Friday, December 29, 2017

Pair of Marijuana Entrepreneurs, Including Founder of Jack’s Hand Cleaner, Busted at Crossville Memorial Airport (KCSV) With More Than 150 Pounds of Weed, Cops Say

A pair of people who moved to Humboldt County from across the country and invested — directly or indirectly — in the local marijuana industry were arrested last week at an airport in Crossville, Tennessee, allegedly in possession of more than 150 pounds of “pharmaceutical grade marijuana,” according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation

One of the arrestees was Arcata resident Erin Elizabeth Reed, who is originally from Crossville, according to a brief bio on the website for Jack’s Hand Cleaner. Reed created the product, which is marketed to growers and trimmers as means of removing “dirt, resin and gardening grime.”

Reed is also listed with the California Secretary of State as manager of the Arcata-based parent corporation Jack’s of Humboldt, LLC, which holds trademarks for the hand cleaner along with a number of other weed-related products, including Jack’s Vapor Pen, Jack’s CBD Oil, and a line of hemp-infused supplements called Jack’s in the Hole.

The other arrestee was Dennis Howard Bonneau, of Weston, Florida. According to a North Coast Journal story from June 2016, Bonneau is a licensed chiropractor and seasoned investor who, through a mutual benefit corporation, purchased a nine-acre parcel in Ferndale, then jumped the gun on a cannabis-growing operation only to get shut down by the county for breaking ground before acquiring a permit.

Authorities in Tennessee were tipped off about a scheduled delivery to the Crossville Municipal Airport and arrived last Thursday to find a small plane, piloted by Bonneau, on the tarmac, according to a press release. Authorities found about 66 pounds of “pharmaceutical grade” weed inside the aircraft and then stopped Reed inside the airport lobby with a bag holding another 90 pounds of weed, “along with edible marijuana products,” the press release states.

The two were booked into the Cumberland County Jail and held on $500,000 bond apiece.

Story, comments and photo ➤  https://lostcoastoutpost.com

Erin Elizabeth Reed

Dennis Howard Bonneau



A man and a woman were taken into custody and charged with trafficking marijuana after a drug task force received a tip that an airplane registered in California was scheduled to land at Crossville Memorial Airport.

Cumberland County Sheriff’s Casey Cox said there was little notice given to local law enforcement and that officers scrambled to assemble and detain occupants of the plane. Crossville and Cumberland County law enforcement officers arrived just as the plane had been refueled and was ready to resume its trip.

Taken into custody at the airport and later charged at the Justice Center were Dennis Howard Bonneau, 47, 15797 SW 20th St., Davie, FL, and Erin Elizabeth Reed, 34, 1109 Janes Rd., Arcata, CA.

Both are charged with possession of more than 70-pounds of marijuana for sale and/or delivery and both were placed under $500,000 bond.

While the press release states 66 pounds of packaged marijuana was seized, the arrest affidavits filed by CPD Mptl. Camden Davis reports 21 pounds of marijuana found in possession of Reed and about 70 pounds in possession of Bonneau.

 A court date of Jan. 22 was assigned to the two suspects, according to their booking sheets.

The booking sheet shows a sister of Reed living in the Crossville area.

“This was a perfect example of how these task forces are supposed to work,” Cox said. “Capt. Jerry Jackson received a call from a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) office and Capt. Jackson alerted the local members of the Appalachia HDITA with the sheriff’s department and the city.”

“The city police department activated very quickly and were able to respond to the airport and detain the suspects.”

Cox added that they were joined by agents from the FBI and TBI.

A TBI press release states that on Thursday, law enforcement received a tip that a scheduled delivery to the Crossville Memorial Airport was on its way. When city police arrived, they found the light plane on the airport tarmac with Bonneau identified as the pilot.

A search of the plane yielded “66 pounds of pharmaceutical grade marijuana inside the airport,” according to the TBI release. Bonneau was taken into custody inside the plane while Reed was taken into custody in the airport’s lounge area.

While the booking sheet states Bonneau claims a Davie, FL address, the TBI press release identify him as having a Weston, FL address.

The marijuana seized was reportedly packaged and marked as pharmaceutical marijuana and a chewy product reportedly laced with marijuana was also found.

Early estimate of street value was placed under $500,000. As of press time, both suspects remained jailed at the Justice Center.

Story and photos ➤ http://www.crossville-chronicle.com

Tampa family concerned after strange drone hovers above their home

TAMPA — Drone pilot experts are issuing a warning after a Bay Area family discovered a strange drone hovering above their home.

When one family heard the buzz of a drone above their Tampa home, they came outside, concerned.

"Perception is reality where I could feel like you're spying on me or you're a bad guy," said Jennifer Potter.

Potter's wife initially heard the drone and watched it hover in their yard for ten minutes. 

They called the police, who they say told them to call the Federal Aviation Administration.

Now, they have some fears about their own privacy, including being recorded without their knowledge.

"Predators could be possibly using them to spy on kids," Potter said.

She is also concerned about criminals using drones to survey people's homes and yards.

"We have a privacy fence for a reason," Potter said. "We want our privacy."

Stu O'Shannon is a pilot and runs the private drone company Ver Sol UAS. He says there are rules all drone pilots need to follow, including those who just use drones for fun.

