Monday, August 6, 2018

PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader, N851EJ: Accident occurred August 04, 2018 in Hartsville, Steuben County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Jersey Devil Dusters LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N851EJ


NTSB Identification: GAA18CA502
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, August 04, 2018 in Hartsville, NY
Aircraft: WSK PZL MIELEC M-18A, registration: N851EJ

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Crashed in a field due to unknown circumstances.

Date: 04-AUG-18
Time: 18:46:00Z
Regis#: N851EJ
Aircraft Make: PZL MIELEC
Aircraft Model: M 18A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 137
City: DANSVILLE
State: NEW YORK

Piper PA-34-200T, N7693F: Incident occurred August 05, 2018 at Niagara Falls International Airport (KIAG), Niagara County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Gear door fell off on takeoff.

Rare Eagle LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N7693F

Date: 05-AUG-18
Time: 18:52:00Z
Regis#: N7693F
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 34 200T
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: MILITARY
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: NIAGARA FALLS
State: NEW YORK

Columbia Lancair-LC-41-550FG, registered to and operated by Reitz Offshore Logistics LLC, N2546B: Accident occurred August 03, 2018 at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW), Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, North Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N2546B

Location: Dallas, TX

Accident Number: CEN18LA315
Date & Time: 08/03/2018, 0810 CDT
Registration: N2546B
Aircraft: COLUMBIA AIRCRAFT MFG LC41-550FG
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 3, 2018, about 0810 central daylight time, a Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing LC42-550FG, N2546B, departed the taxiway and collided with a taxiway sign while taxiing at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), Dallas, Texas. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Reitz Offshore Logistics, LLC, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight that departed Wiley Post Airport (PWA), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, about 0715.

According to the pilot, after an uneventful landing on runway 17L he was issued taxi instructions to a fixed base operator (FBO) on the general aviation ramp. The pilot reported that the taxi was uneventful until the right turn from taxiway K to taxiway Z. He stated that the airplane did not respond to a full application of right rudder and brake pedal. Additionally, an application of the left brake pedal did not slow the airplane. The airplane departed the taxiway and went into a grass median where the right wing impacted a lighted taxiway sign.

A postaccident examination of the airplane was completed by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors with the North Texas Flight Standards District Office. The right wing upper and lower composite skins were fractured and crushed over an area measuring about 2.5 ft wide. The FAA inspectors noted that both right and left main landing gear brake pads were worn excessively, which allowed brake fluid to leak past their respective O-ring seals when the cockpit brake pedals were depressed. Additionally, the right main tire was uninflated and exhibited rotational scoring where the wheel rim had contacted the tire. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: COLUMBIA AIRCRAFT MFG
Registration: N2546B
Model/Series: LC41-550FG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:  No
Operator: Reitz Offshore Logistics, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DFW, 607 ft msl
Observation Time: 0753 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 11000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Oklahoma City, OK (PWA)
Destination:  Dallas, TX (DFW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.897222, -97.037778 (est)

Modification 1 of 1
01/16/2007

THE FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT WAS REMOVED TO FACILITATE INSTALLATION OF THE FERRY FUEL SYSTEM SEATS 2, 3, & 4, & THREE 02 BOTTLES. INSTALLED: 230 GAL CAPACITY SYNTHETIC BLADDER TANK AFT OF PILOT SEAT AREA AND A 30 GAL CAPACITY SYNTHETIC BLADDER TANK IN CO-PILOT SEAT AREA TANKS ARE SECURED TO CARGO HOLD DOWN RINGS AND SEAT BELT ATTACH POINTS WITH NYLON STRAPS. FUEL ROUTED FROM FERRY TANKS THROUGH FLEXIBLE LINES, PUMPS AND VALVES OUT THE LEFT HAND WING ROOT OUT THROUGH THE WING INTO A SPECIAL FUEL CAP. AN HF RADIO SYSTEM INSTALLED CONSISTING OF A KENWOOD TRANSCEIVER MODEL #TS-50 AND A SMART TURNER MODEL #S6-230. A LONG WIRE ANTENNA ALSO INSTALLED. SYSTEMS WERE FUNCTIONALLY TESTED OK WEIGHT AND BALANCE ADDENDUM FOR OVER GROSS WEIGHT OPERATION. THESE SYSTEMS TO BE REMOVED AND AIRCRAFT RETURNED TO NORMAL CONFIGURATION AFTER FERRY FLIGHT TERMINATES. NO PERSON MAY OPERATE THIS AIRCRAFT AS ALTERED, UNLESS IT HAS WITHIN IT AN APPROPR
IATE AND CURRENT SPECIAL FLIGHT PERMIT ISSUED UNDER FAR PART 21.

