Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Beech A36 Bonanza, Rex Grimsley Inc., N8283D : Fatal accident occurred August 31, 2016 at Bentonville Municipal Airport (KVBT), Benton County, Arkansas

REX GRIMSLEY INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8283D 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Little Rock FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA341
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 31, 2016 in Bentonville, AR
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N8283D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 31, 2016, about 0930 central daylight time, a Beech model 36, N8283D, was destroyed when it impacted a hangar during an attempted takeoff from runway 18 at the Bentonville Municipal Airport (VBT), Bentonville, Arkansas. The pilot, who was the sole occupant of the airplane was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact explosion and fire. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and was destined for the Springdale Municipal Airport (ASG), Springdale, Arkansas.

Surveillance video obtained during the on-scene portion of the investigation showed that the accident airplane was departing on runway 18, when it abruptly veered to the east. Another airplane was visible on the recording and was rolling to the north on the same runway. The other airplane had reportedly just landed on runway 36. After veering to the east, the accident airplane crossed the un-paved ground between the runway and the airport ramp area. The airplane became airborne and travelled out of the frame of the video, however, the explosion and fireball were visible on the recording.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

In Memory of Rex Lanier Grimsley
March 27, 1946 - August 31, 2016

Obituary

Rex Lanier Grimsley, of Bentonville, Ark., passed away on August 31, 2016 in a plane crash at the Bentonville Municipal Airport.

He was a committed husband, loving father and grandfather, and Christian. He will be greatly missed by his devoted family, Carolyn Boling Grimsley, his wife of 49 years; son, James Paul Grimsley of Bentonville and his fiancé, Heather Holland; daughter, Jill Grimsley Drewyor of Bentonville and her husband Pine Drewyor; also by his grandchildren, Harper Grimsley (19), a student at the University of Arkansas, Macy Grimsley (18), a student at Texas Christian University, and Margot Drewyor (10), Beatrix Drewyor (6), and James Truman Drewyor (4) of Bentonville.

A cattle broker, avid quail hunter, and pilot, Grimsley was a lifelong resident of Vaughn, just west of Bentonville. He frequently made trips to Texas in his Beechcraft Bonanza to entertain family and friends on bird hunting trips. He spent the evening preceding his death with his family celebrating his grandson's birthday. He died the following morning piloting his aircraft after evading an incoming aircraft at the local airport. 

The older of two children, Grimsley was born in 1946 and raised in Vaughn. His parents, James Knox Grimsley and Wanda Lou Rodgers Grimsley, preceded him in death. He is survived by his sister, Ruthann Grimsley Strickland, and her husband Steve Strickland, of Little Rock. 

Grimsley graduated from the University of Arkansas with a Business degree in 1968, following which he taught distributive education classes in Pine Bluff and later at Bentonville High School. He later attended the U of A and obtained a Masters of Business Administration. He was an ardent Razorbacks fan. Grimsley was an entrepreneur at heart and owned several successful businesses throughout his career, including F&G Feed Store, where he was partners first with Bob Fuqua and later with George Huber, and Brookside Seed Company and Bentonville Lube 'N Go, where he was also partners with Huber, and a prosperous cattle broker business. He was a shareholder and director at Grand Savings Bank.

He was a longtime cattleman, he grew up on a dairy farm in Bentonville, and began running his own beef cattle in 1970. He maintained many interests in agriculture, primarily in the cattle market and was a fixture at several area cattle auctions. Grimsley raised commercial cattle, registered Charolais, and registered Brangus in the Bentonville area and also at Arkoma Land and Cattle Company in Delaware County, Oklahoma. He was joined in the cattle operation by his son, Paul, who will continue to carry on the family tradition.

Grimsley valued work ethic and was known for his entrepreneurship and love for deal making. He loved finance and greatly enjoyed his participation with First National Bank (formerly Citizens Bank) in Bentonville, and later with Grand Savings Bank. His keen mind, quick wit and love of fun made him good company. He was a well-known prankster. Grimsley was a friend to many and enjoyed entertaining family and friends at his Rooster Ridge hunting lodge and had a great affection for his hunting dogs and household pets. He adored his grandchildren. He was a longstanding church member at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). He will be fondly remembered and missed dearly.