"I will tell you that the FAA will no longer give them the pass of 'Oh, I didn't know,'" O'Shannon said.

ABC Action News used this FAA flight map and learned Potter's entire neighborhood is in "restricted airspace," meaning drones can't be flown more than a few feet off the ground. It's simply too close to Tampa International Airport.

In fact, many Bay Area neighborhoods have the same no-fly zone restrictions.

O'Shannon says drone operators could also be violating residents' expectation of privacy by flying over homes and in neighborhoods.

"There could be somebody sunbathing in their backyard and somebody is filming them from a hundred feet with a drone," he said. I think those same rules apply to the person whether he's a hundred feet in the air or peering through your back window."

Potter is just asking drone operators to keep drones out of her yard.

"I mean, it could be a good guy, it could be a bad guy, you just never know," she said.

Drone operators who violate airspace rules face fines or even arrest in some cases.

Story and video ➤ https://www.abcactionnews.com

Michigan State Police helicopter helps apprehend alleged peeping toms



FLINT (WJRT) (12/29/2017) - A Michigan State Police helped police arrest two alleged peeping toms in Flint recently.

Police responded to the area of West Court Street and Pershing streets around 8:40 p.m. Thursday after a caller reported two men peeping through windows at a woman.

Troopers in the helicopter overheard the call and flew overhead, where they got a direct view of the suspects fleeing on foot. They were able to guide responding officers on the ground to the suspects from high above using an infrared camera.

Both suspects were arrested but police could not confirm what, if any, charges they are facing in connection with the incident.

Story and video ➤ http://www.abc12.com

Aircraft mechanic dies after pinned by plane wing at Kagoshima Airport

A mechanic died Friday after getting pinned by the wing of this Japan Coast Guard plane at Kagoshima airport.


KAGOSHIMA – A mechanic died Friday after being pinned under the wing of a plane being pulled into a hangar at Kagoshima Airport, a local airline and fire department said.

Japan Air Commuter Co., a subsidiary of Japan Airlines Co., identified the man as employee Koki Kihara, 31. He was among some 10 people pulling a Japan Coast Guard plane into a hanger for a checkup when the aircraft tilted to the left shortly before 1 p.m., trapping him between its wing and the ground.

The mechanic was unconscious when taken to the hospital by helicopter and was later pronounced dead.

For now, the police believe the Saab 340 aircraft tilted when something caused its left wing wheel to retract into the fuselage.

The plane, 20 meters long and 22 meters wide, was undergoing its annual mechanical check, according to the local coast guard unit, which outsources maintenance to Japan Air Commuter.

The plane is used to patrol territorial waters and conduct maritime search-and-rescue operations.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.japantimes.co.jp

Timothy "Timmy" Richard Wozniak: Founder of Denver affordable private jet service pleads guilty to ID theft, fraud; Entrepreneur racked up hefty charges of more than $70,000 on client’s credit card



Fresh Jets founder Timothy Richard Wozniak pleaded guilty Thursday to identity theft and fraud after getting caught racking up hefty charges on a customer’s credit card.


The Denver entrepreneur behind the affordable private jet service was sentenced to two years of probation on both counts to be served concurrently and ordered to pay $231,264.35 in restitution, according to Vikki Migoya, spokeswoman for the district attorney for the 18th Judicial District.


Other charges, which included theft and forgery, were dropped and case 2016CR1939 was dismissed. Wozniak, 31, has paid the restitution, Migoya added.


Wozniak, who goes by the name Timmy, started Fresh Jets a couple of years after graduating from the University of Denver. The service offered discounted seats on private chartered flights. He also started Fresh Trips in 2015 offering all-inclusive vacations to Cancun. 

Read more here ➤ https://www.denverpost.com

Remos GX, N28GX, registered to and operated by New Mexico Sport Aviation LLC: Fatal accident occurred March 11, 2016 near Ohkay Owingeh Airport (E14), Espanola, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

New Mexico Sport Aviation LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N28GX

Location: Española, NM
Accident Number: CEN16FA122
Date & Time: 03/11/2016, 1627 MST
Registration: N28GX
Aircraft: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU REMOS GX
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 11, 2016, about 1627 mountain standard time, a Remos Aircraft GmbH Flugzeugbau Remos GX airplane, N28GX, impacted terrain following a loss of control in the airport traffic pattern at the Ohkay Owingeh Airport (E14), Española, New Mexico. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by New Mexico Sport Aviation, LLC, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight that departed E14 about 1620 with the intended destination of Santa Fe Municipal Airport (SAF), Santa Fe, New Mexico.

According to the operator, the airplane was based at SAF, and the pilot rented it to gain familiarity with the takeoff-and-landing procedures used at the Los Alamos Airport (LAM), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Because of the restricted airspace immediately to the south of the runway and the noise-sensitive residential area just west of the runway, LAM employs a non-standard traffic pattern. All landings are made on runway 27, and all departures are made in the opposite direction on runway 9.

A review of available Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control (ATC) radar data established that the airplane departed SAF about 1350, flew north-northwest toward LAM, and landed about 1405 on runway 27 at LAM. At 1417:25, the airplane reappeared on radar after it departed LAM on runway 9. The airplane flew about 8.5 miles northeast of LAM before it returned to land on runway 27 about 1427. At 1433:25, the airplane reappeared on radar after it departed LAM on runway 9. The airplane again flew about 8.5 miles northeast of LAM before it returned to land on runway 27 about 1443. At 1449:13, radar data indicated that the airplane had departed LAM and that it continued northeast toward E14. At 1455:29, the airplane descended below available radar coverage about 3.3 miles southwest of E14.

