Thursday, May 30, 2019

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N8044P: Incident occurred May 29, 2019 in West Palm Beach, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Gear up.

https://registry.faa.gov/N8044P

Date: 29-MAY-19
Time: 19:45:00Z
Regis#: N8044P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Boeing B75N1, operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N60955: Accident occurred May 29, 2019 in Fredericksburg, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N60955

Location: Fredericksburg, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA158
Date & Time: 05/29/2019, 0845 CDT
Registration: N60955
Aircraft: BOEING B75N1
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 29, 2019, at 0845 central daylight time, a Boeing B75N1, N60955, experienced a total loss of engine power during a climb from an aborted approach to the pilot's private airstrip near Fredericksburg, Texas. The pilot performed a forced landing and the airplane impacted terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Llano, Texas and was destined to the private airstrip.

The pilot reported that he overflew the runway but did not land because he believed the grass was too long. After overflying the airstrip, while the airplane was in a climb, the engine began to run rough and a forced landing was made in rough, uneven, terrain.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BOEING
Registration: N60955
Model/Series: B75N1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: T82, 1695 ft msl
Observation Time: 0835 CDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / 19 knots, 180°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.77 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Llano, TX
Destination: Fredericksburg, TX (PVT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:   (est)

Piper PA-24-260, N8965P: Incident occurred May 29, 2019 in Indianapolis, Indiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Gear up landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N8965P

Date: 29-MAY-19
Time: 22:15:00Z
Regis#: N8965P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 260
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: INDIANAPOLIS
State: INDIANA

Piper PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow, N3933T: Fatal accident occurred May 28, 2019 near Geauga County Airport (7G8), Middlefield, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
The New Piper Aircraft Company; Phoenix, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3933T

Location: Auburn Township, OH 
Accident Number: ERA19FA181
Date & Time: 05/28/2019, 2355 EDT
Registration: N3933T
Aircraft: Piper PA28R
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 28, 2019, at 2355 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-180, N3933T, was destroyed when it collided with trees and terrain near Auburn Township, Ohio. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time the accident occurred. A visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Cincinnati-Lunken Airport (LUK), Cincinnati, Ohio, about 2209 and destined for the Geauga County Airport (7G8), Middlefield, Ohio.

A preliminary review of the air traffic control (ATC) communications revealed the pilot was not talking to ATC. A review of the last few minutes of radar data revealed the airplane was on a northeasterly heading before it made a left turn to the north-north west toward the LaDue Reservoir near Auburn Township, Ohio. As the airplane reached the southeast bank of the reservoir, it made a steep, descending right-hand turn to the southeast before the data ended at 2355:31. The last recorded ground speed of the airplane was 169 knots on a heading of 104°.

A witness was out walking his dogs around midnight when he heard an aircraft flying south to north toward the reservoir. Initially, he was not sure if it was an airplane or a helicopter because the engine did not sound typical for either aircraft. The witness then concluded it was an airplane that sounded as if the engine was "sputtering" and "definitely had an erratic engine sound." The witness said he raised his "spotlight" to the sky and noted an "extremely low cloud deck." He then entered his home and heard "a very loud thud/boom." The witness said his wife also heard the "boom" but they both thought it was thunder since storms had just passed thru the area. It wasn't until the next day that the witness realized the airplane had crashed.

The airplane came to rest in heavily wooded terrain on the southeast bank of the reservoir about 7 miles southwest of 7G8. The initial impact point was an approximately 70 to 80-foot-tall tree. As the airplane descended through the trees on a heading of 133°, impact marks on the trees became progressively lower before it impacted the ground in a nose low attitude. From the point of initial impact to the point where the engine came to rest was about 270 ft. The airplane wreckage was heavily fragmented and the outboard sections of both wings, the tail section, instrument panel, engine, and the propeller were found along the wreckage path. The largest portion of debris was a section of fuselage that contained the front and rear seats. There was no post-impact fire.

Examination of the airplane revealed that the flaps and landing gear were fully retracted. The stabilator trim actuator was found in the full nose down position. Flight control cables for all major flight controls were accounted for and found broken in numerous areas. The broken ends of these cables exhibited broom-straw fractures consistent with overload from impact.

Both wing fuel tanks were breached, and the finger screens were absent of debris. The fuel selector had separated from the airframe but was found selected to the right tank. The gascolator had also separated from the airframe and only the bowl section, which was crushed, was located. The electric fuel pump separated from the airframe but worked when electrical current was applied. The engine driven fuel pump was damaged from impact and could not be tested. The fuel servo had partially separated from the engine and sustained impact damage. The finger screen was found in the wreckage and was absent of debris. The servo was disassembled, and the diaphragms were intact. The fuel manifold sustained impact damage but remained secure to the engine. The manifold was disassembled, and no fuel was found in the housing. The diaphragm was not damaged.