Visitation will be 5 to 7pm on Tuesday, September 6 at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Rogers. Funeral services will be held at 2pm on Wednesday, September 7, also at the church. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to New Life Ranch, 160 New Life Ranch Dr. Colcord, OK 74338, www.newliferanch.com. Grimsley was a supporter of the mission of NLR.


Arrangements are by Callison-Lough Funeral Home of Bentonville. Online condolences may be made at www.callisonlough.com.















BENTONVILLE (KFSM) — A man piloting a plane that crashed at Bentonville Municipal Airport Wednesday morning (Aug. 31) has died.

Police identified the pilot as Rex L. Grimsley, 70, of Bentonville, according to Gene Page with the Bentonville Police Department.

Page said the plane crashed into an airport hangar around 9:30 a.m. during takeoff. The pilot was the only one on board the six-passenger 1983 Beechcraft A36 Bonanza.

Brandon Nolker, who works at the airport, said a plane was landing at the same time the pilot who died was taking off.

“A guy I work with saw the wing go past and said look out and there was no time to react,” he said. “It sounded like a bomb was going off.”

The Federal Aviation Administration will determine the ultimate cause of the crash. An FAA team from Little Rock has been called in to investigate, which is standard procedure when a plane crashes.

According to the City of Bentonville website, the municipal airport houses 41 single engine and two multiple engine aircraft. The city owns one enclosed t-hangar with six units and one open t-hanger with five units. There are five private box hangars of various sizes and a sixth enclosed t-hangar with eight units.

Source:   http://5newsonline.com











BENTONVILLE —A plane crashed into a hangar at the Bentonville Municipal Airport killing the pilot Wednesday morning, according to Gene Page with the Bentonville Police Department.

Witnesses said the plane was preparing to take off when it hit the hangar, according to Paige.

A preliminary investigation by Bentonville Police identified the pilot was identified as Rex L. Grimsley, 70, of Bentonville, according to Chief Jon Simpson.

The aircraft was a 1983 Beechcraft Bonanza, according to police. It could carry 6 passengers, and was a single-engine, fixed-range aircraft.

Witness Brandon Nolker was in the hangar next to the one that was hit. He told 40/29 News "it sounded like a bomb went off."

"It's just tragic, it's a sad event," Nolker said.

No other aircraft or persons on the ground were injured, Page said. The airport will remain closed for the immediate future.

The FAA is on the way to the airport to take over the investigation.

The Bentonville Municipal Airport is northeast of the larger Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport.

The Bentonville Municipal Airport houses 41 single engine and two multiple engine aircraft, according to the airport's website. The airport is 140 acres large.

There are a total of 8 hangars, at the airport, including two owned by the City of Bentonville.

Source:  http://www.4029tv.com


The pilot of a 1983 Beechcraft Bonanza was killed Wednesday morning when his plane crashed into a hangar at the Bentonville Municipal Airport, said Gene Page, spokesman for the Bentonville Police Department.

The pilot was identified as Rex L. Grimsley, 70, of Bentonville, according to a news release issued Wednesday afternoon.

Grimsley was the only person on board, and there were no other injuries, the news release stated.

Page said he did not know what caused the crash, which happened during takeoff.

The airport is closed, and Federal Aviation Administration investigators are headed to the scene, Page said.

Joey Standley, who works at nearby Northwest Arkansas Winwater, said he and others saw a plane flying low near the hangar, then saw black smoke and called 911.

Cessna 150L, N18601: Accident occurred August 31, 2016 at Rosenau Airport (21ND), Upham, McHenry County, North Dakota

http://registry.faa.gov/N18601 

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fargo FSDO-21

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA350
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 31, 2016 in Upham, ND
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N18601
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 30, 2016, about 2035 central daylight time (CDT), a Cessna 150L, N18601, impacted terrain short of the grass runway at Rosenau Airport (21ND) in Upham, North Dakota. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The private pilot, the sole occupant, suffered serious injuries. The airplane was privately registered and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and flight plan was filed.