The airplane was equipped with a GlobalStar SPOT satellite tracking device, which reported its position every 5 minutes when activated. According to available track data, the device recorded the airplane on the ramp at E14 about 1503. During the next 15 minutes, the device recorded three stationary data points, consistent with the airplane parked on the airport ramp. No position reports were recorded between 1518 and 1627. At 1627:31, a final data point was recorded near the approach end of runway 16. The GlobalStar SPOT data did not include any altitude information. Additionally, there was no recorded ATC radar data for the accident flight because the airport traffic pattern altitude at E14 was below available radar coverage for the area.

There were two witnesses to the accident flight. Both witnesses were standing outside a residence located about 0.4 mile southeast of the runway 16 departure threshold at E14. The first witness reported seeing the airplane enter left traffic for runway 16 and land. The airplane then made a second takeoff and continued to make left turns. The witness reported that, while the airplane was turning from the crosswind leg to the downwind leg, he heard a reduction in engine power and saw the airplane descend toward the ground in a level pitch attitude. The witness reported seeing an explosion shortly after the airplane descended behind a hill. The second witness reported that he heard the airplane takeoff from the airport and then saw the airplane make a left turn. He stated that, while the airplane was in a left turn it pitched nose-down and descended toward the ground. He reported that there was a large explosion and ascending fireball when the airplane impacted terrain. He also noted that the airplane's engine sounded normal during the flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 46, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/04/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/02/2016
Flight Time:  132.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 127.1 hours (Total, this make and model), 41.8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 36.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/13/2006
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 300 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

--- Pilot ---

According to FAA records, the 46-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. Her most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on May 4, 2015, with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

The pilot's flight history was established using her logbook. The final logbook entry was dated March 9, 2016, at which time she had 132.9 hours total flight time, all of which occurred in the year before the accident. All logged flight time had been completed in single-engine airplanes. The pilot had flown 127.1 hours in the accident airplane make/model. She had logged 41.8 hours as pilot-in-command, 4.6 hours at night, and 4.1 hours in simulated instrument conditions. She had flown 89.5 hours during the 6 months before the accident, 36.8 hours during the 90 days before the accident, and 12.5 hours during the month before the accident. The logbook did not contain any recorded flight time for the 24-hour period before the accident flight. The pilot's most recent flight review, as required by 14 CFR 61.56, was completed upon the issuance of her private pilot certificate dated January 2, 2016.

--- Pilot-Rated Passenger ---

According to FAA records, the 53-year-old passenger held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on April 13, 2006, with no limitations. The medical certificate expired on April 30, 2008. On the application for the expired medical certificate, the passenger reported having accumulated 300 total hours of flight experience, of which 35 hours were flown within the previous 6 months. A pilot logbook for the passenger was not located during the investigation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU
Registration: N28GX
Model/Series: REMOS GX
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 356
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/01/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 18 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2916.7 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS
Registered Owner: New Mexico Sport Aviation, LLC
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: New Mexico Sport Aviation, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The 2009-model-year airplane, serial number 356, was a high-wing monoplane of composite carbon-fiber monocoque construction. The airplane was powered by a 100-horsepower, 4-cyinder Rotax 912 ULS reciprocating engine, serial number 6783105. The engine provided thrust through a ground-adjustable, three-blade, Neuform CR3-65-(IP)-47-101.6 propeller. The two-seat airplane was equipped with a fixed tricycle landing gear and wing flaps. The airplane had a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 1,320 pounds. The special-light sport aircraft (S-LSA) was issued an airworthiness certificate on May 13, 2010. New Mexico Sport Aviation, LLC, purchased the airplane on February 21, 2011.

The airplane's recording hour meter was destroyed during the postimpact fire, which precluded a determination of the airplane's total service time at the time of the accident. However, according to dispatch documentation, the airplane's hour meter indicated 2,916.7 hours before the flight departed SAF. According to maintenance documentation, the airframe had a total service time of 2,916.7 hours, and the engine had accumulated 916.7 hours since new. The last condition and 100-hour inspection of the airplane were completed on March 1, 2016, at 2,898.8 total airframe hours. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 22 gallons contained in a single fuselage tank. A review of fueling records established that the fuel tank was topped-off before the accident flight departed SAF. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LAM, 7171 ft msl
Observation Time: 1635 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 230°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / -11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots/ 16 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Española, NM (E14)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Santa Fe, NM (SAF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1620 MST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at LAM about 14 miles southwest of the accident site.

At 1615, about 12 minutes before the accident, the LAM automated surface observing system reported: wind 170° at 10 knots with wind gusts of 15 knots, a clear sky, 10 miles surface visibility, temperature 17°C, dew point -11°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury.

