Sunday, September 9, 2012

Stranded Air Nigeria passengers paid to fuel plane

Over 190 Air Nigeria passengers who arrived the Gatwick Airport on Friday morning were stranded in London for about eight hours and had to contribute for fuel before they could be airlifted to Nigeria.

It was reported that the stranded passengers were asked to contribute extra £40 each to buy fuel for the aircraft.

It was learnt the plane eventually left Gatwick airport at 4:30 a.m and arrived Nigeria at about 12:30 today.

The passengers were reportedly asked to come back for their luggage as the plane arrived without them.

Air Nigeria has said that it will no longer fly from tomorrow, 10 September.

Story and comments:  http://pmnewsnigeria.com

Pitcairn PA-4, N3261: Accident occurred September 09, 2012 in Rawlings, Maryland

http://registry.faa.gov/N3261

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA555  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Rawlings, MD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2013
Aircraft: PITCAIRN PA-4, registration: N3261
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was climbing through about 150 to 200 feet above ground level after takeoff when the engine lost total power, and the pilot performed a forced landing to a nearby pasture. The airplane descended, impacted the ground, and came to rest on the right side of the fuselage. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operations. The carburetor bowl and fuel lines contained a trace amount of fuel. Upon further examination, debris was discovered in the fuel tank, and large sections of a material were peeling from the fuel tank walls. In addition, there were rusty areas in the fuel tank. The fuel tank outlet did not contain a fuel screen for fuel to travel through when exiting the tank.

Maintenance records indicated that in April 1990, the accident airplane had undergone major repairs and alterations, which included sealing of the fuel tank with a sloshing sealer, use of which was approved at the time. However, in 2009, the Federal Aviation Administration released a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin stating that over time, that sloshing sealer could deteriorate and peel from the internal wall of the fuel tank. Pieces of the sealer could then block the fuel tank outlet, potentially starving the engine of fuel. It was not possible to determine to what extent maintenance personnel examined the fuel tank during the most recent annual inspection, which was completed in September 2012. It is likely that the sloshing sealer compound that was applied to the fuel tank in 1990 had peeled off the inner wall of the fuel tank and blocked the fuel outlet, resulting in fuel starvation of the engine and the subsequent total loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation, which resulted from a fuel outlet in the fuel tank that was blocked by peeled debris from a previously approved fuel tank sealer.

On September 9, 2012, at 0945 eastern daylight time, N3261, a Pitcairn PA-4, sustained substantial damaged when it impacted terrain after departing from a private airstrip in Rawlings, Maryland. The airline transport pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by an individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to a witness, who helped start the engine of the accident airplane, the pilot fueled the airplane and sampled the fuel from each of the fuel sumps under the engine with no contamination noted. The engine was primed with fuel, started, idled for approximately 10 minutes, and ran "smoothly" prior to takeoff.

According to the pilot, after takeoff, the airplane was about 150 to 200 feet above ground level when the engine began to gradually lose power. The pilot noted that the engine did not experience any roughness or surging prior to the total loss of engine power. He elected to land in a nearby pasture and initiated a slight left turn to align the airplane with the field. As the airplane continued to descend, the pilot initiated another shallow left turn to avoid striking trees as well as further align the airplane with the field. However, before he was able to level the wings, the airplane struck the ground with the left wing. After ground impact, the airplane turned about 180 degrees and came to rest on the right side of the fuselage, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 1927, and was registered to the pilot in 1998. The airplane was a three-place, metal and fabric design, single-engine, biplane with conventional landing gear. It was equipped with a Wright Curtiss OX5, 90-horsepower engine. In addition, the airplane was equipped with a 32 gallon aluminum fuel tank. The most recent annual inspection was performed on September 3, 2012, and at that time it had accumulated 2877.7 hours of total time in service. According to FAA Form 337 for major repairs and alterations of the airplane, it underwent restoration and major repairs in April 1990. The mechanic stated on the form that it was disassembled, inspected, and cleaned. In the description of maintenance, it noted “fuel tank cleaned, checked for leaks and sealed with Randolph Sloshing Sealer.”

According to a Maryland Department of State Police report, a local fire department responded to the accident site for a small fuel spill. The fuel tank was about one-half full.

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that engine continuity was confirmed. The exhaust valves functioned with no anomalies. The spark plugs were examined with no abnormalities noted. The fuel cap was inspected and was secure on the fuel tank. The fuel strainer was removed, with no debris noted. The carburetor bowl was removed from the engine and it contained a few drops of fuel. The fuel lines contained a trace amount of fuel. The fuel tank was void of fuel as a result of how the wreckage came to rest on the right side of the fuselage and partially inverted. Further examination of the fuel tank with a light and borescope revealed debris in the tank and large sections of a material peeling from the tank walls. In addition, there were rust areas throughout the interior of the fuel tank. The outlet of the fuel tank did not contain a fuel screen for fuel to travel through when exiting the tank.

In February 2009, Piper Aircraft Inc. released a mandatory service bulletin, Service Bulletin No. 251D, concerning Randolph Products Company Sloshing Sealer. The service bulletin stated “the use of Randolph Products Company 802 Sloshing Sealer was authorized at one time to repair aluminum wing tanks that develop leaks in service. It has been discovered that over time, the cured sealer can separate and detach from the inner walls of the tank and become an obstruction in fuel lines and fuel filters, resulting in a loss of engine power.”

In April 2009, the FAA released a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) for several Piper Aircraft models regarding Randolph 802 sealer. The bulletin stated that the “purpose of this SAIB is to highlight the potential of engine fuel starvation from the environmental deterioration of a sloshing compound.” In addition, the “sloshing compound can peel from the wall of the fuel tank and block the fuel tank outlet, which can starve the engine of fuel.” The SAIB recommended that if the sloshing compound was found to be separating from the inner walls of the fuel tank, the fuel tank should be replaced.

Then, in October 2010, an Advisory Circular 43-16A “Aviation Maintenance Alerts Number 387”was distributed concerning sloshing compound that resulted in fuel starvation of a Bird CK airplane. The airframe and powerplant mechanic stated that the airplane was fully restored and Randolph sloshing compound was used to seal the fuel tank. About ten months after the restoration was complete, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power just after takeoff. An FAA inspector who examined that airplane discovered material in the fuel and large portions of sloshing compound was missing from the sides of the fuel tank.



 NTSB Identification: ERA12LA555 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Rawlings, MD
Aircraft: PITCAIRN PA-4, registration: N3261

Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2012, at 0945 eastern daylight time, N3261, a Pitcairn PA-4, sustained substantial damaged when it impacted terrain after departing from a private airstrip in Rawlings, Maryland. The airline transport pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to a witness, who helped start the engine of the accident airplane, the pilot fueled the airplane and sampled the fuel from each of the fuel sumps under the engine with no contamination noted. Then, the engine was primed with fuel, started, and ran "smoothly" prior to takeoff.

After takeoff, the airplane was about 100 feet above ground level when the engine began to gradually lose power. The pilot attempted a left turn back to the runway, but after turning approximately 150 degrees, the airplane descended, impacted trees, and the ground. After ground impact, the airplane turned about 180 degrees and came to rest on the right side of the fuselage, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

The airplane wreckage was retained for further examination.