Cessna 152, Kent State University, N95475: Incident occurred August 30, 2016 in Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY:   http://registry.faa.gov/N95475

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, BOUNCED AND STRUCK THE PROPELLER, MANSFIELD, OHIO.

Date: 30-AUG-16
Time: 13:55:00Z
Regis#: N95475
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MANSFIELD
State: Ohio

Cessna A185E Skywagon 185, N185TJ: Accident occurred August 30, 2016 in Gooding County, Idaho

http://registry.faa.gov/N185TJ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, FLIPPED OVER AND WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY, GOODING, IDAHO.  

Date: 30-AUG-16
Time: 16:15:00Z
Regis#: N185TJ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 185
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: GOODING
State: Idaho

Fairchild M-62A-3 Cornell II, DTD PT-19 LLC, N47164: Accident occurred August 30, 2016 in Madison, Lake County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Olmsted, Ohio 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

DTD PT-19 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N47164

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA342
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 30, 2016 in Madison, OH
Aircraft: FAIRCHILD M 62A-3, registration: N47164
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 30, 2016, about 1950 eastern daylight time, a Fairchild M 62A-3 (PT-19) airplane, N47164, collided with tree while departing from a private strip near Madison, Ohio. The commercial rated pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to DTD PT-19 LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to information obtained by investigators, while departing the private strip, the airplane would not climb with full engine power. The airplane collided with trees about ½ mile from the end of the strip. Substantial damage was sustained to the fuselage and wings.

An examination of the airframe by the responding Federal Aviation Administration found no anomalies with the airframe. However, the flaps were found in the down or extended position. A review of the aircraft checklist, notes for takeoff: "flaps up". The pilot stated to the FAA inspector that he normally takes off with one notch of flaps.

The pilot did not submit a completed NTSB Form 6120.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA342
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 30, 2016 in Madison, OH
Aircraft: FAIRCHILD M 62A-3, registration: N47164
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 30, 2016, about 1950 eastern daylight time, a Fairchild M 62A-3 (PT-19) airplane, N47164, collided with trees while departing from a private strip near Madison, Ohio. The commercial rated pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to DTD PT-19 LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to information obtained by investigators, during departure the airplane would not climb, with full engine power. The airplane collided with trees about ½ mile from the end of the airstrip.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

American Legend AL3, N114LC: Accident occurred August 30, 2016 in Sedona, Arizona

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA461 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 30, 2016 in Sedona, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO AL3, registration: N114LC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane, during approach for landing the airplane encountered “slight” turbulence, but the wind was reported as calm. He further reported that there were building cumulus clouds in the area. The pilot reported that about 4 feet above the ground, the airplane encountered wind gusts from left to right, so he added power and right rudder. 

He reported that the airplane landed on the left main landing gear, immediately veered left, exited the left side of the runway and impacted a drainage culvert. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage frame and right wing ribs.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operations.

As a recommendation the pilot reported that he should have gone around at the first indication of turbulence and tested the conditions further. He wrote that had the conditions worsened he would have departed the area for a suitable airport. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing in gusting wind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N114LC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA461
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 30, 2016 in Sedona, AZ
Aircraft: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO AL3, registration: N114LC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane, during approach for landing the airplane encountered "slight" turbulence, but the wind was reported as calm. He further reported that there were building cumulus clouds in the area. The pilot reported that about 4 feet above the ground, the airplane encountered wind gusts from left to right, so he added power and right rudder. He reported that the airplane landed on the left main landing gear, immediately veered left, exited the left side of the runway and impacted a drainage culvert. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage frame and right wing ribs.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operations.

As a recommendation the pilot reported that he should have gone around at the first indication of turbulence and tested the conditions further. He wrote that had the conditions worsened he would have departed the area for a suitable airport.