Jensen ICP Savannah, N951RA: Accident occurred August 05, 2018 near West Desert Airpark (UT99), Fairfield, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N951RA

Location: Fairfield, UT
Accident Number: WPR18TA212
Date & Time: 08/05/2018, 0800 MDT
Registration: N951RA
Aircraft: ICP Savannah
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 05, 2018, about 0800 mountain daylight time, an experimental Jensen ICP Savannah airplane, N951RA, encountered a downdraft and impacted terrain short of the runway at the West Desert Airpark, Fairfield, Utah. The private pilot received minor injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The personal cross-country flight originated from Spanish Fork Airport Springville-Woodhouse Field, Spanish Fork, Utah, about 0700 and was destined for Fairfield.

The pilot stated that while on the base leg of the traffic pattern, the airplane experienced a loss of lift. Despite his attempts to arrest the descent by adding full throttle, the airplane collided with the desert terrain short of the runway.

The pilot opined that the airplane had likely encountered a severe downdraft and the engine power was not sufficient to overcome the resulting descent rate. He thought that the accident may have been prevented if he had configured the airplane to land in a steeper and higher approach combined with more airspeed. He further stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ICP
Registration: N951RA
Model/Series: Savannah
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPVU, 4497 ft msl
Observation Time: 1356 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Spanish Fork, UT (SPK)
Destination: Fairfield, UT (UT99) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  40.262222, -112.093056 (est)

Bellanca 17-31A Turbo Viking, newly registered to and operated by the pilot, N93668: Accident occurred October 16, 2016 at McAlester Regional Airport (KMLC), Pittsburg County, Oklahoma


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N93668 



Location: McAlester, OK
Accident Number: CEN17LA019
Date & Time: 10/16/2016, 1205 CDT
Registration: N93668
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17-31A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On October 16, 2016, at 1205 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-31A, N93668, experienced a loss of engine power during climb from a touch-and-go landing on runway 20 at Mc Alester Regional Airport (MLC), Mc Alester, Oklahoma. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight instructor and a private pilot/airplane owner received serious injuries. The airplane was newly registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an airplane checkout instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Sundance Airport (HSD), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, about 0930.

A National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/Operator Accident/Incident Report (form 6120.1) was not received from the pilot.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Coordinator for the accident, the flight was for the purposes of an aircraft checkout and flight review for the pilot. An aircraft bill of sale showed the pilot as the purchaser of the airplane and was dated October 13, 2016.

The flight instructor stated, in his form 6120.1, that the airplane was preflighted and topped off with fuel at HSD. He stated that his flight planning calculations indicated there would be 30 gallons of fuel remaining upon arrival at MLC. He stated that the flight departed at 0930 and was flown to Ponca City Regional Airport (PNC), Ponca City, Oklahoma, where an instrument approach and a touch-and-go landing were performed. He then flew to Tulsa International Airport (TUL), Tulsa, Oklahoma, where a touch-and-go landing was performed, followed by a flight to MLC.

The flight instructor stated that during a visual approach to MLC, the left fuel tank was selected since it was the fullest tank. The flight instructor stated that at MLC, the fuel gauges indicated the left fuel tank was less than ½ full, and the right fuel tank was above ¼ full. The auxiliary fuel tank was full. After a touch-and-go landing on runway 20, the airplane experienced a loss of power while climbing through 100 feet above ground level. The flight instructor told the pilot to fly a best glide speed. The flight instructor verified that the fuel selector was positioned to the left fuel tank, the mixture was full rich, and the propeller and throttle were in their full forward positions. The flight instructor stated that about two seconds elapsed from the time of the engine power loss to his flaring the airplane for landing.

Post-accident examination revealed the airplane touched down on a field about 200 feet south of the departure end runway 20. The airplane impacted terrain upright and slid 30-40 feet sustaining substantial damage to both wing spars; no post-impact fire ensued. Damage to the propeller blades were consistent with torsional rotation.

The left and right tanks contained no useable fuel. The auxiliary fuel tank was approximately full. The main fuel supply line from the fire wall to the gascolator, to the engine driven pump, to the fuel servo and to the flow divider were disconnected to check for the presence of fuel, and no or only several drops of liquid consistent in odor with aviation fuel was present. These lines were intact and not broken open. The bottom fuselage area near the fuel selector sustained impact damage, and the fuel lines were separated at the fuel selector valve fittings. The gascolator screen did not contain debris, and the gascolator bowl contained a few drops of liquid consistent in odor with aviation fuel.

