Sunday, August 12, 2018

Beech A36TC Bonanza, N136RM: Fatal accident occurred August 12, 2018 near Whiteman Airport (KWHP), Los Angeles, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/136RM


Location: Sylmar, CA
Accident Number: WPR18FA219
Date & Time: 08/12/2018, 1345 PDT
Registration: N136RM
Aircraft: Beech A36TC
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 12, 2018, about 1345 Pacific daylight time, a Beech A36TC airplane, N136RM, collided with terrain near Sylmar, California, after declaring an emergency while approaching the Whiteman Airport (WHP), Los Angeles, California. The private pilot was fatally injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Placerville Airport (PVF), Placerville, California about 1200 and was destined for WHP.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reported that while the airplane was approaching the WHP airport, the pilot declared an emergency indicating problems with the airplane's engine. An air traffic controller cleared the pilot to land at either WHP or the nearby Van Nuys Airport (VNY). The pilot did not respond and no further transmissions were received from the pilot.

Witnesses reported they observed the airplane flying south over an interstate. The airplane was flying low when it started a right turn, but then turned left and descended below a hillside.

The airplane was moved to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N136RM
Model/Series: A36TC
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: VNY, 802 ft msl
Observation Time: 1351 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Placerville, CA (PVF)
Destination: Whiteman, CA (WHP) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  34.295556, -118.469167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 





SYLMAR (CBSLA) — Federal investigators combed through the wreckage Monday of a small plane that crashed into a Sylmar field, killing the pilot.

Scott Frazier Watson, 55, of Marina Del Rey, was killed when his plane crashed into a field right alongside the 5 Freeway in Sylmar Sunday afternoon. The father of three was pronounced dead at the scene.

Several motorists on the freeway reportedly stopped and ran down the freeway to try to help the pilot before emergency services arrived. Traffic on the northbound 5 and 405 freeways ground to a slow crawl because the crash could be seen from the freeway.

Watson’s daughter, Katie, said her father had his pilot’s license for about 15 to 20 years and that he was returning home to the Van Nuys Airport from a weekend trip.

Watson, who was called by relatives as a computer genius who worked his way up to become head of technology for Disney Engineering, had made a mayday call for help, but it’s not known what was wrong with the plane.

Bob Weis, president, Walt Disney Imagineering, released a statement saying that the company was “stunned and saddened by the loss of our long-time friend and colleague.” The statement continued, saying that “those of us who worked with Scott during his nearly 30-year career at Disney knew him as a humble genius who made making magic look easy.”

Officials from the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA were on the scene Monday to look through the wreckage of the plane.


https://losangeles.cbslocal.com






SYLMAR, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A single-engine plane crashed into a field near the 5 Freeway in Sylmar on Sunday afternoon, killing the pilot who was the only occupant.

The plane went down in the 12600 block of Encinitas Avenue, near the 405 and 5 freeways, around 1:50 p.m., according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Officials say it appears the plane may have had an in-flight emergency and the pilot may have looked at setting down on the freeway, but it was too crowded.

Good Samaritans rushed over to the site of the crash and tried to help the pilot but were unable to get him out. Firefighters used the Jaws of Life extricate him from the wreckage and attempted CPR but were unable to save him.

Officials with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are en route to investigate the cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://abc7.com






A pilot died after his airplane crashed near the 5 Freeway in Los Angeles Sunday afternoon.

The pilot was reportedly trapped in the wreckage after the small, fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft crashed in a field adjacent to the interstate at 12600 Encinitas Ave. in Sylmar, the Los Angeles Fire Department said.

The Beechcraft BE33 aircraft crashed under "unknown circumstances" about 5 miles north of Van Nuys Airport around 1:45 p.m., Federal Aviation Administration Public Affairs Manager Ian Gregor said.

Rescuers managed to pull the man from the plane, but he was pronounced dead at the scene, the LAFD said.

The airplane is registered to Scott Watson, of Marina Del Rey, and was manufactured in 1980, according to FAA records. Authorities have not yet said whether Watson was piloting the plane at the time of the crash.