Beech B19, N52AA: Incident occurred August 29, 2016 in Trenton, Gibson County, Tennessee

http://registry.faa.gov/N52AA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Memphis FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY IN A FIELD, NEAR TRENTON, TENNESSEE.  

Date: 29-AUG-16
Time: 23:10:00Z
Regis#: N52AA
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 19
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TRENTON
State: Tennessee

Suicidal Germanwings pilot had struggled in US flight school



WASHINGTON –  The German pilot who deliberately flew his airliner into a mountainside last year had struggled with learning to fly and had failed a key test of his skills during training in the U.S., according to FBI interviews with his flight instructors.

Andreas Lubitz was promoted anyway. But his training difficulties were one more "red flag" that should have caused Lufthansa and the airline's Arizona flight school to take a closer look and discover his history of depression, asserted attorneys representing families of crash victims.

Lubitz was a co-pilot for Germanwings, a regional airline owned by Lufthansa, when he locked Flight 9524's captain out of the cockpit and set the plane on a collision course with a mountain in the French Alps last year. All 144 passengers and six crew members, including Lubitz, were killed.

One instructor, Juergen Theerkorn, described Lubitz as "not an ace pilot," and said he failed one flight test because of a "situational awareness issue." In aviation, loss of situational awareness usually means a pilot becomes absorbed in something and loses track of what else is happening with the plane.

Another instructor, Scott Nickell, told the FBI that Lubitz lacked "procedural knowledge" and had trouble with splitting his attention between instruments inside the plane and watching what was happening outside. But while Lubitz struggled with training, he would achieve passing scores enabling him to continue the program, Nickell said.

Lubitz failed one of five check rides, which are important tests of a pilot's flying skills, and one of 67 training flights, Matthias Kippenberg, president and CEO of the Airline Training Center Arizona, told the FBI. However, Kippenberg dismissed the failures as unremarkable, saying students are given the opportunity to retake the tests. Only 1 or 2 percent of students fail to be promoted, he said.

The FBI conducted the interviews a week after the March 24, 2015, crash. Summaries were only recently released by prosecutors in Germany, according to attorneys with Kriendler & Kriendler in New York, who are representing the families in a lawsuit against the flight school. The lawyers provided copies to The Associated Press.

Lufthansa spokeswoman Christina Semmel declined to comment "due to the ongoing legal proceedings." The flight school referred calls to Lufthansa.

Officials for Lufthansa and the flight school didn't immediately reply to requests for comment.

An investigation has revealed that Lubitz was being treated for a relapse of severe depression and suicidal tendencies but had hid the information from Germanwings.

Germany's strict patient privacy laws didn't allow doctors to share medical information with an employer without the patient's permission.

Lubitz had had a previous bout of depression in 2008 and had informed Lufthansa, taking a leave of absence two months after starting ground school training in Germany. He was allowed to resume training ten months later after providing a statement from his doctor that he had recovered.

Lubitz was originally scheduled to begin his training at the flight school in Arizona in September 2009, but was rescheduled for September 2010. He didn't actually start until November. Lufthansa told the school in an email that the delay was due to "a long illness," Sherri Harwood, the school's administrative services manager, told the FBI.

The FBI summaries don't contain a copy of that email, so it's not known whether Lufthansa told the school the nature of Lubitz's illness, said Brian Alexander, one of the attorneys representing the families.

The FBI interviews show that flight school officials "acknowledge knowing (Lubitz) struggled in training, had a long illness and was delayed for over a year," Alexander said. "They also admit he failed a check ride due to a loss of situational awareness, which may very well have been caused by the very same anxiety and severe depression which were symptoms of his mental health disorder."

It remains unclear what specific information the school had about Lubitz' medical condition. But If the school had checked, Alexander said, it might have learned that German authorities had twice turned down applications from Lubitz for a pilot medical certificate because of his history of depression before issuing him a certificate in July 2009. That certificate stated it would become invalid if he had a relapse.

In the U.S., the Federal Aviation Administration also initially declined to grant Lubitz a student pilot medical certificate because he said on his application that he hadn't been treated for any mental disorders, and he failed to list doctors who had treated him as required. After a medical examiner working for the FAA in Germany caught the discrepancy, Lubitz refiled a corrected application.