Post-accident examination of the fuel selector was unable to determine selector position due to shifting during impact. The pilot stated that he could not detect the fuel detent and moved the selector to the left fuel tank position using the position indicator light as a reference.

The airplane total time at the last annual inspection was 2,724.15 hours. The engine was a Lycoming IO-540-K1E5 with serial number L-11719-48. The airplane total time since new at the annual inspection was 2,489.15 hours. The tachometer reading at the accident site was 2,480.20 hours.

The engine was rotated through and air was drawn into and expelled from the bottom spark plug holes after these spark plugs were removed. The compression exhibited during engine rotation by hand through the bottom spark plug holes was low. Engine and valve train continuity to the accessory section was confirmed. Both magnetos were rotated and electrical continuity through the ignition harness was confirmed.

The left turbocharger was Garrett Allied Signal, part number 600572-00, serial number 1245 and the right turbocharger was Rajay Industries, part number 315 F 10-2, serial number 2544. Both turbocharger impellers were able to be rotated by hand. There was no record that the turbochargers had been overhauled since the original engine installation at the time that the airplane was manufactured. The turbocharger exhaust bypass valves contained dirt and debris. The exhaust pipes were corroded to a thickness consistent with an unairworthy condition. Duct and packing tape was used to secure a piece of engine baffle to the front of the engine.

The engine had safety wire installed in place of required hardware that included cotter pins, nuts, bolts and washers.

A post-accident calibration check of the fuel tank transmitters was not performed.

The flight instructor stated the he "trusted" the airplane owner's maintenance of the airplane. The flight instructor stated that he did not use the electric auxiliary fuel pump during selection of fuel tanks from the right main fuel tank to the left main fuel tank. He did not attempt use the electric auxiliary fuel pump following the engine power loss because of the elapsed time from the engine power loss to landing the airplane. He said that the use of the electric auxiliary fuel pump would not have remediated fuel because there was not enough time available for it to take effect. He said that he now teaches to change fuel tank selection outside of the airport traffic pattern because the engine is operating at a greater fuel flow demand than in the traffic pattern.

The airplane operations manual states that the electric auxiliary switch is provided for only starting and in the event the engine driven fuel pump fails. The operations manual checklist for landing states that the fuel selector is to be selected to the fullest tank. 



Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/09/2016
Flight Time:   2983 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model), 1530 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 74 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 34 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/07/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 254.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Registration: N93668
Model/Series: 17-31A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1973
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 73-32-119
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3325 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2724.15 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-K1E5
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MLC, 771 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 CDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots / 21 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 200°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tulsa, OK (HSD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Ardmore, OK (ADM)
Type of Clearance: Traffic Advisory; VFR
Departure Time: 1030 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: McAlester Regional Airport (MLC)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 771 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 20
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5602 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:   35.473611, 96.309444 (est)

























































NTSB Identification: CEN17LA019

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2016 in McAlester, OK
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17-31A, registration: N93668
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2016, at 1205 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-31A, N93668, experienced a total loss of engine power during an initial climb from a touch and go landing on runway 20 at Mcalester Regional Airport (MLC), Mcalester, Oklahoma. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight instructor and a private pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was newly registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an airplane checkout instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Sundance Airport, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Zenith CH-701, N3701M: Accident occurred October 15, 2016 in Albrightsville, Penn Forest Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania
Jabiru USA; Shelbyville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N3701M



Location: Albrightsville, PA
Accident Number: ERA17LA016
Date & Time: 10/15/2016, 1540 EDT
Registration: N3701M
Aircraft: HATCHER RODERICK R CH701
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 15, 2016, about 1540 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zenith CH701, N3701M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Albrightsville, Pennsylvania. The private pilot sustained serious injuries and one passenger had minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Benton Airport (PA40), Benton, Pennsylvania about 1455, and was destined for Pegasus Air Park (50PA), Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

The pilot reported that he was about 8 minutes from landing and preparing to descend from 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl) to 1,400 feet msl. The airplane made a "slight lurch" and the engine rpm dropped, followed by a complete loss of power. He placed the carburetor heat to the high setting and established best glide airspeed of 50 to 55 mph. The fuel selector valve was checked, and an engine restart was attempted. The engine initially started; however, it would not develop power and shut down after a few seconds. A second restart was attempted with the same results. A third restart was attempted, and the engine would turn over but not start. The pilot slowed the airplane as much as possible and prepared for a forced landing into trees. The airplane settled into the trees and came to a stop on its left side. The pilot and passenger exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage was confirmed. An examination of the engine and fuel system did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction, fuel blockage, or fuel contamination.