RAWLINGS — Fifty-nine-year-old Robert Keith Armstrong was injured Sunday after his antique aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff from a private air strip in the Black Oak Bottom area off U.S. Route 220, according to Maryland State Police.

The Rawlings resident reportedly suffered minor injuries in the 9:45 a.m. incident and was taken to the Western Maryland Regional Medical Center by private vehicle.

Senior Trooper Eric Derham reported that Armstrong had just taken off from the private air strip in a 1927 Pitcairn Fleetwing Bi Plane and had climbed to approximately 100 feet when the aircraft developed engine problems and crashed.

The crash caused a small fuel spill that was handled by the McCoole Volunteer Fire Department upon alert by the Allegany County 911 center.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the incident. Further investigation will be conducted by the FAA.

The Maryland Emergency Management Agency was also notified of the incident by the 911 center.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 3261        Make/Model: PA-4      Description: PITCAIRN BIPLANE
  Date: 09/09/2012     Time: 0945

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: RAWLINGS   State: MD   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LOST POWER ON TAKEOFF AND CRASHED IN A FIELD. RAWLINGS, MD

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: BALTIMORE, MD  (EA07)                 Entry date: 09/10/2012 



CRESAPTOWN, Md. (AP) -- State police say a pilot suffered minor injuries when his antique biplane crashed shortly after takeoff at a private airstrip in Allegany County.

The pilot, Robert Armstrong, was taken to a hospital after the crash Sunday morning. It happened around 9:30 a.m. at an airstrip in the Cresaptown area.

Police say the pilot reported that his aircraft climbed to about 100 feet before it started to have engine trouble and crashed. The airplane was a 1927 Pitcairn Fleetwing.

Police say the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash.

http://www.foxbaltimore.com



State police say a pilot suffered minor injuries when his antique biplane crashed shortly after takeoff at a private airstrip in Allegany County.
 

The pilot, Robert Armstrong, was taken to a hospital after the crash Sunday morning.

It happened around 9:30 a.m. at an airstrip in the Cresaptown area.

Police say the pilot reported that his aircraft climbed to about 100 feet before it started to have engine trouble and crashed.

The airplane was a 1927 Pitcairn Fleetwing.

Police say the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash.


http://www.wbal.com


Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, C-GLGJ: Plane crash survivor's family awaits hospital transfer - Accident occurred August 13, 2012 in Peachland - Canada

 

The family of a plane crash survivor say their loved one has been stranded in Kelowna by the BC Ambulance Service. 

Last month, a Piper PA Comanche aircraft crashed near Kelowna with four people on board. Two people were killed in the crash.

Survivor Vincent Hannay suffered severe head trauma in the crash and has been in Kelowna General Hospital for nearly a month.

His uncle Rick Hannay says the family has been waiting weeks for him to be transferred to Vancouver General Hospital.

"My sister has been living in a motel near the hospital and it's been getting very discouraging because we've been expecting Vincent to be transferred to VGH at least two weeks ago."

Gavin Wilson with Vancouver Coastal Health says because Hannay has been receiving treatment in Kelowna, patients across the province that require emergency help take priority.

"We can certainly sympathize with the family that they'd want to see that transfer happen sooner," Wilson said. "We're doing our best to make it happen as soon as we could. In this instance it took longer than we'd like, and we apologize for that."

The BC Ambulance Service says it's been busy across the province, and it's not clear when Hannay will be transferred.



http://www.cbc.ca/news

Beech A36 Bonanza, N3224G: Accident occurred September 09, 2012 in Kansasville, Wisconsin

http://registry.faa.gov/N3224G

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA617  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Kansasville, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/2013
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N3224G
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was established in cruise flight at 6,000 feet mean sea level on a north-northwest course. Communications between air traffic controllers and the pilot were routine. The pilot did not advise the controllers of any difficulties or anomalies nor did he issue any distress call. About 30 seconds before the accident, the airplane entered a descent that continued until impact. A witness observed the airplane on its north-northwest course before it "tipped forward" and descended into the ground. The airplane appeared to be intact at the time, and she did not recall seeing any flames or smoke before impact. The main wreckage site was about 50 feet in diameter, with debris extending to about 200 feet. The airplane was fragmented; however, portions of both wings, the empennage, and all flight controls were located at the accident site. The postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction. The relatively concentrated distribution of the wreckage was not consistent with an in-flight break up. Additionally, the existence of day visual meteorological conditions with clear skies precluded the possibility of spatial disorientation. Toxicology testing noted the presence of ethanol; however, it could not be determined if it was as a result of postmortem production or ingestion. Regardless, the ethanol level noted was not impairing and did not pose a significant hazard to flight safety. A review of the pilot’s Federal Aviation Administration medical file, toxicology testing, and autopsy did not provide evidence of acute medical incapacitation, but the latter were significantly limited by the degree of injury. Considering the abrupt departure from cruise flight and the uninterrupted descent to impact, the possibility of an acute medical problem could not be ruled out.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
In-flight loss of control for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the pilot and testing of the airplane did not reveal any anomalies that would have led to the loss of control.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 9, 2012, at 1152 central daylight time, a Beech A36, N3224G, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain near Kansasville, Wisconsin. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The flight originated from Chicago Executive Airport (KPWK), Wheeling, Illinois, at 1136, with an intended destination of Lakeland Airport (KARV), Minocqua, Wisconsin.

At 0857, the pilot contacted flight service. He obtained a weather briefing and filed an IFR flight plan for the route from KPWK, direct to the Badger (BAE) VHF Omni-Range (VOR) navigation station, and direct to KARV.

At 1137, the pilot contacted Chicago Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) after takeoff from KPWK. Air traffic control (ATC) radar track data indicated that the initial data point was recorded at 1137:05 (hhmm:ss) and was located about 0.75 nautical miles (nm) north-northwest of the departure end of runway 34. The altitude associated with that data point was 900 feet msl. The controller subsequently cleared the flight to climb to 4,000 feet msl and then 6,000 feet msl as it proceeded north-northwest bound. Communications were routine and track data depicted the airplane remaining on course and climbing to the assigned altitudes as cleared.

At 1146, control of the flight was transferred to Milwaukee TRACON. The pilot established contact with Milwaukee TRACON controller and advised that he had been assigned 6,000 feet msl. At 1148, the flight was cleared direct to KARV. At 1152, radar contact with the accident airplane was lost. The air traffic controller's attempts to contact the pilot were not successful. The pilot did not advise the controller of any anomalies prior to the loss of contact, nor was any distress call from the pilot received.

Radar track data depicted the accident airplane established on a north-northwest course at 6,000 feet msl. About 1152:15, the airplane began to descend, which continued until the impact with terrain. The final radar data point was recorded at 1152:34 and was located about 0.25 nm south-southeast of the accident site. The altitude associated with that data point was 3,500 feet msl. The elevation of the accident site was approximately 810 feet.

A witness reported observing the airplane on a north-northwest course when it "tipped forward" and descended into the ground. The airplane appeared to be intact at the time and she did not recall seeing any flames or smoke prior to impact. Several additional witnesses reported observing the airplane in a steep nose down attitude prior to impact.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with single-engine land airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a third class airman medical certificate on March 22, 2012, with a restriction for corrective lenses.

