Saturday, January 17, 2015

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, N7061G: Accident occurred January 17, 2015 at West Michigan Regional Airport (KBIV), Holland, Michigan

NTSB Identification: CEN15CA105
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 17, 2015 in Holland, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/10/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 172K, registration: N7061G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was performing a full stop landing to runway 26 at his home airfield. During the landing roll, a strong gusty crosswind lifted the airplane's left wing, the airplane veered right, and the pilot lost control. The airplane exited the runway and impacted a snow bank where it nosed over and came to rest inverted. The pilot reported no mechanical malfunctions or failures contributed to the accident. A review of weather information revealed a prevailing wind from 210 degrees at 21 knots gusting to 28 knots, with a peak wind gust of 30 knots occurring prior to the pilot's landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's loss of control while landing in gusty wind conditions.

GEERLINGS HILLSIDE FARMS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7061G

Holland, Mich.

Strong cross winds are to blame for an overturned airplane at the West Michigan Regional Airport in Holland, according to Holland police.

As a single engine plane was landing at the airport about 1:40 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, when winds pushed the airplane off the runway and into the snow. Upon hitting the snow, the plane flipped over, police said.

The pilot, a 64-year-old Holland man, exited the small plane with minor injuries, according to police.

The incident closed West Michigan Regional Airport Saturday afternoon. Staff at the airport are working to notify the Federal Aviation Administration of the incident. Crews cannot remove the plane from the runway until the FAA is notified.

Multiple agencies responded to the airport, formerly known as the Tulip City Airport. The plane did not catch on fire.

Initially, law enforcement officials shut down entrance ramps at U.S. 31 and Blue Star Highway and other roadways near the scene as a precaution. 

The entrance ramps are now open.

Officials are continuing to investigate the incident.

For more information as this story develops, check www.hollandsentinel.com.




HOLLAND, MI - A 64-year-old Holland man suffered minor injuries Saturday afternoon when his single engine plane flipped over while landing at West Michigan Regional Airport, authorities said.


The plane was landing at about 1:40 p.m. when strong winds pushed it off the runway and into the snow, causing it to flip, the Holland Department of Public Safety said in a news release.

The man escaped with minor injuries.

The plane did not catch fire as a result of the crash. Authorities continue to investigate the incident.

West Michigan Regional Airport, formerly known as Tulip City Airport, is located south of Holland.

Federal Aviation Administration records shows the plane listed as a single engine Cessna, model 172 K.

HOLLAND, Mich. — One person sustained minor injuries Saturday afternoon after a small plane became overturned at Tulip City Airport. Holland City Police and Fire responded to the call at 1:40 p.m. when they got word that a single engine plane had flipped over on one of the airport’s tarmacs.

The sole occupant of the plane was a 64 year-old Holland man, who sustained only minor injuries.

There was no smoke or fire present during the incident, making the response much more manageable for responding agencies.

Police said the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) has already been notified about the incident.

Check back with Fox 17 for more information as it becomes available.






Delta flight evacuated at Raleigh-Durham International Airport (KRDU) after threat on social media

MORRISVILLE, N.C. — A Delta flight from Atlanta to Raleigh-Durham International Airport was evacuated after landing Saturday afternoon due to a bomb threat made on social media, airport officials said.

Flight 1803 left Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport at about 11:30 a.m. Saturday, and RDU officials were made aware of the threat at about 12:30 p.m., airport spokesperson Mindy Hamlin said.

Passengers on the plane were evacuated on a runway at RDU, and the plane was kept away from either of the airport's two terminals. Authorities were checking luggage on the plane following the evacuation.

Several departing flights from RDU were delayed at the time of the incident, although officials did not comment on how the security threat was impacting other flights at the airport.

No other information about the threat was available.

Source:  http://www.wral.com

























MORRISVILLE, N.C. -   A plane was evacuated shortly after landing at RDU International Saturday afternoon due to a bomb threat on social media, officials said.

Delta flight 1803 left Atlanta Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport around 11:30 a.m. and landed shortly after 12:30 p.m. at RDU.

Officials were made aware of the threat around 12:30 p.m. and the plane was put on the ground immediately, Mindy Hamlin of RDU said.

A total of 107 passengers were evacuated once the plane landed. Those passengers will remain at the airport until an investigation into the threat is complete, officials said.

Law enforcement dogs are being used to sniff the aircraft and luggage, officials said.

Evektor-Aerotechnik Sportstar Max, N241BM: January 17, 2015 and December 08, 2013 - Orange County,California

EVEKTOR - AEROTECHNIK A S 
SPORTSTAR MAX 
N241BM

MAMONT AIRPLANE RENTAL LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N241BM

Single engine plane makes emergency landing in Great Park

A single engine plane made an emergency landing in the Great Park at about 10:25 a.m.

The yellow and white Evektor SportStar, with an instructor and student, flew out of John Wayne Airport. The plane landed in the southeastern portion of the park after some engine difficulties, according to Irvine police spokeswoman Farrah Emami.