The pilot reported that the airplane's fuel tanks were topped off earlier that day with about 20 gallons of fuel, and there were about 15 gallons on board the airplane when the accident flight began.

The airplane was equipped with a Dynon FlightDEK D-180 electronic flight information system (EFIS) and a Garmin GPSMap196, both of which captured the accident flight. According to recovered data, the flight began at 1454 and terminated at 1539. A review of the Dynon engine monitor data showed that engine parameters were normal and stabilized until a decrease in rpm, oil pressure, cylinder head temperature, oil temperature, and exhaust gas temperature simultaneously occurred about 1535:30. The EFIS also confirmed there was fuel in both wing tanks when the loss of engine power occurred.

The airplane was a high wing, tricycle landing gear, short takeoff and landing (STOL) design. It was equipped with a Jabiru 3300A engine and a Sensenich fixed pitch propeller. The total aircraft time at the time of the accident was about 60 hours. The engine was sent to the Jabiru USA facility at Shelbyville, Tennessee for further examination and a test run.

There was some impact damage to the engine. The engine mounts were bent and the propeller flange had a very slight deformation. The carburetor was filled with oil due to the engine being shipped inverted. The carburetor was removed and the oil was cleaned out. There was no water and no contaminants inside the carburetor other than the engine oil. The carburetor was then reinstalled. The No. 3 cylinder rocker cover was dented from impact and was replaced with a spare for the run. Dried blue residue with the appearance of fuel staining was observed on the outside of the carburetor bowl; however, the carburetor did not leak.

The engine started on the first attempt after engaging the starter for about 2 seconds. The engine initially emitted oily smoke (a light blue/gray color) which cleared after about 8 seconds of operation. The engine was run for about 6 minutes and 30 seconds with no anomalies noted. The engine was run to a peak rpm of 2,670 and oil temperature and pressure were within the green bands. The run was subsequently terminated by the investigation team.

Pocono Mountains Municipal Airport (MPO) was located about 12 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1553, about 14 minutes after the accident, the temperature and dew point were 57° and 36° F, respectively. According to the carburetor icing probability chart in FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, dated June 30, 2009, the temperature/dew point conditions were conducive to serious icing at glide power.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/25/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/04/2015
Flight Time:  530 hours (Total, all aircraft), 56 hours (Total, this make and model), 403 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HATCHER RODERICK R
Registration: N3701M
Model/Series: CH701 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 7038
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/18/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 65 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 65 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: JABIRU
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 3300
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 120 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MPO, 1915 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 30°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.34 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Benton, PA (PA40)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Stroudsburg, PA (50PA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1454 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.975000, -75.536667 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA016
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 15, 2016 in Albrightsville, PA
Aircraft: HATCHER RODERICK R CH701, registration: N3701M
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 15, 2016, at 1535 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zenith CH701, N3701M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Albrightsville, Pennsylvania. The private pilot sustained serious injuries and one passenger had minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Benton Airport (PA40), Benton, Pennsylvania about 1450 and was destined for Pegasus Air Park (50PA), Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

The pilot reported that he was about 8 minutes from landing and preparing to descend from 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl) to 1,400 feet msl. The airplane made a "slight lurch" and the engine rpm dropped, followed by a complete loss of power. He placed the carburetor heat to the high setting and established best glide airspeed of 50 to 55 mph. The fuel selector valve was checked and an engine restart was attempted. The engine initially started; however, it would not develop power and shut down after a few seconds. A second restart was attempted with the same results. A third restart was attempted and the engine would turn over but not start. He slowed the airplane as much as possible and prepared for a forced landing into trees. The airplane settled into the trees and came to a stop on its left side. The pilot and his passenger exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage was confirmed. A cursory examination of the engine and fuel system did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction. 

The airplane was a high wing, tricycle landing gear, short takeoff and landing (STOL) design. It was fitted with a Jabiru 3300A engine and a Sensenich fixed pitch propeller. The total aircraft time at the time of the accident was about 60 hours.

The engine was retained for further examination.

Short Brothers SD3-60 Sherpa, registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a public aircraft in support of the Forest Service, N148Z: Incident occurred October 13, 2016 at Missoula International Airport (KMSO), Montana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aviation Incident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N148Z  


Location: Missoula, MT
Incident Number: WPR17IA007
Date & Time: 10/13/2016, 1645 MDT
Registration: N148Z
Aircraft: SHORT BROS SD3 60 SHERPA
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

On October 13, 2016, about 1645 mountain daylight time, a Short Bros SD3-60 Sherpa airplane, N148Z, sustained minor damage following a nose gear collapse during landing, at the Missoula International Airport (MSO) Missoula, Montana. The two airline transport pilots, were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), as a public aircraft in support of the Forest Service. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the ferry flight which originated from Kingman Airport, Kingman, Arizona, about 1253.

