Saturday, May 4, 2019

Destiny 2000 Powered Parachute, registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N65481: Fatal accident occurred May 04, 2019 in New Era, Oceana County, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N65481

Location: New Era, MI
Accident Number: CEN19FA134
Date & Time: 05/04/2019, 1042 EDT
Registration: N65481
Aircraft: ALLIANT AVIATION DESTINY 2000
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 4, 2019, about 1042 eastern daylight time, an experimental light-sport Alliant Aviation Destiny 2000, N65481, powered parachute, impacted a field while maneuvering near New Era, Michigan. The powered parachute was destroyed by impact forces. The sport pilot sustained fatal injuries. The powered parachute was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight originated from Rothbury, Michigan about 1000.

The accident flight was the pilot's first flight of the year in the powered parachute. The powered parachute had been flying from east to west when it entered a turn to the south. During the turn, the parachute collapsed. A witness located at the next farm field north of the accident site stated he saw the powered parachute fly over his house about 250 feet above ground level. He said the engine sound changed prior to the parachute collapsing. The powered parachute then entered a spiral descent and impacted the ground.

Examination of the wreckage revealed the ground scarring was limited to an area beneath the powered parachute frame. The left side of the frame exhibited greater damage than the right side and was consistent with a left-banked impact with terrain. The parachute did not exhibit any tears externally or internally. All the parachute lines were connected to the frame. Flight control continuity from the parachute to the flight controls was confirmed.

The Tea Time weather station in New Era, Michigan recorded at 1039: winds – north/northeast at 1 mph, gusts - 5 mph. The weather station recorded at 1044: winds – west/northwest at 1 mph, gusts – 5 mph.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ALLIANT AVIATION
Registration: N65481
Model/Series: DESTINY 2000 No Series
Aircraft Category: Powered Parachute
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFFX, 831 ft msl
Observation Time: 1055 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Rothbury, MI
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.564444, -86.418056 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Mr. Terry Dykstra
September 17th, 1955 - May 4th, 2019



Mr. Terrence L. “Terry” Dykstra, age 63, was welcomed into the loving arms of his Savior unexpectedly Saturday, May 4, 2019, in New Era. 

Terry was born September 17, 1955 to Edward C. and Nancy (Hall) Dykstra in New Era, and lived all of his life there. He worked as a fruit farmer on the family farm for most of his life, but also enjoyed working in construction. 

Terry loved camping, riding his motorcycle, making maple syrup, raising Christmas trees with his oldest daughter, and flying his powered parachute, ‘Ida Red’. Most of all, he loved and adored his family. He is survived by Mary, his loving wife of what would have been 41 blessed years on May 23; two beloved daughters and their spouses: Melissa (Chris) Warp, Jessica (James) Bolan. He was a wonderful PopPop to four beautiful grandchildren: Emily, Bjorn, Hunter and Jensen. 

Terry is also survived by his mother, Nancy Dykstra-Jeffries; 3 brothers: Doug (Maureen) Dykstra, Brad (Jan) Dykstra, Dave Dykstra; several nieces and nephews; and in-laws. He was preceded in death by his father Ed, a niece, and a nephew.

A service to cherish and celebrate Terry’s life will be held Friday, May 10, at 11:00 AM at The Lee Chapel, 6291 S. Harvey St., (231) 798-1100. Visitation will be from 5-8 PM Thursday, also at the funeral home. Contributions in Terry’s memory may be made to Every Child Ministries and/or Grand Haven Christian School. 






BENONA TOWNSHIP – Terrence Dykstra, 63, of Rothbury died Saturday, May 4, as a result of injuries sustained after the Destiny 2000 Powered Parachute he was operating crashed in a field on 56th Avenue about 1/4 mile north of Stony Lake Road about 10:42 a.m.

Dykstra was transported by Life EMS to Mercy Health Partners Lakeshore Campus in Shelby where he succumbed to injuries sustained from the crash, said Oceana County Sheriff Craig Mast.

“There were a couple witnesses who watched it happen,” said OCSO Dep. Mike Fillips. Witness statements advise that the aircraft was low flying when the parachute collapsed and then crashed, Sheriff Mast said. The accident investigation will be turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, who were dispatched to the scene following the crash.