No injuries were reported, and there was no damage to the airplane or property at the park.

http://www.ocregister.com


An Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane sits parked and chalked along former Marine Corps Runway 34-R located at the Great Park in Irvine after making an emergency landing on Saturday morning.

An Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane sits parked and chalked along former Marine Corps Runway 34-R located at the Great Park in Irvine after making an emergency landing on Saturday morning. Irvine Police, Great Park Safety Officers along with the pilot, passenger and Sunrise Aviation Owner/Operator Michael Church go over details for flying the plane out again.





The pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport, along with his female passenger, speaks with an Irvine Police Sergeant after making an emergency landing at the Great Park on Saturday morning.



The pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport pulls equipment out of the plane after making an emergency landing at the Great Park on Saturday morning.


The pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport checks out the plane after making an emergency landing at the Great Park on Saturday morning.


The pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport walks away with equipment after making an emergency landing at the Great Park on Saturday morning. 





The owner/operator of Sunrise Aviation, Michael Church, inspects an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at the Great Park in Irvine.


The pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport looks on as Sunrise Aviation owner/operator Michael Church checks out the plane after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at Irvine's Great Park.

The owner/operator of Sunrise Aviation, Michael Church, inspects an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at the Great Park in Irvine.


The owner/operator of Sunrise Aviation, Michael Church, inspects an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at the Great Park in Irvine.


The owner/operator of Sunrise Aviation, Michael Church, inspects an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at the Great Park in Irvine.


The owner/operator of Sunrise Aviation, Michael Church, at left, speaks with the pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at the Great Park in Irvine.


The female passenger and pilot of an Evektor Sport Star single engine under wing two-seater airplane out of John Wayne Airport listen to Michael Church, of Sunrise Aviation, after an emergency landing on Saturday morning at the Great Park in Irvine.





December 08, 2013:   Evektor-Aerotechnik Sportstar Max, N241BM; Incident occurred in Rancho Santa Margarita, California
 

MAMONT AIRPLANE RENTAL LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N241BM

A flight instructor and student pilot headed to John Wayne Airport were forced to make an emergency landing Sunday afternoon on the northbound 241 toll road in Rancho Santa Margarita, authorities said.  

 The two-seater plane landed at 3:15 p.m. in the center divider of the Foothill Transportation Corridor at Oso Parkway, the California Highway Patrol said. No one was injured.

The $150,000 plane appeared to be intact after touching down.

Two mechanics were seen removing the plane’s wings so it could be transported from the toll road.

No road closures were reported.

An investigation into the incident is underway, authorities said.

http://www.latimes.com/


More details have emerged regarding an emergency landing Sunday of a light airplane on the 241 toll road north of Oso Parkway.

The plane's pilot was Fred Kyle of Trabuco Canyon, California Highway Patrol spokesman Aaron Rothberg said. Kyle is a pilot-instructor who was traveling with Javier Castro of Cypress.

Kyle was forced to make the emergency landing around 3:15 p.m. following "catastrophic engine failure," Rothberg said.

Traffic was diverted briefly following the 3:15 p.m. landing. No one was injured.


http://missionviejo.patch.com

Federal Aviation Administration employee arrested after flying with gun in carry-on bag

ATLANTA -- A Federal Aviation Administration employee is under investigation after flying from Atlanta to New York with a gun in his carry-on, authorities said Friday.

The Transportation Security Administration said in a statement that an FAA safety inspector used a badge to bypass TSA screening and gain access to a secure area of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport on Tuesday while carrying a gun in his bag. He was arrested after arriving at LaGuardia Airport in New York.

In a statement, the FAA said it "takes security incidents involving its employees very seriously," and that Administrator Michael Huerta ordered the suspension of a program allowing safety inspectors to bypass security screenings.

"The agency also will require inspectors to sign a new agreement that details each inspector's responsibility under the program and clearly states that any infraction related to a weapon will result in an immediate and permanent suspension of privileges and possible further disciplinary action," the FAA said.

The inspector "is currently performing non-safety-related duties," according to the FAA, which is investigating the incident along with the TSA and police for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates LaGuardia.

The arrest comes less than a month after investigators uncovered a gun-smuggling scheme involving current and former airline employees and planes flying from Atlanta to New York.

Five people were arrested, including a Delta Air Lines baggage handler. The baggage handler is accused of also using his security badge to bypass security and deliver guns to a smuggler on multiple occasions.

Federal authorities and Atlanta airport officials have pledged stricter employee-security procedures after the smuggling operation was uncovered.

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson was also in Atlanta last week discussing security operations, and federal officials announced they are considering additional security measures for airline and airport employees nationwide.

Story and Comments:   http://www.cbsnews.com

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, United States Air Force Owner (USAF), N5208F: Accident occurred January 19, 2013 in Marysville, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N5208F

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA098
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 19, 2013 in Marysville, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/24/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 172F, registration: N5208F
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane had recently undergone an annual inspection, and the accident flight was the first flight since that maintenance was performed. After departure, the pilot made a 6-nautical-mile flight to another airport, at which point, he decided to perform several practice touch-and-go landings. Following a smooth landing, he configured the airplane for takeoff by confirming the fuel selector was positioned to both wing tanks and then applied full power. The airplane climbed to about 150 feet above ground level, and, then the engine suddenly experienced a total loss of power. The pilot could not restart the engine, and the airplane touched down in a muddy field and came to rest inverted.