The pilot’s logbook was not available to the NTSB. On his most recent application for an airman medical certificate, the pilot reported a total flight time of 2,429 hours, with 31 hours flown within the past 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1995 Beech model A36, serial number E-2924. It was a single-engine, low wing airframe configuration, with a retractable tricycle landing gear. The airplane was certified for a maximum of 6 occupants. The airplane was issued a utility category, standard airworthiness certificate in February 1995. The airplane was powered by a 300-horsepower Continental Motors IO-550-B/BP reciprocating engine. The engine data plate appeared to indicate the serial number as B8913. The airworthiness and maintenance records noted the engine serial number as B8913 and BPA8913.

According to maintenance records, an engine oil change and airframe oxygen system service were completed on July 25, 2012. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated 2,789.7 hours and 1,229.8 hours time in service, respectively. The most recent annual inspection was completed on February 7, 2012, at 2,712.0 hours total airframe time.

Records indicated that the accident engine was originally manufactured to an IO-520-BB design configuration (serial number 578701). In 2005, the IO-520-BB engine was modified to an IO-550-B/BP engine configuration (serial number B8913/BPA8913) under STC SE09997SC. At that time, the engine fuel injectors were replaced in accordance with STC SE09289SC and a turbonormalizing system was installed in accordance with STC SE5222NM. The accident engine was installed on the airplane in March 2005. In addition, wingtip fuel tanks were installed in accordance with STC SD4-1629 at that time.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

The Burlington Municipal Airport (KBUU) Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS) was located about 7 miles west of the accident site. At 1135, conditions were recorded as: wind from 360 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots; visibility 10 miles; clear sky; temperature 17 degrees Celsius; dew point 8 degrees Celsius; and altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury.

At 1155, the BUU recorded weather conditions were: wind from 360 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 16 knots; visibility 10 mile; clear sky; temperature 18 degrees Celsius; dew point 7 degrees Celsius; and altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury.

The Kenosha Regional Airport (KENW) Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) was located about 12 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1153, conditions were recorded as: wind from 010 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 16 knots; visibility 10 miles; clear sky; temperature 20 degrees Celsius; dew point 9 degrees Celsius; and altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main accident site was about 50 feet in diameter. It encompassed portions of four backyard areas within a subdivision. A postimpact fire consumed portions of the airframe, an adjacent two-car garage structure, and a shed. The adjacent residential structures sustained thermal damage from the postimpact fire. Debris from the airplane was located up to 200 feet from the main accident site. There were no reports of any injuries to individuals on the ground.

The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, wings, empennage, engine, and propeller assembly. The main impact crater contained the propeller and engine, which were embedded about 4 feet into the ground. The fuselage was fragmented, with portions consumed by the postimpact fire. Portions of the elevators and rudder were located with the main wreckage. In addition, two fragmented elevator sections recovered about 180 feet south and 200 feet south-southwest of the main wreckage. The elevator counter balance weights had separated from the elevators. One was recovered about 180 feet south-southeast of the main wreckage. The second was recovered about 15 feet southeast of the main wreckage. Two remnants of an oxygen bottle were recovered from the accident site. The top and bottoms portions of the bottle were located about 140 feet northeast and 50 feet north of the main wreckage, respectively.

The wings were fragmented, with larger sections exhibiting chordwise crushing damage. Structure associated with the right wing was located west of the main impact crater. Structure associated with the left wing was located east of the main impact crater. Portions of the left and right ailerons and flaps were recovered with the main wreckage. Observed separations of the control cables appeared consistent with overstress failures. The flap actuators had separated from each wing. The actuator extension was consistent with a zero degree deflection (flaps up).

The nose and right main landing gear were located with the main wreckage. The left main landing gear assembly was located about 30 feet north of the main impact crater in an adjacent yard. The landing gear actuator was fragmented. One section of the actuator came to rest about 130 feet west of the main impact crater. A second actuator section came to rest on the adjacent driveway, about 40 feet southwest of the main impact crater.

The engine sustained damage consistent with significant impact forces. The top and bottom of the crankcase was fractured along the entire length of the engine. The crankshaft was distorted, but appeared otherwise intact when examined through the fractured portions of the crankcase. The connecting rods appeared intact. The cylinders were displaced relative to the crankcase and deformed consistent with impact forces. The magnetos were separated and fragmented. The fuel pump was separated and damaged. The throttle body was fragment with only the throttle valve intact. The fuel metering unit was damaged. The fuel inlet screen appeared intact and was free of debris. The oil pump remained attached to the engine. The pump gears appeared intact, with light scoring observed on the housing.

The propeller hub was fracture consistent with impact forces. The aft portion of the propeller hub remained attached to the engine crankshaft. The propeller blades were separated from the hub. The propeller blades and hub fragments were recovered from the main impact crater. Two blades were bent forward at the tip over the outboard one-third to one-half of the blade span. The third blade was bent aft at the tip over the outboard one-half of the blade span. All three blades exhibited scoring of the faces, as well as leading/trailing edge gouges.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was completed by the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office on September 11, 2012. The pilot’s death was attributed to multiple blunt force injuries sustained as a result of the accident. The medical evaluation was limited by the degree of injury which precluded a complete autopsy examination and left only muscle available for toxicological analysis.

FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute toxicology testing noted that 15 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol was detected in muscle tissue. Testing was negative for all other substances in the screening profile.



NTSB Identification: CEN12FA617 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 09, 2012 in Kansasville, WI
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N3224G
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2012, at 1153 central daylight time, a Beech A36, N3224G, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain near Kansasville, Wisconsin. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from Chicago Executive Airport (PWK), Wheeling, Illinois, at 1137, with an intended destination of Lakeland Airport (ARV), Minocqua, Wisconsin.

At 1146, the flight established contact with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Milwaukee Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facility en route to ARV. The airplane was in cruise flight at 6,000 feet mean sea level. At 1148, the flight was cleared direct to the destination airport. About 1152, radar contact with the accident airplane was lost. The air traffic controller's attempts to contact the flight were not successful. The pilot did not advise the controller of any anomalies prior to the loss of contact, nor was any distress call from the pilot received.

A witness reported observing the airplane on a north-northwest course when it "tipped forward" and descended into the ground. The airplane appeared to be intact at the time and she did not recall seeing any flames or smoke prior to impact. Several additional witnesses reported observing the airplane in a steep nose down attitude prior to impact.

The main accident site was about 40 feet in diameter. It encompassed portions of four residential backyard areas within a residential subdivision. A postimpact fire consumed portions of the airframe. The propeller and engine were embedded about 3 feet into the ground. The adjacent residential structures sustained thermal damage from the postimpact fire. However, there did not appear to be any impact related damage. There were no reports of any injuries to individuals on the ground.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 3224G        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
  Date: 09/09/2012     Time: 1653

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: RACINE   State: WI   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. RACINE, WI

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: MILWAUKEE, WI  (GL13)                 Entry date: 09/10/2012 



DOVER — The Racine County Sheriff’s Office has released the name of the pilot killed in Sunday’s plane crash near Eagle Lake.

The pilot, who was the lone occupant of the plane, has been identified as John David Brock, 67, of Chicago, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

He would have turned 68 this Sunday.

Brock’s single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza was flying from Chicago Executive Airport to Minocqua in north-central Wisconsin when it crashed and hit a building, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 

The crash ignited the aircraft, two homes, two cars, a garage and was described as a large ball of fire with flames everywhere.