Emergency crews responding including OCSO, Shelby-Benona Fire Department and Grant Township First Rescue.

Original article ➤  http://www.oceanacountypress.com

BENONA TOWNSHIP, Michigan — A 63-year-old Rothbury man died Saturday after his powered parachute crashed in an open field near Benona Township, according to the Oceana County Sheriff's Office.

Deputies with the department responded to South 56th Avenue, approximately a quarter mile north of W. Stony Lake Road, to reports of a downed aircraft that had crashed up to 30 feet from the roadway. When they arrived, they found 63-year-old Terrence Dykstra, who had suffered from life threatening injuries.

Dykstra was transported to Mercy Health's Lakeshore Campus, where he died from his injuries. No other passenger was involved in the crash as Dykstra was the only one injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were contacted by the sheriff's office and were still investigating the scene as of Saturday afternoon. The accident remains under investigation. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wwmt.com

NEW ERA, Michigan — FAA and NTSB officials have arrived on the scene of a fatal powered-parachute crash in Benona Township.

The Oceana County Sheriff’s Office says in a news release a 63-year-old man from Rothbury was piloting the motorized parachute when it went down on S. 56th Avenue, a quarter-mile north of W. Stony Lake Road.

Police identified the pilot as Terrence Dykstra, and say he was driven by Life EMS ambulance to Mercy Health-Lakeshore Campus in Shelby, where he died. There were no other passengers, and no one was injured on the ground.

According to the news release, “Calls to 911 began coming in at 10:42 a.m. indicating that a powered parachute had crashed…callers to 911 told dispatchers at Mason-Oceana 911 that the aircraft was approximately 25-30 feet off from the roadway. Witness statements advise that the aircraft was low-flying when the parachute collapsed and then crashed.”

The Sheriff’s Office says federal investigators were dispatched to the crash scene late Saturday afternoon.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox17online.com

OCEANA COUNTY, Michigan -- A Rothbury man died when a powered parachute crashed in a field, apparently after the parachute collapsed while flying low.

Oceana County sheriff’s deputies identified the man as 63-year-old Terrence Dykstra.

Rescuers responded to the area of South 56th Avenue, north of West Stony Lake Road, about 10:40 a.m. Saturday, May 4 after several people called 911 to report the crash. The location is in Benona Township near New Era and the aircraft was only a short distance off the road.

Rescuers arrived to find Dykstra and took him to Mercy Health-Lakeshore Campus in Shelby but he did not survive his injuries.

Authorities with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were investigating the crash later Saturday.

“Witness statements advise that the aircraft was low flying when the parachute collapsed and then crashed,” according to a sheriff’s department news release.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mlive.com

Bell 206B JetRanger, N49643: Accident occurred May 04, 2019 in Oxnard, Ventura County, California ● Incident occurred April 20, 2018 in Goleta, Santa Barbara County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

May 04, 2019:  Crashed in a field due to unknown circumstances. 

Aspen Helicopters AG Helicopters Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N49643

Date: 04-MAY-19
Time: 16:55:00Z
Regis#: N49643
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 206B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: OXNARD
State: CALIFORNIA


One person was injured when a helicopter crashed near Oxnard on Saturday morning.

The crash was reported at 9:44 a.m. An agricultural worker witnessed the helicopter going down near a nursery off Gonzales Road and Victoria Avenue, according to the Oxnard Fire Department.

On the ground, the helicopter was in flames and set off a small grass fire, said Oxnard Fire Department Battalion Chief Sergio Martinez. Firefighters had doused the blaze.

The pilot was able to climb out of the helicopter before rescue crews arrived. He suffered a leg injury and was taken to a hospital, Martinez said. The injury did not appear to be life-threatening.

It appeared he was crop dusting the nursery area when the crash happened, he said.

The area is near three jurisdictions, and engines from the city of Ventura, Oxnard and Ventura County fire departments responded.

"We still have engines from all three agencies on scene," said Capt. Stan Ziegler from the Ventura County Fire Department.

Firefighters would remain there until they made sure the fire was out. There was no fuel spill or hazardous materials issue, he said.