The pilots reported that prior to landing, they had an unsafe nose gear indication. After multiple unsuccessful attempts to get the nose gear to extend and indicate that it was down and locked, they decided to come in for a landing. During the landing roll, as the airplane's nose was lowered, the nose gear collapsed, and the forward section of the bottom of the fuselage, made contact with the runway surface. Once the airplane came to a stop, both pilots egressed.

Examination of the airplane by the operator revealed minor damage on the underside of the fuselage.

The airplane was returning to MSO, on its first flight, after being re-painted by a vendor in Kingman, Arizona. According to the operator, examination of the nose gear revealed that it failed to lock in the extended position and collapsed during landing. The flight crew attempted to extend and lock the nose gear during the flight but were unsuccessful.

Post incident examination of the nose gear down-lock actuator piston (plunger), revealed that its chrome surface had been painted, which resulted in the locking piston not engaging, and prevented the locking of the nose gear during landing gear extension. The painting of the nose gear down-lock actuator piston was not observed by maintenance personnel or the flight crew on their pre-flight exterior checks.

The airplane manufacturer Shorts issued a SD3-60 Sherpa Service Information Letter (SIL) Sherpa L-23, in April 2007, titled: Servicing/Painting – Removal of masking material/paint from nose landing gear down-lock actuator piston after cleaning/painting operations. The SIL described a similar incident where the nose gear failed to lock in the down position, on the first flight after the airplane had been re-painted. The subsequent investigation revealed paint spray on the exposed chrome piston of the nose landing gear down-lock actuator. The SIL stated "to ensure that all masking material has been removed from the exposed piston after cleaning/painting, and that the piston is free from any paint or cleaning materials."

Additionally, the landing gear emergency accumulator was observed during the pre-flight checks to indicate below the specified pressure. The accumulator was serviced by maintenance to an adequate pressure, prior to takeoff. However, the pressure bled down during the incident flight, and when the emergency landing gear extension was used, the accumulator did not have adequate pressure. According to the operator's maintenance inspector, when activated, a fully serviced emergency accumulator forces the rapid application of hydraulic pressure into the system, however, according to the airplane's manufacturer, this is reliant on the main system hydraulic pressure being depleted so that the emergency pressure can change a control valve position. In this situation, the emergency pressure would be greater than the residual pressure of the failed main hydraulic system.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/12/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/06/2015
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 8715 hours (Total, all aircraft), 148 hours (Total, this make and model), 7755 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 82 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 49, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/25/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/02/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6424 hours (Total, all aircraft), 210 hours (Total, this make and model), 4921 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SHORT BROS
Registration: N148Z
Model/Series: SD3 60 SHERPA SHERPA VAR
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1994
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate:
Serial Number: SH3428
Landing Gear Type: Hull; Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/24/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 5203.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-65R
Registered Owner: USDA Forest Service
Rated Power: 1298 hp
Operator: USDA Forest Service
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MSO, 3206 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1653 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 7000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: KINGMAN, AZ (IGM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: MISSOULA, MT (MSO)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1253 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MISSOULA INTL (MSO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 3206 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 9501 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 46.916389, -114.090556 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17IA007
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Incident occurred Thursday, October 13, 2016 in Missoula, MT
Aircraft: SHORT BROS SD3 60 SHERPA, registration: N148Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On October 13, 2016, about 1645 Mountain daylight time, a Short Bros SD3-60 Sherpa, N148Z, sustained minor damage following a nose gear collapse during landing, at the Missoula International Airport (MSO) Missoula, Montana. Two Airline Transport Pilots, the only occupants of the airplane, were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), as a public use aircraft in support of the Forest Service. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the ferry flight which originated from Kingman Airport, Kingman, Arizona, about 1253 Mountain standard time.

The pilots reported that prior to landing, they had an unsafe nose gear indication. After multiple unsuccessful attempts to get the nose gear to extend and indicate that it was down and locked, they came in for a landing. During the landing roll, as the airplane's nose was lowered, the nose gear collapsed, and the forward section of the bottom of the fuselage, made contact with the runway surface. Once the airplane came to a stop, the flight crew egressed.

Examination of the airplane by the operator revealed that the underside of the fuselage, near the nose wheel, sustained minor damage.