Wednesday, July 5, 2017

New airport manager for Sikorsky Memorial Airport (KBDR), Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut

STRATFORD — Bridgeport officials launched a national search for a new airport manager, and all along she was in their backyard.

Michelle Muoio, who lives in Shelton and works for Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. in Stratford, accepted the $98,298 position running the Bridgeport-owned, Stratford-based Sikorsky Memorial Airport. She starts July 5.

John Ricci, who ran the airport for years until 2013 and now helps oversee it as head of Bridgeport’s public facilities department, said Muoio was chosen from 13 applicants and three finalists — one from Kansas and one from Colorado. The opening was advertised through the American Association of Airport Executives.

Ricci interviewed Muoio along with Kurt Sendlein, an airport administrator on loan to Sikorsky from the Connecticut Airport Authority since early last year.

“Once we saw Michelle’s resume, experience and education, and after we sat with her, I’d already made up my mind,” Ricci said. He added it helped that Muoio was local and would not experience the “sticker shock” of the area’s high cost of living.

She was subsequently unanimously approved by the Airport Commission.

For the past nine years Muoio has worked in the flight operations section of Sikorsky Aircraft, moving up from coordinator to supervisor to manager. Between 2004 and 2008 she was employed in New York with airport management and consulting firms and as a safety inspector for the Federal Aviation Administration.

“She has very impressive credentials,” said Bridgeport City Council President Tom McCarthy, who sits on the airport commission. “She was local and understands the need for marketing and the value of the airport for economic development.”

Muoio’s arrival, it is hoped, draws to a close a turbulent few years at Sikorsky during which city officials had to implement a long-delayed, federally required runway safety upgrade amidst sudden, sometimes shocking, management changes.

Ricci was shepherding that project through until he was fired by then-Mayor Bill Finch. He subsequently aided former Mayor Joe Ganim in his 2015 bid to oust Finch during that year’s Democratic primary. Ganim put Ricci in charge of public facilities.

Ricci’s successor running the airport, Pauline Mize, died from cancer in 2015. And her successor, Steve Ford, died suddenly in early 2016 after a fall at his home.

The runway work had been temporarily halted in June, 2015 after a construction worker was killed when the gas-powered saw he was using kicked back and struck him in the neck. Then another contractor, over the following Labor Day weekend , allegedly drove a truck through an area where planes taxi, alarming the FAA.

Federal officials put a lengthier stop to the runway work and audited the airport’s management and policies. That ultimately resulted in the Connecticut Airport Authority, which runs several other facilities but not Sikorsky, sending Sendlein to help satisfy the FAA’s demands and see the safety upgrades to their conclusion.

Ganim and Ricci have both made it clear they believe the airport, which continually operates in the red, should be sold. And, as previously reported, the city is hoping the buyer would be the Connecticut Airport Authority or CAA.

Is the hiring of Muoio proof that Sikorsky will be on the city’s books for several years to come?

“The sign that you can take from that is that Kurt’s (tenure) was going to expire,” McCarthy said. “I love Kurt. He did a great job. But we were in need of an airport manager.”

Ricci said Muoio was told about a possible “takeover” in the future, “particularly by the CAA.”

“(But) they’re going to need a manager whether they take it over or not,” Ricci said. “And my thinking is even if we came to some kind of deal with CAA, they’re still a couple years away.” Ricci added it would also require a lengthy FAA approval process.

But, Ricci emphasized, “We’re making every effort to get out of the airport business.”

David Faile, president of the Friends of Sikorsky Airport, said he was sorry to lose Sendlein. Faile said he learned a new manager had been hired and was awaiting the details.

“She’s had a lot of aviation jobs,” Faile said about Muoio’s resume. “Maybe she’s great. Hope she is. I hope she’s a hands on person. That was the great thing about Kurt.”

http://www.ctpost.com

10 pounds of marijuana found in suitcase at Louis Armstrong International Airport (KMSY)

Safiya Zina, left, of California, Michael Lewis, center, of New Orleans, and Sarah Abd-Elaziz, of California, were arrested, accused in a scheme to transport almost 10 pounds of marijuana to New Orleans, according to authorities.