At 1635, about 8 minutes after the accident, the LAM automated surface observing system reported: wind 180° at 10 knots with wind gusts of 16 knots, a clear sky, 10 miles surface visibility, temperature 18°C, dew point -11°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: Ohkay Owingeh Airport (E14)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5790 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5007 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

E14, a public airport located about 3 miles northeast of Española, New Mexico, was owned and operated by the Ohkay Owingeh Tribal Council. The airport field elevation was 5,790 ft mean sea level. The airport was served by a single asphalt runway, runway 16/34, that measured 5,007 ft by 75 ft. The airport was not equipped with an air traffic control tower. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  36.032778, -106.047222 (est) 

The accident site was in an open field located about 885 ft east of the runway 16 departure threshold. The damage to the airplane was consistent with it impacting the ground in a nose-down pitch attitude on a southeast heading. There was no appreciable wreckage propagation from the point-of-impact. The main wreckage consisted of the entire airplane. All major structural components and flight controls were identified at the accident site; however, a majority of the carbon-fiber composite fuselage, wings, and empennage were destroyed during the postimpact fire. The pitot tube, which was installed on the leading edge of the left wing, had penetrated the ground at a 45° angle. A majority of the flight control push-pull tubes for the elevator and ailerons were destroyed by the postimpact fire. Flight control cable continuity for the rudder was confirmed from the control surface to the cockpit. The entire cockpit and instrument panel were destroyed during the postimpact fire. Two of the three propeller blades exhibited impact and fire damage. The remaining propeller blade appeared undamaged.

The engine sustained extensive thermal damage during the postimpact fire. Disassembly of the engine revealed no mechanical failures of the crankshaft, camshaft, connecting rods, or pistons. Additionally, there were no anomalies observed with the cylinders or their respective valve assemblies. The sparkplugs and piston domes exhibited normal wear and combustion signatures. Both carburetors exhibited extensive thermal damage that was consistent with prolonged exposure to fire. The throttle and choke arms remained attached to the carburetor control cables. The ignition modules, secondary coil pack, and stator exhibited extensive thermal damage from the postimpact fire that precluded testing of the ignition system. The fuel pump remained intact with minor heat damage. A small amount of automobile fuel was ejected from the outlet fitting when the fuel pump was actuated by hand. Further disassembly of the fuel pump revealed no anomalies or contamination. The oil pump remained intact, and its drive shaft rotated freely. The oil pump shaft drive pin was found fractured and was retained for additional testing. The engine disassembly revealed ample lubrication throughout the engine and there was no evidence of oil starvation. The coolant pump housing exhibited thermal damage that was consistent with prolonged exposure to fire. The coolant impeller remained attached to the drive shaft; however, the impeller had partially melted during the postimpact fire. The reduction gearbox assembly remained intact, and the drive gear exhibited no pitting or galling. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator in Albuquerque, New Mexico, performed autopsies on the pilot and pilot-rated passenger. The cause of death for both individuals was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on specimens obtained during each autopsy. The pilot's toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all tested drugs and medications.

The pilot-rated passenger's toxicology results were negative for ethanol. Atorvastatin, losartan, and warfarin were detected in liver. Additionally, losartan and warfarin were detected in muscle. Atorvastatin, brand name Lipitor, is a prescription medication used for lowering high blood cholesterol. Losartan, brand name Cozaar, is a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure. Warfarin, brand name Coumadin, is a prescription medication used to prevent clot formation. The detected substances are not generally considered performance-impairing. 

Tests And Research

The engine crankcase, camshaft, oil pump shaft, and oil pump drive pin were submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for additional examination. The examination indicated that the camshaft had a yoke machined into the end opposite the drive gear that drove the oil pump shaft. As designed, a drive pin passed through the body of the oil pump shaft, which engaged the camshaft yoke. The camshaft yoke did not exhibit any abnormal wear or deformation. The bearing bore in the crankcase that corresponded with the oil pump drive yoke exhibited scoring on the inner surface about mid-depth. The depth of the scoring was about 0.024 inch. The scoring was consistent with the profile of the oil pump shaft drive pin. The drive pin fractured inboard of the outer diameter of the oil pump shaft on both sides, leaving a portion of the drive pin within each side of the shaft. Examination of the fracture surfaces revealed crack arrest marks consistent with a fatigue fracture. Hardness measurements made across the diameter of the drive pin were consistent with the manufacturer's design specification. Although the drive pin had fractured, it remained engaged to the camshaft yoke and continued to rotate the oil pump shaft. Additionally, the postaccident engine disassembly revealed ample lubrication throughout the engine, and there was no evidence of oil starvation.

According to the engine manufacturer, a fractured oil shaft drive pin is indicative of an oil system with restrictive hoses and fittings that can result in a pulsating oil supply to the oil pump. The pulsating loading of the drive pin can result in a fractured drive pin. The Rotax 912 installation manual stipulates that oil hoses have an inside diameter of 11 millimeters. The oil hoses recovered with the wreckage had inside diameters that measured 9 millimeters. Additionally, the Rotax 912 installation manual stipulates full-flow angled fittings for oil hose connections. Examination of the oil cooler revealed a right-angle fitting that did not meet the engine manufacturer's full-flow fitting specification.


Video:  Karen Young - First Solo

Thomas Spickermann was a proud supporter of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s “Young Eagles” program, a program that showed young people the many pathways into the aviation field one could take. 

Thomas Spickermann

Karen Young and her husband at the Los Alamos Airport.


The National Transportation Safety Board has yet to release a final report on a plane crash that killed two Los Alamos National Laboratory employees – the pilot and the plane’s only passenger – on March 11, 2016.