The crash did not spark a fire, damage structures or cause any other injuries, the LAFD said.

The National Transportation Safety Board is overseeing the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbclosangeles.com





Update Aircraft Down 08/12/2018 INC#0772 

Update Aircraft Down; INC#0772; 2:10PM; Field near 12600 Encinitas Av; Sylmar; Only patient and only apparent occupant of the Beechcraft A320 single engine aircraft was an adult male pilot who was trapped in wreckage (since freed) but is now deceased at scene; There are no other injuries; No fire; No structures damaged; All further inquiries to National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) which will be overseeing the investigation; FS 75; Batt 12; Valley Bureau; Council District 7; Dispatched LAFD Units: BC12 CM42 E18 E275 E290 E474 E75 E90 E91 EM15 H6 HR3 RA75 RA90 RA91 T75 T90 UR88; - Brian Humphrey

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Mooney M20K 231, registered to CKD LLC and operated by the pilot, N231EC: Fatal accident occurred August 11, 2018 near Baker City Municipal Airport (KBKE), Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N231EC

Location: Baker City, OR
Accident Number: WPR18FA218
Date & Time: 08/11/2018, 1017 PDT
Registration: N231EC
Aircraft: Mooney M20K
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 11, 2018, at 1017 Pacific daylight time a Mooney M20K, N231EC, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during the landing approach into Baker City Municipal Airport, Baker, Oregon. The private pilot and student pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to CKD LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight cross-country. The flight departed Caldwell Industrial Airport, Caldwell, Idaho about 1045 mountain daylight time. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

About 1015, a pilot located in his hangar about 1,300 ft southwest of runway 31 midfield, observed a low-wing airplane flying directly overhead and to the south. It caught his attention because it was flying lower than the pattern altitude at between 600 and 700 ft above ground level, and it was inside the normal left downwind traffic pattern. He then heard the airplane reduce engine power, a sound that he was familiar with, and that seemed appropriate for an airplane descending to land. He did not see the airplane emitting any smoke or vapors, and a short time later he got onto his motorcycle and drove along the adjacent frontage road. He instinctively looked to the runway threshold in anticipation of watching the airplane land but did not see the airplane and thought nothing more of it. He stated that in retrospect this was unusual, as the airplane should have landed about that time.

About the same time, the owner of a local fixed base operator was in her office, located on the airfield. She had just dispatched one of the company airplanes with a student and instructor and heard it, along with a Forest Service and local agricultural airplane, make radio calls reporting takeoff. She then heard the pilot of the accident airplane report that he was on final for runway 31. She did not hear the pilot make any more calls, and did not hear the airplane landing.

Multiple witnesses located to the south of the airport recounted observations of a low-wing airplane flying south-southeast in a direction typically followed by airplanes making a landing approach for runway 31. Two witnesses observed the airplane then begin a left turn and out of view beyond trees, followed by the sound of a thump. One witness observed the airplane turn, and then immediately transition to a rapid nose-down descent. Another witness located under the approach path for runway 31 observed the airplane fly overhead to the south and then off into the distance. Based on its location, he assumed it had just taken off, and a short time later he looked back and could no longer hear the airplane, but saw it was in a nose-dive.

The wreckage was located in a pasture about 1 1/4 miles south-southeast of the runway 31 threshold. The fuselage came to rest on a heading of about 090° magnetic and had sustained crush damage from the nose through to the forward edge of the vertical stabilizer. Both wings exhibited leading-edge crush damage perpendicular to the wing chord, and the smell of aviation fuel was present at the site.

The propeller and hub had separated from the engine and were buried about 12 inches into the turf just forward of the main wreckage at what appeared to be the first impact point. The turf surrounding the propeller had been sliced open, and an 18-inch square scallop of sod was ejected about 5 ft to the south. Both blades appeared to have cut through the turf, resulting in the propeller effectively becoming screwed into the ground. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N231EC
Model/Series: M20K No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:  No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBKE, 3373 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 290°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Caldwell, ID (EUL)
Destination: Baker City, OR (BKE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  44.813333, -117.793889

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

William Watts and Dr. Mihoko Matsuda Nelsen 

Watts, William "Bill" Jeff and his wife; Nelsen, Mihoko Matsuda, passed away on August 11, 2018. 