The FAA is investigating the crash along with the National Transportation Safety Board. In a week or two a preliminary report could be released, but it could take months to determine a preliminary cause.

 
The burned-out hulks of two cars and a charred skeleton of a garage are all that remain after a Beechcraft A-36 plane crashed into the back yard of a home on Kennedy Drive near Eagle Lake at about noon on Sunday. The crash ignited the aircraft, two homes, two cars, a garage and the pilot was killed.
 

 

 
 
 


Kansasville - A pilot was killed Sunday when a small plane crashed into a yard along Eagle Lake in Kansasville in southeastern Wisconsin, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said. 

The single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza was flying from Chicago Executive Airport to Minocqua in north-central Wisconsin when it crashed and hit a building, FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro said. The pilot, who was the only person onboard, was killed and the plane was destroyed, he said, but no injuries on the ground were reported. 

The cause of the crash was not immediately known, and the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate. 

"Fire units quickly extinguished the flames, which destroyed the plane, a garage, two cars, damaged two homes and other outbuildings," Kansasville Fire Chief Chad Franks said. "The incident is now under investigation by the Racine County Sheriff's Office and the FAA." 

The pilot's name was not immediately released. The plane's tail number was registered to a Chicago address. 

Brian Block was sitting in his living room when he heard the sound of a plane engine, close by and louder than normal. 

"Then 'kaboom!' The whole house shook," Block told The Times Journal of Racine

Block jumped in his car and drove a block to the scene where he saw flames coming from a small plane sitting in a neighbor's yard. 

Travis Barstad said debris including plane parts was scattered everywhere. Roofing and siding hung off houses and burned car shells were visible, he said. 

"I heard people screaming, 'It's a plane! It's a plane!'" he said.
================

KANSASVILLE, Wis. (AP) - The Federal Aviation Administration says the pilot was killed when a plane crashed into a yard along Eagle Lake in Kansasville in southeastern Wisconsin.
 

FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro says the single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza was flying from Chicago Executive Airport to Minocqua in north-central Wisconsin when it crashed and hit a building around noon Sunday. He says the pilot, who was the only person on board, was killed and the plane was destroyed, but no injuries on the ground were reported.

Molinaro says the cause of the crash is unknown, but the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

The pilot's name has not been released.

Witnesses report hearing the plane flying low and then a loud boom. They describe seeing the plane, cars, sheds and trees on fire.

============

Racine County Sheriff’s Department along with the Kansasville Fire Department are on scene in the 24000 block of Kennedy Drive in the area of Eagle Manor/Eagle Lake for a plane crash. MABAS Alerts have gone out for towns across the area including, Raymond, Kansasville, Union Grove, Burlington, Salem, Bristol and numerous others. The Racine Fire Bells have been dispatched to the accident scene.

There is damage to homes and vehicles, radio reports that the plane did hit buildings. Numerous sheriff’s are on scene for crowd control. Reports that the plane is severely damaged and burned. There are multiple vehicles that were on fire along with at least 2 structures. Deputies are trying to keep onlookers away from the scene, radio reports that there are a lot of low hanging power lines in the area from the accident. WE Energies has been contacted. Radio reports that a 2 seater plane is missing off the radar.

Investigators are on scene, numerous first responders on scene. WE Energies is on scene.

12:36 p.m.- Some tankers are being allowed to return to service, enough fire units on scene. Mabas alert is being canceled, Union Grove and Kansasville FD’s remain on scene. Residents report seeing 2 planes shortly before the crash, unconfirmed at this time with RCSD. FAA needs information regarding the plane and number of passengers, authorites report that with the severe damage they are unable to provide this information at this time. Residents report that it appears no one on the ground was injured, citizens were unable to gain access to the plane due to the intensity of the flames.

1:01 p.m.- Residents report that the news media is starting to show up (TMJ4)


1:06 p.m. – Radio reports that the Medical Examiner is on scene now.


http://racineuncovered.org


TOWN OF DOVER – It could take authorities months to determine the preliminary cause of Sunday’s fatal plane crash near Eagle Lake, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said Monday. 

The pilot of a small plane, who authorities say was a man in his mid-50s from northern Illinois, was killed when he crashed into a yard near Eagle Lake at about noon on Sunday.

“Parts of the plane were strewn about 60 yards,” said Sgt. David Coughlin of the Racine County Sheriff’s Office, who was at the scene Monday.

Due to the extent of the “catastrophic injuries,” Coughlin said they are unable to identify the man based on his remains. Authorities have been able to identify the pilot based on his travel plans and the plane’s route, Coughlin said, but the sheriff’s office has received a request from the pilot’s son not to release his father’s name until more family can be notified.

The single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza was flying from Chicago Executive Airport to Minocqua in north-central Wisconsin when it crashed and hit a building, FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro said.

The crash ignited the aircraft, two homes, two cars, a garage and more, according to Chief Chad Franks of the Kansasville Fire Department.

Molinaro said Monday the FAA is investigating along with the National Transportation Safety Board. In a week or two a preliminary report could be released, but it likely will not include the cause, Molinaro said.

Based on the extent of the injuries, Coughlin said it is very unlikely authorities will ever know if the man died because of the impact or if he had a medical emergency that led to the crash.

The pilot was the only person on board, authorities said, and no injuries on the ground were reported.

The scene, following the crash, was described as a large ball of fire with flames everywhere.

“It was just flames,” said Brian Block, who lives along Lakeshore Drive close to the crash scene in the 24000 block of Kennedy Avenue.

Block, 54, was sitting in his living room just before the crash when he heard the sound of a plane engine, louder than normal and close by.

“Then ‘kaboom!’ The whole house shook,” he said.

Block jumped in his car and drove a block to the scene where he saw major flames coming from a small plane now sitting in a neighbor’s yard.

Piaggio P.180 Avanti, N146SL: During landing the aircraft veered off the runway - Teterboro Airport (KTEB), New Jersey

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 146SL        Make/Model: P180      Description: P-180 Avanti
  Date: 09/09/2012     Time: 1618

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: TETERBORO   State: NJ   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  DURING LANDING THE AIRCRAFT VEERED OFF THE RUNWAY. TETERBORO, NJ

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER

  FAA FSDO: TETERBORO, NJ  (EA25)                 Entry date: 09/10/2012
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N146SL


 
 Officials stand by after a private plane veered off the runway onto the grass at Teterboro Airport on Sunday.


A pilot deliberately swerved his plane off a runway at Teterboro Airport and into nearby grass in order to stop after his brakes failed during an emergency landing Sunday, authorities said.

Neither the pilot nor the co-pilot was injured, said Jackie Yodashkin, a spokeswoman for the Port Authority, which runs the airport. There were no passengers.

The incident happened shortly after the Piaggio P180 Avanti turbo-prop had taken off from Teterboro. The pilot radioed that he was experiencing “technical problems” with the plane and requested permission to land back at Teterboro, Yodashkin said.

When the pilot touched down around 12:20 p.m., he was unable to stop the plane on a 6,000-foot runway and instead veered it off the runway into the grass where it slowed to a stop.

Port Authority officials did not release the name of the pilot, how many years he has been flying or where the plane was bound. Officials said they didn’t know where the plan was headed.

Investigators are “looking to see if it was a hydraulic problem,” Yodashkin said.

The plane was built in 2004 and received an “airworthiness certification” last week, according to a Federal Aviation Administration database.

