Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Cessna 525C CitationJet CJ4, N918LF: Incident occurred September 09, 2020 at Columbia Gorge Regional Airport (KDLS), The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft while taxiing to the ramp struck a fuel truck.

Life Flight Network LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N918LF

Date: 09-SEP-20
Time: 04:00:00Z
Regis#: N918LF
Aircraft Make: TEXTRON
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: THE DALLES
State: OREGON

Diamond DA-20C-1 Eclipse, N802CT: Accident occurred September 11, 2020 at Fillmore Municipal Airport (KFOM), Millard County, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

802CT Aircraft Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N802CT

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 11, 2020 in Fillmore, UT
Aircraft: Diamond DA20, registration: N802CT

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landed, veered off the runway and ground looped. 

Date: 11-SEP-20
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N802CT
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FILLMORE
State: UTAH

Beechcraft C90 King Air, N695DA: Incident occurred September 13, 2020 at Beloit Airport (44C), Rock County, Wisconsin

On September 13, 2020 at Beloit Airport (44C), Beloit, Wisconsin, the pilot forgot to extend the landing gear and landed with gear retracted.


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin


Aircraft landed gear up.

https://registry.faa.gov/N695DA

Date: 13-SEP-20
Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: N695DA
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: C90
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BELOIT
State: WISCONSIN








AIRCRAFT:  1966 Beech C90 N695DA, LJ-758,  TT: 9425.4, Hobbs 1874.7

Phase 1 & 2 on 8/14/2020 at TT: 9401.1

ENGINES:    

Left Engine - Pratt & Whitney PT61-60A, SN PCE25510;

TT 5052.7; TSMOH: 5052.7;

CSMOH at inspection 4208;

Phase 4 & 1; 8/14/2020  5028.4;                                                            
                      
Right Engine - Pratt & Whitney PT61-60A, SN  PCW25511;

TT 5052.7, TSMOH: 5052.7;

CSMOH at inspection 4208; 

Phase 4 & 1; 8/14/2020  5028.4.

PROPELLERS:  

Left Prop - Hartzell, S/N  FY2934, TSMOH 3414.6;

Phase inspection 2 & 3;  8/5/19; 9275.9;
 
Right Prop - Hartzell, S/N   FY2872, TSMOH 3414.6;

Phase inspection 2 & 3;  8/5/19; 9275.9.

EQUIPMENT:   

Garmin: GPS 500;

Collins Nav/coms;

Collins Autopilot;

Collins DME;

Collins Transponder.
 
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT: On 09/13/20, at Beloit Airport (44C), Beloit, Wisconsin, the pilot forgot to extend the landing gear and landed with gear retracted.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:  The damage includes but may not be limited to the following: 

Both propellers severely damaged;

Both engines need tear down inspection;

Damage to exhaust stacks on right engine;

Bottom of both engine nacelles damaged;

Trailing edge of both flaps damaged;

Four antennas on belly damaged. 

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Aircraft currently outside at the Beloit Airport, Beloit, Wisconsin.

REMARKS:   

Skydiving jump plane;

Insurer reserves the right to reject any and all bids;

Salvage is as is/where is;

The posting information is the best to our knowledge;

An inspection of the salvage is highly recommended. 

LOGS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATE OR COMPLETE.

WARRANTY:  There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, useability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage. All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING. Failure of the bidder to view the salvage or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.

HOURS estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted. 

Read more here: http://www.avclaims.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N7562F: Accident occurred September 13, 2020 at Pearland Regional Airport (KLVJ), Brazoria County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Green Airports Development Corp

https://registry.faa.gov/N7562F

NTSB Identification: CEN20CA393
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 13, 2020 in Houston, TX
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration: N7562F

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Aircraft landed and skipped over taxiway and flipped over in the grass.

Date: 13-SEP-20
Time: 20:35:00Z
Regis#: N7562F
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Ryan Navion B, N37C: Fatal accident occurred September 11, 2020 near Van Nuys Airport (KVNY), Los Angeles County, California


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aircraft crashed into a parking lot shortly after takeoff due to unknown circumstances and there was a post impact fire.