A Celebration of life will be held on Saturday, August 25th at 10:00 am at LifeSpring Christian Church, 174 N. Star Rd., Star, Idaho. 

Please join us to share your memories.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Mooney Summit, The Bill Gilliland Foundation at: https://www.mooneysummit.com



Two people died when the Mooney M20K 231 plane in which they were traveling crashed nose first into a Baker Valley hay field near the airport Saturday morning.

The victims have been identified as William J. Watts, 77, who was piloting the plane, and Mihoko Matsuda Nelsen, 70, both of Middleton, Idaho.

The two had been traveling from Caldwell, Idaho, and were believed to have been enroute to the Baker City Airport, Sheriff Travis Ash stated in a press release.

The Baker County Sheriff’s Office was notified of the crash about 10:20 a.m. Saturday.

Ash said the hay field where the plane crashed is owned by Sam Johnson. It is near Lindley Road and Interstate 84 north of Baker City.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration N-number registry, the airplane was a 1979 single-engine Mooney M20K 231 registered to a business in Canyon County, Idaho.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board responded to Baker City to remove the airplane. The agencies are conducting an investigation to determine the cause of the crash, Ash said.

The Baker County Sheriff’s Office was assisted at the site by the Baker City Fire Department, Baker Rural Fire Department, Baker City Police Department, Oregon State Police and the Canyon County Sheriff’s Office.

Original article ➤  https://www.bakercityherald.com

BAKER COUNTY, Oregon — The two people on board an airplane that took off from Caldwell, Idaho, Saturday morning died when it crashed in eastern Oregon.

The Baker County Sheriff's Office says the Mooney M20K 231 airplane crashed near Lindley Road and I-84, in a hay field belonging to Sam Johnson.

When law enforcement arrived at the scene, they found that the airplane had crashed nose-first into the ground. The two people on board did not survive the crash. Their identities will not be released until next of kin has been notified.

The airplane had been traveling from Caldwell and was believed to have been en route to the Baker Airport.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration N-number registry, the airplane was a single-engine Mooney M20K, manufactured in 1979, and registered to a business in Canyon County.

The Baker County Sheriff’s Office is working with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the crash.

The Baker City Fire Department, Baker Rural Fire Department, Baker City Police Department, and Oregon State Police assisted the Baker County Sheriff's Office at the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktvb.com

Smith Hornet, registered to the Western Sky Aviation Warbird Museum Inc and operated by the pilot, N218B: Fatal accident occurred August 11, 2018 at St. George Regional Airport (KSGU), Washington County, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N218B

Location: St. George, UT
Accident Number: WPR18LA217
Date & Time: 08/11/2018, 0855 MDT
Registration: N218B
Aircraft: SMITH HORNET
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 11, 2018, about 0855 mountain daylight time, an amateur built experimental Smith Hornet airplane, N218B, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the St. George Regional Airport (SGU), St. George, Utah. The pilot was fatally injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to the Western Sky Aviation Warbird Museum Inc and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

A pilot, flying in the area at the time of the accident, reported that shortly after he landed, he observed the accident airplane nose down in the dirt next to the runway surface with the engine still running. He radioed for assistance before proceeding to the airplane himself.

The airplane was moved to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SMITH
Registration: N218B
Model/Series: HORNET
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SGU, 2884 ft msl
Observation Time: 0856 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: St. George, UT (SGU)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:   37.035278, -113.506111

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Sterling Keith Palmer
August 11, 2018

St. George, UT- Sterling Keith Palmer, 69, passed away on Saturday, August 11, 2018.  He was born on March 24, 1949 in Monticello, UT to Kenneth Palmer and Marba Helquist. Sterling married Kathleen Denise Hanson on August 10, 1973 in Salt Lake City, UT at the Salt Lake City LDS temple.