The oil sump was impact separated from the engine. The oil filter was disassembled, and the filament was absent of debris.

The engine sustained impact damage and the No. 2 cylinder was partially separated from the engine case and the No. 4 cylinder was slightly backed off the engine case and missing the rocker cover. The top and bottom spark plugs sustained impact damage and were removed. The electrodes appeared light gray in color consistent with normal wear per the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. A borescope was used to internally examine the engine. A large amount of mud and dirt was observed, but no internal damage to the pistons and valves were noted. The engine was manually rotated via the vacuum pump drive-spline, which was inhibited by the debris, but valve train movement was observed on all cylinders except the No. 2 cylinder due to it being separated. Strong compression was established on the No. 1 and No. 3 cylinders, and weak compression on the No. 4 cylinder due to impact damage. Both magnetos were separated from the engine, and one magneto was too damaged to test. The other magneto was spun with a drill and spark was produced to each terminal. The vacuum pump was disassembled, and the drum was fractured, but the vanes were intact.

The two-bladed propeller had separated from the engine at the crankshaft, but both blades remained attached to the hub. One blade was bent forward about 70 degrees at mid-span and exhibited leading edge gouging. The other blade was bent forward at the hub and the tip of the blade was curled. The leading edge of the blade exhibited some gouging. Several slash marks were observed on a cluster of trees just prior to where the airplane first impacted the ground. One of the slash marks was deep enough where it almost cut the approximately 12-inch-wide tree in half. The propeller governor separated from the engine and was too damaged to be tested.

The closest weather reporting facility to the accident site was from Portage County Airport (KPOV), Ravenna, Ohio, located approximately 12 miles south of the accident site. Weather reported at 0015 was wind calm, visibility 1 1/4 miles, scattered clouds at 200 ft, scattered clouds at 4,800 ft, temperature 18° C, dew point 17° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.76 inches of Hg.

The National Weather Service had issued airmen's meteorological (AIRMET) Sierra for IFR conditions over northeast Ohio into Pennsylvania, and AIRMET Tango for moderate turbulence from the surface to 15,000 ft.

At the time of the accident both the Sun and the Moon were more than 15° below the horizon and provided no illumination. The Moon phase was a waning crescent.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for single-engine airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on June 19, 2018. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed he had a total of 142.9 flight hours, of which, 132.9 hours were in the accident airplane. He had accrued 3.7 hours of simulated instrument time and 11.8 hours at night. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N3933T
Model/Series: PA28R 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: POV, 1196 ft msl
Observation Time: 2355 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.7 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Lunken, OH (LUK)
Destination: Middlefield, OH (7GB) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  41.375278, -81.193056

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Troy Bankert’s Legacy Fund


On May 28, 2019, Troy Bankert tragically passed away doing what he loved, flying his Piper Arrow back from a fun weekend of camping. This fund is being set up to help his two sons, Lucas and Oliver with any immediate expenses necessary during this difficult time. Troy’s unexpected death has devastated all of us. This is just one small way to honor his memory and help the two boys that mattered most to him.


Troy Wesley Bankert
1964 - 2019

Chagrin Falls, Ohio - Troy Wesley Bankert, age 55, of Chagrin Falls, Ohio, passed away late Tuesday evening, May 28 in a plane crash in Northeast Ohio. Born on April 4, 1964 in Indianapolis, he was the son of Sandra Ann (Lumpkins) and the late Paul Wesley Bankert, Sr. Troy attended Tipton High School, graduating in 1982 and would later serve his country in the United States Marine Corps, leaving as a Sergeant after 6 years. Afterward, he earned his bachelor's degree at Florida International University and eventually his law degree at Hofstra University in New York City.

Troy was a man of many hobbies and was always eager to learn. Everyday brought a new adventure for him. He was full of fun facts. You couldn't watch a movie without him giving you the full filmography of every actor. He was an avid snacker and loved cooking his family a good meal whether that was breakfast B's & G's or a delicious steak. He loved a good adventure, whether that meant driving fast cars or flying his 1967 Piper. He lived and loved to the fullest and his heart was always open to helping others. He and his endless hugs will be sorely missed by all who knew him.

Troy is survived by his two sons, Lucas and Oliver Bankert of Chagrin Falls, Ohio, as well as his loving girlfriend of 11 years, Jennifer Otto of Newbury, Ohio, and her daughter and son, Sydney Otto of New York, New York, and Lance Cpl. Trevor Otto of Meridian, Mississippi, to whom he was like a second father.