The plane is owned by Avantair Inc. of Clearwater, Fla., according to the FAA.

Avantair leases planes and offers “fractional ownership” to customers. The Avanti can hold seven passengers and is the world’s fastest turbo-prop plane, rivaling the speed of many small jet planes, according to Avantair’s website. Company executives didn’t return a phone call Sunday seeking comment.

The plane was not damaged. There was no disruption to service as other planes continued to land and take off at the airport Sunday afternoon while Port Authority police responded to the scene.

“We’ll see where the investigation moves forward,” Yodashkin said Sunday afternoon. “Right now we’re deciding where to move the plane. “

Teterboro has long been the focus of concern from residents in its flight path as it has evolved from a small general aviation airstrip into one of the busiest airports in the country.

In 2005, a jet plane with too much weight overran the runway, crashed through the airport’s barrier, ran across Route 46 and slammed into a warehouse during an aborted takeoff. A year after the crash, the Port Authority installed an arrestor bed — a stretch of aerated cement that acts like flypaper for planes — on the northeast side of the runway. In October 2010, an arrestor bed was credited with stopping and preventing the crash of an out-of-control jet that had landed on the 6,000-foot runway.


http://www.northjersey.com 

 NTSB Identification: WPR12FA332
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 91 Subpart K: Fractional
Accident occurred Saturday, July 28, 2012 in Henderson, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2014
Aircraft: PIAGGIO P180, registration: N146SL
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The twin-engine airplane departed 23 minutes behind schedule to pick up passengers at an intermediate airport. During the takeoff roll, the left elevator departed the airplane and was found off the side of the runway 3 days later. The crew arrived at the intermediate airport and  quickly boarded the two waiting passengers. They did not perform an adequate preflight inspection and departed about 5 minutes behind schedule. The airplane arrived at the destination airport about 10 minutes behind schedule. 
Upon postflight examination by the crew, the left elevator was observed missing from the tail’s horizontal stabilizer. An examination of the attachment nuts on the hinges of the right elevator found that they were finger tight. Examination of the hinge fittings on the left elevator and horizontal stabilizer revealed no mechanical damage or deformation to any of the components. Review of airplane maintenance records showed that an airworthiness directive (AD) had been complied with 54 days earlier, which involved both elevators being removed and then reinstalled. 

Materials laboratory examination of one of the right elevator attachment hardware bolt-nut combinations revealed that the self-locking nut exhibited run-on torque values well below the acceptable minimum torque. Based on the finger tight condition of the right elevator attachment hardware and the lack of any mechanical damage to the hinge fittings of the left elevator and stabilizer hinge structure, it is likely that all four sets of attachment hardware for both elevators were not properly torqued during the AD maintenance 54 days earlier. Additionally, 26 days before the event, a phase inspection was completed during which the elevator should have been visually inspected and functionally checked. The airplane had flown 158.9 hours with loose elevator attachment hardware before the two sets of bolts on the left elevator had completely worked their way out of the hinges, and the elevator departed the airplane.

The cockpit voice recorder revealed that the flight crew had experienced unusual pitch control responses during each of the departures and landings. The flight crew could have identified the missing elevator during a preflight inspection at the intermediate airport, yet they decided to continue the flight despite the pitch control problems experienced during the takeoffs and landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The failure of maintenance personnel to properly torque the elevator attachment hardware in accordance with the maintenance manual, which led to the detachment of the elevator. Contributing to the accident were maintenance personnel’s failure to identify the loose attachment hardware during a scheduled inspection, the flight crew’s decision to continue the flight after identifying a flight control problem, and the flight crew’s failure to perform an adequate preflight inspection at the intermediate airport. 


HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On July 28, 2012, at 0832 Pacific daylight time, a Piaggio P180, N146SL, arrived at Henderson Executive Airport, Henderson, Nevada, missing its left elevator. The airplane was operated by Avantair under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulation, Part 135. The two crew, both airline transport pilots, and two passengers were unhurt, and the airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from San Diego, California, about 0735.

According to the Aventair trip sheet, the planned schedule for the Piaggio P180 crew was to depart Camarillo, California, at 0552, arrive at San Diego at 0642, then depart San Diego at 0730, and arrive at Henderson at 0822. The crew arrived at Camarillo at 0500, preflighted the airplane, and took off at 0615. The Piaggio P180 arrived at San Diego at 0715. The Captain went to the fixed base operator (FBO) to sign for services then did a walk around on one side of the airplane. The First Officer met the two passengers, loaded the baggage, and stayed with the passengers who were upset about the delay. The First Officer stated that he did not perform the required walk around prior to departing San Diego, and that, per the Aventair general operating manual, both pilots are required to do an airplane walk around on every leg. The airplane departed San Diego at 0735 (5 minutes behind schedule), and arrived at Henderson Executive Airport at 0832 (10 minutes behind schedule). When the crew performed a post flight walk around, they noticed that the left elevator was not present on the tail. The crew reported that they had a non-eventful departure and flight from San Diego, and that the captain noticed that more back pressure on the flight controls was required for a normal landing upon arrival at Henderson.

On July 31, 2012, at 1720, personnel at the Camarillo Airport located an airplane flight control surface lying in the grass off the north side of runway 8 near the intersection of taxiway C. The flight control surface was identified by personnel at the Avantair fixed base operator (FBO) as an elevator from a Piaggio P180. An FAA inspector collected the elevator from airport personnel, and delivered it to the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC) on August 1, 2012.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The 10-seat, twin turboprop, business airplane, serial number 1091, was manufactured in 2004. It was powered by two Pratt & Whitney PT6A-66 850-hp engines, and equipped with two Hartzell HC-E5N-3A controllable pitch propellers. The airplane was in a continuous airworthiness program utilizing the manufacturer's inspection criteria. Review of the airplane maintenance records show that the total airframe time was 8,351.9 hours when it landed at Henderson. The most recent maintenance inspection was a 150-hour "A" inspection completed on July 2, 2012, at total aircraft time (TAT) of 8,269.4 hrs. The "A" phase inspects the engines, propellers, flight controls, and landing gear. Part of the inspection includes a visual inspection and functional check of the elevator. 

The most recent maintenance was performed on July 27, 2012, at TAT 8,350.3 hours. The crew had repositioned the airplane from Van Nuys, California, to Camarillo, in order to have the right main landing gear door rod assembly and the navigation lights repaired.

Airplane maintenance records show that on June 4, 2012, TAT 8,191.5 hours, Avantair complied with airworthiness directive AD 2010-23-01, which required the left and right elevators be removed, the elevator hinges be inspected for corrosion between the elevator hinge fittings (metal) and the horizontal stabilizer (carbon fiber), and replaced if necessary. The elevators were then reinstalled. 

Examination of the hinge fittings by the NTSB IIC of the left horizontal stabilizer and the corresponding hinge fitting on the left elevator revealed no damage, deformation, or witness marks. The two sets of bolts, nuts, and straight bushings that attached the left elevator to the horizontal stabilizer were not located.

The airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanic who removed the right elevator reported that the self-locking nuts on the right elevator were loose, and could be loosened and removed with his fingertips. The mechanic took photos to document the loose nuts before he removed the elevator.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The Captain, age 31, held an Airline Transport Pilot certificate with ratings for multiengine land and instrument airplane, and held a first-class medical certificate issued April 16, 2012, with no limitations. The pilot reported in the NTSB Pilot Accident Report Form 6120.1 that he had 5,037 hours of total flight time.