Yoloa Corp

https://registry.faa.gov/N37C

Date: 11-SEP-20
Time: 22:02:00Z
Regis#: N37C
Aircraft Make: RYAN
Aircraft Model: NAVION B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: VAN NUYS
State: CALIFORNIA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Los Angeles County Coroner's Office: https://mec.lacounty.gov

Pacific Palisades residents Jill Young and Jim deVarennes died on September 11 in a single-engine plane crash, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, deVarennes, 62, was piloting a Ryan Navion B from the Van Nuys Airport to the Santa Ynez Airport in Santa Barbara County when the crash occurred.

An eyewitness reported that the aircraft made a steep climb away from the airport and seemed to stall, before crashing into the ground.

Young, who graduated from UCLA in 1978, was the sister of Palisadian Dr. Troy Elander, an ophthalmologist in Santa Monica. She had an interior design business, also in Santa Monica.

DeVarennes owned a local business, Palisades Roofing and Construction. According to the company’s website, Jim initially owned a tree company and was called to assess the roof damage caused by a fallen oak. “After successful removal of the tree, Jim offered to repair the homeowner’s roof as a courtesy. The following day the homeowner’s neighbor asked for a new roofing estimate. After doing some research, Jim submitted a bid, hence PRC’s first job was on the books. What began as a $40 favor has grown into a million dollar business.”

The airplane accident is under investigation by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.



Officials on Sunday released the name of the 62-year-old pilot killed in a single-engine plane crash just west of the Van Nuys Airport, a crash that also killed his passenger.

The pilot was identified as Jim De Varennes of Pacific Palisades, according to the Los Angeles County coroner's office. The name of his passenger, a female, will be released pending notification of next of kin, according to the coroner's office.

The crash occurred at 3:04 p.m. Friday in a parking lot in the 6900 block of North Hayvenhurst Avenue, according to Nicholas Prange of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

De Varennes and the passenger were pronounced dead at the scene.

A witness said the plane made a steep climb, stalled, then nose-dived into the ground.

Preliminary information indicated that the Ryan Navion B plane had taken off from Van Nuys Airport and was heading for Santa Ynez Airport in Santa Barbara County, according to the Federal Aviation Administration's Ian Gregor, who says the plane caught fire after crashing.

The LAFD responded to the scene and put out flames from the crash. No injuries or building damage were reported on the ground, but multiple reports said three vehicles suffered damage.

“The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate,” Gregor said. “The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation and will determine the probable cause of the accident.”

https://www.nbclosangeles.com

Mooney M20C Ranger, N672TP: Incident occurred September 12, 2020 at Riverton Regional Airport (KRIW), Fremont County, Wyoming

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aircraft gear collapsed on landing. 

https://registry.faa.gov/N672TP

Date: 12-SEP-20
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N672TP
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: RIVERTON
State: WYOMING

American Champion 8KCAB Decathlon, N83DH: Fatal accident occurred September 13, 2020 near Groton Municipal Airport (2E6), Brown County, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Location: Groton, SD
Accident Number: CEN20LA389
Date & Time: 09/13/2020, 1100 CDT
Registration: N83DH
Aircraft: Champion 8KCAB
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 13, 2020, about 1100 central daylight time (CDT), an American Champion 8KCAB, N83DH, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Groton, South Dakota. The commercial pilot and passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

According to a witness, after takeoff, the airplane accelerated down the runway in ground effect before the nose pitched up to an estimated 45° angle. The airplane then rolled right and inverted and exited the roll maneuver in a nose-low attitude prior to impact with the ground. One witness estimated the roll was initiated between 75 and 100 ft above ground level. Two witnesses reported that the maneuver appeared intentional due to the rapid roll rate. Of the three witnesses interviewed, all stated that they did not know of any planned aerobatic maneuvers for the flight. The flight was part of a group of pilots attempting to raise money to help youth gain interest in aviation.

A family member stated that the pilot routinely performed low-level aerobatics in the accident airplane.