Also surviving is his mother Sandra Ann (Lumpkins) Bankert of Kirklin, two brothers, Paul Wesley Bankert, Jr. (Sharon) of Zionsville and Curt Wesley Bankert of Kirklin; two sisters, Christy Jo Hopkins of Zionsville, and Gina Lynn McKinley (Mike) of Carmel; 8 nieces and nephews, Jessica, Daniel, Alysa, Charles, Joseph, Lance Cpl. Wesley, Sam, and Lance Cpl. Nicholas, as well as numerous aunts, uncles and cousins across the country.

A celebration of Troy's life will be held at The Gymnasium at Mts. Runn Church at 250 South 775 East, Zionsville, IN 46077 on Friday, June 7, 2019 beginning at 1 p.m. Military honors will be at 3:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, please consider supporting Troy's sons by donating to Troy Bankert's Legacy Fund at https://www.gofundme.com

AUBURN TOWNSHIP, Ohio — After hours of searching, authorities have confirmed the body of the pilot and his plane have been located in a wooded area near the edge of the LaDue Reservoir in Geauga County, according to the Geauga County Sheriff's Office.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol has identified the pilot as Troy Bankert, 55, of Middlefield Township, located in Geauga County.

The missing plane and Bankert were found in a heavily wooded area located off the southeast corner of LaDue Reservoir. Authorities say Bankert was killed on impact and there were no other passengers on board at the time of the crash.

Flight records shows Bankert left the Wayne County Airport at about 11 p.m. Tuesday. It's believed the plane crash at around 11:55 p.m.

Geauga County Sheriff Scott A. Hildenbrand said the area where the plane was found is so heavily wooded, that crews had to cut down several trees to clear a path for emergency crews to get near the plane debris.

"The plane was very badly damaged. It was in lots of pieces," Hildenbrand said.

On Wednesday, authorities started looking for a small plane near the LaDue Reservoir, located near US 44 and Route 422, in Geauga County, after the girlfriend of the pilot, who had an app on her phone to track his location, reported him missing after he made an abrupt turn above the LaDue Reservoir, according to state officials.

The 4-seat Piper Cherokee Arrow plane left Cincinnati at 10 p.m. and was headed to the Geauga County Airport when it did not arrive. The plane last seen on the radar at 2,600 feet at 4 a.m. over the southeast area of the reservoir.

Search crews used three boats and drones to search for the plane and the pilot since foggy conditions and a low ceiling made it difficult to use planes during the beginning of the search.

Hildenbrand said the information they received from the Bankert's girlfriend and a call from a neighbor who heard a loud noise nearby, helped search crews narrow down the location of the crash site.

A private citizen from Mantua in Portage County volunteered to fly his helicopter to help authorities search for the missing pilot and the plane. At one point, the fog was so heavy that all the drones had to be brought down.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol and the FAA are leading the investigation.

Original article ➤ https://www.news5cleveland.com

GEAUGA COUNTY, Ohio - Law enforcement crews located the wreckage of a plane and the body of a pilot near LaDue Reservoir in Geauga County Wednesday morning.

A search had been underway through the night in the water, and then a wooded area on Shaw Road.

The wreckage was found between Shaw Road and the reservoir.

The pilot was the only person on the small plane, which was a 1967 Piper Cherokee Arrow. The Ohio State Highway Patrol said the pilot has been identified as Troy Bankert, 55, of Middlefield Township.

Authorities said he was a relatively new pilot. He took off from the Wayne County Airport at around 11 p.m. Tuesday, the highway patrol said.

The plane's wreckage was found in a heavily wooded area.

Crews had to cut a path to reach the plane.

Geauga County Sheriff Scott Hildenbrand said the plane was split into several pieces.

They were able to identify the plane by the tail number reported from a friend of the pilot.

The last known location of the plane was around 4 a.m. over the reservoir, according to Scott Denamen with the State Wildlife Office.

Law enforcement was tipped off to the plane's location by someone who lived in the area.

That person heard a loud crash last night, but thought it was thunder from storms in the area.

The wreckage was found by drones and boots on the ground.

Crews were unable to fly planes to search due to fog in the area and a low ceiling. At one point, the sheriff says they had to bring down the drones because the fog was so heavy.

Multiple agencies assisted in the search.

The cause of the crash is pending and remains under investigation by the FAA and the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox8.com

Piper Cherokee PA-28R-200, N41585: Incident occurred May 29, 2019 at Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport (KLBB), Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Gear up landing.