The airplane’s fuel selector handle was designed to be affixed to its shaft via a spring pin that slides through a hole on the handle and shaft only when the handle is properly aligned with the shaft; the spring pin prevents the handle from being installed incorrectly. A postaccident examination revealed that the fuel selector handle had been installed 180 degrees out of alignment, which was only possible because the spring pin attaching the handle to the shaft had been modified. Disassembly of the fuel valve also revealed excessive wear to the internal mechanism. 

The mechanic who conducted the airplane’s annual inspection reported that he had taken off the fuel selector handle to remove the panel and check for leaks. He checked the “off” position when receiving the airplane, but he did not check it after finishing the annual inspection. During postaccident examinations, the fuel flowed freely through the valve when the fuel selector handle was near the “off” position, and the fuel stopped flowing when the handle was in the “both” position consistent with the handle indicating an opposite selection. Although one of the magnetos had worn beyond service limits and was not producing an adequate spark, its failure was unlikely related to the total loss of engine power. It is likely that the mechanic improperly installed the fuel selector handle after taking it off during the annual inspection, which was only possible due to the incorrectly modified fuel selector handle assembly.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power during initial climb due to fuel starvation, which resulted from maintenance personnel’s improper installation of the fuel selector handle. Contributing to the accident was an incorrectly modified fuel selector handle assembly. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 19, 2013, about 1605 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 172F, N5208F, made a forced landing into a muddy field following a total loss of engine power during the initial climb from the Yuba County Airport, Marysville, California. Beale Aero Club was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and passenger sustained minor injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local positioning flight departed from Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California at 1553 with a planned destination of Yuba County Airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a military visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed.

The CFI stated that the airplane had recently undergone an annual inspection and this flight was the first since that maintenance was performed. The CFI intended to reposition the airplane at the Yuba County Airport where it was normally based. After departure, he made the approximate 6 nautical mile flight to the destination, at which point he decided to perform several touch-and-go practice takeoff and landings. Following a smooth landing, he configured the airplane for takeoff by confirming the fuel selector was positioned on "BOTH" wing tanks, the carburetor heat was off, the flaps were retracted, and the fuel mixture was "RICH." He applied full power and the airplane climbed about 150 feet, during which time he noted the oil pressure and temperature were showing normal indications. 

Shortly thereafter, the engine suddenly experienced a total loss of power. He lowered the nose and configured the airplane for its best-glide airspeed. Despite his efforts, the CFI could not restart the engine and the airplane touched down in a muddy field. The main landing gear dug into the soft terrain and the airplane flipped over coming to rest inverted. The wreckage was located about 50 feet from the first impact location and about 0.5 miles from the edge of the runway. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cessna 172F, serial number 17253209, was manufactured in 1965. The engine's data plate indicated it was a Teledyne Continental Motors O-300-D engine, serial number 25471-D-73-D-R. 

Fuel System Design 

The airplane's fuel system was a gravity-fed design where fuel flowed from metal tanks in the inboard section of each wing, through a selector valve, and continued to a fuel strainer before entering the carburetor. 

The fuel selector valve was located near the floor of the fuselage between the pilot and copilot positions on the pedestal. The valve was coupled to a selector handle via a diagonally affixed shaft. The handle positions were labeled "OFF, LEFT, BOTH and RIGHT" with a placard. The handle could be rotated either direction, and was designed to settle into a detent located at one of four selected positions. Upon rotation of the handle, a cam lobe in the fuel valve applied pressure against a series of spring-loaded ball-bearing valve fittings. Depending on the position of the cam, fuel could pass through either the left or right tank fitting, or no fuel would be ported to the fitting that was routed to the carburetor.

The selector handle was designed to be affixed to its shaft via an offset spring-pin that slides through a hole on the handle and shaft when properly aligned (will only fit in one direction to prevent the handle from being installed incorrectly).

Maintenance

A review of the airplane maintenance logbooks revealed that the engine had accumulated 5,038.1 hours total time, and 1,563.1 hours since the last major overhaul. The last annual inspection was dated as having been completed January 18, 2013. The records indicated that during this maintenance the mechanic complied with Cessna Service Bulletin SB99-18R1A, which requires draining the fuel tanks to inspect the fuel gauge accuracy.

The mechanic that worked on the airplane was the director of maintenance, and maintained all of the operators' airplanes, which was a flight club that also provided training. He stated that the airplane's last annual inspection took longer to perform than was usual because he had been interrupted to do a 100 hour inspection for another airplane. He recalled that he had received the accident airplane for maintenance on October 31, 2012 with minimum fuel (since he had to check the fuel quantity indicator), and January 19 was when he returned the airplane back into service.