The airplane came to rest about 200 yards south of runway 15 at Groton Municipal Airport (2E6). The airplane impacted in an upright, nose low attitude before it came to rest inverted. Both wings, the fuselage, and tail all sustained substantial damage in the impact.

A detailed wreckage examination is pending. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Champion
Registration: N83DH
Model/Series: 8KCAB No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KABR, 1300 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Groton, SD (2E6)
Destination: Groton, SD (2E6)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 45.528611, -98.093056 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 
Tina Hansen
December 26th, 1964 - September 13th, 2020

Tina Hansen, age 55, of rural Garden City, died tragically on Sunday, September 13, 2020, along with her husband, Doug Hansen, in a plane accident in Brown County near Groton, SD.


Memorials in their memory will be appreciated in lieu of flowers.


Visitation Services will be held from 8:30-11:00AM on Saturday, September 26, 2020, at the Clark County Airport. Funeral Services will follow, beginning at 11:00AM with Reverend Mark Tracy officiating. Interment will be held at a later date.  
Funeral arrangements are with by the Furness Funeral Home at Clark where there is an online registry at www.furnessfuneralhome.com

Doug Hansen
November 17th, 1955 - September 13th, 2020

Doug Hansen, age 64, of rural Garden City, died tragically on Sunday, September 13, 2020, along with his wife Tina (Karber) Hansen, in a plane accident in Brown County near Groton, SD.


Memorials in their memory will be appreciated in lieu of flowers.


Visitation Services will be held from 8:30-11:00AM on Saturday, September 26, 2020, at the Clark County Airport. Funeral Services will follow, beginning at 11:00AM with Reverend Mark Tracy officiating. Interment will be held at a later date.  
Funeral arrangements are with by the Furness Funeral Home at Clark where there is an online registry at www.furnessfuneralhome.com

GROTON, S.D.  - Sunday’s crash marked an abrupt end to a weekend of activity at the Groton airport and emotions are still running high, with the deaths of a married couple from Clark as they tried to take off.

Darrell Hillestad knew Doug and Tina Hanson as those who shared an interest in aviation with him, and Doug and Darrell had both worked in the industry for many years. Which made it hard for Hillestad to process Sunday’s events.

“Doug was a friend of mine, and it hit me in a very hard spot.”

The couple had stopped by the city airport for a fly-in breakfast that Hillestad had helped host.

“Made it a little fly-in breakfast, and wanted to give the kids a good experience out here. To introduce them to aviation I guess, basically,” said Hillestad.

But as the group began to leave the airport to go on a poker run in the area, the Hanson’s had trouble taking off.

“Well, I was flying and, I had seen Doug take off, and end up crashing,” said Hillestad.

Their single-engine American Champion aircraft had crashed just after takeoff. The plane hit the ground and flipped over on it’s back. However exact details of how and why the aircraft crashed is still under investigation. Despite this, Hillestad said he hopes people know that flying is a safe activity.

“It’s like driving a car or walking across the street, or riding a motorcycle or whatever. I mean, it’s sad when things happen and aviation is a very safe industry. I want to clarify that. It is very safe. Accidents do happen. It’s very sad when it does, it draws a lot of attention when it does.”

An investigation into the crash is ongoing. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration will be out to the crash site in the coming days. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, it’s the third fatal plane crash this year in South Dakota

According to their obituaries, funeral arrangements are still being made for Doug and Tina Hanson. Announcements will be made by Furness Funeral Home in Clark.


A married couple from Clark died in a Sunday morning plane crash near Groton.

Doug Hansen, 64, and Tina Hansen, 55, were killed in the crash.

Grant Rix was attending the Groton Fly-in/Drive-In with his family Sunday and said he witnessed the crash.

“We were walking our kids to the vehicle to leave, and the plane had already taken off and was just kind of going along the runway at about 10 feet off the ground or something like that, trying to gain airspeed,” Rix said.

At first, he said, he thought the airplane was performing a barrel roll, so he pointed it out to his kids.

“All of a sudden it looked like the airplane didn’t have much altitude, and then it hit the ground with the wheels down then flipped over onto its backside,” Rix said.