The pilot was Karen Young, 46, and the passenger was Thomas Spickermann, 53. Young and Spickermann were employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory and worked in the same division. Young was a Los Alamos resident and Spickermann lived in Hernandez.

NTSB Chief of Media Relations Chris O’Neil said the case is still active and under investigation.

“The investigation into the aviation accident (March 11, 2016, Espanola, NM, case number CEN16FA122) remains under investigation. It generally takes 12 to 24 months for the NTSB to complete the investigation of a fatal general aviation accident,” O’Neil said in an email Wednesday.

An initial report is available online at the NTSB website. The report does assign any fault or cause of the accident.

The report instead focused on conditions leading up to the crash.

The airplane was a 2009 Remos GX, rented from New Mexico Sport Aviation.

Young flew the plane out of Santa Fe Municipal Airport and practiced take offs and landings at the Los Alamos County Airport and the Ohkey Owingeh Airport near Española.

At the time of the accident, which investigators said was around 4:30 p.m., Young was taking off and landing at the Ohkay Owingeh Airport, which is near Española.

An eyewitness to the accident told investigators he saw the airplane making left turns, and when it was turning from the crosswind to the downwind leg of the turn, “he heard a reduction in engine power and saw the airplane descend nose first toward the ground,” according to the preliminary report.

The plane’s fuel tank had a capacity of 22 gallons, and the plane’s fuel tanks were “topped off” before it took off, according to investigators.

“A review of fueling records established that the airplane fuel tanks were topped off before the accident flight departed SAF (Santa Fe Municipal Airport),” a statement in the report said.

Maintenance records showed no history of outstanding maintenance problems or issues, according to the report. A partial examination of the engine showed no mechanical failures in the crankshaft, connecting rods and pistons.

An examination of Young’s aviation records revealed that she was a pilot in good standing. There were no previous accidents, enforcement proceedings or safety incidents. She had 132.9 of flight time, 41.8 of those as a pilot.

Will Fox, a member of Chapter 691 of the Experimental Aircraft Association, said in a previous Los Alamos Monitor article on the accident that Young was naturally curious about things and enthusiastic about aviation.

“Karen was an incredibly enthusiastic young lady, real quick with a smile,” Fox said. “Very outgoing, a very positive person … very inquisitive. If she wanted to find out about something she wouldn’t hesitate to call you and ask you questions till she wore you out. She reminded me a lot of her dad.”

At the time of the accident, Spickermann also belonged to Chapter 691 of the Experimental Aircraft Association, where he served as the eaa691.net’s webmaster and newsletter publisher. He loved to build airplanes and had built and owned at least one, a Zenith CH750 STOL.

Fox also said in the same article that Spickermann was never one to brag about his accomplishments, but instead wanted to instill the same love of flying and building that he had into others.

“As soon as he got done, he started giving everybody rides,” Fox said, about Spickermann’s completed Zenith. “He used to say that if he could build one, then anyone could build one.”

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.lamonitor.com





Location: Española, NM
Accident Number: CEN16FA122
Date & Time: 03/11/2016, 1627 MST
Registration: N28GX
Aircraft: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU REMOS GX
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On March 11, 2016, about 1627 mountain standard time, a Remos Aircraft GmbH Flugzeugbau model Remos GX, special-light sport aircraft (S-LSA), N28GX, was destroyed during a postimpact fire following a loss of control in the airport traffic pattern at the Ohkay Owingeh Airport (E14), Española, New Mexico. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by New Mexico Sport Aviation LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed for the personal flight that departed E14 about 1620 with the intended destination of Santa Fe Municipal Airport (SAF), Santa Fe, New Mexico.

According to the aircraft owner, the pilot had rented the airplane to gain familiarization with the takeoff-and-landing procedures used at the Los Alamos Airport (LAM), Los Alamos, New Mexico. When operating at LAM, all landings are made on runway 27 and all departures are made to the opposite direction on runway 9. A review of available Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control (ATC) radar data indicated that the airplane departed SAF about 1350, preceded north-northwest toward LAM, and subsequently landed on runway 27 about 1405. At 1417, the airplane reappeared on ATC radar after it had departed LAM on runway 9. The flight then proceeded about 8.5 miles northeast of LAM before returning to land on runway 27 about 1427. At 1433, the airplane reappeared on ATC radar after it had departed LAM on runway 9. The flight again proceeded about 8.5 miles northeast of LAM before returning to land on runway 27 about 1443. At 1448, ATC radar data indicated the airplane had departed LAM and continued northeast toward E14. At 1455, the airplane descended below available radar coverage about 3.3 miles southwest of E14.

The airplane was equipped with a GlobalStar SPOT satellite tracking device, which reported its position every 5 minutes when activated. According to available track data, the device recorded the airplane on the ramp at E14 about 1503. During the next 15 minutes, the device recorded three stationary data points while the airplane situated on the ramp. There were no position reports received between 1518 and 1627. At 1627:31, the final GlobalStar SPOT data point was recorded near the approach end of runway 16. The GlobalStar SPOT data did not include any altitude information. Additionally, there was no ATC radar data for the accident flight because the airport traffic pattern altitude was below available radar coverage.