Sterling was raised in Blanding, UT until he left to serve an LDS mission in Hong Kong. After his return from Hong Kong, Sterling attended the University of Utah where he graduated Magna Cum Laude with a degree in Sociology in 1973.  Upon graduation, he commissioned in the United States Air Force and served as a C-141 aircraft commander, instructor and flight examiner pilot. Sterling’s duties brought him and his family all across the world as he continued to answer the call from his country.  He retired honorably in 2000 as a Colonel.

Sterling is survived by Kathleen Palmer (St. George, UT), his two children, James (Los Angeles, CA) and Matthew (Billings, MT), and his beautiful granddaughter, Poppy (Billings, MT).

Funeral services will be held at 11:00am on Saturday, August 18 in Blanding, UT at the Blanding Stake Center, 100 West 800 North.  Interment will take place at the Blanding City Cemetery.


Arrangements are made under the direction of Spilsbury Mortuary. Family and friends are invited to sign his online guestbook at www.Spilsburymortuary.com.



ST. GEORGE — A man died Saturday morning after crashing an aircraft near a runway at St. George Regional Airport.

Officials have identified the pilot as 69-year-old Sterling Palmer, of St. George. 
 
The man, who was the only occupant in the plane, was taking off at runway No. 1 in an ultra-light experimental aircraft at approximately 9 a.m., airport spokesman Marc Mortensen said.


“We’re not exactly sure what happened,” Mortensen said, “but he didn’t get very far in the air before it fell to the ground and crashed.”

Mortensen said it appears the pilot died on impact. Officials aren’t releasing the name of the pilot or information about who owns the aircraft until next of kin are notified.

St. George Police Department, St. George Fire Department and airport operations responded to the scene of the crash.

Mortensen said officials informed the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration of the crash. FAA officials will be conducting the investigation into the crash alongside St. George Police detectives.

Although the airport remained operational, Mortensen said the runway was shut down to general aviation aircraft. He said officials expected to have it cleared by noon in time for a SkyWest commercial flight from Phoenix arriving at 12:15 p.m.

This report is based on preliminary information provided by emergency responders and may not contain the full scope of findings.

Story and video ➤ http://www.stgeorgeutah.com



A St. George man is dead after his single-engine aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff at St. George Regional Airport on Saturday morning. 

Sterling Palmer, 69, was the only person onboard, officials said.

Emergency respondents were called to the scene around 9 a.m. after the plane, an Ultralight experimental aircraft, plummeted out of the sky upon take off and nosedived into the ground.

According to Marc Mortensen, director of support services at St. George City, the pilot was taking off on Runway 1 headed northbound. Officials have not yet determined the cause of the fatal crash. 

"The plane hit the side of the runway and went into the dirt," Mortensen said. "The nose impacted the ground, and the deceased, we're sure he was killed on impact." 

Several agencies responded to the scene, including St. George Police Department, St. George fire, and SGU Regional Airport Operations personnel. 

"Our hearts and prayers go out to Mr. Palmer's family at this time," St. George Mayor Jon Pike said in a written statement.

Mortensen said officials are working closely with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration in conducting the investigation into the crash.

"The police detectives quarantined the site and did the work they needed to do before they moved the aircraft and the body," Mortensen said. 

The crash delayed one SkyWest flight from Phoenix for about 15 minutes, and the airport was able to resume commercial and general aviation operations by 12:30 p.m., according to Mortensen.

Mortensen said officials arrived on scene quickly, and staff who were in the vicinity were able to secure the site efficiently and shut down the runway in a timely manner. 

"It's still really fresh for the family," Mortensen said. "It's a difficult time for them, and our hearts go out to them."