That was around 11 a.m. at the Groton Municipal Airport.

One victim died on the scene, and the other was transported to Avera St. Luke's Hospital, where they were pronounced dead, according to the Brown County Coroner Michael Carlsen.

The plane was a American Champion 8KCAB Decathlon, according to information from the Federal Aviation Administration. It was registered to Doug Hansen.

The plane crashed under unknown circumstances near the runway, also according to Federal Aviation Administration information.

In a tweet, the National Transportation Safety Board announced that the crash is under investigation, however, the agency was not present at the scene. The Federal Aviation Administration is also investigating the incident.

Sunday's was the third fatal airplane crash in South Dakota this year, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. An man died in a plane crash at the Sioux Falls airport in June, and another person died in a plane crash northwest of Parkston in July.

https://www.argusleader.com

de Havilland Canada DHC-3T Texas Turbine Otter, N3125N: Incident occurred September 15, 2020 and Accident occurred June 04, 2015

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

September 15, 2020: Aircraft ditched in Naknek Lake, Alaska.

Katmai Air LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N3125N


Date: 15-SEP-20

Time: 18:27:00Z
Regis#: N3125N
Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DH3
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: KATMAI AIR
City: NAKNEK LAKE
State: ALASKA









The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Skwentna, AK
Accident Number: ANC15LA037
Date & Time: 06/04/2015, 1230 AKD
Registration: N3125N
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC-3T
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Flight control sys malf/fail
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

Analysis

The airline transport pilot was conducting an on-demand commercial taxi flight. The pilot reported that, during cruise flight and while applying back pressure to the control yoke, he felt a vibration. The pilot reduced engine power and then executed a precautionary landing. After landing, the pilot found damage to the elevator servo tab and spar structures inside the right elevator.

Subsequent examination of the airplane revealed that the elevator auxiliary spar and rear spar forward of the servo tab location exhibited fractures and buckling consistent with overload. Dark staining was evident around many of the rivets on the upper servo tab skin. Such staining, commonly known as "smoking rivets," is typically caused by the loosening of one or more rivets, which allows relative movement between the rivet(s) and the underlying structure. However, if the joint is adequately riveted, there should be no movement between the rivet(s) and the underlying structure.

About 1 year (309 flight hours) before this accident, a similar anomalous event involving the accident airplane occurred. A review of maintenance records indicated that, after that accident, the elevator rear spar was repaired, the false spar was replaced, and a new elevator servo tab was fabricated. The operator's director of maintenance reported that the servo tab was made in accordance with the drawing for the original part number tab. Postaccident examination of the servo tab skin found that the material used to construct the tab was about 25 percent thinner than the skin material specified in the original servo tab design and that the hinge used was not in accordance with the original servo tab design.

The director of maintenance also reported that, initially, the elevator servo tab was fastened together using the correct rivets. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector subsequently inspected the airplane and required the removal of those rivets and replacement with the rivets based on a service bulletin applicable to airplanes equipped with an optional flutter kit; however, the optional kit was not installed on the accident airplane, so the replacement rivets were incorrect. Replacing the rivets required drilling out each of the rivets fastening the tab skin, C-channel, and hinge together; drilling out the rivets can enlarge the holes beyond their nominal diameter. In an adequately riveted joint, the rivet expands to fill the hole and should slightly deform the hole, making each hole diameter slightly larger than the original; however, if the diameter is already larger than required, the rivet may not adequately fill the hole.

The servo tab is subject to a harsh vibratory environment due to the natural airframe vibration and the propeller wash induced on the airplane's tail. Based on the dark staining evidence, the rivets installed on the accident servo tab likely did not adequately fill the holes in the tab structure, which allowed them to loosen over time. The holes in the servo tab upper skin and upper leg of the C-channel, where the rivets were changed, were likely slightly larger than nominal following the rivet replacement.