There were two witnesses to the accident flight. Both witnesses were standing outside a residence located about 0.4 miles southeast of the runway 16 departure threshold. One of these witnesses reported seeing the airplane make left traffic for runway 16 and land. The witness reported that the airplane made a second takeoff and continued to make left turns. He reported that as the airplane was turning from the crosswind-to-downwind leg, he heard a reduction in engine power and saw the airplane descend toward the ground in a nose level attitude. The airplane subsequently descended behind a hill which was followed by an explosion. The second witness reported that he heard the airplane takeoff from the airport, and as the airplane was making a left turn, he saw it descend nose first toward the ground. He noted that there was a large explosion and ascending fireball upon the airplane impacting the terrain. The same witness reported that the engine sounded as if it was operating normally during the accident flight.

The wreckage was located in an open field about 885 feet east of the runway 16 departure threshold. The initial impact point was where the engine had impacted the ground on a heading of south. No discernable wreckage debris path was projected from the initial impact point. The main wreckage consisted of the entire airplane. All major structural components and flight controls were identified at the accident site; however, a majority of the carbon-fiber composite fuselage, wings, and empennage had been destroyed during the postimpact fire. The pitot tube, located on the leading edge of the left wing, had penetrated the ground at a 45 degree angle. A majority of the flight control push-pull tubes for the elevator and ailerons were destroyed during the postimpact fire. Flight control cable continuity for the rudder was confirmed from the control surface to the cockpit. The engine had sustained significant thermal damage during the postimpact fire. A partial disassembly of the engine revealed no mechanical failures of the crankshaft, connecting rods, and pistons. No anomalies were noted with the cylinders or valve assemblies. Normal wear and combustion signatures were noted on the upper spark plugs. The magneto assembly, located on the rear of the engine, was destroyed during the postimpact fire. No anomalies were noted with the reduction gearbox assembly. Two of the three propeller blades exhibited impact and fire damage. The remaining propeller blade appeared undamaged.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 46, held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land airplane rating. Her last aviation medical examination was completed on May 4, 2015, when she was issued a third-class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. Her last flight review, as required by FAA regulation 61.56, was completed upon the issuance of her private pilot certificate dated January 2, 2016. The pilot's flight history was reconstructed using pilot logbook information. Her most recent pilot logbook entry was dated March 9, 2016, at which time she had accumulated 132.9 hours total flight time, of which 41.8 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. She had logged 127.1 hours of flight time in a Remos GX special-light sport aircraft. She had accumulated 4.1 hours in simulated instrument meteorological conditions and 4.6 hours at night. She had flown 132.9 hours during the prior 12 months, 89.5 hours in the previous 6 months, 36.8 hours during prior 90 days, 23.5 hours in the previous 60 days, and 12.5 hours in the 30 day period before the accident flight. The pilot's logbook did not contain any recorded flight time for the 24 hour period before the accident flight.

The accident airplane was a 2009 Remos Aircraft GmbH Flugzeugbau model Remos GX, serial number 356. A 100-horsepower Rotax model 912 ULS reciprocating engine, serial number 6783105, powered the airplane through a fixed-pitch, three blade, Neuform model CR3-65 propeller. The airplane had a fixed tricycle landing gear, was capable of seating two individuals, and had a certified maximum gross weight of 1,320 pounds. The special-light sport aircraft (S-LSA) was issued an airworthiness certificate on May 13, 2010. The current owner-of-record, New Mexico Sport Aviation LLC, purchased the airplane on February 21, 2011. According to dispatch documentation, the airplane's HOBBS hour meter indicated 2,916.7 hours before the accident flight. The airframe had accumulated a total service time of 2,916.7 hours. The engine had accumulated a total service time of 916.7 hours since new. The last condition and 100-hour inspection of the airplane were completed on March 1, 2016, at 2,898.8 total airframe hours. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 22 gallons (21 gallons useable) contained in a single fuselage tank. A review of fueling records established that the airplane fuel tanks were topped-off before the accident flight departed SAF.

The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Los Alamos Airport (LAM), Los Alamos, New Mexico, about 14 miles southwest of the accident site. At 1556, the LAM automated surface observing system reported the following weather conditions: wind 190 degrees true at 12 knots, gusting 24 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 10,000 feet above ground level (agl), scattered clouds at 18,000 feet agl, broken ceiling at 25,000 feet agl; temperature 26 degrees Celsius, dew point -9 degrees Celsius, altimeter setting 29.69 inches of mercury. A peak wind velocity of 27 knots was recorded at 1525. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU
Registration: N28GX
Model/Series: REMOS GX
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: New Mexico Sport Aviation LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LAM, 7171 ft msl
Observation Time: 1556 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / -9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 10000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 24 knots, 190°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.69 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Española, NM (E14)
Destination: Santa Fe, NM (SAF) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries:  2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.032778, -106.047222 (est)

Winter conditions have airlines de-icing planes at Dayton International Airport (KDAY)

DAYTON -  Extreme winter conditions have caused airline crews at the Dayton International Airport to take precautions to keep passengers safe this winter season before takeoff.

Airline crews use de-icing fluid in extreme cold temperatures, but use it more often with active snowfall, according to airport officials.

Area temperatures are forecast to drop near or below zero this weekend and snow also is expected, according to Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini.

Dayton-based flights use about 90,000 gallons of de-icing fluid on planes a year. 

