Saturday, September 5, 2015

Nervous Tourist Vomits Cocaine at Costa Rica Airport

A 49-year old male tourist attempted to leave Costa Rica with a belly full of cocaine, but his skittish and queasy disposition caused him to vomit 64 packets filled with cocaine, right in front of officers from the Drug Control Police (Spanish initials: PCD) at the airport.

According to a press release from the Ministry of Public Security (Spanish initials: MSP), the incident occurred on Friday at the Juan Santamaria International Airport (SJO), located in the province of Alajuela and not far from Downtown San Jose. The tourist is an Italian male who had previously entered Costa Rica at the Sixaola land border crossing with Panama on July 22nd.

The Italian tourist was identified by the last name of Mencaroni; he was at SJO attempting to board a flight to Panama, but his final destination was Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, the main international airport of the Kingdom of The Netherlands.

The PCD officers patrolling the passenger terminal at SJO noticed that Signor Mencaroni appeared to be very nervous, and thus they decided to approach him. Upon doing so, Signor Mencaroni chucked up the first packet, which PCD officers assumed contained cocaine. At that point, the tourist was detained and taken to a separate area where he ejected the contents of his stomach over a period of eight hours, for a total of 64 packets.

A closer inspection and analysis of the packets revealed that the suspect was transporting nearly 371 grams of cocaine hydrochloride in powder form, distributed among 63 packets. A single packet, for some reason, contained 6.2 grams of marijuana. Aside from the cocaine and cannabis, Signor Mencaroni was also carrying 770 euros and 11,000 colones (about $22).

The suspect was later taken to a clinic for a medical evaluation before being taken into custody so that he could sit through an interview with prosecutors.

Source: http://news.co.cr

Huron County commissioners to reduce airport board membership • By reducing the board from five to three, two members can make a quorum for a meeting

The Huron County commissioners are in the process of reducing the amount of airport board members from five to three.

Currently, the airport board consists of Harry Brady, Melissa James and Randy Birchfield, with two seats vacant.

By reducing the board from five to three, two members can make a quorum for a meeting. Now, if one person is absent, the board can’t take any official meeting action.

Marques Binette, Huron County assistant prosecutor, is reviewing a resolution the commissioners expect to adopt at Tuesday’s meeting that will make the board reduction official.

On Thursday, the commissioners pointed out that many boards, including themselves and township trustees, are made up of three people.

“This is being done at the request of the airport board,” Commissioner Joe Hintz said.

In recent times, the commissioners have praised the work of Brady and James, as board members. Brady, a pilot, brings years of aviation experience to the board. James, also the director of the Huron County Chamber of Commerce, brings her business background and connections to the mix.

Birchfield, a new board member, also brings a lifetime of pilot and aviation experience to the board. He operates a flight school at the airport.

In the upcoming weeks, improvements are set to take place at the facility, as the county recently was awarded a $256,000 federal grant for runway and taxiway repairs.

Commissioner Tom Dunlap said recently he expects the county to apply for at least one more grant, with the ultimate hope of “right-sizing the airport.”

Brady added his thoughts Thursday in support of the pending board reduction.

“Why did we ever need five people to run the airport?” he said. “Things are moving forward here and we are making strides.

”I asked the commissioners, ’Why does it take five people to run the airport and just three to run the entire county?’“ Brady said. ”They said, ’You know, you are right.’“

Story and comments:  http://www.norwalkreflector.com

Skydive Long Island instructor in critical condition after mid-air collision



Two people were injured in a mid-air collision in a skydiving accident in Calverton this afternoon, Riverhead Town Police said in a press release this afternoon.

Kevin Arcamona, 29, of Island Park, told police that he, Patricia Baronowski, 46, of East Farmingdale, and another person were in a free fall when his knee came into contact with Baronowski’s head, knocking her unconscious. Baronowski’s reserve parachute was activated automatically. She landed in a tree, suspending her about 15-20 feet off the ground, police said.

Baronowski was airlifted by Suffolk County Police helicopter to Stony Brook University Hospital with a head injury. She is in critical condition, a hospital spokesperson said.  Arcamona, who suffered a leg injury was taken there by Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance.

“Both injuries appear to be non-life threatening,” police said.

Baronowski is a skydiving instructor at Skydive Long Island, according to the company’s website. She is the founder and president of an investor and public relations firm, Pristine Advisers.

“Patricia has been a skydiver since the year 2000 and already has over 1,800 jumps under her belt. She’s a skydiving instructor and coach and a member if SIS – Sisters in Skydiving,” the site says.

Ray Maynard, owner of Skydive Long Island in Calverton, could not immediately be reached for comment.

