost that space.

“It’s that work and some additional work that’s moving to Grand Rapids. We lost our lease and had to find more space,” Klapmeier said.

Until now, many of the composite parts for the Eclipse have been made by subcontractors in far-flung locations. Klapmeier said he wants to bring that work into the company and into the Northland.

“I think it’s better business sense for us to make our own composite parts. And I think northern Minnesota is the right place for workforce compatibility, workforce productivity. ... We know Minnesota. This is where we live,” said Klapmeier, who has a home outside Cloquet and a cabin outside Iron River.

Klapmeier said he wants to have private financing lined up for Kestrel before deciding on a location for the plane’s production plant. In the meantime, he said One Aviation is focused on bringing Eclipse and a second-generation Eclipse jet to full production and market before refocusing on Kestrel.

Anzelc said the Grand Rapids project has been well-vetted, noting Klapmeier began meeting with Iron Range officials more than a year ago at the Capitol in St. Paul.

“It’s a very complex project. It’s not fully an IRRRB deal. Grand Rapids is taking the lead and we are essentially helping them out. We’re a partner. There will be other partners,” Anzelc said. “This has been a slow, deliberate process. It’s been a long time unfolding.”

In addition to Klapmeier as CEO, One Aviation lists Ken Ross as president, Ed Underwood as CFO and Steve Serfling, a Deer River native, as executive vice president.

The Eclipse 500 is a small six-seat business jet in the works since the mid-2000s. The Albuquerque-based company started fast but entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2008 and was liquidated in 2009 before being reformed as Eclipse Aerospace, which merged with Klapmeier’s Kestrel Aircraft to form One Aviation in April 2015.

The Kestrel 350 is an all-composite, single-engine turboprop aircraft in the works for several years. It is planned to carry up to eight people at high speed over long distances and designed to be “far more versatile” than jet aircraft, and “burn less fuel, and be able to maintain approach speeds at large busy airports yet land on short, grass or gravel strips,” according to the company’s website.

The Kestrel plane doesn't yet have Federal Aviation Administration certification to begin production or sales.

Klapmeier has had an ongoing feud with Duluth-based Cirrus, which he co-founded with his brother, Dale, since leaving the company in 2009; a legal dispute about expenses stemming from a lawsuit filed against Cirrus and initially won by Klapmeier — but then overturned on appeal — is now being decided by the Minnesota Supreme Court.

Source:  http://www.superiortelegram.com

Records: Iowa State University president got plane ride to Des Moines airport

AMES, Iowa —Iowa State University President Steven Leath was flown in a school airplane to the Des Moines airport at least once to catch a commercial flight.

Records show university pilots flew Leath and his wife from Ames to Des Moines on Feb. 17. The 84-mile roundtrip was billed to private donations for $380.

University officials claimed the 18-minute flight for the Leaths didn't cost extra because the plane was already going to Des Moines for maintenance.

However, ISU flight services manager Dave Hurst said the work wasn't performed that day because Elliott Aviation didn't have the equipment or personnel available.

Still, he said the record was incorrect and the trip shouldn't have been billed as a passenger flight even though the Leaths were aboard. They flew commercial to visit a donor.

Iowa State University has compiled a list of 25 commonly asked questions regarding the plane controversy. The list of questions and answers can be found here.

Source:  http://www.kcci.com

Incident occurred October 07, 2016 at Niagara Central Dorothy Rungeling Airport (CNQ3), Welland, Ontario



Damages to two aircraft that collided last Thursday at the Dorothy Rungeling Airport in Welland could approach $1 million, according to a federal investigator.

“We are trying to get to the bottom of why exactly that happened,” said Peter Rowntree, a senior regional investigator with the Transportation and Safety Board of Canada.

“We have the radio out of one of the aircraft and we are going to have it tested to see if it is working properly and see where we are going from there,” Rowntree said.

Rowntree estimated damage to one of the planes, a Pilatus PC-12, could be between $500,000 and $1 million. He said the second plane, an ultralight, is a write-off.

On Oct. 6 two planes collided while taxiing. The pilot of the ultralight plane was taken to hospital with minor injuries. The pilot and four passengers of the second plane were not hurt.

The Transportation Safety Board isn’t conducting a full investigation, but are looking into why the crash occurred. Rowntree said once they know what the cause is, investigators will decide if there is need for a more in-depth investigation for safety purposes.

The Dorothy Rungeling Airport is considered an uncontrolled airport, so all communication over the radio is not recorded. Rowntree said they wont be able to check if the landing and take off were communicated via the radio before the crash occurred.

“There is no tower there, they are on a unicom, so basically everyone should be on the same frequency when they are at the airport. It is their responsibility to know what they are doing and what their intent is.”

He said investigators are asking for people who were listening to the airport frequency at about 2 p.m. last Thursday to come forward with information. Witnesses can call the airport at (905) 714-1000.

Rowntree said it’s hard to predict how long the investigation will take.

If one of the pilots is found to be at fault, Rowntree said the Transportation Safety Board does not take disciplinary action. The Transportation Safety Board doesn’t determine any civil or criminal liability. Rowntree said they focus on how to better safety procedures and ensure better safety practices in the future.

“It would be up to transport Canada that if they were interested in this occurrence it would be up to them to investigate the circumstances of the accident,” Rowntree said about whether there could be a police investigation.

Source:  http://www.wellandtribune.ca

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N429ES: Incident occurred May 11, 2018 and Accident occurred October 05, 2016 at John Rodgers Field (PHJR), Kapolei, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aircraft landed hard with a prop strike.

Barbers Point Flight School LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N429ES

Date: 11-MAY-18
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N429ES
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KAPOLEI
State: HAWAII

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Kapolei, HI
Accident Number: GAA17CA025
Date & Time: 10/05/2016, 1200 HDT
Registration: N429ES
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that during the landing flare he pitched up "higher than what is normal" and the airplane bounced three times during the touchdown. The pilot further reported that he was able to taxi the airplane to the ramp, but he noticed the nose wheel was flat.

During a 100-hour maintenance inspection conducted a week later, it was revealed that the firewall sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's use of an excessive pitch attitude during the landing flare, which resulted in a bounced landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Pitch control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Hard landing (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age:40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/31/2015
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2034 hours (Total, all aircraft), 39 hours (Total, this make and model), 1302 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 47 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N429ES
Model/Series: 172 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1997
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17280296
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/12/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-360 SER
Registered Owner: BARBERS POINT FLIGHT SCHOOL LLC
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHNL, 7 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 81°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3300 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LIHUE, HI (LIH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kapolei, HI (JRF)
Type of Clearance: Traffic Advisory; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1100 HDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: KALAELOA (JOHN RODGERS FIELD) (JRF)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 30 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 04L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4500 ft / 200 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None

Latitude, Longitude:  21.302778, -158.078611 (est)