A suitcase logged into the lost and found at Louis Armstrong International Airport in Kenner contained almost 10 pounds of marijuana, according to the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office. Narcotics investigators arrested three people after a woman showed up and tried to claim the luggage.

Sheriff's Office detectives went to the airport, located at 900 Airline Drive, Kenner, Thursday (June 29) after receiving a report of an abandoned suitcase that contained drugs. Inside, authorities found 9.92 pounds of marijuana, an arrest report said.

Cedric Reed is also accused of beating a woman with a handgun earlier that day, according to authorities.

One day later, Safiya Zina, 38, of Antioch, Calif., showed up at the airport and tried to claim the suitcase, the arrest report said. Investigators detained Zina and questioned her about the bag.

She told them she was to be paid $1,000 to bring the bag to New Orleans from California and turn it over in exchange for money that she would take back to California, the report said.

Investigators allowed the exchange to occur and took into custody the two people who had arranged to meet Zina: Michael Lewis, 27, of New Orleans, and Sarah Abd-Elaziz, 29, of Oakland, Calif., the report said. The pair had $3,600 in their possession, according to authorities.

Zina was arrested Friday and booked into the Jefferson Parish Correctional Center in Gretna with possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute and possession of marijuana. Authorities searched her Kenner hotel room and found a small amount of marijuana, the arrest report said.

Bond for Zina was set at $20,500. But she was released Sunday without bond because of crowding at the jail.

Lewis was booked with conspiracy to possess or distribute drugs. He was released Saturday on a $20,000 bond.

Abd-Elaziz was booked with conspiracy to possess or distribute drugs and drug possess. She is accused of possessing drugs for which she had no prescription, the report said. She was released Saturday on a $25,000 bond.

http://www.nola.com

Dafoe TCOW Smith Cub, N810GL: Accident occurred July 14, 2015 at Cascade Airport (U70), Valley County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N810GL

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA218
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 14, 2015 in Cascade, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2016
Aircraft: DAFOE GERALD W TCOW SMITH CUB, registration: N810GL
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot/owner of the ultralight airplane was conducting a personal flight. He stated that, after landing, he applied the brakes to slow the airplane. He did not feel any right brake resistance, and the airplane swerved left due to left brake application. He attempted to correct with rudder inputs, but the airplane ground looped to the left, which resulted in the right landing gear collapsing and damage to the right wing. The pilot stated that the he had recently been having ongoing difficulty with the airplane’s right brake function.
Examination and disassembly of the right brake master cylinder revealed that the master cylinder piston O-ring had a gouge in it. The gouge likely allowed brake fluid to bypass the seal, which resulted in a loss of brake pressure and, therefore, reduced effectiveness after landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A gouge in the right brake master cylinder piston O-ring, which resulted in a loss of brake pressure and reduced effectiveness after landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s decision to operate the airplane with an ongoing brake issue.

On July 14, 2015, at 1030 mountain daylight time, a Dafoe TCOW Smith Cub, N810GL, ground looped after landing, collapsing the right landing gear and substantially damaging the right wing. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to the pilot, and was operated as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot stated to the NTSB investigator that after landing he applied brakes to slow the airplane. He did not feel any right brake resistance, and the airplane swerved left due to left brake application. He attempted to correct with rudder but the airplane ground looped to the left, collapsing the right landing gear, and damaging the right wing.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane and the brake system. He did not note any unusual wear on the pins or brake pads. He did note that the owner had installed an additional brake fluid reservoir to the right brake master cylinder. There was no indication of brake fluid leak. The pilot/owner did state to the inspector that he had been having on-going issues with the right brake.

The NTSB investigator authorized the pilot to disassemble and examine the right brake system. The pilot reported back that he found a gouge in the master cylinder piston o-ring that would allow brake fluid to bypass the seal.

Students who complete new drone program could earn $150 per hour



An area school is helping create skilled workers for a high-demand and high-flying industry. Putnam County High School students can become commercially licensed drone pilots through a new career pathway.

The drone, or unmanned aircraft, industry is expected to have an economic impact of $82 billion in the United States by 2025, according to a report from the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. In addition, the Federal Aviation Administration predicts the number of commercially licensed drone pilots to increase from 20,000 in 2016 to as many 400,000 by 2021.