The airplane was inspected about 1 month (18.6 flight hours) before the accident flight in accordance with an airworthiness directive (AD) that required checks for elevator servo tab condition, fastener security, and tab free-play. Although maintenance personnel found the tab to be compliant with the AD's maximum free-play/trailing edge deflection allowances, the dark staining should have provided maintenance personnel a visual indication that there was a problem with relative movement between the rivets and the underlying structure; however, no maintenance action was taken.

The reported vibration during the accident flight and the overload damage observed on the servo tab and elevator spar structures are consistent with aerodynamic flutter of the elevator servo tab that excited to the point of imposing damaging loads on the servo tab and the elevator spar structures. For a servo tab flutter event to develop, both airspeed (airflow) and inadequate structural stiffness are required. Inadequate stiffness of the servo tab was evident by both the inadequate servo tab skin thickness and the loose rivets. Inadequate elevator control system stiffness was evident by the low elevator control cable tensions recorded after the event.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flutter failure of the right elevator servo tab due to the improper fabrication of the servo tab and maintenance personnel subsequent failure to detect anomalies with the servo tab.

Findings

Aircraft
Tab structure (on elevator) - Failure (Cause)
Tab structure (on elevator) - Not serviced/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Fabrication - Maintenance personnel (Cause)
Scheduled/routine maintenance - Maintenance personnel (Cause)

Factual Information

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 4, 2015, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a de Havilland DHC-3T Otter airplane, N3125N, equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-12JR turboprop engine, experienced an anomalous in-flight vibration during cruise flight in the vicinity of Skwentna, Alaska. The flight was being operated by Alaska Air Taxi, LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as an on-demand commercial air taxi. The airline transport pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right elevator. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the area. The flight departed Anchorage, Alaska, about 1200, en route to an off-airport landing strip near Big River, Alaska.

According to the pilot, during cruise flight, while applying back pressure to the control yoke, a vibration was felt. The pilot immediately reduced power and executed a precautionary landing. After landing, the pilot examined the airplane and found that the skin on the right elevator servo tab was fractured in several places, a portion of the tab was missing, and spar structures inside the right elevator were buckled and fractured.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The de Havilland DHC-3 Otter, as designed in the early 1950s, is a single-engine, propeller-driven airplane originally powered by a reciprocating radial engine. The type certificate for the DHC-3 is currently held by Viking Air Limited, Sidney, British Columbia, Canada. The accident airplane was modified in November 2008 to be equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-12JR turboprop engine, a Hartzell model HC-B4TN-5QL propeller, and other modifications in accordance with supplemental type certificate (STC) SA09866SC, held by Texas Turbine Conversions, Inc., of Denison, Texas.

The accident airplane was not equipped, and was not required to be equipped, with a modified elevator servo tab and control linkage. (See the "Additional Information" section below for more information.) The original design for DHC-3 servo tab (P/N C3TE13-12) specifies the use of a single piece of 0.016-inch thick 2024 Alclad aluminum formed into a triangular shape with a C-channel incorporated into the forward edge, a continuous hinge (P/N NAS-30-3A-LT) installed at the forward edge of the tab between the upper skin and the upper leg of the C-channel (to attach it to the elevator), and CR-163-4 blind rivets to fasten the hinge and tab skin together. According to design specifications, the NAS-40-3A-LT hinge is made from anodized 61S-T6 aluminum alloy with a width from the hinge centerline to the edge of the flange of 0.625 inch and a flange thickness of 0.045 inch.

A maintenance record dated June 3, 2014, documented repairs to the elevator rear spar, replacement of the false spar, and fabrication of a new servo tab. According to the Alaska Air Taxi Director of Maintenance (DOM), the new servo tab was built in accordance with the drawing for the original P/N C3TE13-12 servo tab. He pointed out that the original drawing specified the use of CR163 blind rivets to fasten the tab and hinge together. The DOM used CR9163 rivets, the modern equivalent of CR163 rivets (which were no longer available), for the repair. This maintenance was performed on the airplane following a previous anomalous event involving the elevator servo tab. See NTSB accident ANC14LA035 for more information about that event. An FAA Form 337 dated June 6, 2014, was submitted for the repair.