The mechanic further stated that his normal fuel system check during an annual inspection was as follows: Upon receiving and then releasing the airplane back into service, he would turn the selector to the "OFF" position and observe the amount of time the engine continues to run. This procedure would aid him in ensuring that the selector was shutting off the fuel and that the seals were intact. He would then test all the fuel selector positions. Subsequently, as part of the annual, he would remove the center console and the fuel selector cover in an effort to complete the checklist required item of cycling the selector and looking for leaks. He has had experiences in the past where he has seen selectors leaking or where the engine doesn't completely shut off.

The mechanic recalled that he had taken the selector handle off in an effort to remove the panel. He then checked to make sure the detents engaged into each position selected. If the shaft's alignment was slightly off it wouldn't feed from the correct tank, which he would be able to see from staining around the valve. The handle is usually indexed so that it can only be installed in the correct position. This is accomplished by an offset roll-pin that can only be inserted with proper alignment, but in the accident airplane, the handles offset hole had been drilled out to accommodate a bolt, which in turn enabled the handle to be able to be secured 180-degrees out of alignment. He was sure he had it in the correct position because during the post-inspection he put the selector in the both position and the engine ran normally. He ran the engine in the "LEFT," "RIGHT," and "BOTH" positions, though he didn't test "OFF"). He did check the "OFF" position when receiving the airplane, but did not do it after finishing the annual.

TEST AND RESEARCH

The engine and fuel system were examined following recovery of the wreckage; a detailed examination report with pictures is appended to the report in the public docket. 

An external examination of the engine case revealed that it was intact with no holes or perforations observed. Investigators rotated the engine via the propeller. The engine's internal mechanical continuity was established during rotation of the crankshaft and upon attainment of thumb compression in all cylinders. Visual inspection of the engine revealed no evidence of foreign object damage or detonation, and no indication of excessive oil consumption. The valve train was observed to operate in proper order and equal lift action occurred at each rocker assembly. An oil film was present in the all six rocker box areas. The left magneto, Slick model 6364, serial number 04091034 was removed and function tested. The test revealed that the magneto did not produce adequate spark. The magneto was dissembled for further evaluation. It was determined the cam was worn causing the point gap to be out of the manufacture's tolerance.

The airplane had sustained damage to the wings during the accident sequence, however the fuel tanks appeared to be intact and no ruptures could be located. The fuel selector handle was positioned on the "RIGHT" selection, consistent with the pilot's statement of where it was at the time of the accident. The hardware attaching the handle to the shaft consisted of a bolt with a washer and nut securing it, rather than the spring-pin listed in the Cessna Illustrated Parts Catalogue. The handle appeared to have a smaller hole (slanted diagonal) machined below the larger hole that the bolt attached through. 

Investigators disconnected the carburetor and noted that with the fuel selector handle near the "OFF" position (just left of the detent), the fuel flowed freely through the valve. When the selector was positioned in the "BOTH" position the fuel stopped flowing, consistent with handle indicating an opposite selection.

Removal of the pedestal revealed that the fuel selector assembly and valve rotated when the handle was turned. Disassembly of the fuel valve disclosed that all four detent positions on the cover were worn and contained debris; the cam lobe appeared worn.





A Beale Air Force Base training pilot has sued the Beale Aero Club, blaming it for a plane crash two years ago.

Maj. James Grogan filed his case this week in Yuba County Superior Court against the club, its former mechanic, John Henry, and the former manager, Connie Schupe.


Grogan and a 17-year-old student pilot were in a Cessna 172F on Jan. 19, 2013, when it suddenly lost power and crashed into a field south of the Yuba County Airport.


Grogan was treated at Rideout Memorial Hospital for moderate injuries. The student pilot was not injured.


Grogan was earning more than $105,000 per year at the time of the accident, according to the lawsuit, but "as a result of the injuries sustained, (he) is unable to perform his regular duties."


In a statement to the National Transportation Safety Board a few days after the accident, Grogan wrote: "As the operator, I saw no way to prevent this mishap/accident ... There was no previous indication of maintenance problems and no indication motor was about to quit. All emergency checklists run to completion as time and circumstances allowed."


A Beale Aero Club spokesman declined to comment on the suit on Friday. The Aero Club is on Beale Air Force Base.


The NTSB, in a statement of probable cause last September, blamed the crash on "maintenance personnel's improper installation of the fuel selector handle. Contributing to the accident was an incorrectly modified fuel selector handle assembly."


The NTSB said the plane "had recently undergone an annual inspection, and the accident flight was the first flight since that maintenance was performed."


According to the report, the airplane's "fuel selector handle had been installed 180 degrees out of alignment, which was only possible because the spring pin attaching the handle to the shaft had been modified. Disassembly of the fuel valve also revealed excessive wear to the internal mechanism."


The NTSB said it was "likely that the mechanic improperly installed the fuel selector handle after taking it off during the annual inspection, which was only possible due to the incorrectly modified fuel selector handle assembly."




















NTSB Identification: WPR13LA098
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 19, 2013 in Marysville, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172F, registration: N5208F
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 19, 2013, about 1605 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 172F, N5208F, collided into a muddy field following a total loss of engine power during the initial climb from the Yuba County Airport, Marysville, California. The Beale Aero Club was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and passenger sustained minor injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local position flight departed from Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, at 1553, with a planned destination of Yuba County Airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a military visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed.