Story and photos:  http://www.riverheadlocal.com

Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane, N4707S, E & B Aero LLC: Fatal accident occurred September 05, 2015 near Midland International Air and Space Port (KMAF), Midland County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Analysis

The commercial pilot took off from the airport in the airplane with three passengers on board. The pilot reported that, during the takeoff and while crossing the departure end of the runway, the engine began to lose power. The pilot managed to climb and level off the airplane about 40 ft above ground level. The airplane would not maintain altitude, so he conducted a wheels-up landing in a field. The passengers reported that, during the forced landing, the airplane struck a rock and stopped suddenly. The pilot sustained serious injuries and died 24 days after the accident.

Postaccident examination confirmed flight control continuity. An examination of the turbocharger revealed that the wastegate actuating cable was frayed and kinked at both ends. When the throttle was advanced, the cable bound. The bypass valve's actuator arm was corroded, and the bolt and nut used to fasten the actuator cable to the arm were seized and corroded. An examination of the single-driven dual magneto revealed that both sides had improper ignition timing. A subsequent examination revealed that the points were worn. During a bench test, the magneto operated normally. Because the engine was test run successfully with the wastegate cable, bypass valve actuator, and magneto in place, it is unlikely that they directly caused the partial loss of engine power. However, the role they might have played in the power loss could not be determined.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The partial loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined based on the available evidence.

Findings

Aircraft
Turbocharger - Damaged/degraded
Magneto/distributor - Fatigue/wear/corrosion

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 
Lycoming Engines; Arlington, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N4707S

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA404
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Midland, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA TR182, registration: N4707S
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 5, 2015, about 1836 central daylight time, a Cessna TR182 airplane, N4707S, impacted terrain following a forced landing to a field near Midland, Texas. The pilot was seriously injured at the time of the accident, but succumbed to his injuries 24 days later. The three passengers were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to E & B Aero LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Midland International Air & Space Port (MAF), Midland, Texas, and was en route to El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas.

The airplane departed from runway 16R at MAF, and proceeded south. The airport elevation was 2,872 ft mean sea level (msl). GPS data showed the airplane climbed to an altitude of 2,910 ft, where it leveled off. This occurred about one minute after takeoff and the airplane's recorded groundspeed was 58 kts. The airplane remained around this altitude for about 32 seconds before descending to the ground. The airplane's groundspeed while level was about 60 kts. During the descent to the ground, the airplane's airspeed decreased to about 50 kts.

The passengers on board the airplane said that right after takeoff the pilot experienced difficulties with the airplane. It was not developing power and it would not climb. The pilot elected to put the airplane down in a field rather than bring the airplane back around to land at MAF. The passengers said he did a good job controlling the airplane. During the forced landing in the field, the airplane struck a rock. The sudden stop resulted in the pilot sustaining a broken back. The passengers were able to get out of the airplane on their own.

In a postaccident interview with the FAA, the pilot told the inspector that the wastegate might not have opened. It was a problem the pilot experienced during a previous flight, during which he described that engine was running, but the manifold pressure "overboosted." Three days before the accident he had a repair station replace the manifold pressure gauge and bypass valve. The pilot stated that during the accident flight the airplane was configured with 10 degrees of flaps for takeoff and the mixture was full rich. During the takeoff, the engine was at full power and the airspeed increased to between 80 and 100 kts. As the airplane crossed the departure end of the runway, he realized that the manifold pressure was up and the rpms were low. He decided to continue the flight rather than land straight ahead. When he found that the airplane could not maintain altitude, he executed a wheels up forced landing in a field.

The airplane was located in grass field two miles south of the airport. An examination of the airplane at the scene showed substantial damage to the engine mounts and firewall. The airplane's lower cowling and nose gear doors were crushed upward. The fuselage, aft of the rear cabin at the baggage compartment, was bent downward. The main landing gear were crushed upward into their wheel wells. The propeller showed torsional bending, chordwise scratches and leading-edge nicks. One of the two propeller blades was bent and twisted aft under the nose cowling, and exhibited laterally running scrapes and material missing at the blade tip. Flight control continuity was confirmed. A portable GPS unit and an engine monitoring device were retained and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination and data readout.

A review of the airplane's maintenance records showed it underwent an annual inspection on February 19, 2015. The airframe time at the inspection was 2,142.2 hours. Further review of the records showed that between July 29 and August 19, 2015, the turbocharger wastegate was checked, and it was found the pressure relief valve was not opening correctly to limit the manifold pressure. The valve was replaced and it functioned properly during a ground run of the engine. Also during the records review, it was discovered that a service bulletin, Lycoming Service Bulletin SB-643, had not been complied with.