The First Officer, age 34, held an Airline Transport Pilot certificate with multiengine land and instrument airplane ratings, and held a first-class medical certificate with no limitations issued on April 11, 2012. He reported in the NTSB Pilot Accident Report Form 6120.1 that he had 5,624 hours of total flight time.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The airplane was equipped with an L-3/Fairchild FA2100-1010 cockpit voice recorder (CVR), which records 30 minutes of digital audio stored in solid-state memory modules. The CVR was removed, and sent to the NTSB's Audio Laboratory for readout. The CVR contained 30 minutes of excellent quality recording from the captain's and first officer's audio panels, and 30 minutes of good quality recording from the cockpit area microphone (CAM). A CVR Group was not convened. The recording was audited by the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, and a summary report prepared. The Cockpit Voice Recorder Specialist Factual Report is located in the official docket of this investigation.

The majority of the conversation between the Captain and First Officer between 0815 and 0825 pertained to airplane operations. At 0825, air traffic control (ATC) cleared the airplane for a visual approach to runway 17R at Henderson. At 0829, the crew lowered the landing gear, and performed landing checks. One minute later, the CAM starts recording a rattling sound that continues all the way to touchdown. At 0831:24, an automated voice announced "five hundred above, sink rate, sink rate." The Captain replied "correcting". At 0831:53, the Captain said "ha ha," the First Officer replies "crazy isn't it?" and the Captain said "yeh, its really bad at the end there." As the crew taxied the airplane, they continued to discuss the unusual feel of the airplane in the flare and landing. The First Officer said he had the same unusual feel landing in San Diego.

After the airplane engines were shut down and the passengers disembarked, the CAM recorded a 2 1/2-minute cell phone call made by the Captain. The Captain described to the person on the other end of the phone that he and the First Officer were not getting normal elevator control at rotation and landing, and that he had no real control during the landing flare. He described the takeoff out of San Diego where he had the control yoke all the way back at rotation speed of 106 kts, but the airplane didn't rotate until 120 kts. On the departure out of Camarillo the First Officer said the controls felt strange, and he saw him pull the yoke all the way back. The Captain also said that at that point they were in a hurry, and that was why he hadn't called in the problem after departing Camarillo. The Captain then noted that that he had not experienced the unusual control response yesterday when departing out of Van Nuys.

TESTS & RESEARCH

The left elevator command lever with attached fractured torque tube and the two sets of right elevator attachment hardware were examined by the NTSB Materials Laboratory. On the attachment fittings, the elevator rotates about bushings that are held in place by two ¼-28 bolts, washers, and self-locking nuts. In order to measure the wear on the in service elevator attachment hardware, new OEM (exemplar) attachment hardware was also tested in the same manor. The complete Materials Laboratory Factual report is located in the official docket of this investigation.

The left elevator torque tube remained bolted to the left elevator bellcrank. The attachment fitting was observed to be fractured through a flange where it transitioned out of a cylindrical section. The top part of the flange was bent in the outboard direction, and the lower part of the flange was bent in the inboard direction. Using a stereomicroscope, the fracture surfaces were examined, and were found to have a smeared appearance. The deformation and fracture features were consistent with an overstress failure caused by downward bending of the left elevator about the attachment fitting.

The attachment hardware of the right elevator (2 bolts & 2 self locking nuts) were examined for thread wear and functionality. The running torque of the right attachment fitting self-locking nuts was measured using a calibrated torque wrench with 0.1 in-lbs precision. A stack of washers was placed over each right attachment fitting bolt shank such that three bolt threads were exposed when the nut was turned onto the bolt and tightened to a wrenching torque of 115 in-lbs in accordance with the P180 maintenance manual (Piaggio, 1991) and MS21043 (NASC, 2003). The wrenching torque was measured using a calibrated torque wrench with 1 in-lbs precision. The running torque was measured while turning the nut onto the bolt (on-running torque) and while turning the nut off of the bolt (off-running torque). For the first bolt/nut combination, the on- and off-running torque was 1.2 in-lbs and 1.5 in-lbs, respectively. For the second bolt/nut combination, the on- and off-running torque was 8.5 in-lbs and 9.0 in-lbs, respectively. According to the P180 maintenance manual, self-locking nuts should be discarded when the running torque (called breakaway torque in the manual) falls below 3.5 in-lbs for ¼-28 nuts.

The change in running torque and breakaway torque with sequential torque cycles was measured using exemplar hardware. Two A286 bolts were used in conjunction with silver-plated self-locking nuts and gray-anodized aluminum washers. The A286 bolts, nuts, and washers were the same material types as the accident attachment hardware. The results for the A286 bolts show an on-running torque between 6.1 and 7.0 in-lbs, and off-running torque between 6.8 and 8.8 in-lbs. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

On August 7, 2012, Avantair initiated a fleet wide inspection of all their Piggio P180 airplanes. The focus of the action was to inspect and replace as necessary all elevator mounting hardware. The Executive Vice President of Avantair confirmed on December 6, 2012, that as a precaution, all elevator self-locking nuts had been replaced with new hardware for their fleet of P180's.

TL Ultralight SRO Stingsport TL-2000, N898N: Accident occurred September 01, 2012 in Longmont, Colorado

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA655
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 01, 2012 in Longmont, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2014
Aircraft: TL ULTRALIGHT SRO STINGSPORT, registration: N898N
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While conducting maneuvers at 2,500 feet, the airplane began to vibrate violently. The pilot aborted the maneuver and retarded the throttle to idle; the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot executed a forced landing into a field. After the landing, the pilot and the designated pilot examiner noticed that two of the propeller blades had separated from the propeller hub. An examination of the fractured blades and blade sleeves revealed that blade A likely fractured due to progressive cracking at laminate bonds at the interface between the wood blade and the metal sleeve. The powdery wood observed in the slots and at the root end of the blade shank were indicative of rubbing wood as the cracks progressed. The blade B fracture was likely secondary and occurred due to the vibrations associated with the imbalance created by the blade A fracture and subsequent separation. The propeller log indicated that manufacturer-specified visual inspections and torque checks were not conducted at the specified interval of 150 hours but at intervals of about 203, 320, and 250 hours. The delayed visual inspections reduced the likelihood of detecting the cracks and the delayed torque checks might have contributed to crack growth in the blade.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the wood propeller blades in flight. Contributing to the accident was the owner/operator’s failure to complete required inspections on the propeller within the specified interval, which reduced the likelihood of detecting the cracks and may have contributed to the crack growth. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 1, 2012, about 1130 mountain daylight time, a TL Ultralight SRO Stingsport airplane, N898N, conducted a forced landing after two of the propeller blades separated inflight near Longmont, Colorado. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The sport pilot and the designated pilot examiner (DPE) on board were not injured. The aircraft was registered to STING4FUN LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Erie Municipal Airport (KEIK), Erie, Colorado at 1100. 