Original article ➤ https://www.thespectrum.com

Kitfox Super Sport, N26LD: Accident occurred August 09, 2018 in Hunter, Greene County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N26LD

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA515
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 09, 2018 in Hunter, NY
Aircraft: DELL LAWRENCE Kitfox, registration: N26LD

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Crashed into a field and flipped over.


Date: 09-AUG-18
Time: 23:18:00Z
Regis#: N26LD
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: KITFOX SUPER SPORT
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: HUNTER
State: NEW YORK




JEWETT — A Berkshire County man is lucky to be alive after the plane he was piloting made a hard landing and flipped over in a Jewett field Thursday afternoon, police said.

Roger C. Tryon, 64, of Monterey, Massachusetts, sustained minor injuries, Greene County Sheriff Greg Seeley said. Tryon did not have to be taken to a hospital.

Tryon suffered facial cuts and bruises, said Lt. Tracey Quinn with the Greene County Sheriff’s Office.

“It could have been a lot worse,” Seeley said. “He was very lucky to be alive.”

Tryon took off from Indiana and was on his way to refuel at the Columbia County Airport, located off Route 9H in Ghent, when he ran out of fuel. He was likely on his way home to Massachusetts after the planned stop, Seeley said.

“Tryon would have landed fine, but the field that he landed in was saturated from the rain in the past couple days,” Seeley said. “Even my boots were sinking into the ground.”

Tryon wanted to land the aircraft in the Jewett field, but the plane’s wheel sunk into the ground during the landing attempt, which caused it to flip over.

“He almost made it to Columbia County,” Seeley said Thursday night.

Police do not know if Tryon was flying a private plane or had rented one for the trip.

Tryon holds a certificate as a private pilot and is rated on single-engine airplanes, according to an airman details report from the Federal Aviation Administration.

The crash remains under investigation by the FAA, Quinn said. The plane was removed from the scene and examined.

In May, a plane also piloted by a man named Roger Tryon of Monterey, Massachusetts, had to make an emergency landing in a farmer’s field in Taghkanic.

Tryon, who had one passenger on board, was flying a single-engine airplane when the engine stalled May 26 at about 12:30 p.m., according to the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office.

Police could not confirm Friday if the pilots in each incident are the same person.

The men were on their way from the Hudson Valley Regional Airport in Wappingers Falls to the Great Barrington Airport in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in May, when the plane’s engine started to sputter. Tryon had to make an emergency landing in a grassy field off Koeppe Road.

As Tryon’s plane dived toward the ground, it lost its landing gear, including its wheels, which caused the plane to make a “pancake landing,” police said in May.

The left wing struck the ground, spinning the aircraft 180 degrees. The plane’s engine and belly were damaged as a result of the forced landing, but both men were unharmed.

Original article ➤ https://www.hudsonvalley360.com

Robinson R22 Beta, N92TR: Accident occurred August 10, 2018 near Ocean City Municipal Airport (26N), Cape May County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N92TR

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA483
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 10, 2018 in Ocean City, NJ
Aircraft: Robinson R22, registration: N92TR

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Rotorcraft force landed in a marsh due to unknown circumstances.

Date: 10-AUG-18
Time: 13:30:00Z
Regis#: N92TR
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R22 BETA
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: OCEAN CITY
State: NEW JERSEY











A student pilot and her flight instructor were hurt Friday morning when their helicopter crashed into a marsh near the runaway at Ocean City Municipal Airport, officials said.

The Robinson R22 made a hard landing around 9:30 a.m, according to Ocean City police and the Federal Aviation Administration. The plane's owner, Harvey Shubart, 62, of Doylestown, Pa. was teaching Carol Gray, 64, of Bear, Delaware how to hover when they lost control and went down on the west side of the tarmac.

Both were able to exit the helicopter on their own. They were taken to Shore Medical Center in Somers Point to be treated for injuries not considered life-threatening. 

Video footage shows the damaged helicopter on its side with damage to its rotors. A witness said the helicopter was hovering above the grassy marsh before it crashed. 