The FAA could have refused to issue the certificate because Lubitz lied on the application, but he was allowed to provide a statement from his doctor that he was fit to fly and that medications for depression had been discontinued.

John Goglia, an aviation safety expert and former National Transportation Safety Board member, agreed with attorneys that Lubitz's struggles were a warning that should have caused the school to look closer, although "not a bright red one." It's not unusual for students to fail a single check ride, he said.

The school's washout rate of only 1 or 2 percent seems low, he said.

Story and video:   http://www.foxnews.com



NTSB Identification: DCA15WA093
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 24, 2015 in Barcellonette, France
Aircraft: AIRBUS INDUSTRIE A320-211, registration:
Injuries: 150 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The BEA of France has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Airbus A320-211 airplane that occurred on March 24, 2015. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the BEA's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of Manufacturer and Design of the engines.

All investigative information will be released by the BEA-FR.

Unregistered Quicksilver: Fatal accident occurred August 30, 2016 near Mount Vernon Airport (KMVN), Jefferson County, Illinois

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT QUICKSILVER, CRASHED IN A FIELD, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS FATALLY INJURED, 2 MILES FROM MOUNT VERNON, ILLINOIS.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Springfield FSDO-19


Date: 30-AUG-16

Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Aircraft Make: QUICKSILVER
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Fatal
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: MOUNT VERNON
State: Illinois

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

An autopsy shows the pilot of an ultralight plane that crashed south of the Mt. Vernon Outland Airport on Tuesday died from injuries sustained in the crash.

Jefferson County Coroner Eddie Joe Marks says Jason Pearson of McLeansboro sustained massive blunt force trauma caused by the deceleration and crash of the plane. He reports no health problems were found that could have contributed to the crash.

Marks says a witness reported seeing the ultralight plane going straight up and then apparently stalling before the crash occurred. He reports Pearson had done various maneuvers with ultralights for years.

The crash occurred in a bean field in the area of North Chestnut Lane and East Liberty Road.

The accident remains under investigation by the FAA, Jefferson County Sheriff's Department and the coroner's office.


Source:   http://www.wjbdradio.com








MT. VERNON — The pilot who crashed his ultralight aircraft Tuesday afternoon south of Liberty Road has been identified as Jason Pearson.


Pearson, 39, of McLeansboro, was killed Tuesday afternoon after his ultralight aircraft crashed near a creek and wooded area south of Liberty Road and east of Chestnut Acres Road, just before 4 p.m. Pearson was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident by Jefferson County Coroner Eddie Joe Marks.


Marks said Pearson's remains have been taken to Hughey Funeral Home and an autopsy is scheduled for Thursday to determine if the death was caused by the crash.


Mt. Vernon Outland Airport Manager Chris Collins was one of those called first to the scene, which could only be reached on foot or ATV. He and first responder representatives from the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office and Jefferson Fire Protection District and a local resident to begin the initial identification of the pilot.


Collins returned to the airport, where he verified that Pearson's vehicle was at his hangar which housed the aircraft, which had been taken up by Pearson earlier.


The FAA was contacted Tuesday, an official aircraft was asked to fly overhead to take investigative photos for the National Traffic Safety Administration and the FAA. The FAA then requested first responders on the ground take several photographs of the scene.


Collins said although the NTSB and FAA usually don't investigate ultralight crashes, an investigation is underway due to the fatality.


Collins said Wednesday the FAA investigator arrived to inspect the scene by 11 a.m. Wednesday morning and left the scene about 1 p.m.


"He released the aircraft to take to the airport, and secure in a hangar," Collins said. "The NTSB is now the owner of the aircraft until they or the FAA release it to the family."


Collins said once in the hangar, the FAA investigator will begin his inspection of each piece of the wreckage.


"It's easier to see everything which is laid out on a level floor," Collins said.


The investigation is expected to take several weeks to conclude.