It was unclear what caused the crash, according to early reports. The FAA was expected to investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.vcstar.com







Firefighters responded to a helicopter crash in a field in Oxnard Saturday morning, the Oxnard Fire Department said.

The crash was reported at about 9:40 a.m. near the intersection of West Gonzales Road and North Victoria Avenue, according to authorities.

When crews responded, they found a helicopter down and on fire in the field, Oxnard Fire Department Battalion Chief Sergio Martinez said.

The pilot, a man in his 40s, had extricated himself out of the aircraft before first responders arrived, and was suffering from "lower extremity injuries" that were not life-threatening, Martinez said.

The man was assessed at the scene and transported to a hospital, authorities said.

The crash started a small grass fire that was put out, according to fire officials.

Photos showed firefighters working at the scene of the crash where debris covered a small grass field that was charred black from the fire.

The helicopter appeared to have been part of a nearby crop-dusting operation, Martinez said.

No other injuries were reported.

It is unknown what caused the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://ktla.com

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

April 20, 2018:  Rotorcraft struck a powerline, landed without incident.

Date: 20-APR-18
Time: 15:50:00Z
Regis#: N49643
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 206B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 133
City: GOLETA
State: CALIFORNIA

Guimbal Cabri G2, N572MD: Fatal accident occurred May 04, 2019 in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Crashed into bay due to unknown circumstances.

Monumental Helicopters

JSC Investment Group LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N572MD 


Date: 04-MAY-19
Time: 15:56:00Z
Regis#: N572MD
Aircraft Make: HELICOPTERES GUIMBAL
Aircraft Model: CABRI G2
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: ANNAPOLIS
State: MARYLAND

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Matthew David Clarke


Matthew David Clarke, 36, of Pasadena passed away suddenly on May 4, 2019. 

The name Matthew means gift of God and he spent his life being just that. Matthew was the middle child of Steve and Barbara (Weller) Clarke. He grew up in Pasadena and graduated from Calvary Baptist Academy in 2001. He married Allison Gray on July 19, 2003, the two met during a youth conference at church. 

Matthew cherished and absolutely adored Allison. Together they served the Lord, raised their children, and were business partners. At the age of 20 Matthew embarked on a career with New York Life. Matthew was an Independent Financial Advisor with New York life for many years and was the founder of Retirement Income Solutions. 

Matt has studied at the American College and earned the designations of Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow (LUTCF) and Certified Long Term Care Consultant (CLTC). In 2004, he was named Rookie of the Year for the Baltimore New York Life office and then in 2008 was promoted to Partner, where he ranked in the top 25 Partners nationally (out of 300+) in his firm. He also has been a qualifying member of Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT) many times. MDRT is recognized throughout the industry as the standard of excellence among financial professionals. In 2012 he was President of National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA) , Anne Arundel Chapter. Matthew has successfully passed his Life and Health license exams along with his Series 6, 63 and 65. 

Matthew was Christ like, hardworking, ambitious, and determined and it reflected in the quality of his work. He received numerous accolades and awards in his career. Following his devotion to his Savior Jesus his family relationships were the most important thing. He shared a special relationship with his parents not only as son but friend and next door neighbor, together they shared the unique experience of raising three generations together. He enjoyed MANY hobbies to include, hunting, fishing, shooting, leatherworking, boating, camping in his RV and was a legend on the grill his smoking skills left everyone coming back for seconds. Before he passed he was working on his latest smoking Delicacy an alligator.  He relished in doing all these activities with others creating lasting memories. He loved quality one on one time with each of his children they always enjoyed breakfast with dad. He was a devoted member of Grace Pointe Church of the Nazarene where he served as a leader on the church board. His relationship with God did not express its self only in his church membership but in his personal devotion to the Lord. He constantly abided in his presence and it equipped him to lead his family and community. He was truly a renaissance man, he could go from baking a cake to sitting in a tree stand hunting and excel at each.

He was preceded in death by his father-in-law, Rev. Thomas Gray; grandfather Everett Weller; grandmothers, Shirley Weller, and Jean Clarke. He leaves to cherish precious memories his wife, Allison Michelle Gray Clarke; his children, Carter, Tanner, and Madeline; his parents, Steve and Barbara Clarke; his siblings, Niki Furry and Tim Clarke and his wife Patrice; grandfather, Alvin Clarke, Jr.; mother-in-law, Karen Gray; sister-in-law, Ashley Fisher and her husband Cody; 5 nephews, Alex, Dylan, Everett, Graham, and Harvey; uncles and aunts, Steve and Janet Weller and Dave and Gail Clarke; a host of other relatives, business associates, and special friends.