The airplane was examined in Lancaster, Texas, on October 29-30, 2015. Examination of the engine showed continuity throughout. The single-drive dual magneto was tested for proper ignition timing. The left magneto was at 18-degrees before top center (BTC). The right magneto was at 16-degrees BTC. Proper ignition timing is 23-degrees BTC.

The turbocharger waste gate actuating cable was frayed and kinked at both ends. When the throttle was advanced, the cable binded. The actuator arm on the bypass valve was corroded and the bolt and nut used to fasten the actuator cable to the arm was seized and corroded.

The engine and airplane fuselage was secured to a trailer and using the on-board battery and engine starter, the engine was started and run to 1,400 rpm when the number 5 top spark plug shorted due to lead fowling. The spark plug was replaced and the engine operated to full power (2,400 rpm). The power was then reduced to 1,800 rpm and an ignition test was performed. Both magnetos dropped about 300 rpm. The operating limitation is a drop no lower than 150 rpm on each magneto. The turbocharger operated normally during the test run and manifold pressure achieved 31.5 inches of mercury at full power.

Following the engine run, the magneto was removed and disassembled for inspection. The points were excessively worn. The magneto was reassembled and tested and operated from 0 to 3,000 rpm with no defects.

The engine monitoring device was examined on November 20, 2015. The device was a panel mounted gauge that allowed the pilot to monitor and record up to 24 parameters related to engine operations. The data extracted included 15 sessions from May 23 to the accident flight. Data extracted from the accident flight revealed:

The engine monitor began recording at engine start. A plot of the data for the accident flight showed that about 420 seconds, EGT, manifold pressure (MAP) and engine rpm began to climb. RPM increased from 1,250 to about 1,750, MAP rose from 18 inches to 20 inches, and EGTs rose from about 1,200 to 1,300 degrees F.

About 540 seconds, these parameters increased again with EGT exceeding 1,400-degrees F, MAP rising to 31 inches, and RPM to 2,500. This would have occurred about the time the airplane took off.

At 700 seconds, engine RPM decreased to zero and EGT decreased to about 1,000 degrees F. MAP was about 30 inches. All recorded data ended 20 seconds later.


The pilot died on September 29, 2015. The El Paso County, Texas, Medical Examiner cited the cause of death as complications of multiple blunt injuries.


MIDLAND COUNTY, Texas - One person was transported to the hospital after a minor plane crash in Midland County Saturday evening.

Officials with the Texas Department of Public Safety tell us the crash happened just before 7 p.m. in a field west of S County Road 1270, two miles south of the airport.

We are told a Cessna N4707S aircraft left from the Midland International Airport at 6:45 p.m. en route to El Paso. That's when officials say the pilot began to experience engine problems, and could not pick up airspeed. That caused the plane to make a hard landing on the 42nd block of SCR 127.

Midland Police say the plane had four people on board. One passenger was transported to Midland Memorial Hospital after complaints of back injuries.

Source: http://www.newswest9.com

An airplane landed in a field south of Midland International Air & Space Port on Saturday night. 

Department of Public Safety officials on the scene said the plane left Midland International, reported engine troubles and had to land in the field, located west of South County Road 1270.

DPS also reported four people were inside the plane when it went down. One was transported to a nearby hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening.


The plane landed in a field occupied by pumpjacks and surrounded by power lines.

Story and photo:  http://www.mrt.com

Beech A36 Bonanza, N985K: Fatal accident occurred June 02, 2015 at Siler City Municipal Airport (KSCR), North Carolina

Analysis

The purpose of the accident flight was to reposition the accident airplane in order to have maintenance performed on its alternator. The accident pilot planned to fly with the airplane's landing gear extended for the duration of the flight and used a handheld radio for communications, presumably because of the intermittent or non-functional state of the alternator. Another pilot, who was flying in his own airplane, accompanied the accident flight, and they arrived in the vicinity of the destination airport about the same time. As the accident pilot maneuvered his airplane to land, the accompanying pilot watched as the accident airplane flew a downwind traffic pattern leg very close to the runway, then entered a "tight" base-to-final turn. The airplane subsequently entered what the accompanying pilot described as an accelerated aerodynamic stall and descended in a nose-down attitude toward the ground. The airplane impacted trees and terrain about 500 ft short of the runway threshold. A postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures, with the exception of the alternator, which failed a diagnostic test run. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack while maneuvering for landing, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Barbara Harris-Para

Barbara Harris-Para died when the Beech A36 Bonanza (N985K) crashed into woods during a landing attempt at Siler City Municipal Airport, North Carolina. Barbara was a flight instructor and was once governor of the New Jersey/New York section of the Ninety-Nines, a women’s flying club founded by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. For her, aviation was not a childhood dream, but it turned into one later in life. “She was always afraid of heights, believe it or not. She decided she would learn how to fly to overcome her fear of heights. Then she really got into it,” her brother said. Over the next 30 years, she became a very experienced pilot and a flight instructor and, after retiring from teaching in 1998, she worked for the Federal Aviation Administration as a Freedom of Information Act officer, he said.