A flight can be delayed for 10 to 20 minutes to de-ice a plane depending on winter precipitation and how many planes need to be de-iced, according to Terry Slaybaugh, director of the airport. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.daytondailynews.com

Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport (KCHA) grapples with soaring passenger traffic

As Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport passenger boardings in 2017 near the half-million mark for the first year ever — up 67 percent since the start of the decade — officials are eyeing the future.

Building more gates for arriving and departing aircraft, raising a parking garage for airport users and adding another security checkpoint line are among ideas that could take off.

The airport is spending $1.1 million on a new plan looking ahead by a decade or so. The aim is to meet unprecedented passenger growth that has fueled four consecutive years of record high traffic at Lovell Field.

A better Chattanooga area business climate, more competitive air fares and added nonstop flights to markets such as New York City and Chicago are among reasons for the soaring traffic numbers, airport officials said.

"We're already where we were predicted to be in 2027," said Terry Hart, the airport's chief executive.

A first phase of potential airport work will be drawn up that Lovell Field officials could put into place to meet needs, said Brian Mohr, of aviation planning firm InterVistas.

The company will craft differing possibilities for moving ahead at the airport, though there's "not a silver bullet alternative here — there rarely is," he said.

Still, the rapid climb in passengers is pushing officials to look at possible expansions of the airport's concourse to add more gates for aircraft. The airport now has five gates that can handle about nine planes.

Hart said all the spots are taken at peak times at the airport.

"We'll look at growing gate capacity," he said.

Along with that could come added concessions in the concourse such as restaurants, more restrooms and space to hold greater numbers of passengers, officials said.

Parking also is an issue under study by planners.

While the airport has added hundreds of new spaces in the past couple of years, there are times when the closest lots to the terminal are full. That requires people to park in a newly built overflow lot and take a shuttle to the terminal.

Planners are looking at options for at least one potential parking garage at the airport.

"We're not saying you have to have a parking garage, but where would the garage be and how would it work?" Mohr asked.

Airport Authority member Jim Hall said it would be a mistake to put a parking garage in front of the terminal and block the airport's signature copper-domed rotunda.

"To me, that is important," he said. "I think we make a mistake if we stick a parking garage out in front of the building, which is sort of the symbol of the airport."

According to InterVista, rental car parking could be moved into the ground floor of a garage.

Adding another line to the security checkpoint in the terminal also is under study to speed fliers into the concourse to board their planes.

Mohr said planners don't envision more than one checkpoint location at the airport. Alternatives continue to call for the checkpoint to be located in the terminal's rotunda area, planners said.

No cost figures have been attached to any possible airport expansions. Planners expect the new master blueprint to be ready about mid-2018.

Hall, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said he's also concerned about the ability of roads and overpasses off airport property to support Lovell Field's growth.

"It seems to me we've got to try to do that together rather than separately," he said.

Earlier in December, airport officials announced a new annual record for passenger boardings after just 11 months.

With December's boardings still to be counted, the airport already has flown past last year's mark of 419,059 passengers, Hart said. Through November, the airport had boardings of 446,203 passengers, figures show. That's up 16.7 percent over the same period in 2016.

Hart said that when December figures are included, officials expect boardings to come in at about 485,000 passengers for all of 2017.

Officials said the boardings boost will bolster their case for wooing even more airline service from the carriers.

"In time, that will translate into new service opportunities," said Dan Jacobson, the Airport Authority chairman.

Hart said that airport officials in recent meetings with airline route planners expressed interest in new nonstop service between Chattanooga and Houston and the Scenic City and Washington Dulles International Airport.

Federal Aviation Administration funds will pay 90 percent of the cost of developing the new master plan, with the airport picking up the remainder.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.timesfreepress.com

Cessna 182Q Skylane, N199RN, registered to Western Flying Club Inc and operated by the pilot -and- Piper J3C-65, N25786, registered to Grecor LLC and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred December 16, 2017 near Burlington–Alamance Regional Airport (KBUY), Burlington, Alamance County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Western Flying Club Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N199RN

Location: Burlington, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA055A
Date & Time: 12/16/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N199RN
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 16, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N199RN, and a Piper J3C-65, N25786, collided in midair near Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport (BUY), Burlington, North Carolina. The private pilot of the Cessna and the commercial pilot of the Piper were not injured. The Cessna and the Piper both sustained substantial damage. The Cessna was registered to Western Flying Club Inc. and was operated by the pilot. The Piper was registered to Grecor LLC and was operated by the pilot. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as personal flights. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for either flight. The flights originated at BUY about 1220.

The Piper pilot reported that he had recently performed maintenance on the smoke generator system and installed a new fuel pump. He asked the Cessna pilot to fly adjacent to him to verify the smoke system operation. After departure, the Piper pilot flew on the right side of the Cessna and both pilots acknowledged each other. The Piper pilot turned on the smoke system and the Cessna pilot verified that it operated normally. The Piper pilot then broke-off to the right to leave the formation.

The Piper pilot subsequently elected to fly inverted to check the oil system and mixture control. After clearing for traffic and tightening his harness, he rolled inverted. The systems operated normally, so he rolled again to level the airplane upright. During the return to level flight, he heard a loud noise and the airplane rolled to the right. He believed that he had experienced aileron flutter. He was able to control the airplane and returned to BUY and landed without further incident. It was after landing that he realized that he had collided with the Cessna.