The family will receive visitors at Singleton Funeral & Cremation Services, P.A., 1 2nd Ave. SW (at Crain Hwy) on Friday, May 10 from 7-9 pm. A Celebration of Life will be celebrated at Grace Pointe Church of the Nazarene in Severn on Saturday at 1 PM with a visitation from 12:00 noon until time of service. Interment Glen Haven Memorial Park. Memorial contributions can be made in Matthew’s name to Annapolis Area Christian School for the Clarke Children’s Education Fund- 109 Burns Crossing Rd, Severn, MD 21144. Online donations may be made at https://aacsonline.ejoinme.org

https://www.singletonfuneralhome.com

Matthew David Clarke

Charles "Chuck" Knight



The pilot who died in a helicopter crash in the Chesapeake Bay Saturday was remembered this week as an “attentive and conscientious” flyer by those who taught him how to navigate the skies.

Officials responded Saturday around 12:30 p.m to a report of a downed helicopter just south of the lighthouse near Bloody Point, which is off of Kent Island and home to the deepest part of the Chesapeake Bay. The bodies of pilot, Charles Knight, 38, of Mount Airy, and passenger, Matt Clarke, 36 of Pasadena, were recovered around 6 p.m. from the wreckage, found in about 55 feet of water. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Knight’s family could not be reached for comment Monday. A relative of Clarke’s declined to comment Saturday.

News of the crash shocked the staff of Monumental Helicopters, a Tipton-based company that rented the helicopter to Knight on Saturday around 11:30 a.m. Knight had graduated from Monumental’s pilot training program about a year ago and was a familiar face in the tight-knit flying community, said company spokesman Seth Clute.

“We’re dealing with a lot of emotions, a lot of questions that are unanswered,” Clute said. “We’re very interested and invested in finding out what happened. We just don’t know, and that may be one of the worst parts about it.”

Knight did not share any details about the nature of the trip before he took off Saturday, but Clute said he rented the company’s bright yellow Cabri G2.

Monumental owners bought the Cabri G2 model in 2017 for $415,000 and named it the “Bee.” The tiny two-person helicopter was purchased specifically for use in the company’s flight school because of its higher weight capacity, the Capital Gazette reported at the time.

Knight, who was known as a frequent flyer at Monumental, rented the “Bee” several times a month, including the weekend before the crash, Clute said.

Company officials have been in contact with investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration, said Clute, adding he is eager to figure out what went wrong.

“A loss like this deeply affects all of us,” Clute said.

Coast Guard officials ask that if anyone saw anything in the vicinity south of Kent Island, that they contact the Sector Maryland-National Capital Region at 410-576-2525 or on VHF-FM Channel 16.


Original article ➤  https://www.baltimoresun.com


The bodies of two men were recovered after a Guimbal Cabri G2 crashed into the Chesapeake Bay, near Bloody Point on the Eastern Shore, after noon Saturday, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said in a statement Sunday morning.

Police identified the victims as the pilot, Charles Knight, 38, of Mount Airy, and the passenger, Matt Clarke, 36 of Pasadena. They said the wreckage was found in 55 feet of water about 6 p.m. Saturday and that Natural Resources Police investigators are working with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration investigators to recover the wreckage. Police said autopsies will be conducted.

Knight’s family could not be reached Sunday morning; a relative of Clarke’s declined to comment.

Capt. Brian Albert said Saturday that officers responded about 12:30 p.m. to a downed helicopter just south of the lighthouse and Maryland Natural Resources Police were first on the scene.

Bloody Point is off Kent Island, near the Bay Bridge. Nicknamed “The Hole,” Bloody Point is the deepest part of the bay at 174 feet deep.

The Anne Arundel County Fire Department sent considerable resources to assist neighboring Queen Anne’s County emergency responders, Capt. Russ Davies said. The helicopter went down about ¾ of a mile out into the water, he said.