Barbara Harris-Para

Fred Para sits for a portrait on his couch in his home on September 3, 2015 in Whispering Pines. It has been just over three months since Para was involved in a plane crash that killed his wife and left him with severe injuries. He continues to make progress in his rehabilitation and hopes to pilot an airplane again soon.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N985K


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board



Location: Siler City, NC
Accident Number: ERA15LA231
Date & Time: 06/02/2015, 0800 EDT
Registration: N985K
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 2, 2015, about 0800 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36, N985K, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while attempting to land at Siler City Municipal Airport (SCR), Siler City, North Carolina. The private pilot was seriously injured, and the commercial pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which originated from Moore County Airport (SOP), Pinehurst, North Carolina.

According to a friend of the pilot, the purpose of the accident flight was to reposition the airplane in order to have maintenance performed on the alternator. The accident airplane departed from SOP, and, due to concerns related to the airplane's electrical system, the pilot kept the landing gear extended for the duration of the flight and planned to utilize a handheld communication radio. The friend departed SOP a short time later in his own airplane and arrived in the area of SCR before the accident airplane. The friend reported that a "haze" layer was present near the north side of the airport that was not present toward the south. The friend subsequently maneuvered his airplane so that the accident airplane could enter the traffic pattern and land first.

The accident airplane initially entered the traffic pattern on a downwind leg for landing on runway 22, but upon noting the haze to the north, the pilot announced that they would transition over top of the airport to a left downwind for landing on runway 4. The friend intermittently observed the accident airplane as it maneuvered and noted that, while on the downwind-to-base turn to the runway, the airplane was near the runway in a left bank and nose-high attitude. He further described the turn from base to final as "too tight," and he thought that the airplane had entered an accelerated stall. When he next saw the airplane, it was in a nose-down attitude heading toward a stand of trees that bordered the runway's east side short of the runway threshold. The friend did not observe the impact, but when he did not receive a reply to his inquiries as to their position, he assumed that the airplane had crashed. He subsequently orbited the area where he last observed the airplane and located the accident site. He then landed his own airplane, contacted emergency services, and proceeded to the accident site to render assistance.

The pilot seated in the left seat held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate, which was issued in June 2014. On the application for that certificate, he reported 1,430 total hours of flight experience. The pilot-rated passenger, who was seated in the right seat, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, as well as a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. The passenger held an FAA second-class medical certificate, which was issued in September 2014, and on the application for that certificate, she reported 4,900 total hours of flight experience. According to the friend, the passenger was not operating in the capacity of a flight instructor on the accident flight.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site and identified the initial impact point as a tree located about 500 ft southeast of the runway 4 approach threshold and about 300 ft southeast of the extended runway centerline. The wreckage came to rest about 65 ft from the initial impact point on a 65° magnetic bearing. First responders advised the inspectors of an odor of fuel at the accident site but indicated that there was no postimpact fire.

Detailed examination of the wreckage confirmed flight control continuity from the control column and rudder pedals to each flight control surface. The landing gear selector switch was found in the extended position, and examination of the landing gear actuators revealed positions consistent with the landing gear being extended at impact. The flap actuator was found in the retracted position. One of the three propeller blades was separated from the propeller hub, and all three blades exhibited chordwise scratching. The airplane's alternator was removed and placed on a test bench. The alternator failed the diagnostic test run, with the report noting that the unit produced "low output" and recommending replacement of the stator and/or rotor.

The 0755 weather observation at SCR included calm wind, 7 statute miles visibility, a broken ceiling at 200 ft, and overcast ceiling at 9,000 ft, temperature 19°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury. At 0815, the weather conditions included 5 statute miles visibility in light rain, scattered clouds at 200 ft, scattered clouds at 6,500 ft, and an overcast ceiling at 8,000 ft.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Raleigh, North Carolina, performed an autopsy of the pilot-rated passenger. The reported cause of death was "multiple injuries." 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/01/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1430 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 69, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/01/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 4900 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N985K
Model/Series: A36
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: E-1947
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/17/2013, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3651 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  3501 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB
Registered Owner: BHB OF THE SANDHILLS LLC
Rated Power:
Operator: BHB OF THE SANDHILLS LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSCR, 614 ft msl
Observation Time: 1155 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 73°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Thin Broken / 200 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 200 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: PINEHURST/SOUTHERN PINES, NC (SOP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Siler City, NC (SCR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0720 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Siler City Municipal Airport (SCR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 615 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 4
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  35.697222, -79.508333