"As to the official findings, who knows how long it will take on that," Collins said. "There are a lot of guidelines they have to follow. We never know how long these things are going to take."


Pearson was a professional in the aviation industry and active with the local Experimental Aircraft Association. He worked on the pit crew for several hang glider, ultralight and RC shows.


"I've known him for over 20 years," Collins said. "Everyone is devastated at the airport. It hits close to home."


Collins said when not working in the airshow industry, he would be at Mt. Vernon Outland Airport flying his ultralight, which was based in a hangar at the airport, or talking with other aviation enthusiasts. Pearson used the aviation handle "Snoopy."


"He just got back into town on Monday," Collins said. "He has been in California working. But, we always knew when the airshow circuit was done, because he would come out here and fly when he was home."


Collins said Pearson "lived the aviation life."


"I don't know anyone who was more excited about aviation than Jason," Collins said. "Model airplanes, remote control airplanes, the ultralight he flew — he loved it all."


"Jason Pearson was not a performer, but without Jason, performers couldn't do their jobs," said Scott McMillan, another aviation professional from Colorado. "Jason was one of the best air show grunts in the business and I am a better person for having known him."


Pearson was also home in August and took part in the 10th Annual Jim LeRoy Memorial Fly-In, hosted by the Hamilton County Fearless Flyers Model Club and served as an officer.


Funeral service information has not been announced at this time.


Source:   http://www.register-news.com





JEFFERSON COUNTY -- New details have emerged about Tuesday afternoon's ultralight crash near the Mt. Vernon Airport.

Jefferson County Sheriff Travis Allen has confirmed that the crash killed Jason Pearson, 39, of McLeansboro.

Rosalie Mahan lives just down the road from where the plane crashed and saw it going down while on her way to the store.

"This plane just come like it was coming down the road, and I got my mail and thought, 'Well, he sure is kind of low,'" said Mahan.

Mahan says she never would've thought the plane was about to crash.

"About an hour later my son, who lives here in town, texted me and told me there was a plane that went down here in town," added Mahan.

That plane belonged to Pearson, who regularly flew out of the Mt. Vernon Airport.

"It's kind of a small, tight-knit group of people who fly out of there together," added Jefferson County Chief Deputy Clint Taylor.

That tight-knit group called Pearson a great person and great friend.

When Mahan found out Pearson was killed in the crash, she was distraught.

"I had to go get my daughter to come stay the night with me, that's how much it upset me," added Mahan.

Federal investigators finished up their investigation Wednesday afternoon.

There is no word yet on when the findings will come out.


Story and video:   http://www.wsiltv.com

Mt. Vernon Airport Manager Chris Collins speaks with Jefferson County Coroner Eddie Joe Marks and Jefferson Fire Protection District Capt. Ryan Clinton on Tuesday before the coroner goes back to the fatal ultralight crash scene.



The pilot of an ultralight aircraft is dead after his plane crashed in a bean field about a half mile south of Mt. Vernon Outland Airport late Tuesday afternoon.

Jefferson County Coroner Eddie Jo Marks pronounced the man dead at the scene of the crash. His name is not being released pending notification of family.

Marks says both the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are expected to join the investigation on Wednesday. He said the pilot was experienced with flying ultra light aircraft.

An autopsy is planned Thursday to try and determine if the pilot had any underlying health issues that could have caused the crash.

Marks says a witness reported the ultralight spiraling down to the ground south of the East Liberty Road. He reports there was no fire after the crash.

The crash was reported shortly after four Tuesday afternoon.