The department sent several boats, a dive team and its Canteen Unit, which provides water and food to emergency responders, to Kent Island in support of a host of Queen Anne’s County fire companies, Davies said.

The U.S. Coast Guard launched two boats to search for the two men. Other agencies responding also include the National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Talbot County Fire Department.

The Coast Guard reported winds of five to 10 knots, one-foot seas and a water temperature of 62 degrees.

The helicopter, which was not a military craft, had taken off from Tipton Airport near Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County, said Scott Wheatley of the Queen Anne’s Department of Emergency Services.

Trevor Hardman, a Prince George’s County firefighter, was fishing for rockfish with his 15-year-old son and his friend when he heard a “frantic” distress call over marine VHF radio.

“Another boat said they witnessed a helicopter crash in front of them near Bloody Point,” Hardman said. “I was about a mile away, so I turned around and rushed to Bloody Point.”

Hardman said it was just after noon and the heavy fog in the area had just begun to lift.

At the time, he said there were several other boaters trying to convey latitude and longitude coordinates to rescue authorities to help them find the site of the impact.

Hardman readied lifejackets to pull people out of the water, but when he arrived, he said, “there was nothing but pieces everywhere and jet fuel.”

Hardman pulled a flight bag out of the water that contained a flight log and a maintenance record, he said.

He said the helicopter was a Cabri G2, per the records he found. He handed the records over to the U.S. Coast Guard.

A Coast Guard spokesperson confirmed the type of helicopter and said all materials handed over to the Coast Guard were then transferred to Maryland Natural Resources Police.

An employee at Kent Point Marina said she heard the helicopter circling over a nearby farm shortly after noon.

“Then it went over the marina and it was gone,” said Brandi Colbert, who works in the marina’s bait house.


Coast Guard officials ask that if anyone saw anything in the vicinity south of Kent Island, that they contact the Sector Maryland-National Capital Region at 410-576-2525 or on VHF-FM Channel 16.
Original article can be found here ➤https://www.baltimoresun.com



STEVENSVILLE, Maryland — A Guimbal Cabri G2 crashed into the water near Kent Island Saturday afternoon and killed two men on board.

The Coast Guard confirmed they found two bodies at 8 p.m. near the debris.

Maryland's Department of Natural Resources said the two men they were searching for are 38-year-old Charles Knight and 36-year-old Matt Clarke.

An eyewitness who lives right on the edge of Bloody Point, near where the crash happened, said he saw the helicopter faltering not long before it crashed into the water.

"He come up from there," the neighbor said, pointing at the trees behind his house. "Went over Poplar Island, turned around and come back. When he come back over the trees, the helicopter started missing."

The neighbor asked that his name not be revealed.

Monumental Helicopters says it was one of their Cabri G2 helicopters that this neighbor saw overhead. 

The company said a private pilot, who the DNR identified as Knight, rented it this morning.

The DNR says Knight and Clarke took off from Tipton Airport in the morning and around noon, a call came in that a two-passenger helicopter had crashed into the water near Kent Island off of Bloody Point.

"I thought he was going to hit the house. I really did," the neighbor said.

The neighbor can see where crews had been meeting all day to start the search and rescue mission from his doorstep, but officials said that about a mile off shore, there is a large pile of debris.

The Coast Guard said the wreckage eventually led Anne Arundel divers to find the helicopter and bodies of the two men killed in the crash.

DNR officials said the weather wasn't that bad the morning the chopper was flying, with low winds and only slightly limited visibility.

However, they're still looking for the cause of the crash.

They suspended their search for the night because of weather but plan to continue Sunday morning.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wusa9.com



The bodies of two men were recovered after their Guimbal Cabri G2 crashed in Maryland, police said.

The helicopter went down Saturday in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland Natural Resources police said. Authorities identified the victims as Maryland residents Charles Knight, 38, of Mount Airy, and Matt Clarke, 36, of Pasadena. Knight was the pilot and Clarke a passenger, police said.

The two went missing Saturday when the helicopter crashed around 12:30 p.m. about a mile south of Kent Island, Maryland, police said. Authorities found the wreckage in about 55 feet of water Saturday evening.

The cause of the crash is unknown. Natural Resources Police investigators will be working with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration to recover the wreckage, police said.