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA231
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 02, 2015 in Siler City, NC
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N985K
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 2, 2015, about 0800 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36, N985K, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while attempting to land at Siler City Municipal Airport (SCR), Siler City, North Carolina. The private pilot was seriously injured, and the commercial pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Moore County Airport (SOP), Pinehurst, North Carolina. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to a friend of the pilots, the purpose of the accident flight was to reposition the airplane in order to have maintenance performed on the alternator. The accident airplane departed from SOP, and due to concerns related to the airplane's electrical system, the pilots kept the landing gear extended for the duration of the flight. The friend departed SOP a short time later in his own airplane, and arrived in the area of SCR prior to the accident airplane. The friend recalled that the airport's automated weather observation system was reporting a visibility of 7 statute miles, scattered clouds at 400 feet, and an overcast ceiling at 9,000 feet. He also reported that a "haze" layer was present near the north side of the airport that was not present toward the south. The friend subsequently maneuvered his airplane so that the accident airplane could enter the traffic pattern and land first.

The accident airplane initially entered the traffic pattern on a downwind leg for landing on runway 22, but upon noting the haze to the north, the pilots announced that they would transition over top of the airport to a left downwind for landing on runway 4. The friend intermittently observed the accident airplane as it maneuvered, and noted that while on the downwind-to-base turn to the runway, the airplane was in close proximity to the runway, in a left bank and nose-high attitude. When he next saw the airplane, it was in a nose-down attitude, heading toward a stand of trees that bordered the runway's east side, short of the runway threshold. The friend did not observe the impact, but when he did not receive a reply to his inquiries as to their position, assumed that the airplane had crashed. He subsequently orbited the area where he last observed the airplane and located the accident site. He then landed his own airplane, contacted emergency services, and proceeded to the accident site in order to render assistance.

The pilot seated in the left front seat held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. He held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate, which was issued in June 2014. On the application for that certificate, he reported 1,430 total hours of flight experience. The pilot-rated passenger seated in the right front seat held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, as well as a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. According to the friend, she was not operating in the capacity of a flight instructor on the accident flight. She held an FAA second-class medical certificate, which was issued in September 2014, and on the application for that certificate, she reported 4,900 total hours of flight experience.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site and identified the initial impact point as a tree located about 500 feet southeast of the runway 4 approach threshold, about 300 feet southeast of the extended runway centerline. The wreckage came to rest about 65 feet from the initial impact point, on a 65-degree magnetic bearing. First responders advised the inspectors of an odor of fuel at the accident site, but that there was no post-impact fire. The wreckage was recovered, and a detailed examination was scheduled for a later date.
Fred Para sits for a portrait on his couch in his home on Thursday, September 3, 2015 in Whispering Pines. It has been just over three months since Para was involved in a plane crash that killed his wife and left him with severe injuries. He continues to make progress in his rehabilitation and hopes to pilot an airplane again soon. 



Barbara Harris-Para




Frederick Para dreams of flying a plane again.

The 72-year-old accomplished pilot is recovering from severe injuries he sustained when his single-engine plane crashed June 2 in a wooded area near the Siler City Airport in Chatham County. Para’s wife and co-pilot, Barbara Harris-Para, died from injuries she sustained in the crash.

“I want to fly again,” said Para, who has been a pilot for more than 30 years. “Put it this way: If you were a 16-year-old kid and you had a car wreck, would you just stop driving altogether?”

Para hopes to fly again within the next six months, but he is realistic enough to know it may not happen. But he is determined enough to try.

He sustained injuries to both legs, his hips and pelvis, and his right hand and wrist in the crash.

“Doctors wired him back up. He’s like the bionic man,” said friend and fellow pilot Jim Murray.

Despite the severity of his injuries — his right hand and wrist had to be reattached, as did his right foot just above the ankle — Para is making remarkable progress thanks to his determination and hard work, and the continued support of the community.

For the past few months, Para has been rehabilitating at his Whispering Pines home with the help of a team of full-time caregivers.

“I can sleep in my own bed,” he said. “I can use my own couch. I can stand up and move around a little bit. I just can’t walk long distances yet. But I am getting there.”

The next hurdle Para hopes to clear in the coming weeks is to walk without a cane. He said he expects to get a custom-made shoe for his right foot that will help him.

A longtime weight lifter who has exercised regularly throughout his life, Para credits his physical conditioning, his positive attitude and his determination as key factors in his recovery — as is being able to recover at home. He also said the great support from the community has helped him tremendously.