Source:   http://www.wjbdradio.com

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, Swift Fork Air, N9575D: Accident occurred August 25, 2016 in Central, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N9575D

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA458
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Thursday, August 25, 2016 in Central, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA18, registration: N9575D

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Robinson R44 II, Hawaii Pacific Aviation Inc., N74805: Accident occurred August 26, 2016 in Kailua/Kona, Hawaii

HAWAII PACIFIC AVIATION INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N74805

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA168
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 26, 2016 in Kailua/Kona, HI
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration: N74805
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 26, 2016, about 0745 Hawaii standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N74805, was substantially damaged following a loss of control after landing at the Kona International Airport at Keahole (HKO), Kailua/Kona, Hawaii. The two certified flight instructors were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed during the personal flight, which was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed HKO about 0715.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the flight instructor who was acting as pilot-in-command reported that after landing and in the process of bottoming out the collective, the helicopter began to gently oscillate fore and aft about its longitudinal axis. This was followed shortly by the oscillating condition becoming more severe, to the point where one main rotor blade, the tail boom, and the lower vertical fin impacted terrain. The tail boom and lower vertical fin were substantially damaged as the result of the impact with terrain.

The helicopter was secured by the operator pending further investigation.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N13668: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 near Missoula International Airport (KMSO), Missoula County, Montana

http://registry.faa.gov/N13668


Pilot Roy "Skip" Owings







A single-engine airplane was forced to make an emergency landing in a field west of Missoula on Friday. Both occupants walked away unscathed.

Pilot Roy "Skip" Owings and his wife Judy, both local residents, had just left the Missoula Airport in the Cessna and were about 10 miles north of Evaro when Roy noticed a little vibration in the engine and saw that he had lost all his oil pressure.

"When he uttered the word Mayday to the control tower, that put more than an alert in my thinking and I commenced to pray ardently," Judy Owings said. "Probably my first thought was he’s an amazing pilot and so thorough in all his pre-flight (inspections). I knew that if something was awry, it was not his negligence at all."

Roy decided the plane wasn't going to make it back to the airport, so he picked a field near the Wye that didn't have any trees. Other than the engine damage, the plane was fine.

"It was no rougher than a rocky landing strip in Idaho," Owings said. "I'm thankful I have an incredibly calm wife and I’m very thankful that God was watching out for us.''

He said he has "been very diligent about rehearsing this kind of stuff in my mind for years and years and years. It’s almost like clockwork." And on Friday, it paid off.

Judy said that when she realized that they were going to have to land in a field, she was confident in her husband’s ability.

“I knew he could do it,” she said. “He’s very calm. He was concerned about bushes or something and he asked me if I was OK. I knew that whatever happened it would be OK.”

She said the landing was very bumpy.

“When we were first in touch with the control tower, he thought probably we could make it in and they cleared us to land,” Judy recalled. “But the plane was dropping sooner than we expected. And they suggested Highway 93 and there was way too much traffic.''

Her husband had been scouting for options. "He said, 'There’s a field we could land in, there’s another one.’ And then he said, 'This is the one,’ and so he picked it.”

Owings first got his pilot’s license in Seattle in 1974 and has more than 700 hours of flying experience. They owned an equipment company in Missoula, but Owings now works for Halliburton.

They were headed to Kalispell to visit his mother. Owings said he flew the plane from Utah the day before for work, and everything was fine.

Firefighters from the Frenchtown Rural Fire Department were on the scene shortly after the landing at about 11:30 a.m., and the Missoula County Sheriff’s Department responded as well. The plane did not start a grass fire.

Judy said she’s never heard her husband say the word “Mayday” before.

“He was very resolute and looking for what he should do next, and very calm,” she said. “Since he started flying, and I love flying with him, he has always learned to be looking for a place to land if we might need to. He’s probably the most conscientious pilot I know. There’s a lot of people I wouldn’t fly with.”

Roy Owings said the FAA will have to conduct an investigation and the plane is going to have to get towed out.

“We won’t be flying it,” he said. “Not for a while.”

He said he’s never had to declare an emergency before.

“I knew I could set it down,” he said. “It was a good landing.”

Story and photo gallery:   http://missoulian.com














MISSOULA -   No injuries have been reported after a small plane made an emergency landing in a field northwest of Missoula on Friday morning.

The single-engine Cessna went down in a field near the Jellystone RV Park.

Authorities say the aircraft experienced mechanical issues after taking off from Missoula International Airport.

The pilot attempted to return to the airport but ended up being forced to make an emergency landing in the field. 

Story and photo gallery: http://www.krtv.com