The CFI stated that the airplane had recently undergone an annual inspection and the accident flight was the first flight since that maintenance was conducted. The CFI intended to position it back at the Yuba County Airport where it was normally based. After departure, he made the short flight to the destination, at which point he decided to perform several touch-and-go practice takeoff and landings. Following a smooth landing, he configured the airplane for takeoff by confirming the fuel selector was positioned on "BOTH" wing tanks, the carburetor heat was off, the flaps were retracted, and the fuel mixture was "RICH". He applied full power and the airplane climbed to about 150 feet, during which time the CFI noted the oil pressure and temperature were showing normal indications.

The CFI further stated that at 150 feet above ground level (agl), the engine suddenly experienced a total loss of power. He lowered the nose and configured airplane for a best-glide airspeed. Despite his efforts, the CFI could not restart the engine and the airplane touched down in a muddy field. The main landing gear dug into the soft terrain and the airplane flipped over inverted. The wreckage was located about 50 feet from the first impact location and about 0.5 miles from the edge of the runway.

The wreckage was taken to a hangar for further examination.

Pilot punches engineer in cockpit: Air India captain grounded in Chennai after attack over snag repair

Jan. 17: The pilot of an Air India flight today allegedly punched an aircraft engineer in the cockpit, giving him a bleeding nose, after a dispute over whether a snag had been corrected. 

An Air India spokesperson said Capt. Maniklal had been grounded till an inquiry into the fracas on the Chennai airport tarmac was completed. The Delhi-bound flight, AI 143, eventually left two hours late with its 118 passengers.

Aviation sources blamed the incident on multiple factors: the habitually tense relations between pilots and ground engineers, a failure to follow standard procedure for resolving such disputes, and nerves frayed by the recent disasters involving Southeast Asian airliners.

The Airbus 319 was to take off at 9.45am but was initially delayed by a technical snag after arriving from Mumbai. Aircraft engineer Kannan entered the cockpit, worked on the fault, and then signed the fitness sheet saying the snag had been corrected.

But an unconvinced Maniklal refused to take off. Airline officials quoted other members of the technical team and an airhostess as saying that Maniklal and Kannan began arguing, and the pilot ended up punching the engineer.

As a bleeding Kannan stumbled out of the cockpit, the pilot locked the cockpit door. The other members of the technical team took Kannan to a nearby hospital.

Senior Air India officials rushed to the aircraft and after much persuasion got the pilot to step out of the cockpit. Maniklal was taken to the airline's ground station at the airport.

The flight took off at 11.40am with a different pilot, Krishnakumar. About 30 among the passengers were to catch a connecting flight to Paris; airline officials promised alternative arrangements if they missed it.

Aviation sources spoke of a longstanding undercurrent of tension between pilots and ground engineers, caused by the frequent maintenance issues and compounded by egos. They said each group often undermined the role of the other.

Before flying, a pilot has to check around 250 cockpit switches, each meant for a particular aircraft function. He refuses to fly if there's a problem with any of them. The switches have lights that blink in case of a snag.

A source in a private airline said the standard operating procedure was for the pilot and the engineer to call up their respective bosses in case of a disagreement and have it sorted out at the higher level. This was obviously not done in this case, he said.

One pilot said the recent crashes involving Malaysian and Indonesian aircraft may be "playing on the minds of some of the pilots and making them more tense".


 
Pilot dan Teknisi Berkelahi di Kokpit, Penerbangan Air India Tertunda 3 Jam

NEW DELHI, KOMPAS.com - Sebuah penerbangan maskapai Air India dari kota Chennai menuju Paris tertunda selama tiga jam, Sabtu (17/1/2015), setelah terjadi perkelahian di kokpit antara kapten pilot dan seorang teknisi.

Pesawat dengan nomor penerbangan AI 143 itu tiba dari Mumbai dan dijadwalkan melanjutkan penerbangan menuju New Delhi pada pada pukul 9.45 waktu setempat, sebelum perjalanan berlanjut ke Paris. Namun, sesaat sebelum jadwal keberangkatan sebuah masalah teknis muncul.

Setelah satu tim teknisi naik ke pesawat dan memeriksa masalah yang muncul, kapten pilot merasa kurang yakin dengan hasil pekerjaan sang teknisi sehingga menolak untuk menerbangkan pesawat. Keduanya kemudian bertengkar yang berujung pada perkelahian.

Juru bicara Air India GP Rao mengatakan pihaknya segera melakukan investigasi terkait perkelahian yang akhirnya menunda penerbangan yang membawa 122 orang penumpang itu.
Harian The Times of India mengabarkan pilot yang terlibat perkelahian itu bernama Kapten Manik Lal dan si teknisi bernama VT Kannan.

"Dia (Kapten Lal) tak senang melihat terlalu banyak teknisi di dalam kokpit dan menyuruh sebagian dari mereka keluar," kata seorang sumber di manajemen Air India.