“I really, really appreciate all the people who sent me cards and visited me,” Para said. “My task of getting better is easier with all that support.”

Sitting near the fireplace in his home is a basket filled with dozens, maybe even hundreds, of cards of support sent to Para. They are still there, unanswered, because he is just now regaining enough strength in his hand and fingers so that he can begin writing again.

“Basically, I can write my name, but not real good,” he said. “That’s the problem. I have to build up the muscles in my forearm.”

Para, an Air Force veteran, was a licensed pilot who also worked as a limousine driver with Donald Trump Industries before he retired. He got his pilot’s license in 1985.

Together for more than 50 years, Para and his wife moved from New Jersey to Whispering Pines in 2006. Avid pilots, the Paras flew in their own plane throughout most of the United States and to several of the Canadian provinces. Combined, they logged more than 5,000 hours of flight time.

“I am lucky to have lived an adventurous life,” he said.

The couple were taking their Beechcraft Bonanza A36 in for maintenance on June 2 when they had what Para described as a “freak accident”: There was bad weather in the area, and when he attempted to land the plane, he “missed the runway and grabbed a tree.”

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Para said he misses his wife greatly, and thinks about the accident a lot.

“You don’t know why something happens or when it happens,” Para said. “I can’t change the past. Now I have to try to make the most of the rest of my life.”

Story and photo:  http://www.thepilot.com




http://registry.faa.gov/N985K 

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA231
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 02, 2015 in Siler City, NC
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N985K
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 2, 2015, about 0800 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36, N985K, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while attempting to land at Siler City Municipal Airport (SCR), Siler City, North Carolina. The private pilot was seriously injured, and the commercial pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Moore County Airport (SOP), Pinehurst, North Carolina. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to a friend of the pilots, the purpose of the accident flight was to reposition the airplane in order to have maintenance performed on the alternator. The accident airplane departed from SOP, and due to concerns related to the airplane's electrical system, the pilots kept the landing gear extended for the duration of the flight. The friend departed SOP a short time later in his own airplane, and arrived in the area of SCR prior to the accident airplane. The friend recalled that the airport's automated weather observation system was reporting a visibility of 7 statute miles, scattered clouds at 400 feet, and an overcast ceiling at 9,000 feet. He also reported that a "haze" layer was present near the north side of the airport that was not present toward the south. The friend subsequently maneuvered his airplane so that the accident airplane could enter the traffic pattern and land first.

The accident airplane initially entered the traffic pattern on a downwind leg for landing on runway 22, but upon noting the haze to the north, the pilots announced that they would transition over top of the airport to a left downwind for landing on runway 4. The friend intermittently observed the accident airplane as it maneuvered, and noted that while on the downwind-to-base turn to the runway, the airplane was in close proximity to the runway, in a left bank and nose-high attitude. When he next saw the airplane, it was in a nose-down attitude, heading toward a stand of trees that bordered the runway's east side, short of the runway threshold. The friend did not observe the impact, but when he did not receive a reply to his inquiries as to their position, assumed that the airplane had crashed. He subsequently orbited the area where he last observed the airplane and located the accident site. He then landed his own airplane, contacted emergency services, and proceeded to the accident site in order to render assistance.

The pilot seated in the left front seat held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. He held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate, which was issued in June 2014. On the application for that certificate, he reported 1,430 total hours of flight experience. The pilot-rated passenger seated in the right front seat held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, as well as a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. According to the friend, she was not operating in the capacity of a flight instructor on the accident flight. She held an FAA second-class medical certificate, which was issued in September 2014, and on the application for that certificate, she reported 4,900 total hours of flight experience.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site and identified the initial impact point as a tree located about 500 feet southeast of the runway 4 approach threshold, about 300 feet southeast of the extended runway centerline. The wreckage came to rest about 65 feet from the initial impact point, on a 65-degree magnetic bearing. First responders advised the inspectors of an odor of fuel at the accident site, but that there was no post-impact fire. The wreckage was recovered, and a detailed examination was scheduled for a later date.

Blakesburg Fly-in brings in hundreds of antiques

Greg Lucas looks up at portrait of his late son, Connor who was an avid aviation enthusiast. Connor took his first solo flight at 16.



BLAKESBURG— Clear blue skies made for a perfect day at the largest aviation event in the state, at the Antique Airfield in Blakesburg on Saturday afternoon.

The 62nd Annual Antique Airplane Association and Airpower Museum AAA/APM 2015 Invitational Fly-in at the old-fashioned runway located near Blakesburg was the destination of more than 350 barnstorming flyers from all over the country. The flying enthusiasts navigated their way to southeastern Iowa to unite with old friends and meet new club members.