Putnam High’s drone pathway was created last year through a partnership with Mercer University and Advanced Airspace Management, a company that provides aerial imaging services. Principal Marc Dastous said there are a few other drone programs in the country, but he didn’t know of any others that involve collaboration with a business.

Hands-on experience

The curriculum for the two-semester program, which can accommodate 15 students, was developed by Advanced Airspace Management co-founder John Granich and Mercer electrical and computer engineering professor Anthony Choi✔, who is also involved with AAM. Granich and Glenn Morris, chairman of the Putnam High’s Career Technical Agriculture Education department, provided instruction for the courses.

Students master flying on computer simulators and lower-end models before taking higher-quality drones into the air, Dastous said. With support from Parrish Construction, the school was able to build its own drone port — an airport for drones — with a runway and landing area in the spring.

Students get a foundation of the basics as they learn about FAA rules and regulations, aircraft safety, weather, navigation, airport operations, aircraft stability, time management for flights, downloading data, taking photos, and air cinematography, surveying and geology, Granich said.

They also take the FAA’s commercial licensing test, which is required to fly drones for work. Twelve students participated in the pathway last year, and nine now are FAA certified, he said.

By going through this program at Putnam High, students are able to get hands-on experience with real technology and see how math, science and engineering apply to the real world, Choi said.

“You can have a social effect on the world through engineering, and that’s a message that we really need to get across at the middle school and high school level, because I think we’re missing that,” he said.

Looking ahead

Students can take their drone knowledge into the military or private industry or learn more advanced skills in college, Granich said. Three Putnam High graduates who completed the pathway are attending Mercer on engineering scholarships and another is going to an aeronautical college.

Drones can be used to do jobs related to precision agriculture, construction, mining, law enforcement, cinematography, news reporting and the military. For example, drone pilots might be contracted to survey crops, inspect buildings or record aerial footage for films.

Granich hopes the career pathway at Putnam High will produce at least 10 certified drone pilots each year. Students can get placed in jobs at Advanced Airspace Management or other companies across the state and country. The average drone pilot earns between $100 and $150 an hour.

“We want to build the workforce in our area,” Dastous said. “We need to do what’s in the best interest of the kids. If a student can leave with a skill that they can earn a living with and be self-sufficient, we’ve accomplished what we’ve set out to.”

Advanced Airspace Management will transition out of the drone program this year and leave it in the hands of the school to fully manage, Granich said. Granich and Choi plan to pitch the curriculum to other school districts in Georgia.

“We wanted to leave a lasting impact, an actual-built-from-the-ground-up curriculum that would stay at the school and, if successful, then be transferred to other school systems,” Choi said. “We knew that the (unmanned airspace systems) industry was a booming industry.”

As a separate project, Choi and Granich will ask legislators to fund an initiative to train 300 veterans and leg amputees to become drone pilots, Granich said.

Partnership with NASA

Mercer University is able to provide other education outreach activities to the Putnam school system through grant funding from NASA.

On March 23, the high school hosted an unmanned systems balloon launch and workshops with experts from Kennedy Space Center and NASA, Choi said. Thirteen Mercer engineering students and Putnam High School students in the drone pathway also were involved.

High-altitude balloons, equipped with technology to collect and transmit data, can travel to heights where the atmosphere is thin and conditions are similar to space. About 300 students were on site for the launch, and the rest of the county’s students and countless others watched the event through a live-stream online.

NASA is supporting Mercer in creating a Center for High Altitude Payload Delivery Systems, through which schools could design and submit high-altitude balloon experiments. Putnam County will be one of the first school systems to try it out, Choi said.

In addition, Mercer is collaborating with NASA on a project to track and live-stream on NASA TV the total lunar eclipse Aug. 21. Check back with The Telegraph as the date nears to learn more about the project.

http://www.macon.com

Grumman American AA-1B Trainer, N8969L: Accident occurred July 18, 2015 near Lancaster Airport (KLNS), Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA276
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 18, 2015 in Lititz, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA1B, registration: N8969L
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that he and a student pilot were performing touch-and-go landings in the airport traffic pattern at night; the instructor was flying the airplane. While on the downwind leg for the third and final landing, he reduced the engine power and the engine subsequently experienced a partial loss of power. The instructor switched the fuel tank selector and attempted to restore power, but was unsuccessful. He then performed a forced landing to a cornfield, during which the airplane nosed over. The instructor’s statement did not address whether he used carburetor heat during the accident flight, and the carburetor heat control was found in the full-forward (off) position. An examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical anomalies with the airframe or engine. The spark plugs were light gray in color and exhibited normal wear. The fuel quantity onboard the airplane at the time of the accident could not be determined. Although the weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the accumulation of carburetor icing at glide power, the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the engine found no mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8969L