"Teknisi VT Kannan kemudian masuk ke kokpit dan menyatakan pesawat belum siap untuk diterbangkan. Namun pilot menolak mendengarkan penjelasan si teknisi," tambah sumber itu.

Pihak Air India mengatakan penerbangan akhirnya bisa dilanjutkan setelah pilot yang terlibat perkelahian itu diganti. Manajemen maskapai menegaskan hingga kini belum jelas benar pemicu perkelahian itu.

http://internasional.kompas.com

Aviation Attorney Jonathan C. Reiter Featured in News Report about $10 Million Lawsuit in US Airways Crash



The New York City lawyer at The Law Firm Of Jonathan C. Reiter talks about the airplane accident in Philadelphia with NBC10.


New York, NY (PRWEB) January 17, 2015

A case handled by New York airplane accident lawyer Jonathan C. Reiter was featured in an investigative report aired Jan. 2 by NBC10 about a US Airways jet crash in Philadelphia.

Reiter, founder of The Law Firm Of Jonathan C. Reiter, filed a lawsuit seeking $10 million in damages on behalf of his client Frank Gabbamonte of Hawthorne, N.Y. The lawsuit alleges that Gabbamonte jumped down an emergency chute and sustained permanent damage to his shoulder following the crash. US Airways flight 1702 crashed after an aborted takeoff on March 13, 2014, at Philadelphia International Airport, the lawsuit states.

The lawsuit alleges Gabbamonte struck his shoulder on the ground after going down the emergency slide, which resulted in a severe injury. Gabbamonte was diagnosed with tears of the left rotator cuff, labrum and biceps tendon, which forced him to give up his job delivering heavy auto parts, according to allegations in the lawsuit.

The lawsuit alleges officials initially blamed the crash on a blown tire in the front landing gear, but an internal Federal Aviation Administration report shows that pilot error was the cause of the crash. The lawsuit, citing the FAA documents, alleges the flight crew failed to ensure that take-off performance data was entered properly and did not keep the aircraft under proper control during an aborted take-off. The lawsuit also alleges the FAA report reveals the pilot in command should not have been flying that day because he had undergone a medical procedure two days prior and had been given medications that were not completely out of his system.

The jet aircraft lifted off the ground and was about 70 feet in the air when the captain, believing the plane was unsafe to fly moved the throttles to the idle position, the lawsuit alleges. The tail of the aircraft struck the runway, which drove the nose landing gear into the runway, the lawsuit alleges. This caused the tires to blow out and the nose landing gear to collapse, according to the suit, which alleges the plane then skidded about 2,000 feet down the runway before stopping. The crew deployed several escape slides to evacuate the passengers, the lawsuit alleges.

NBC10 said US Airways declined to comment because of pending litigation and the ongoing investigation.

The NBC10 report cited is “Man Files $10 Million Lawsuit in US Airways Crash at Philadelphia International.”

The case is Gabbamonte v. US Airways, Inc. et al; case number 1:2014cv09489; New York Southern District Court.

About The Law Firm Of Jonathan C. Reiter 

Serving clients throughout the world for more than 30 years, New York City lawyer Jonathan C. Reiter and his talented team of attorneys have obtained more than $150 million for clients worldwide. Mr. Reiter has represented victims of many major airline crashes, including American Airlines Flight 587, Egyptair Flight 990 and Continental Connection Flight 3406. An experienced Manhattan personal injury lawyer, Reiter and his fellow lawyers at The Law Firm Of Jonathan C. Reiter have a well-earned reputation for handling a wide range of cases, medical malpractice, medical misdiagnosis, mass transit accidents, auto accidents and other personal injury cases. The law firm works on a contingency fee basis. As a result, clients only pay fees if the law firm wins their case. To schedule a free consultation, call (212) 736-0979.

The Law Firm Of Jonathan C. Reiter 
The Empire State Building 
350 5th Avenue Suite 6400 
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http://www.jcreiterlaw.com

Source:  http://www.prweb.com


NTSB Identification: DCA14MA081
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of US AIRWAYS INC
Accident occurred Thursday, March 13, 2014 in Philadelphia, PA
Aircraft: AIRBUS A320 - 214, registration: N113UW
Injuries: 154 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 13, 2013, at about 1830 eastern daylight time (EDT), US Airways flight 1702, an Airbus A320, N113UW, experienced a nose gear collapse and other damage after aborting the takeoff on runway 27L at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The airplane came to rest on the edge of the runway, and the passengers exited the aircraft via the emergency slides. There were no injuries to the passengers and crew members and the airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight between KPHL and Hollywood International Airport, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Friday, January 16, 2015

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N5660E, Hawaiian Night Lights LLC: Accident occurred January 16, 2015 in Ualapue, Hawaii