This year's theme is "Record Breaking" with the Curtiss Robin and Stinson 108 Series being the featured aircraft for the weekend.

"The Curtiss Robin of course is representative of the "Record Breaking" aircraft theme and will help us commemorate this colorful era of aviation history, while the Stinson 108 is representative of one the most successful post-war aircraft produced," according to a statement from Fly-In Chairman Brent Taylor.

Row after row of antique airplanes and their pilots could be spotted across the lawn. Including, Willard VanWarmar, of Leavenworth, KS and Kevin Nobiling, Oskaloosa with VanWarmar's Stearman 41' antique aircraft. VanWarmar took the two hour flight down from Leavenworth to participate in the weekend's Fly-in.

"I went to this Fly-In over forty years ago," said VanWarmer. " I haven't been to every single one, but I try to go as often as I can." "This plane was my father's and when he passed away I started working on it. It's been in the family for over 25 years."

There's a lot of flying going on throughout the day. Many find find it entertaining just to watch everyone else fly. This fly-in is a very low-key event to others around the country. It's a time for pilots to socialize and talk about one thing: airplanes.

In order to attend this prestigious gathering, AAA membership is required and is open to anyone with an interest in preserving and flying antique and classic aircraft. Being a pilot or airplane owner is not a requirement for belonging.

Safeguarding a historic environment of aviation’s golden past is the shared mission by both AAA/AMP and its more than 20 active chapters, along with a growing membership, which fuels the organization’s passion for flying by the seat of your pants.

Another member who has a passion for flying is Greg Lucas of Paul's Valley, Oklahoma. His Cessna 180 just might fall outside the Antique category of planes, into the newer Classic models, but it sure does tell a story.

"I've been coming out here for 20 years," said Lucas.

Since Lucas started getting into airplanes he's owned over 17 and throughout the span of his hobby 'career' but has since scaled back from five to only two.

What makes this plane stand out is two life-size spray painted portraits of Lucas' late son, Connor balancing out both sides of the tail wings.

"Connor was an avid aviation enthusiast and at 16 he went and got in his first solo fly before he even got his driver's license," said Lucas.

According to Lucas, before the fatal ATV accident that took his son's life in May 2010, Lucas was set to go to Oklahoma State and then on to the Air Force Academy to become a pilot.

"They saw what potential he had and that immediately had him going the Air Force Academy route," said Lucas.

Matt Grimes, a family friend whose father first got Greg Lucas interested in planes was the artist that helped with his son's portraits.

" Now I can have Connor with me every time I fly and I know nothing bad will ever happen to me," said Lucas.

As Connor's smiling face stares up at the sky, there's no doubt that Lucas always has a special co-pilot looking out for him.

Story and photos:  http://www.ottumwacourier.com


Willard VanWarmar, Leavenworth, KS and Kevin Nobiling, Oskaloosa stand under VanWarmar's Stearman 41' antique airplane.

Battle of Britain Spitfire flypast over London cancelled after Shoreham crash ramps up insurance cost • A group of private Spitfire owners had hoped to fly over London on September 20 to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain

The Shoreham air crash could have a long-term effect on insurance for air displays.



A Battle of Britain commemoration flypast by 20 Spitfires over London has been cancelled after the Shoreham air disaster made the cost of insuring the event unaffordable.

The organizers of the flypast, which they had hoped would happen on September 20, were told they would need third party insurance cover of £250 million, which would have required a premium of around £50,000.

It raises the prospect that air shows scheduled for next year may find the cost of insurance prohibitive as a result of the Hawker Hunter crash at Shoreham, in which 11 people died.

Paul Beaver, who was organizing the event, said: “The intention was that 20 privately-owned Spitfires would fly over London to mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. We had started the planning in March, and had applied to the Civil Aviation Authority and even the Prime Minister to get the go-ahead.

“The route we were going to take would have made sure there was always somewhere for an aircraft to land if it got into difficulties, and usually the individual owners’ aircraft insurance, which provides £5 million of third party cover per aircraft, would have been enough.

“But after Shoreham we took soundings from an insurance expert who advises the air shows, and he said the feedback he was getting from underwriters was that we would need to take out £250 million of insurance cover, which made the whole thing untenable.

“I really hope the underwriters take a pragmatic view when the air show season starts next year, because if they don’t it will make life very difficult.”

An unrelated flypast of massed fighter planes will still go ahead on September 15 over the south of England which will be attended by Prince Harry.