The DOM stated that following the June 3, 2014, repair, an FAA inspector had inspected the airplane and wanted to ground the airplane because he did not use CR3243 Cherry Max rivets to fasten the tab together. The DOM said that the FAA inspector was incorrect and that, per the drawing, he had used the correct rivets. He noted that the Cherry Max rivets were used only for DHC-3 airplanes that were equipped with an optional flutter kit, which the accident airplane had not incorporated. The DOM provided a copy of the service bulletin that applied to modified airplanes for reference. A maintenance record for the airplane dated June 5, 2014, showed that the CR9163 rivets were removed from the servo tab hinge, CR3243 Cherry Max rivets were installed, and the airplane was returned to service.

A maintenance log entry dated May 5, 2015, documented a 100-hour inspection for the airplane and referenced compliance with AD 2011-18-11 (which specified an elevator servo tab inspection) at an airframe total time of 16,688.0 (Hobbs 1902.0).

The review of airframe logs did not locate a record for compliance with AD 2011-12-02 (which specified revised airspeed limitations and airspeed indicator markings), however, the AD compliance record for the airframe showed it was complied with on July 15, 2011. The airplane's airspeed indicator had red radial markings at 134 mph and 144 mph consistent with the specifications in AD 2011-12-02.

WRECKAGE EXAMINATION

The airplane had been repaired and returned to service on June 4, 2015, before the NTSB was notified of the event. Examination of photographs of the damaged components provided by the operator showed that more than half of the servo tab remained attached to the elevator. There was dark staining around most rivets on the servo tab upper skin portions recovered. The staining extended aft along the airflow direction from some of the rivets. There was also dark staining on the forward face of the servo tab and the aft face of the auxiliary spar that emanated from the hinge.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Elevator Servo Tab and Hinge

Photographic evidence showed that the outboard, aft corner of the tab with outboard filler and control horn attached remained attached to the control rod after the event but was not supplied to the NTSB. NTSB examination of the elevator servo tab and hinge components revealed that the outboard 14 inches of tab separated from the elevator and was not recovered with the exception of the outboard aft corner. The inboard 31 inches of tab was mostly intact. The upper and lower skins were fractured about 26.5 inches outboard of the inboard end from the trailing edge forward to the C-channel area but the channel and hinge were not fractured.

The C-channel and hinge were cut during disassembly separating the remaining tab into 2 pieces. There were three additional fractures of the upper and lower tab skins located about 7, 14.5 and 19 inches outboard of the inboard end. They extended forward from the trailing edge about 0.5, 0.75 and 1.5 inches, respectively. About 31 inches of the tab hinge remained installed on the tab and the elevator. The remaining portion of hinge was separated and not recovered.

Skin thickness measurements of the servo tab skin pieces were performed at several locations (the paint was not removed before the measurements were taken). All measurement readings were between 0.012 and 0.013 inch. Examination of the hinge found it was marked with "MS 20001-2" along its length. Specifications for the MS 20001-2 hinge indicate that it is made from anodized 2024-T3511 aluminum alloy with a width from the hinge centerline to the edge of the flange of 0.531-inch and a flange thickness of 0.044-0.056 inch.

Elevator Auxiliary and Rear Spar Structures

The elevator auxiliary spar (installed between the upper and lower elevator skins in the area forward of the servo tab) remained installed in the elevator but was fractured in two locations about 29 inches and 41.5 inches outboard of the inboard edge of the tab. The inboard 3.5 inches of auxiliary spar was cut off during disassembly and not retained. The upper flange of the auxiliary spar was intact on each of the three pieces examined. The elevator hinge half remained attached to the upper flange of the auxiliary spar on the inboard piece. The hinge half was marked with "MS 20001-2" along its length. Most of the lower flange of the auxiliary spar was fractured from the spar between about 3.5 and 25 inches outboard of the inboard end. Portions of the fractured flange were attached to the lower elevator skin. There was a branched fracture in one of the formed ribs on the lower skin running forward about 5 inches and located about 41.5 inches outboard of the inboard end of the tab cutout coincident with the fracture in the auxiliary spar. The aft edge of the upper skin was fractured at the auxiliary spar through the rivet holes from about 14 inches to 35 inches outboard of the inboard end.