The Cessna pilot reported that, while in straight and level flight, he observed a flash of yellow at his 9 o'clock position, which was the Piper. He reported that the Piper struck his left wing. He was able to maintain airplane control and returned to BUY for landing.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined both airplanes. The right wing and aileron of the Piper were structurally damaged, as was the outboard portion of the Cessna's left wing. No other damage was noted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N199RN
Model/Series: 182 Q
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BUY, 616 ft msl
Observation Time: 1754 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Burlington, NC (BUY)
Destination: Burlington, NC (BUY) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.049722, -79.473056 (est)

Grecor LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N25786

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Burlington, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA055B
Date & Time: 12/16/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N25786
Aircraft: PIPER J3C
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 16, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N199RN, and a Piper J3C-65, N25786, collided in midair near Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport (BUY), Burlington, North Carolina. The private pilot of the Cessna and the commercial pilot of the Piper were not injured. The Cessna and the Piper both sustained substantial damage. The Cessna was registered to Western Flying Club Inc. and was operated by the pilot. The Piper was registered to Grecor LLC and was operated by the pilot. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as personal flights. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for either flight. The flights originated at BUY about 1220.

The Piper pilot reported that he had recently performed maintenance on the smoke generator system and installed a new fuel pump. He asked the Cessna pilot to fly adjacent to him to verify the smoke system operation. After departure, the Piper pilot flew on the right side of the Cessna and both pilots acknowledged each other. The Piper pilot turned on the smoke system and the Cessna pilot verified that it operated normally. The Piper pilot then broke-off to the right to leave the formation.

The Piper pilot subsequently elected to fly inverted to check the oil system and mixture control. After clearing for traffic and tightening his harness, he rolled inverted. The systems operated normally, so he rolled again to level the airplane upright. During the return to level flight, he heard a loud noise and the airplane rolled to the right. He believed that he had experienced aileron flutter. He was able to control the airplane and returned to BUY and landed without further incident. It was after landing that he realized that he had collided with the Cessna.

The Cessna pilot reported that, while in straight and level flight, he observed a flash of yellow at his 9 o'clock position, which was the Piper. He reported that the Piper struck his left wing. He was able to maintain airplane control and returned to BUY for landing.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined both airplanes. The right wing and aileron of the Piper were structurally damaged, as was the outboard portion of the Cessna's left wing. No other damage was noted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N25786
Model/Series: J3C 65
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BUY, 616 ft msl
Observation Time: 1754 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Burlington, NC (BUY)
Destination: Burlington, NC (BUY) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.049722, -79.473056 (est)




"Two planes hit in midair. Their pilots somehow landed safely. We spent the last week chasing down this story and finally got confirmation today, December 28th." -Times-News

Two planes apparently sustained minor damage after a midair collision December 16 a few miles from the Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport.

“My unconfirmed understanding is that on Saturday, December 16, 2017, two aircraft that had departed the Burlington Alamance Regional airport were flying in an area approximately 5 to 10 nautical miles north of the Burlington Alamance Regional Airport. While in flight, the two aircraft came in physical contact,” Airport Manager Dan Danieley wrote in a statement to the Times-News. “The pilots did in fact safely return both aircraft to the Burlington Alamance Regional Airport and to their respective airplane hangars. The Federal Aviation Administration was called in to investigate the incident. The Federal Aviation Administration has turned over the investigation to the National Transportation Safety Board, with whom the investigation remains.”

Five to 10 nautical miles (about 5.75 to 11.5 statute miles) due north of the airport would be about from David Moore and Stoney Creek Church roads, northeast of Altamahaw, to U.S. 158 near Casville in Caswell County.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration registry, the two planes were a Cessna 182Q belonging to the Western Flying Club — the club’s newest plane, according to its Facebook page — and a Piper JC3-65 belonging to Grecor LLC of Asheville, Ala., which operates under the name Greg Koontz Airshows.

“I wasn’t in the plane; I would not be the one to tell you anything about it,” said Greg Koontz, owner of Greg Koontz Airshows. “I’m still waiting on the reports myself.”

The Western Flying Club is based at the airport. The Times-News received unconfirmed photos of a plane with the same tail number as its plane, showing a piece of the tip of the left wing missing and wires hanging, and another plane with no visible identifying information and with damage going about halfway along the back of its right wing.

Christopher O’Neil, National Transportation Safety Board chief of media relations, confirmed there was a “limited investigation” ongoing. In response to a Facebook message from the Times-News, the Western Flying Club referred questions to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Accidents at the Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport have been rare in the past few years. A crash Feb. 16 damaged the wing of a Cessna 172M belonging to Missionary Air Group at the end of a runway. That incident was blamed on crosswinds. Before that, no accident had been reported at the airport since 2013.

2013 was, however, a bad year.

On Jan. 16, 2013, David Gamble, 57, died in the crash of a Pilatus PC-12 carrying LabCorp samples. The National Transportation Safety Board concluded Gamble became disoriented after the nighttime take-off, possibly while being distracted resetting the plane’s transponder.

On Dec. 16, 2013, there was a non-fatal accident with a Cessna 182T while the pilot was practicing takeoffs and landings. Mechanical error was a possible explanation but not a certainty, according to the National Transportation Safety Board report.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.thetimesnews.com