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA086
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 16, 2015 in Ualapue, HI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/11/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N5660E
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that he was performing an introductory flight lesson for a student with her parents on board as passengers. Rather than fly in the normal practice area, the flight instructor and student decided to fly across a channel toward an adjacent island to avoid unfavorable weather conditions. The student flew the majority of the flight following the shoreline until the flight instructor took the flight controls and turned the airplane inland to return to the airport. As the flight instructor flew the airplane over mountainous terrain, the engine lost partial power, and the airplane then began to descend. The flight instructor subsequently performed a forced landing into densely forested terrain. The airplane was not recovered from the accident site, and it could not be examined on site due to the inhospitable and remote terrain; therefore, the reason for the partial loss of engine power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power during cruise flight for reasons that could not be determined because the airplane was not recovered. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 16, 2015, about 1400 Hawaiian standard time, a Cessna 172N, N5660E, collided with terrain near Ualapue, on the Island of Molokai, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to Hawaiian Night Lights LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI), student pilot undergoing instruction, and one passenger sustained minor injuries; a second passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings during the accident sequence. The instructional flight departed Honolulu International Airport, Honolulu, at 1304. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The CFI reported that the flight was an introductory lesson for the student, who was a Japanese citizen, and that the student's parents were the passengers. The CFI was the owner of Hawaiian Night Lights, and utilized the airplane for flight instruction.

The CFI stated that they planned to flying for 2 hours, and prior to departure, decided to fly east towards Molokai due to unfavorable weather conditions around the Island of Oahu. The departure was uneventful and they flew east, following the northern coastline towards the end of Molokai. Having reached a waterfall as they approached the eastern shore, the CFI took the controls and initiated a circling climb inland over the mountainous terrain. During the climb he noticed that the engine was not producing full power, even though the throttle control was fully forward. He estimated the engine speed to be about 200 rpm lower than normal, and he applied carburetor heat. The flight progressed over the mountains at an altitude of about 3,500 ft mean sea level (500 to 1,000 ft above ground level) while he maintained best rate of climb airspeed. As they passed over a ridge the airplane began to descend at 400 ft per minute, and they became trapped below the peaks of surrounding terrain. The pilot turned off carburetor heat and began performing tight turns and chandelle maneuvers in an effort to clear terrain while now flying at best angle of climb airspeed. He warned the passengers of the impending crash, however, as they did not speak English, they could not fully understand. As they approached the valley floor he extended the flaps and told the passengers to brace for impact.

The airplane came to rest at the 3,000 ft level, on the eastern side of the island, 73 miles from the departure airport. Video of the accident site taken by search and rescue personnel revealed that the airplane was situated in densely wooded terrain within a crevasse just below a ridgeline.

Due to the inhospitable nature of the terrain, the airplane could not be examined at the accident site. Additionally, the airplane was not insured, and at the time of completion of this report it had not been recovered from the accident site; therefore, no examination was performed.

The most recent maintenance action performed on the airplane was an annual inspection, which was completed on August 1, 2014. According to maintenance logbooks, at that time the airframe had accrued 5,517.3 total flight hours, with the engine accumulating 1,362.7 hours since overhaul. The pilot reported that the airplane had flown an additional 95.6 hours since the inspection.

Radar data provided by the FAA recorded the majority of the flight leading up to the turn towards terrain. The data revealed a target departing eastbound following the southeastern shoreline of Oahu. The target then made the 26-mile crossing over the Kaiwi Channel where it performed a series of turning maneuvers. It then continued to track along the northern shoreline of Molokai. The final segment of the flight was not recorded as the airplane descended behind terrain and out of the radar coverage area.

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA086 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 16, 2015 in Ualapue, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N5660E
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 16, 2015, about 1400 Hawaiian standard time, a Cessna 172N, N5660E, collided with terrain near Ualapue, on the Island of Molokai, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to Hawaiian Night Lights LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI), student pilot undergoing instruction, and one passenger sustained minor injuries; a second passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings during the accident sequence. The instructional flight departed Honolulu International Airport, Honolulu, at 1304. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The CFI reported that the accident flight was an introductory flight lesson for the student, who was a Japanese citizen, and that the student's parents were the passengers. They departed Honolulu and headed east towards Kalaupapa where they performed basic flight maneuvers. They then followed the coastline towards the eastern end of Molokai. Having reached the eastern shore, they turned back, flying a direct route to the Koko Head VOR (very high frequency omni-directional radio range). Shortly thereafter, at an altitude of about 3,300 feet mean sea level, the engine lost power. The airplane began to descend, and as they approached a ridgeline the airplane encountered downdrafts. The pilot reported that the airplane was by now in a valley, and they had no route to escape, so he elected to force land the airplane into trees.

HAWAIIAN NIGHT LIGHTS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N660E 


A Maui pilot, who performed an emergency landing himself on Piilani Highway two years ago, helped locate a Cessna single-engine aircraft that made a forced landing Friday afternoon at the 3,000-foot elevation on the eastern end of Molokai.

"It's amazing that they were able to land," Capt. Ryan Fields said in a phone interview with The Maui News on Friday afternoon. "It's a miracle that they did what they could because it's 3,000 feet up, and I guess they landed in some trees. I don't know how they landed a airplane up there. It's pretty crazy, and it's a bad place to go down, I'll tell you that."