Shubart has been a commercial pilot since 2014, according to records.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating to determine the cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.nj.com










OCEAN CITY, N.J. (WPVI) -- A helicopter with a student pilot and an instructor aboard crashed at a small airport in southern New Jersey, leaving both injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the Robinson R22 helicopter ended up in a marsh area west of Ocean City Municipal Airport around 9:30 a.m. Friday. It apparently had taken off a short time earlier.

The occupants were identified as Harvey Shubart, 62, of Doylestown, Pa. and Ocean City, and Carol Gray, 64, of Bear, Del.

Police say Shubart is the owner of the helicopter and a flight instructor. Shubart was teaching Gray how to hover when they lost control and made a hard landing in the marshes, according to investigators.

They were the only occupants of the rotorcraft, police said. Both Shubart and Gray were taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the NTSB and FAA.

The helicopter was heavily damaged in the incident, ending up on its side with damage to its rotors.

Story and video ➤ https://6abc.com

Robinson R22 Beta, ZS-HBP: Accident occurred August 15, 2018 in Queenstown, South Africa

NTSB Identification: WPR18WA225
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2018 in Queenstown, South Africa
Aircraft: ROBINSON R22, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 15, 2018, at 0830 Universal Coordinated Time, a Robinson R22 Beta helicopter, ZS-HBP, impacted power lines while conducting a game capturing flight near Queenstown, South Africa. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger was fatally injured. The helicopter was substantially damaged. The helicopter was being operated under the pertinent civil regulations for the Government of South Africa.

The Civil Aviation Authority of South Africa, Accident & Incident Investigation Division (AIID) is investigating the accident. As the state of manufacture of the airplane, the NTSB has designated a US accredited representative to assist the AIID in its investigation.

All inquiries concerning this accident should be directed to:

South African Civil Aviation Authority
Accidents and Incidents Investigation Division
Private Bag X 73
Halfway House 1685
South Africa
Tel: +27 (0) 11 545-1000
Website: http://www.caa.co.za


George Snyman, 32, was killed when a helicopter crashed in a field in the Eastern Cape yesterday. It is understood that the chopper was flying over Thaba Thala Game Farm in the Sterkstroom district when it fell.

Police spokeswoman Captain Namhla Mdleleni confirmed that one passenger was killed instantly. The pilot, Joshua Cilliers, 28, was seriously injured and taken to hospital.

“All relevant emergency role players attended the scene. The cause of the crash is still under investigation. An inquest docket has been opened at the Sterkstroom police station,” Mdleleni said.

Bell 412EP, JA200G: Fatal accident occurred August 10, 2018 in Nakanojo, Japan


NTSB Identification: ANC18WA065
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Friday, August 10, 2018 in Nakanojo, Japan
Aircraft: BELL 412EP, registration:
Injuries: 9 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Japan has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a BELL 412EP helicopter that occurred on August 10, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Japan's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Japan.








All nine crew members of a rescue helicopter which crashed on an eastern Japan mountain were confirmed dead Saturday, while the government's transport accident investigation panel started its probe at the accident site.

"For some reason, the helicopter appears to have flown at lower altitudes and hit trees," a panel investigator said of the area near the prefectural border of Gunma and Nagano where the Bell 412EP went down Friday.

Local police also checked the site. The helicopter had made a sharp turn before it went missing, according to local authorities.

Eyewitnesses said the helicopter was flying at a very low altitude, and one said the engine was making an unusual sound.

There was no flight recorder on the aircraft, according to the Gunma government, as such devices are not mandatory for rescue helicopters.

The helicopter belonged to the prefectural government and was operated by the Tokyo-based aviation company Toho Air Service. Last year one of the company's helicopters crashed in Gunma Prefecture, killing four employees who were aboard.

The rescue helicopter was checking a mountain trail ahead of its opening to climbers on Friday when it crashed. Two of the crew had been confirmed dead Friday.

Bodies of the remaining seven crew were recovered from the crash site as the search operation resumed Saturday morning and around 160 rescuers, police officials and Self-Defense Forces personnel entered the area by foot.