NTSB Identification: ERA15LA276
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 18, 2015 in Lititz, PA
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA1B, registration: N8969L
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 18, 2015, at 2125 eastern daylight time, a Grumman American AA-1B, N8969L, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after a partial loss of engine power in Lititz, Pennsylvania. The flight instructor and a passenger, who was a student pilot were not injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local personal flight was operating in the traffic pattern at Lancaster Airport (LNS), Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, the airplane had not been flown in a while, and the purpose of the flight was to "take it around the airport pattern for a few landings." He and the student pilot had just completed a flying lesson in another airplane, and he invited the student to fly with him on the accident flight. Prior to the flight, the airplane's battery required a jump-start to start the engine, after which the flight instructor ran the engine for 20 minutes to charge the battery. He shut down the engine, restarted it successfully, and then repositioned the airplane to add 13 gallons of non-ethanol automotive fuel, and estimated the total fuel quantity on board was 16 gallons. Prior to takeoff, he performed a preflight inspection and engine run-up with no issues noted. The flight departed runway 31, remained in the traffic pattern, and performed two touch-and-go landings. On the third and final circuit in the traffic pattern, while on the downwind leg, the pilot reduced the engine power and selected 15° of flaps to initiate a descent to the runway. When the airplane was on the base leg of the traffic pattern, the engine experienced a partial loss of power. The pilot raised the flaps, increased the mixture to rich, and switched the fuel selector in an attempt to restart the engine. He then elected to perform a forced landing and turned toward a cornfield. After landing in the cornfield, during the landing roll, the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the outboard section of the right wing leading edge, fuselage nose section, and rudder were substantially damaged. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the control surfaces. The throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat controls were found in the full forward position, and remained connected to their respective locations on the engine. The inspector was unable to examine the fuel tanks for fuel quantity due to the airplane's inverted orientation. Crop damage leading up to the wreckage was about 90 feet long and oriented east-northeast.

A subsequent examination of the engine by an FAA inspector revealed that all four cylinders exhibited thumb compression and both magnetos produced spark on all towers. Crankshaft and valvetrain continuity were established by manual rotation of the propeller. The top spark plugs were removed, the electrodes were intact, grey in color, and a small amount of oil was present on the No. 1 electrode. The wings had previously been removed, which precluded inspection of the fuel tanks.

According to the airplane maintenance records, it had accrued about 2 hours of operation between November 2012 and March 2014, 1 hour of operation between March 2014 and March 2015, and 0.6 hour between March 2015 and the time of the accident, including the accident flight. The most recent annual inspection was performed on March 20, 2015. At that time, the engine had accrued a total of 3,011 hours, with 1,079 hours since overhaul.

The pilot held commercial and flight instructor certificates with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. According to his logbook, he had accrued a total of 320 flight hours, and he reported 2 hours of flight experience in the same make and model as the accident airplane. His most recent first class medical certificate was issued on July 16, 2015.

The recorded weather at LNS, at 2153, reported wind from 050° at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; few clouds at 11,000 ft above ground level; temperature 23° C; dew point 22° C; and an altimeter setting of 29.92 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, indicated a probability of serious icing at glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident. The pilot did not mention if he utilized the application of carburetor heat during the accident sequence.

O'Dell Aeromaster, N55J: Fatal accident occurred July 30, 2015 at Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport (KSLR), Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA329
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 30, 2015 in Sulphur Springs, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: O'DELL AEROMASTER, registration: N55J
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot had purchased the experimental amateur-built airplane about 2 weeks before the accident. The previous owner had provided the pilot with a 1-hour familiarization flight, during which he repeatedly told the pilot not to lean the mixture control on takeoff. During takeoff on the familiarization flight, the pilot leaned the mixture, resulting in a total loss of engine power while still on the runway. After advancing the mixture control, the engine restarted and they continued the flight. The pilot again leaned the mixture control at altitude, which resulted in the engine running rough. 