Story and photos:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Cessna 152, N6141Q: Accident occurred September 05, 2015 in Miami, Florida

C&G AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6141Q

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA342 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Miami, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/14/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N6141Q
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, before taking off to practice instrument approaches in the local traffic pattern, he checked the airplane’s fuel status by looking at the cockpit quantity indicators and looking into the fuel tanks. After conducting three touch-and-go instrument landing system landings, the pilot was attempting a GPS landing. While established on radar vectors for an instrument approach and at 1,500 ft mean sea level, he observed engine “roughness,” followed by a loss of power. He attempted a forced landing on a road; however, he subsequently chose to land in a muddy area within the boundary of a national park instead. 

Postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed that the fuel system was undamaged, and there was no evidence of fuel leakage at the scene. The fuel tanks were drained, and 0.45 gallon of fuel was recovered from the left tank, and no fuel was found in the right tank. The operator reported that, at the time of the accident, the airplane had been flown for about 4.6 hours since its last refueling. The airplane had a usable fuel capacity of 24.5 gallons, and its fuel consumption rate in cruise flight was about 6.1 gallons per hour; therefore, the usable fuel would have been consumed during the accident flight. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper preflight fuel planning and in-flight fuel management, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

On September 5, 2015, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 152, N6141Q, force landed following a total loss of engine power during a practice instrument approach to Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. The private pilot and a pilot-rated passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by Dean International, Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated at TMB about 1110. 

The private pilot, who was seated in the left, cockpit seat, reported the following. He checked the aircraft fuel state by looking at the cockpit quantity indicators and by looking into the tanks. After completing the other preflight tasks, he entered the local pattern for practice instrument approaches. While established on radar vectors for a fourth approach, at 1,500 feet above mean sea level and on a westerly heading, he observed engine "roughness" followed by a loss of rpm. He attempted a forced landing on a road; however, he elected to land in a muddy area within the boundary of the Everglades National Park instead. After the airplane came to rest, the pilots secured the airplane and first responders arrived at the accident scene. 

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The wreckage was located within the confines of the Everglades National Park, in a grass area. No evidence of fuel or oil leaks was observed around the wreckage. Both wing fuel tanks were intact and unbreached. The fuselage and engine firewall sustained structural damage from impact forces. The nose wheel and propeller were broken off due to impact forces. 

The inspector returned the next day and drained the fuel tanks with the assistance of the operator's maintenance personnel. The right wing tank contained no fuel. The left wing tank was drained and its contents were placed in a 5-gallon container; it was later quantified at 0.45 gallon. Once the wreckage was recovered from the accident site, the inspector completed his examination of the engine and found no evidence of an anomaly or failure. 

The operator reported that the airplane was last refueled on September 4th, the day prior to the accident; it was then flown an additional 2.2 hours that day. The accrued time on the airplane during the accident flight was about 2.4 hours; therefore, a total of 4.6 hours accrued since the last refueling before the accident. The capacity of the airplane fuel tanks was 26 gallons, including 24.5 gallons of useable fuel. 

According to the performance chart for the Cessna 152 (cruise at 2,000 feet pressure altitude, 2,400 rpm, standard temperature, and 101 knots true airspeed) fuel consumption was about 6.1 gallons per hour.

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA342 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N6141Q
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 5, 2015, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 152, N6141Q, force landed following a total loss of engine power during a practice instrument approach to Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. The private pilot and a pilot-rated passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by Dean International, Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated at TMB about 1200.

The private pilot, who was seated in the left, cockpit seat, reported the following. He checked the aircraft fuel state by looking at the cockpit quantity indicators and by looking into the tanks. After completing the other preflight tasks, he entered the local pattern for practice instrument approaches. While established on radar vectors for a fourth approach, at 1,500 feet above mean sea level and on a westerly heading, he observed engine "roughness" followed by a loss of rpm. He attempted a forced landing on a road; however, he elected to land in a muddy area within the boundary of the Everglades National Park instead. After the airplane came to rest, the pilots secured the airplane and first responders arrived at the accident scene.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The fuselage and engine firewall sustained structural damage from impact forces. One wing tank contained about 0.75 gallons of fuel, and the other tank was dry. There was no evidence of fuel leakage at the accident site. The operator reported that the flight departed with about 12 gallons of fuel on board. The fuel capacity of the airplane was 26 gallons.

The airframe and engine were retained for further examination.
 
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19


Two injured in plane emergency landing near Miami Executive Airport

Two people made an emergency landing near the Miami Executive Airport Saturday after taking a training flight.

A pilot and co-pilot aboard a single-engine Cessna landed just west of the airport, 12800 SW 145th Ave., at about 1:30 p.m. Both victims suffered minor injuries and were treated by Miami-Dade fire rescue workers, according to airport spokesman Greg Chin.

The training flight was through the Dean International Flight School offered at the airport.

“It was a training flight and we’re not exactly sure what happened yet,” Chin said.