A brother of one of the men was "boating in the vicinity" when he saw the crash and notified the Coast Guard, said Corinne Zilnicki, a Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class.

First responders found debris in the area but had not located the men earlier Saturday, said Scott Wheatley, assistant chief with the Queen Anne's County Department of Emergency Services. After several hours searching for the men, crews suspended operations as weather conditions worsened.

Capt. Brian Albert with the Maryland Natural Resources Police had said the search will resume Sunday morning.

Rescue boats from the Coast Guard's station in Annapolis, a dive team with the Anne Arundel County Fire Department and several other agencies assisted in the search for the missing men.

The crash took place near Bloody Point in Queen Anne's County, south of the Bay Bridge. The Bloody Point Hole is the deepest part of the bay at 174 feet below sea level and approximately a mile west-southwest off the southern tip of Kent Island, according to the Maryland Geological Survey.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cnn.com

Silverlight Aviation AR-1 American Ranger 1, N925AG: Incident occurred May 04, 2019 in New Caney, Montgomery County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Struck tree while turning to avoid mobile home park during emergency landing.

Southwest Gyroplanes LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N925AG

Date: 04-MAY-19
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N925AG
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: AR 1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
 City: NEW CANEY
 State: TEXAS




A pilot from Anahuac survived the second gyrocopter crash of his life Saturday afternoon, this time in New Caney.

The Montgomery County Sheriff's Office reported the gyrocopter crash just after 2 p.m in a parking lot near FM 494 and Antique Lane.

"The pilot is okay," MCSO stated.

The pilot, Danny Whitten, said in an interview with the Montgomery County Police Reporter, that he was on a return trip to Anahuac after flying to Cleveland. At about 1,500 feet, he said the engine began to malfunction, which forced him to make an emergency landing in front of Embrace Fellowship Church.

"I shot for the asphalt and I missed it," Whitten said in the interview. "I pulled back on the stick to slow it down some and it dropped like a rock and crashed into the tree. But, I'm OK."

The pilot said this is the second rotorcraft crash he has survived. The first crash was about 40 years ago when he was in a similar rotorcraft that he said also had an engine malfunction.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.chron.com


o


MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Texas — A gyrocopter has crashed in a Montgomery County church parking lot, deputies tell KHOU 11.

The scene is near FM 494 and Antique Lane. 

The Montgomery County Sheriff's Office said the pilot was the only person on the gyrocopter. The pilot was injured but is expected to be okay, deputies said. 

The East Montgomery County Fire Department said the helicopter was reportedly at 1500 feet when it experienced a in-flight emergency. 

The Texas Department of Public Safety is investigating. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.khou.com

Cessna 182G Skylane, VH-DJN: Fatal accident occurred April 08, 2019 in Wongabel, Australia

Richard Patrick O’Sullivan

Dearly Loved Father of Helen and Joanne.

"We looked up to him in life and now we look up knowing he is flying high doing what he loves forever."  
~


NTSB Identification: WPR19WA107
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Monday, April 08, 2019 in Wongabel, Australia
Aircraft: Cessna 182, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On April 8, 2019, about 0740 coordinated universal time a Cessna 182G airplane, VH-DJN, impacted terrain in the Wongabel State Forest, Wongabel, Queensland, Australia. The pilot in command was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The personal flight was owned and operated by a private individual.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB). 

This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the ATSB. 

Further information pertaining this accident may be obtained from: 
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canverra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel: (61) 2 6230-4408 
Email: atsvasir@atsb.gov.au
Fax: (61) 2 6274-6434
Website: http://www.atsb.gov.au









Collision with terrain involving Cessna 182, VH-DJN, 14 km SSW of Atherton Aerodrome, Queensland, April 08, 2019

Investigation number: AO-2019-018

The ATSB is investigating the collision with terrain involving a Cessna 182G, registered VH-DJN, which occurred 14 km south-south-west of Atherton Aerodrome, Queensland.

The aircraft had flown from Cloncurry to Mount Garnet on the morning of April 08, 2019, with the pilot and one passenger on board. The aircraft landed at Mount Garnet at about 0915 Eastern Standard Time, where the passenger disembarked to conduct prearranged activities in the local area. The pilot then departed for a flight to Atherton, intending to return to Mount Garnet by the prearranged time of about 1400-1430. The accident occurred during the flight to Atherton, probably at about 1000.

