Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Piper PA-25-235 Pawnee, Superior Food Distributors LLC, N8569L: Fatal accident occurred March 04, 2017 in Villa Tapia, Dominican Republic

José Ernesto Rosario Alvarez
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Superior Food Distributors, LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N8569L

NTSB Identification: ERA17WA124
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Saturday, March 04, 2017 in Villa Tapia, Dominican Republic
Aircraft: PIPER PA25, registration: N8569L
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 4, 2017, about 1330 coordinated universal time, a Piper PA-25-235, N8969L, was destroyed following a collision with antenna wires and terrain during an aerial application flight near Villa Tapia, Dominican Republic. The pilot was fatally injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of the Dominican Republic.

Further information can be obtained from:

Comisión Investigadora de Accidentes de Aviación
Junta de Aviación Civil
Calle José Joaquín Pérez no. 104, Gazcue
Santo Domingo
República Dominicana
Tel.: (1) 809 689-4167
E-mail: ciaa.jac@gmail.com
Fax: (1) 809 221-8616

This report is for informational purposes, and only contains information released by the Government of the Dominican Republic.




Saab 340B, Regional Express Airlines, VH-RXS: Incident occurred March 23, 2017 in Dubbo, Australia

NTSB Identification: ENG17WA019
Incident occurred Thursday, March 23, 2017 in Dubbo, Australia
Aircraft: SAAB 340, registration:
Injuries: 26 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On March 23, 2017, a Saab 340B, registered in Australia as VH-RXS, had an in-flight shutdown of the right engine, a General Electric CT7-9B. During the climb, the crew detected abnormal turbine temperatures and vibrations from the right engine. The crew shut down the engine and the airplane returned to Dubbo, Australia. The examination of the engine after the airplane landed revealed damage to the stage 4 turbine blades.


The investigation of this incident is under the jurisdiction of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the Government of Australia.


Further information pertaining to this incident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau
PO Box 967
Civic Square ACT 2608
Tel: +61 2 6257 4150
Website: http://www.atsb.gov.au
Email: atsbinfo@atsb.gov.au

Aviation safety investigation and report: http://www.atsb.gov.au

Engine failure or malfunction involving SAAB 340, VH-RXS, near Dubbo, NSW, on March 23, 2017

Investigation number: AO-2017-034
Investigation status: Active
Investigation in progress

Summary:   The ATSB is investigating an engine malfunction involving a Regional Express (Rex) SAAB 340, VH-RXS, near Dubbo, New South Wales, on March 23, 2017.

After departure, the flight crew observed unusual indications and detected vibrations from the right engine. The flight crew shut the engine down and returned to Dubbo. There were no injuries and the aircraft sustained damage to the engine.

As part of the investigation, the ATSB will interview the flight crew and gather additional information.

A report will be released within several months.

Azul Raises More Than $570 Million in Initial Public Offering: Company’s shares to begin trading in United States and Brazil Tuesday morning



The Wall Street Journal
By Luciana Magalhaes
April 11, 2017 6:32 a.m. ET


SÃO PAULO— Azul Linhas Aéreas Brasileiras SA, Brazil’s third-largest airline by passengers, said it raised $571.2 million in an initial public share offering Monday in Brazil and in the U.S., and will begin trading Tuesday morning.

Azul sold 85.4 million preferred shares for 21 reais each and ADSs for $20.06. Shares will trade on Brazil’s B3 stock exchange, until recently known as the BM&FBovespa, and on the New York Stock Exchange.

The budget airline was quickly able to reverse the sale’s suspension last Thursday by Brazil’s financial market regulator, just as banks leading the IPO were setting the price for the shares.

The market regulator, known as CVM, cited an irregular release of information related to the offering as the reason for the suspension, and asked for a correction for those problems. The CVM didn’t provide details on the released information.

Azul said on its investors relations site Friday that it took the requested measures to proceed with the equity sale, without giving specific details.

The airline, which saw three previous efforts to sell shares to the public sink due to economic and political problems in Brazil, said in regulatory filings that had  it expected to sell as many as 72 million preferred shares, for up to 23 reais ($7.32) each in Brazil and  as much $21.81 a unit in the U.S.

Founded in 2008 by businessman David Neeleman —who also created U.S. discount carrier JetBlue Airways Corp. —Azul said in the documents that it plans to use the net proceeds of the sale to repay indebtedness of approximately 315 million reais and the rest for general corporate purposes.

The company has applied for the shares to trade on the B3 stock exchange in Brazil, which recently changed its name from BM&FBovespa, under the symbol “AZUL4,” and on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “AZUL.”