Following the familiarization flight, the pilot departed to an unknown destination, and, during that flight, he landed at an en route airport due to a rough-running engine. Maintenance personnel at the airport found that the airplane had 26 mechanical discrepancies and was unairworthy. Two mechanics and two experimental aircraft builders told the pilot that the airplane was unsafe and should be taken apart and "trailered" home. The mechanic repaired a leaking brake, replaced all of the spark plugs, serviced the oil, and ran the engine. During the postmaintenance engine run, the magnetos were checked and appeared to function properly, and the engine ran smoothly. The pilot then departed on the accident flight. The mechanic stated that the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power about 200 ft above ground level and the airplane entered a left turn, which subsequently developed into a stall/spin. The airplane completed about 1/4 turn in the spin before impacting terrain. 

Postaccident examination was precluded by damage sustained in the postcrash fire. The investigation was unable to determine if the loss of engine power occurred due to the pilot's improper manipulation of the engine controls, or if there was a mechanical malfunction.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postimpact damage precluded a thorough examination of the airplane. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to maintain control following the loss of engine power, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall/spin.

David L. German


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

 http://registry.faa.gov/N55J



NTSB Identification: CEN15LA329
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 30, 2015 in Sulphur Springs, TX
Aircraft: O'DELL AEROMASTER, registration: N55J
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2015, at 1941 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built O'Dell Aeromaster, N55J, experienced a total loss of engine power and impacted terrain during climb after takeoff from runway 1 (5,001 feet by 75, concrete) at Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport (SLR), Sulphur Springs, Texas. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was recently purchased by the pilot but was still registered to the previous airplane owner. The airplane was operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and was en route to an unknown destination.

Witnesses observed the airplane taxi to the runway and take off, not performing any preflight or engine run-up. The engine ran smoothly until the aircraft was 200 feet above ground level, back-fired and experienced a total loss of engine power. The pilot maintained the same nose-up attitude and turned to the left, causing the left wing to stall. The airplane stalled entered a ½ turn stall-spin toward the left and impacted the ground, left wing and nose first. 

A Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector stated that about two weeks prior to the accident the pilot purchased the accident airplane from the previous airplane owner in Lufkin, Texas, located about 150 miles south of SLR. The previous owner explained the very sensitive engine mixture controls and warned the pilot several times not to lean the engine on takeoff and never below 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl). The previous owner stated that the pilot did not seem to pay attention to his instructions and appeared distracted. The previous owner stated that the pilot mentioned that he could not understand why the engine should not be leaned on takeoff because the pilot said that he always had to lean the mixture on takeoff when he flew other airplane(s). The previous owner explained to the pilot that Lufkin,Texas, was only at 450 feet above msl, not the 4,500 feet msl the pilot was used to. 

The previous owner stated that the pilot did not want any instruction in the airplane, but the previous owner insisted and took the pilot for a one-hour familiarization flight in the airplane. The previous owner stated that during the familiarization flight, the pilot leaned the mixture on takeoff, the engine quit. The previous owner pushed the mixture control back to full rich, the engine started, and the flight continued. The pilot leaned the mixture again during the flight, below 3,000 feet msl, causing the engine to run rough. The previous owner, again, returned to mixture control to full rich, and the engine smoothed out. The pilot, again, was told by the previous owner not to lean the mixture below 3,000 feet msl and never on takeoff.

The previous owner stated that the pilot was "… ancy [sic] and in a hurry to leave". The previous owner stated that the pilot did not have any aviation navigation sectional charts in his possession. The pilot did not preflight the aircraft prior to the departing flight and did not check weather nor file a flight plan for his departure from Lufkin, Texas. The pilot then landed at SLR and reported the engine was running rough to maintenance personnel located at the airport. 