The wreckage was located on mountainous terrain in the Herberton Range National Park, 14 km south-south-west of Atherton Aerodrome. 

The ATSB is currently evaluating the feasibility of an on-site deployment. The initial ATSB safety investigation will include examination of photographs of the wreckage and the assessment of aircraft and pilot records, weather information and any available recorded data.

Any witnesses that observed the aircraft are asked to call 1800 992 986 or complete the ATSB’s online witness form.

A final report will be released at the end of the investigation.

Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify those affected and seek safety action to address the issue

https://www.atsb.gov.au

Boeing 737-924, N31412: Accident occurred April 11, 2019 in Fort Myers, Florida



United Airlines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N31412

NTSB Identification: DCA19CA137
14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of United Airlines
Accident occurred Thursday, April 11, 2019 in Fort Myers, FL
Aircraft: Boeing 737, registration: N31412

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Friday, May 3, 2019

Beechcraft A36 Bonanza, operated by the private pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N3241N: Accident occurred December 11, 2015 near Fayetteville Regional Airport (KFAY), Cumberland County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N3241N

Location: Fayetteville, NC
Accident Number: ERA16LA066
Date & Time: 12/11/2015, 1931 EST
Registration: N3241N
Aircraft: RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT COMPANY A36
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

During a cross-country flight at night, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power. The private pilot's attempts to restart the engine were unsuccessful. The pilot attempted to glide the airplane to a diversionary airport, but when he realized the airplane would not reach the airport, he conducted a forced landing into wooded terrain.

Teardown examination of the engine revealed that the No. 1 cylinder and No. 3 connecting rod had fractured. Metallurgical examination revealed that there was a gray rubbery substance on the case halves, through bolts, and main bearing saddle faces, which could have restricted oil flow. The engine manufacturer's overhaul manual and a service bulletin and service information letter (SIL) listed only one approved sealant for use between case halves, which was similar in color and texture to grape jelly not to the rubbery gray sealant found in the engine, which was not an approved sealant. Further, the SIL stated that the use of an incorrect sealant "on mating threads and between mating surfaces can cause incorrect torque application and subsequent engine damage or failure."

Further, the No. 3 connecting rod journal exhibited heat damage and deformation, and the No. 3 connecting rod fracture was consistent with a lack of lubrication. Additionally, the No. 4 main bearing saddle boss exhibited fretting damage, consistent with bearing shift due to lack of torque on the through bolts and blockage of its oil port, which also would have restricted oil flow.

Review of maintenance records revealed that the engine was overhauled about 20 months before the accident. The engine had been operated for about 300 hours during that time. It is likely that maintenance personnel applied the unapproved sealant to the engine case halves during the engine overhaul, which ultimately resulted in the total loss of engine power.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
Maintenance personnel's application of an unapproved sealant to the engine case halves during engine overhaul, contrary to manufacturer's instructions, which resulted in lubrication restriction due to a bearing shift and the subsequent internal failure of the engine due to the loss of case through-bolt torque.

Findings

Aircraft
Maintenance/inspections - Incorrect service/maintenance (Cause)
Oil - Fluid level (Cause)

Personnel issues
Unauthorized maint/repair - Maintenance personnel (Cause)
Use of policy/procedure - Maintenance personnel (Cause)

Factual Information 

On December 11, 2015, at 1931 eastern standard time, a Beechcraft A36, N3241N, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a wooded area after a total loss of engine power near Fayetteville, North Carolina. The private pilot and two passengers received minor injuries, and one passenger received serious injuries. Nighttime visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The personal flight departed Bay Bridge Airport (W29), Stevensville, Maryland about 1730 destined for Charleston Executive Airport (JZI), Charleston, South Carolina. The airplane was operated by the private pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, about 2 hours after takeoff the airplane was in cruise flight at 8,000 feet when the engine suddenly lost power. Engine power was restored for a few seconds, and then the airplane lost engine power again as the propeller "windmilled." The pilot turned the airplane toward Fayetteville Regional Airport (FAY) for a forced landing, and the propeller stopped turning during the descent. Attempts to restart the engine were unsuccessful. As the airplane approached FAY, the pilot determined that he was below the visual approach slope indicator lighting glidepath and that the airplane would not reach the airport and performed a forced landing to wooded terrain.