The prefectural government has identified the nine who died, including the pilot Noriyuki Amagai, 57, and mechanic Susumu Sawaguchi, 60, both employees of Toho Air Service.

Those two were part of a prefectural disaster management unit, as were two passengers -- Satoshi Ozawa, 44, and Akihiro Oka, 38.

The five others killed were all firefighters -- Ken Tamura, 47, Yosuke Mizuide, 42, Hidetoshi Shiobara, 42, Hiroshi Kuroiwa, 42, and Masaya Hachisuka, 43.

The Gunma government said contact with the Bell 412EP was lost after it left a heliport in Maebashi city around 9:15 a.m. Friday. It was due to return an hour and a half later.

According to a local weather station, the weather near the crash site was cloudy, but the wind was not strong at the time.

The helicopter went into service in May 1997 and had clocked over 7,000 flight hours. It was due to be retired in 2020.

https://english.kyodonews.net

Kawasaki BK 117B-2, VH-JWB: Fatal accident occurred August 17, 2018 in Ulladulla, Australia

NTSB Identification: WPR18WA230
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Friday, August 17, 2018 in Ulladulla, Australia
Aircraft: Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. BK117 B-2, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 17, 2018, about 1400 local time, a Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. BK117 B-2 helicopter, VH-JWB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during aerial firefighting operations near Ulladulla, New South Wales, Australia. The helicopter was operated by Sydney Helicopters. The commercial pilot was fatally injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel: +612 6274 6054
Fax: +612 6274 6434
www.atsb.gov.au


Allan Tull was killed while assisting with the bushfire effort in Ulladulla.



A Sydney helicopter company is mourning the loss of their close friend and colleague, who was killed in a tragic accident while helping to fight bushfires on the NSW south coast.

Allan Tull, whose helicopter crashed near Ulladulla on Friday afternoon, "was regarded as one of the most experienced fire bombing pilots in the industry," according to Sydney Helicopters chief pilot Mark Harrold.

"Tully had a wealth of aerial firefighting experience and his aviation knowledge and skills were of the highest standard," Mr Harrold said in a statement on Friday evening.

"The aviation firefighting industry is very close and this tragic loss will be felt by all involved along with the broader firefighting community and those he worked alongside in other parts of the world."

A spokesman for NSW Ambulance said it was believed the water bombing helicopter had crashed "into a tree" at Woodstock, near Ulladulla.

Emergency services were called to the corner of Plot Road and Kingiman Road shortly after 2pm on Friday. NSW Police located the aircraft wreckage and found Mr Tull, and sole occupant, deceased at the scene.

The NSW Rural Fire Service confirmed "a serious incident" had occurred "involving one of its contracted water bombing helicopters working on a bush fire in the Shoalhaven area".

All aircraft working on the Kingiman fire were grounded in the wake of the incident and will resume operations tomorrow, a spokesman for the RFS said.

NSW Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant expressed his sympathy to the pilot's loved ones, as well as the emergency services community.

"This a tragic event and my deepest sympathies are with the pilot’s family and friends," he said in a statement.

"My thoughts and prayers are also with the emergency services community, especially the many brigades and units working to contain the Kingiman Fire."

A crime scene has been established to be forensically examined, with a report to be prepared for the coroner. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau will also conduct an investigation into the tragedy.

Footage of the scene indicates the cable connecting the helicopter with its water drum was caught in trees.

Fairfax Media understands a mechanism should have released the load when it became stuck.

Firefighters have been battling to get the Kingiman bushfire under control since Wednesday when it threatened homes in the Ulladulla area and destroyed almost a dozen outbuildings.

It's one of three major bushfires on the state's South Coast that have destroyed and threatened properties in the past few days.

The worst damage so far has been from the bushfire further south at Bemboka, near Bega, where the RFS confirmed three homes were lost on Wednesday.

While conditions have eased since Wednesday's emergency, firefighters have been working to contain the fires before gusty winds return to the region on Saturday.

https://www.smh.com.au