About 59 inches of the rear spar was removed and retained for examination consisting of 4 pieces. The spar was buckled and fractured through the inboard 3 lightening holes. There was a fracture of the upper flange of the rear spar about 31 inches outboard of the inboard end above the 6th lightening hole. There was a repair installed between the 7th and 8th lightening holes, about 36 inches to 41.5 inches outboard of the inboard end. The repair consisted of a doubler on the aft face of the web, a doubler on the forward face of the web and upper flange and a doubler on the forward face of the web and lower flange. The spar was fractured through the upper flange at the 8th lightening hole and through both the upper and lower flanges at the 9th lightening hole.

See the Airworthiness Group Factual Report in the public docket for more detailed information.

Elevator Controls

After this event, the airplane was repaired by replacement of the right elevator auxiliary spar, hinge, a portion of the rear spar, the outboard closeout rib, and the upper and lower skins and installation of a newly built servo tab. On June 13, 2015, a logbook entry documented the tightening of the elevator control cables to the maximum permissible value. According to the DOM, the cables had about 10 pounds of tension prior to tightening them to about 80 pounds.

Radar and Airspeed Data

Radar data from three previous flights with this airplane was available from Flight Aware. The previous flights occurred on February 23, 2015, April 9, 2015 and May 24, 2015. An NTSB Senior Meteorologist provided winds aloft for these three dates along the flight paths that were used to determine the airplane's airspeed for each flight.

During the cruise portion of the February 23 flight, the airplane maintained an average calibrated airspeed of about 130 knots for about 20 minutes of recorded flight. This was 5 knots beyond the Vne (never exceed speed) established by AD 2011-12-02.

During about a 10 minute period on the April 9 flight, the airplane's average airspeed was between 115 knots and 120 knots.

The May 24 flight consisted of a 10 minute period where the airplane remained between 110 knots and 140 knots.

See the Aircraft Performance Study in the public docket for more detailed information.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Aerodynamic Flutter

Flutter is an aeroelastic phenomenon that can occur when an airplane's natural mode of structural vibration couples with the aerodynamic forces to produce a rapid periodic motion, oscillation, or vibration. The vibration can be somewhat stable if the natural damping of the structure prevents an increase in the vibratory forces and motions. The motions can become dynamically unstable if the damping is not adequate, resulting in increasing self-excited destructive forces being applied to the structure. Flutter can range from an annoying "buzz" of a flight control or aerodynamic surface to a violent and destructive failure of the structure in a very short period of time. Aircraft speed and structural stiffness are two inputs that govern flutter; as speed increases or structural stiffness decreases, the susceptibility to flutter will increase. (Source: NTSB Aircraft Accident Brief, NTSB/AAB-12/01, "Pilot/Race 177, The Galloping Ghost, North American P-51D, N79111, Reno, Nevada, September 16, 2011.")

Summary of Related Elevator Servo Tab Safety Activity, including ADs

The FAA, Transport Canada (TC), the Civil Aviation Authority of Australia, the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand, Viking Air Limited, and various STC holders have a history of activity (spanning several years) related to elevator servo tab safety for a variety of configurations of the DHC-3 airplane, including original and STC-modified (turbine) powerplant configurations. A summary of the items that applied to the accident airplane's configuration for U.S. operations at the time of the accident is provided below. A detailed history of various ADs for other DHC-3 configurations, an optional Viking Air Limited flutter-prevention modification kit STC (with its own related ADs and a service bulletin), and additional requirements from TC for DHC-3 airplanes in Canada, are contained in the Airworthiness Group Factual Report in the docket for this investigation.

In June 2011, the FAA issued AD 2011-12-02 to impose limitations on the airspeed of DHC-3 airplanes equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-10 or -12JR turboprop engine per STC SA09866SC. The AD required inserting limitations into the airplane flight manual to specify a maximum operating airspeed limitation of 144 mph for a land/ski airplane and 134 mph for a seaplane and modifying the airspeed indicator to include a red radial line at 144 mph for a land/ski airplane and/or a red radial line at 134 mph for a seaplane.