Examination of the wreckage at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest upright on the floor of a pine forest area. The engine and mounts separated from the firewall. The left wing was crushed and curled upward from about mid-span to the wing tip. A portion of the right wing was separated outboard of the flap and was located in the debris path about 25 yards prior to the main wreckage. The landing gear and flaps were found in the retracted position.

The airframe and engine were subsequently examined at a recovery facility under the supervision of a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator. Fuel was present in both main tanks and both tip tanks, the fuel selector valve functioned normally, and the auxiliary pump switch was in the on position. Teardown examination of the engine revealed metal fragments from the No. 1 cylinder in the oil sump and internal damage including one connecting rod separated from the crankshaft, and two other connecting rods exhibiting discoloration consistent with heat damage. Additionally, a gray colored rubbery substance was observed on the mating surfaces of the crankcase halves. Engine components were forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC, for further examination. Metallurgical examination revealed beads of gray sealant on the through bolts and on the main bearing saddle faces, which can restrict oil flow. The No. 3 connecting rod journal exhibited heat damage and deformation and the No. 3 connecting rod was fractured, consistent with a lack of lubrication. Additionally, the No. 4 main bearing saddle boss exhibited fretting damage, consistent with bearing shift and blockage of its oil port, restricting oil flow.

Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on October 15, 2015. At that time, the engine had accumulated 300.6 hours since major overhaul. The engine was overhauled by Aero Engines of Winchester, Inc. on April 21, 2014.

Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) Service Information Letter (SIL)99-2B, published October 17, 2005, related to current authorized sealants, lubricants, and adhesives. The SIL did not list any sealant on the mating surfaces of the crankcase halves except Gasket Maker P/N 646942 – or Loctite 515 Gasket Eliminator Sealant (or its predecessor, Permatex Aviation Grade 3D). Additionally, review of the overhaul manual revealed instructions to apply only TCM Sealant P/N 654663, which was Loctite 515, and silk thread P/N 641543 to the crankcase halves.

According to the Manager of Air Safety at Continental Motors Inc., the gray rubber sealant found in the engine was not consistent with Loctite 515, which appears in color and texture like grape jelly.

Additionally, review of TCM Service Bulletin (SB)96-7C, published February 8, 2005, which related to torque values for fasteners on all TCM engines, stated: "WARNING THE USE OF SEALANTS OR LUBRICANTS OTHER THAN THOSE SPECIFIED BY TCM ON MATING THREADS AND BETWEEN MATING SURFACES CAN CAUSE INCORRECT TORQUE APPLICATION AND SUBSEQUENT ENGINE DAMAGE OR FAILURE."

The FAA Subsequently published Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) NE-16-13, "Powerplant – Prohibited use of sealant" on March 8, 2016. According to the FAA principle maintenance inspector of Aero Engines LLC. (formerly Aero Engines of Winchester, Inc.), he performed a compliance action after the accident for Aero Engines to use only the specific sealant part number and product name (not MIL-SPEC [military standard]) specified by the engine manufacturer when overhauling their respective make and model engine. Additionally, Aero Engines reviewed all their overhauls for unapproved sealants and did not find any other subsequent cases. As of the publication of this report, there have been no further similar engine failures that were overhauled by Aero Engines. There was one previous case (NTSB ID No. ERA14FA313) of a similar failure of an engine overhauled by Aero Engines.

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail (Defining event)
Loss of engine power (total)
Attempted remediation/recovery

Emergency descent
Off-field or emergency landing

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/04/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   538 hours (Total, all aircraft), 245 hours (Total, this make and model), 502 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT COMPANY
Registration: N3241N
Model/Series: A36
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: E-3241
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/15/2015, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3651 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 39 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1736 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-B
Registered Owner: ACES AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: FAY, 189 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 220°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: STEVENSVILLE, MD (W29)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: CHARLESTON, SC (JZI)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1730 EST
Type of Airspace: Class C; Class E

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 34.990000, -78.829722 (est)