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

Aventura UL, N580TX: Accident occurred, April 03, 2017 in Garden Ridge, Comal County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N580TX

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA149
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 03, 2017 in Garden Ridge, TX
Aircraft: HUGHES WILLIAM J AVENTURA UL, registration: N580TX
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 3, 2017, about 1934 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Hughes model Aventura UL amphibian airplane, N580TX, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing near Garden Ridge, Texas. The airline transport pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight departed Kitty Hawk Flying Field (TS67), located near Garden Ridge, Texas, about 1915.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to simulate water landings by performing low passes over a grassy area that was situated along the western edge of runway 14/32 (700 feet by 200 feet). The pilot reported that he had completed several low passes before the accident. The pilot stated that after completing an uneventful low pass, while on the right crosswind leg, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power and the propeller stopped rotating. The pilot subsequently completed a forced landing to a nearby clearing; however, he did not recall the impact sequence.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector performed the postaccident examination of the airplane at the accident site. The airplane landing gear were positioned for a water landing. The emergency ballistic parachute recovery system was armed but had not deployed. The three fuel tanks (1 main, 2 auxiliary) contained automotive gasoline premixed with engine oil. The fuel filter assembly and both carburetors contained fuel. Engine crankshaft continuity was confirmed by rotating the propeller. The spark plugs exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft and appeared undamaged. One of the three propeller blades had punctured the fabric-covered aft fuselage during the impact sequence. The propeller was removed from the engine to facilitate an operational engine test run. The engine, a 55-horsepower Hirth model 3202, serial number 901269, started and ran at various engine speeds without any hesitation or anomalies. The postaccident examination and operational test run revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal engine operation.

At 1958, the automated surface observing system (ASOS) located at Randolph Air Force Base (RND), about 6 miles south of the accident site, reported: wind 200 degrees at 5 knots, clear sky, 10 mile surface visibility, temperature 26 degrees Celsius, dew point 8 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.69 inches of mercury.

Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion, N1215M, Great PLains Leasing LLC: Accident occurred April 05, 2017 at Detroit Lakes Airport (DTL), Becker County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Great PLains Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1215M

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA148 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 05, 2017 in Detroit Lakes, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA T210M, registration: N1215M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 5, 2017, at 1410 central daylight time, a Cessna 210M single-engine airplane, N1215M, experienced a right main landing gear collapse at the Detroit Lakes Airport (DTL), Detroit Lakes, Minnesota. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right horizontal stabilizer. The airplane was registered to Great Plains Leasing, LLC, Dickinson, North Dakota, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed the Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota, about 1350.

According to the pilot, before the accident flight, the airplane had been experiencing intermittent landing gear problems, and the purpose of the flight was to bring the airplane to a maintenance facility at DTL to examine the landing gear system. Before the flight, the landing gear circuit breaker was pulled out "in order to keep the gear in the down position and eliminate the gear warning horn" for the flight to DTL. While landing at DTL, the pilot noticed the left wing slightly dropped after touchdown, and the pilot corrected with aileron to maintain runway centerline. Shortly thereafter, the pilot could feel the right main landing gear slowly collapse. The pilot was unable to maintain the airplane on runway centerline, and the airplane exited the runway surface. The airplane came to rest upright with the right main landing gear collapsed, and the right horizontal stabilizer was bent.

On April 18, 2017, the airplane was examined by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector and a mechanic. During the initial examination, the landing gear was retracted and extended multiple times. Each gear retraction was normal, and the gear extension cycle resulted in the left main and nose gear extending and locking, and the right gear extending with no movement from the downlock actuator. After loosening the hydraulic line fittings at the downlock actuator, hydraulic fluid was present at the actuator. The actuator was removed for further examination, and was found difficult to move. According to the inspector, after removal, the actuator released, and the internal spring mechanism freely moved the actuator. The actuator was disassembled with no internal problems noted. 

On April 24, 2017, a former pilot of the accident airplane stopped into the FAA office in Fargo, North Dakota, to discuss the accident. According to the pilot, he had previously flown the airplane in September 2016 from DTL to JKJ, and experienced an unsafe gear warning horn and advised the airplane owners. During his landing, he landed with the landing gear pump circuit break in and the gear warning horn functioning. He stated that with the landing gear pump operating (circuit breaker in), the pump pressure on the landing gear actuator held the gear in the "saddle" until the airplane was on the ground. The weight of the wheels would then keep the gear in the down position. To his knowledge, the airplane had been in storage since his flight. 


According to the Cessna Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH), Section 3, Emergency Procedures, Landing Gear Malfunction Procedures, all landing gear malfunction scenarios listed in the POH require the landing gear pump circuit breaker to be in the "IN" position.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA148
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 05, 2017 in Detroit Lakes, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA T210M, registration: N1215M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 5, 2017, at 1410 central daylight time, a Cessna 210M single-engine airplane, N1215M, experienced a landing gear collapse at the Detroit Lakes Airport (DTL), Detroit Lakes, Minnesota. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right horizontal stabilizer. The airplane was registered to Great Plains Leasing, LLC, Dickinson, North Dakota, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed the Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota, about 1350.

According to the pilot, before the accident flight, the airplane had been experiencing intermittent landing gear problems, and the purpose of the flight was to bring the airplane to a maintenance facility to examine the landing gear system. Before the flight, the landing gear circuit breaker was pulled in order to keep the gear in the down position for the flight to DTL. While landing at DTL, the pilot noticed the left wing slightly dropped after touchdown and the pilot corrected with aileron to maintain runway centerline. Shortly thereafter, the pilot could feel the right main landing gear slowly collapse. The pilot was unable to maintain the airplane on runway centerline, and the airplane exited the runway surface. The airplane came to rest upright with the right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane was recovered for further examination.