The DPE stated that while the pilot was conducting a steep turn demonstration at 2,500 feet above the ground, the engine began vibrating violently. The pilot aborted the maneuver and retarded the throttle to idle when the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot made an emergency landing in a nearby field. After the landing, the pilot and DPE noticed that two of the three propeller blades had separated from the propeller hub. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and engine mount. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 43, held a sport pilot certificate at the time of the accident. He received his private pilot certificate after the conclusion of the accident flight. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a TL Ultralight SRO Stingsport, two-place, high wing, fixed gear, light sport airplane manufactured in 2006. An airworthiness certificate was issued for N889N on March 10, 2006. It was powered by a Bombardier Rotax engine and equipped with a 3 bladed WoodComp wooden propeller. 

Visual inspections of the propeller and propeller hub and bolt torques were checked per the TL Ultralight SRO and WoodComp instructions. The inspections were completed on: August 1, 2009 at a total time of 158.4; August 3, 2009 at a total time of 361.2; August 12, 2010 at a total time of 680.9; and September 1, 2011 at a total time of 924.8. 

According to WoodComp, the propeller inspections were required at 150 hour intervals. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 

An automated weather report at Erie, Colorado, 14 miles north of the accident site, was issued at 1134 and reported: wind from 020 degrees and 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, sky clear, temperature 29 degrees Celsius (C), dewpoint 3 degrees C, and pressure 30.12 inches of mercury. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest upright in a field. The engine mounts and firewall were bent during the forced landing. The rest of the airplane was otherwise unremarkable. 


TESTS AND RESEARCH

The remaining propeller blade and all three propeller sleeves were examined by the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC. Each of the propeller blades and corresponding blades sleeves were labeled A, B, and C for identification purposes. 

Blade A consisted of an entire blade sleeve and a small amount of fractured wood inside the sleeve. A tan powdery substance was noted in the sleeve and in the slots of the sleeve. The substance was tested and matched that of the wood propeller. Progressive cracks were evident in blade A between the blade and the metal sleeve. 

Blade B consisted of an entire blade sleeve and a section of wood which remained attached to the sleeve and also extended out of the sleeve. The blade exhibited cracks in the wood that corresponded to the interface between the blade and the sleeve. 

Blade C consisted of an entire blade sleeve and an entire wood blade and exhibited kinked fibers in the composite layer and crack features at the blade root near the metal sleeve.


http://registry.faa.gov/N898N
 
NTSB Identification: CEN12LA655 
 Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 01, 2012 in Longmont, CO
Aircraft: TL ULTRALIGHT SRO STINGSPORT, registration: N898N
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 1, 2012, about 1746 mountain daylight time, a TL Ultralight SRO Stingsport TL-2000, N898N, was substantially damaged while maneuvering near Longmont, Colorado. The sport pilot and the designated pilot examiner (DPE) on board were not injured. The aircraft was registered to STING4FUN LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Erie Municipal Airport (KEIK), Erie, Colorado at 1700.

The DPE stated that while the pilot was conducting a steep turn demonstration at 2,500 feet above ground level, the engine began vibrating violently. The pilot aborted the maneuver and pulled the throttle back to full idle whereupon the engine quit entirely. The pilot made an emergency landing in a nearby field without further incident. After landing, the pilot and DPE examined the airplane and found two of the three propellers were missing.

The remaining propeller and three propeller sleeves were retained for further examination.

 
IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 898N        Make/Model: LSA       Description: STINGSPORT
  Date: 09/01/2012     Time: 1746

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: LONGMONT   State: CO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, PROP SEPARATED FROM HUB, LONGMONT, CO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER

  FAA FSDO: DENVER, CO  (NM03)                    Entry date: 09/04/2012


Foreign airlines ferry 82 percent of India’s cargo traffic

New Delhi: Foreign airlines carry a whopping 82 percent of India's air cargo traffic, which is projected to grow at 10-12 percent rate over the next five years.

Official figures showed foreign carriers flew out 83.1 percent of international cargo from India in 2009-10, 83.7 percent in 2010-11 and 82.5 percent in 2011-12.

Indian carriers marginally increased their presence in this area raising their cargo carriage vis-a-vis their foreign competitors from 16.9 and 16.3 percent in 2009-10 and 2010-11 to 17.5 percent in 2011-12, the data showed.

The percentage share of domestic cargo carried by all the private carriers put together was 79.8, 81.4 and 83.8 percent during the same period, as Air India's share declined from 20.2, 18.6 and 16.2 percent.

Expressing concern that almost the entire chunk of international air cargo from India were being carried by foreign carriers, official sources said while most airlines carried cargo in aircraft bellies, there was negligible presence of dedicated cargo airlines in the country.

All major airports, from where majority of air cargo is flown out, also saw a decline of 12.3 percent in cargo handling in 2011-12, primarily due to the global slowdown and the Eurozone crunch, the sources said. These airports were Chennai, Kolkata, Thiruvananthapuram, Delhi and Mumbai.

While total cargo handled at these and other airports had grown by 11.8 percent in 2009-10 and 7.1 percent in 2010-11, but declined by 12.3 percent last year, the data showed.

Source:   http://post.jagran.com

I Shop Therefore I Am: Pitts S-2B pilot shops while rescue workers look for him - Sheffield Township, Ohio

By CARL E. FEATHER - Star Beacon 

SHEFFIELD TOWNSHIP —  A report of a plane crash south of Plymouth Ridge Road late Friday morning back fired.

Kingsville firefighters were dispatched to the Gageville Country Store at the corner of Route 193 and Gageville-Monroe Road shortly before 11:30 a.m. A woman who lives about 1.5 miles east of Route 193 reported hearing the roar of an airplane over her house and then what sounded like an explosion. Another caller, to the west of Route 193, reported hearing an aircraft flying very low over her home at Plymouth-Brown and Carson roads.

“It sounded like it was right on top of my house. I said ‘Holy ---! What the --- is that?’” she said.

Kingsville firefighters drove around the neighborhood east of Route 193 in search of debris or a fire. They were assisted by the Ohio State Highway Patrol and Ashtabula County Sheriff’s Department.

When Sheffield Volunteer Fire Department’s President Bob Smith heard the report, he became a little suspicious. Smith knew that there was a private airfield off Gageville-Monroe Road, and he called the cell phone of the pilot who flies out of there.

Smith’s hunch was on the money. The pilot, Jim Victor, and his father had taken their Pitts S-2B plane up that morning. After doing some high-altitude acrobatics, they re-fueled at the Northeast Ohio Regional Airport in Denmark Township and landed about the time the “crash” was heard. Victor then drove to Home Depot in Ashtabula Township, which was where he was when Smith called.

Victor stopped at the staging area on his way back from the store and told a Highway Patrol Trooper that he had used a different approach, from the north, than what he normally uses because of wind conditions. Further, he usually flies in the evening, so the neighbors would not have been accustomed to hearing his aircraft at that time of the day.

He said that the engine of the airplane might have back fired or made a racket as he pulled back for the landing.

“It’s not uncommon for that engine to crackle and pop a little,” he said.

The description of the red, white and blue plane matched that provided by the caller, and the Highway Patrol and Kingsville firefighters called off the search.

Victor said his aircraft was flying at a safe altitude so he did not know what the caller to the west heard. He was certain of one thing, however.

“We’re done flying for today,” Victor said as he headed home.


Source:  http://starbeacon.com

Take a ride with a crop duster - Air Tractor Inc AT-802A, N370JB

 
Sit back and enjoy while the Daily News gives you a ride on the wing and in the cockpit of crop dusting pilot Dale Bitner's plane.
 The Norfolk Daily News covers Northeast and North Central Nebraska.