On July 18, 2015, an aircraft mechanic at the SLR examined the airplane and engine and made the following observations:

1. Both airspeed indicators indicate 50 miles per hour while in the hangar.

2. Gascolator leaking fuel.

3. Exhaust leak at number 1 cylinder.

4. No emergency locator transmitter installed in the airplane.

5. No fuel shutoff on the top fuel tank.

6. No fuel quantity indicators.

7. No master switch or circuit breakers.

8. Brake fluid around the right tire. Found the brake piston installed backwards, causing the O-ring to leak.

9. All of the aileron trailing edges were broken away from the aileron ribs.

10. Flying wires and landing wires were too loose.

11. No javelins on wires.

12. No battery master switch installed. The electrical power was always "on".

13. A two sided switch was installed for the starter. One side was "momentary on" and the other switch was glued in place, not functioning.

14. The required "EXPERMENTAL" placard was not installed as required by the Operating Limitations assigned at the time the Special (Experimental) Airworthiness Certificate was issued.

15. A bushing was made by tying a knot in clothes line rope on the throttle shaft in order to act as a travel stop.

16. All installed safety wire were too small and many times backwards.

17. All cotter keys too small for the fasteners.

18. Landing gear bungees too soft and worn out.

19. Right lower wing had a broken rib.

20. The engine had three different types of spark plugs installed, all worn beyond limits and oil fouled.

21. The number 5 cylinder, lower spark plug was found to be finger tight.

22. The engine was 5 quarts low on oil.

23. Various hardware missing from the engine cowling.

24. Fuel line fittings were aluminum, not steel.

25. Fuel lines were hydraulic hoses, not fuel lines.

26. The carburetor was installed backwards.

The mechanic was asked by the pilot to "annual" the aircraft. The mechanic refused, stating that the airplane was in too rough of condition and should be completely dismantled and rebuilt. The pilot was told by two certificated mechanics and two other experiential aircraft builders that the aircraft was unsafe and should be taken apart and "trailered" home.

The mechanic repaired the leaking brake and replaced all of the spark plugs, serviced the oil and ran the engine. The magnetos were checked and appeared to function properly. The engine started easily and appeared to run smoothly.

On July 30, 2015, the pilot pumped 19.7 gallons of fuel into the top fuel tank and asked the mechanic if he would fly with him. The mechanic refused and again told the pilot not to fly the aircraft. 

The airplane was destroyed by a post-crash fire. Impact forces and post-crash fire precluded functional testing of the airplane, engine, and its accessories.

The pilot's last airman medical certificate was issued January 2000 and at that time the pilot reported a total of 151 flight hours.

Cessna 207A, N9620M, Alaska Air Taxi LLC: Accident occurred July 03, 2017 in Hope, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Alaska Air Taxi LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9620M

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA388
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 03, 2017 in Hope, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 207, registration: N9620M

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft force landed.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 18:32:00Z
Regis#: N9620M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C207
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: ALASKA AIR TAXI
City: TRAPPER JOE LAKE
State: ALASKA

Vans RV-8A, N90774: Incident occurred July 04, 2017 at Phoenix–Mesa Gateway Airport (KIWA),Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N90774

Aircraft on taxi, caught fire and was extinguished.

Date: 04-JUL-17
Time: 23:26:00Z
Regis#: N90774
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV8
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: MESA
State: ARIZONA

Cessna P210R Pressurized Centurion, N66NF: Accident occurred July 04, 2017 at Ells Field-Willits Municipal Airport (O28), Mendocino County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N66NF

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA384
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Willits, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA P210, registration: N66NF
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the airplane reported that, while landing and trying to maintain the runway centerline, the airplane was "blown to the east, presumably by either stronger winds or gusts." He added that he continued to descend, while attempting to correct back to the right towards the runway centerline. He further added, that he was "fearing a stall," and elected to "put the plane down in the grass and dirt to the left of the runway." Unable to stop the forward momentum with full application of the brakes, the airplane continued over the edge of the embankment, and came to rest in the trees.

A witness, flying from another airplane in the pattern reported that, the accident airplane did not touch down until the second half of the landing runway. He added that, the airplane was "over the dirt" on the east side of the runway when it touched down and went off the embankment at the end of the runway. He observed the pilot exit the airplane and walk away.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system about 21 nautical miles from the accident site reported, about the time of the accident, the wind was 150° at 12 knots, gusting to 20 knots. The pilot landed on runway 16.