In August 2011, the FAA issued AD 2011-18-11 requiring repetitive inspections of the elevator servo tab, correcting all discrepancies, and reporting results to the FAA for all DHC-3 airplanes. (The AD superseded AD 2011-05-02 issued in February 2011, retaining all of the requirements and changing the applicability to include all DHC-3 airplanes.) The AD requires operators to inspect the elevator servo tab every 100 hours in accordance with Viking DHC-3 Otter Maintenance Manual Temporary Revisions No. 18, No. 19, and No. 20.

In March 2004, the FAA issued an AD that initially mandated the installation of an STC for a modified elevator servo tab and redundant control linkage on all turbine-powered DHC-3 airplanes (including Honeywell [STC SA09866SC], Walter M601E-11 [Canada Turbine Conversions, Inc., STC SA09857SC], and Pratt & Whitney PT6A-34 or -135 [A.M. Luton STC SA3777NM]turbine engine installations). According to Federal Register Vol. 69, No. 40, Monday, March 1, 2004, page 9523, in which the FAA announced the original AD, the FAA referenced "several reports of situations where pilots of…DHC-3 airplanes with installed turbine engines have experienced buffeting of the elevators." The FAA noted that, in all cases, the airplanes had been modified with a Pratt & Whitney engine per STC SA3777NM. In April 2004, the FAA issued a revised AD 2004-05-01R1 to remove the mandate for the Honeywell- and Walter-equipped airplanes. The FAA stated that it decided to remove the applicability to the Honeywell- and Walter-modified airplanes after it evaluated the concerns, comments, and technical information related to all three STC configurations.

An NTSB review of available records found only one previous documented instance of an in-flight failure of an elevator servo tab on a DHC-3 airplane equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-10 or -12JR turboprop engine. That previous event occurred on this same airframe about 1 year prior to this accident. See NTSB accident ANC14LA035 for more information.

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Flight control sys malf/fail (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/18/2015
Flight Time: 16000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 15000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Registration: N3125N
Model/Series: DHC-3T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 394
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 11
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/05/2015, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 19 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 16688 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: HONEYWELL
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TPE331
Registered Owner: KATMAI AIR LEASING LLC
Rated Power: 900 hp
Operator: Alaska Air Taxi LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: ALASKA AIR TAXI LLC
Operator Designator Code: JKGC

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASW, 148 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1848 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 308°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 8 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.33 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain; Moderate - Patches - Fog
Departure Point: ANCHORAGE, AK (ANC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: MCGRATH, AK (MCG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1200 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 61.966111, -151.187500


Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage, N596ST; accident occurred September 15, 2020 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Denver, Arapahoe County, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N596ST

Location: Englewood, CO
Accident Number: CEN20CA394
Date & Time: 09/15/2020, 1420 MDT
Registration: N596ST
Aircraft: Piper PA46
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot was performing a straight-in approach to runway 35R, and the approach was "bumpy" due to winds and terrain. She reported that about touchdown, a "severe wind event caused what felt like a potential upset." The pilot felt the left wing lift up and an uncommanded downturn to the right. She applied full power to bank left and climb, but the airplane did not climb. The left wing tip scraped the runway, and the airplane was forced to the right. Before the pilot was able to regain control, the airplane impacted a taxiway sign and several runway lights. The airplane then landed and taxied to the ramp. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the rear wing spar and wing root. The pilot reported there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 70, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/07/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/26/2020
Flight Time:  2935 hours (Total, all aircraft), 722 hours (Total, this make and model), 2887 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 67 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N596ST
Model/Series: PA46 350P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 4636596
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/05/2020, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4358 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1147 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540-AE2A
Registered Owner: Capital Holdings 109 Llc
Rated Power: 350 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held:None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: APA, 5884 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1453 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 9000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Plainview, TX (PVW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Englewood, CO (APA)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace:Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: Centennial Airport (APA)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5885 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10001 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.558611, -104.850000 (est)