The fixed wing, single-engine Cessna 172 reportedly lost its engine power and was forced to make an emergency landing near Halawa Falls, Federal Aviation Administration and fire officials said.

A survivor of a plane that made a forced landing Friday afternoon on the eastern end of Molokai is assisted by hospital security guards and nurses at Maui Memorial Medical Center. The victim, who was in serious condition, was among three other passengers aboard a privately-owned Cessna that reportedly lost engine power near Halawa Falls. The other three passengers sustained minor injuries.

The four people aboard the plane were airlifted to a landing zone at Pu'u o Hoku Ranch by a Maui fire rescue crew aboard the Air One helicopter, said Capt. Rylan Yatsushiro, spokesman for the Maui Fire Department.

He said one person was in serious condition and was flown by Maui Medevac to Maui Memorial Medical Center. Three others suffered minor injuries and were transported by medics to Molokai General Hospital for further evaluation and treatment, Yatsushiro said.

The person in serious condition had a neck brace and was seen being helped out of the medevac helicopter by Maui Memorial Medical Center security and nurses around 4:30 p.m. The victim, who was on a stretcher, was placed on a cart and driven up a hill from the helipad to the emergency room.

Hawaiian Night Lights LLC is listed as the registered owner of the plane. A phone number listed for the Honolulu-based company was disconnected.

The plane was manufactured in 1978 and was certified on June 12, 2014.

The aviation company has a Hauula, Oahu, address and was registered in 2006, according to state Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs records.

Fields, a pilot for Mokulele Airlines, said the Cessna went down around 2 p.m. He did not see the Cessna go down but was aware that a plane in east Molokai had issued a mayday call.

He said his aircraft, which was traveling from Molokai to Maui, was the only plane in the area at that time. He was able to confirm and locate the downed Cessna from a vantage point two to three miles away from the air.

"All I could tell was that there was a plane where I wasn't expecting it to be," he said. "We knew they were there, and we were picking it up on the radar and radioed in their coordinates."

Field said he did not see any smoke or flames from the aircraft and does not know what caused the plane to lose engine power. He said winds weren't too strong in Halawa Valley on Friday, though the area is known for being difficult to navigate due to its mountains, which reach almost 5,000 feet, and limited visibility.

"It's when it gets kind of cloudy that makes it hard, and lately the vog has been kind of bad so the visibility is kind of bad," he said. "It's not a place you want to be in."

The valley is a popular area for tourists and residents and boasts towering waterfalls and lush mountainsides. Maui resident Bobby Hill, a private pilot, said Friday that he usually takes a route through the Halawa Falls area on flights between Maui and Oahu.

"That's a very common route for sightseeing because it's beautiful on that side," he said. "It's less bumpy on trade-wind days."

Seeing the crashed Cessna on Molokai brought back memories for Fields, who dealt with his own miraculous landing after his plane experienced engine trouble off Wailea on a flight to the Big Island two years ago.

In October 2013, Fields helped maneuver a Cessna Grand Caravan carrying nine others onto Piilani Highway - avoiding cars and telephone poles. Everyone aboard walked away unscathed.

Fields confirmed that he was one of the two pilots aboard the Cessna Grand Caravan but said he could not comment on the incident until the National Transportation Safety Board issues its final report.

As one who could relate to the pilot of the downed plane, Fields said he was glad to be part of rescue operations Friday.

"It was cool being in the area and to help," he said. "I was pretty excited to be a part of that."

While all passengers survived Friday's landing, Halawa Valley has been the site of some of the worst air disasters in Hawaii's history.

On Nov. 1, 1996, a small plane carrying Maui Democratic Chairman Robert McCarthy, Maui County Councilman Tom Morrow and four others slammed into a ridge above the valley on a trip back to Maui following a campaign event. The crash killed everyone aboard.

On Oct. 28, 1989, an Aloha Island Air flight slammed into the valley walls killing 20 people. Thirteen of the victims were from Molokai, including eight Molokai High School volleyball players and two faculty members. It is reportedly the worst interisland air disaster in state history.

http://www.mauinews.com

EAST MOLOKAI (HawaiiNewsNow) - A hard landing in a remote area on Molokai has sent four to the hospital.

Pilot Michael Richards and three passengers were flying at 3,000 feet over Halawa Valley when their Cessna Skyhawk lost its only engine,.

"It could have been much worse. It's a miracle that they had a place where they could put that plane down without killing themselves," said Valerie Richards, the pilot's mother.

"That poor baby didn't have a place to land. It was steep terrain, heavily wooded and there was no smooth place to go."

Richards and two of the passengers -- a father and daughter from Japan-- were treated at Molokai General for minor injuries. A third -- the mother -- suffered more serious injuries and was sent to Maui Memorial.

It's not Richard's first hard landing. He and a student were forced to land in a field near the Waipio Costco when the engine gave out. He also had a hard landing on Lanai in 2007. No one was injured in either instance.

"I do have experience with this ... I'm not a foreigner to this scenario," the pilot told Hawaii News Now in June.

FAA officials will now investigate this hard landing. And Richards plans to be back up and flying again soon.


http://www.k5thehometeam.com