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, N5209U, Colorado Northwestern Community College: Incident occurred July 04, 2017 at Montrose Regional Airport (KMTJ), Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale

Colorado Northwestern Community College: http://registry.faa.gov/N5209U

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 04-JUL-17
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N5209U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MONTROSE
State: COLORADO

Cirrus SR20, N611DA, Aerosim Flight Academy: Accident occurred July 03, 2017 at Orlando Sanford International Airport (KSFB), Seminole County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aerosim Academy Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N611DA

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway into the midfield.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 12:24:00Z
Regis#: N611DA
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Flight Number: CONN462
City: SANFORD
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N6186V, Floriflt LLC: Incident occurred July 03, 2017 at Daytona Beach International Airport (KDAB), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Floriflt LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6186V

Aircraft sustained a tailstrike under unknown circumstances.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 13:30:00Z
Regis#: N6186V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Beech 77, N18328, SkyWay Leasing Inc: Incident occurred July 03, 2017 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

SkyWay Leasing Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N18328

Aircraft force landed on a dirt road during pipeline patrol.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 13:40:00Z
Regis#: N18328
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE77
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LAKELAND
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-28R-200, N722WM, RexAir Sales & Leasing LLC: Incident occurred July 03, 2017 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

RexAir Sales & Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N722WM

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 18:07:00Z
Regis#: N722WM
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA

Ultramagic N-425, N990BR, Orlando Balloon Rides: Incident occurred July 03, 2017 in Orlando, Orange County, Florida



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Buoyant Investments Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N990BR

Hot air balloon, force landed in a pond.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 12:00:00Z
Regis#: N990BR
Aircraft Make: ULTRAMAGIC
Aircraft Model: N425
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ORLANDO
State: FLORIDA

New Hyannis-Worcester Service Represents Latest Expansion for Rectrix



HYANNIS – With their new service between Worcester and Hyannis, Rectrix Aviation continues to expand into the commercial passenger jet market.

The new flight between Worcester Regional Airport and Barnstable Municipal Airport debuted last week and represents the first major expansion of the company’s Hyannis shuttle service. Rectrix, a private charter operator, began running roundtrip passenger flights to and from Nantucket in 2016.

The move is a part of Rectrix’s long-term goals to establish a series of regional routes and scheduled flights.

According to CEO Richard Cawley, the company plans to start service between Worcester, Baltimore-Washington International, and Sarasota, Florida. He said Hyannis would be linked to that route.

“Massachusetts is a great aviation market that is so untapped. It’s unbelievable,” Cawley said.

The expansion efforts follow what the company describes as a successful rollout of the daily Nantucket-Hyannis service last year. Rectrix reported in February they exceeded their projected passenger goals in the first three months of service.

The company, the state’s largest private-jet operator, has expressed optimism that their expansion into scheduled service will continue on an upward trend.

“We have the pockets to do it and we’ll make it successful,” Cawley said.

http://www.capecod.com

Sonex/Sonex, N390SG: Accident occurred July 03, 2017 in Eldon, Miller County, Missouri

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Kansas City, Missouri

http://registry.faa.gov/N390SG

Aircraft force landed in a field and struck a fence.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 21:50:00Z
Regis#: N390SG
Aircraft Make: SONEX
Aircraft Model: SONEX
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ELDON
State: MISSOURI

Cessna 172E, N3518S: Incident occurred July 03, 2017 in Sidney, Cheyenne County, Nebraska,

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

http://registry.faa.gov/N3518S

Aircraft force landed in a field and struck a fence.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N3518S
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SIDNEY
State: NEBRASKA

Cessna 170B, N2774D, Sasquatch Air LLC: Accident occurred June 28, 2017 at Alamogordo-White Sands Regional Airport (KALM), Alamogordo, Otero County, New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Sasquatch Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2774D

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA382
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 28, 2017 in Alamogordo, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 170, registration: N2774D


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, sustained substantial damage.

Date: 28-JUN-17
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N2774D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C170
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALAMOGORDO
State: NEW MEXICO

Van's RV-6, N660PC, AJ Aviation LLC: Incident occurred July 04, 2017 at Santa Fe Municipal Airport (KSAF), New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

AJ Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N660PC

Aircraft on landing, bounced and struck its tail.

Date: 04-JUL-17
Time: 17:34:00Z
Regis#: N660PC
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SANTA FE
State: NEW MEXICO