Hudson, Ohio: CEO’s company offers unique opportunity to combine jets, luxury cars

Hudson -- People who had the chance to tour private jets at Cuyahoga County Airport in early August at the "Road to the Runway" event got a taste of the business run by Hudson resident Mike Silvestro. 

Silvestro, who learned to fly years ago, teamed up with his friend and college classmate Kenn Ricci, who founded Flight Options in 1988. Ricci is chairman of the company.

Flight Options in Richmond Heights, where Silvestro is the CEO, offers fractional ownership of jet planes to companies and executives.

"It's a rather unique business," Silvestro said. "It's functional and fun."

He described his duties as CEO as numerous.

Silvestro said he spends a lot of time with customers. He added it is a serious business, complying with FAA regulations, maintenance and scheduling of a fleet of 100 jets all across the country.

Flight Options, based in Richmond Heights, collaborated with Collection Auto Group, based in North Olmsted, which deals with luxury auto sales and leases, to bring "Road to the Runway" to Cuyahoga County Airport in August.


Read more here: http://www.hudsonhubtimes.com

Photo essay: Pilots fly the skies at the 2012 Virginia Air Show

 

 Front Royal - Talented pilots took to the skies at the annual Virginia Air Show that takes place at the Warren County Airport in Front Royal, Va. 

As the day went on, the weather was questionable, however the show went on, at least for a time, before the wind and rain rolled in.

The gates to the Virginia Air Show opened at 7 a.m., however this reporter didn't arrive until just short of 11 a.m. In the early morning on the day's schedule of events was listed the arrival of the pilots and the aircraft they would be showcasing during their performances later in the day.

Still, there was plenty of time to walk around the airport grounds and explore this annual community event. On display were many small and vintage aircraft. For cars, several Mustangs were on display, along with some other models. Additionally, there were military vehicles, helicopters and World War II memorabilia for visitors to enjoy.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com

 

Reno Air Races start Wednesday



The TravelNevada.com Reno National Championship Air Races will return Wednesday to Northern Nevada for the 49th annual event, and will include a tribute to the people who lost their lives at last year's event. 

 “The last year has been a true test to our organization, our fans, both the northern Nevada and aviation communities and those who were directly impacted by the tragedy of last year,” said Mike Houghton, president and CEO of the Reno Air Racing Association. “We have worked hard to bring this historic event back to Reno and we look forward to remembering and celebrating as we, once again, gather for an aviation event unlike any other.”

Reno Mayor Bob Cashell and Sparks Mayor Geno Martini will join Houghton, in a recognition of first responders, victims and fans.

“We are grateful for the tremendous leadership from our state and community leaders, local businesses and our sponsors for remaining by our side through a difficult time but we will truly never forget the incredible display of courage that was shown in a moment of tragedy last year by the first responders, victims and fans,” said Houghton. “This year's event will pay tribute to everyone who was impacted or who provided support during this trying time and we have a very special and exciting week planned to properly remember and celebrate these heroes and the spirit of aviation.”

As part of its return, the TravelNevada.com National Championship Air Races welcome back the F-22 Raptor.

Further, the event will feature civilian air show performers and additional military demonstration teams. The F/A-18E Super Hornet will perform a demonstration and legacy flight Friday through Sept. 16 and the Patriot Jet Team will return to the Reno Air Races beginning Thursday. Kent Pietsch, Clay Lacy and Jim Pietz will also perform aerobatics throughout the week.

For more information on this year's event or to purchase tickets, visit www.airrace.org or call (775)972-6663. 


Source:  http://www.recordcourier.com

Piece by piece, Goodyear’s new airship arrives at Wingfoot hangar: Wingfoot Lake Airship Operations Balloonport (4OH6), Akron/Suffield, Ohio

 
Sep 7, 2012 by Akron Beacon
 Ed Ogden of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. talks about the arrival of the first parts of a new, state-of-the-art Goodyear blimp. Employees will start building the new blimp in early 2013 in Goodyear's Wingfoot Lake hangar in Suffield Townshjp, Ohio. Its first flight likely will be in early 2014. The new airship will be a semi-rigid Zeppelin, with parts from Germany. For the full story, go to www.ohio.com/news/local/piece-by-piece-goodyear-s-new-airship-arrives-at-wingfoo­t-hangar-1.332411Video by Akron Beacon Journal Business Writer Jim Mackinnon, using an Apple iPhone 4.  

SUFFIELD TWP.: A truck carrying the first container of German-made parts for a newer, larger and faster Goodyear airship backed slowly past the Spirit of Goodyear blimp inside the Wingfoot Lake hangar base Thursday afternoon.

Starting in January, those parts — with lots more to come — will be assembled into a state-of-the-art airship. By early 2014, the Spirit of Goodyear and its late 1960s-era design will be retired and taken apart.

The $63 million overhaul of the iconic Goodyear blimp fleet, first announced in May 2011, is under way.

“It’s a new beginning,” said Ed Ogden, who heads public relations for the Spirit of Goodyear.

Almost the entire Wingfoot hangar base turned out to watch the tractor-trailer work its way slowly through the open hangar, then through large doors to a work area for unloading.

Read more here:  http://www.ohio.com

Take a Hike: Airplane Monument Trail

The Airplane Monument Trail in Cuyamaca has far-reaching views from its Japacha Ridge vantage point, as well as a memorial that marks “the site of one of the most sought after crash sites in U.S. military history,” wrote Alexander D. Bevil in the Journal of San Diego History.

After climbing uphill nearly 800 feet, the trail reaches the monument: A bronze plaque at the base of a battered, stone-mounted Liberty V-12 engine reads “In memory of Col. F.C. Marshall and 1st Lt. C.L. Webber who fell at this spot Dec. 7, 1922.”


The two military officers had left North Island in a twin-seat Army DeHaviland DH4B model biplane early that morning, Webber, 26, sat at the rear-seat controls with Marshall, 55, the forward-seat passenger on a fact-finding inspection tour of cavalry posts throughout the Southwest. Marshall was a decorated World War I veteran and Webber was an expert pilot in what were still the early days of aviation.

Their crash would also become associated with several notable people who went on to play major roles in U.S. military aviation history, Bevil said.

During a two-week period in July-August 1922, Webber and his co-pilot, 1st Lt. Virgil Hines, logged almost 4,000 miles in a DH4B exploring and mapping potential air routes.

“Arguably, the most historic use of DH4Bs occurred on June 26, 1923, when North Island Army pilots Virgil Hine and Frank W. Seifert made the first successful aerial refueling from their plane to that of fellow pilots’ Lieutenants Lowell H. Smith and John Paul Richter beneath them.”

Within just two months, Hine, Seifert, Smith and Richter were all establishing new world flight records for distance, speed, and duration, including flying some 1,250 miles over San Diego for 37 hours and 15 minutes, using in-flight refuelings.

All of these pilots had tried to help locate the crash site of Webber and Marshall when the two failed to reach their destination on that Dec. 7.

“By Dec. 17, the search for Webber and Marshall had evolved into the largest combined air and ground search in U.S. military history during peacetime,” wrote Bevil.

But it wasn’t until May 4, 1923, that the wreckage and the pilots’ remains were discovered by local rancher George W. McCain when he was riding on horseback along Japacha Ridge.

Read more here:   http://www.utsandiego.com