Hub City Aviation Academy LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N41585

Date: 30-MAY-19
Time: 03:05:00Z
Regis#: N41585
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28R 200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LUBBOCK
State: TEXAS

Piper PA-28R-201 Arrow III, N106ER: Fatal accident occurred April 04, 2018 near Daytona Beach International Airport (KDAB), Volusia County, Florida

Zachary Michael Capra



Deadly ERAU plane crash: Father of student pilot sues Piper Aircraft, claims

DAYTONA BEACH — The family of an Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University student killed in a plane crash along with a federal examiner last year when a wing detached from the airplane is suing Piper Aircraft alleging it knew of structural failures in that model since 1987 but failed to warn pilots and owners, or require testing that could have saved lives.

Zack Capra, a 25-year-old Navy veteran who was taking his commercial pilot license exam, and Federal Aviation Administration pilot examiner John Shahriar Azma, a father of four, were killed on April 4, 2018, when the left wing came off the Piper PA-28 as they flew west of Daytona Beach International Airport.

In the April crash, the plane had climbed to 900 feet when radar contact was lost. It crashed in a cow pasture along Tomoka Farms Road near the Daytona Flea & Farmer’s Market.

“The horror and fear of impending death for pilots from an in-flight breakup of their aircraft cannot be overstated as it is a pilot’s worst nightmare come true,” according to the wrongful death lawsuit filed by Capra’s father, John Charles Capra, who is administrator of his son’s estate.

John Capra had posted on his Facebook page recent tattoos in honor of his son. One showed an eagle with a scroll with the words “Tailwinds of hope.” The other tattoo was a drawing of the blue and white Piper his son was flying compete with its registration, N106ER. Above the plane were the letters “RIP ZMC JSA” and below it were a latitude and longitude.

Investigators found cracks consistent with metal fatigue beginning at or near an attachment bolt hole on the left wing spar, a metal piece that bears the load of the wing, according to the National Transportation Safety Board’s preliminary report. The right wing also had fatigue cracks at the same location.

After the crash the investigators found another Piper PA-28 at the university with a similar crack to the one in the deadly crash. The second plane had just over 7,600 hours of flight time. FAA records showed the plane was registered to the university. The college grounded its fleet of about a half-dozen Piper PA-28s.

Jacqueline Carlon, spokeswoman for Vero Beach-based Piper, said the company had just received the lawsuit and declined to comment.

“This is a pending lawsuit, we can’t respond,” Carlon adding it would be addressed the “normal litigation channels.”

The Piper in the deadly crash had been built in 2007 and also had more than 7,600 hours. It was used exclusively for flight training and had undergone its annual inspection on March 21, 2018, two weeks before the crash.

The Piper was being used in a demanding training environment in Florida which is known for rapid development of cumulus clouds that can create turbulence for planes, the lawsuit states, which makes inspections of the planes all the more important.

The Piper had endured “no less than seven separate ‘hard landing’ reports,” each requiring a Piper-specified inspection, the lawsuit states, and each time the plane was inspected.

But the types of inspections needed to detect the crack in the Piper’s wing spar were not done. Such tests were not required despite Piper knowing about the flaw, said Arthur Alan Wolk, of the Wolk Law Firm in Philadelphia which specializes in representing plaintiffs in aircraft crashes, in a phone interview. Wolk is the lead attorney in the case while Jeffrey Bigman is the local counsel.

He said Piper models PA-32, a single-engine type like the PA-28, and the PA-34, a twin-engine, also have similar problems.

Wolk said that the problem was identified in 1987 but Piper asked the FAA to withdraw an airworthiness directive requiring an inspection to detect the problem without fixing the flaw in the plane.

“Well, if nobody does the inspection then nobody finds the problem,” Wolk said. “If nobody finds the problem then somebody else is going to die.”

He added that there were several non-destructive tests that Piper could have required to catch the problem before a wing fell off and pilots and passengers got killed.

“For years prior to 1987, Piper knew that more than a hundred PA-28 aircraft had suffered in-flight structural failures resulting in the loss of life of hundreds of occupants,” according to the lawsuit.

Piper spokeswoman Carlon declined also to respond to the allegations that hundreds had died.

Wolk said that the NTSB and Piper about two weeks ago again inspected the wreckage of the Piper in the ERAU crash. He said he hopes that will lead to a new FAA directive to address the problem.

The FAA in December published in the federal registry a notice about a proposed air worthiness directive for inspections of the main wing spar on some Piper models “to address the unsafe condition on these products.”

The deadline for comments was last month and the FAA is reviewing them to determine the next step, wrote FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen. The inspections would be based on service hours and cover PA-28 and PA-32 aircraft.

The lawsuit accuses Piper of negligence, fraudulent misrepresentation, fraudulent concealment, negligent failure to warn and other violations. The company lobbied the FAA to withdraw the directive for expensive inspections of the plane, the lawsuit states.

By doing so, Piper ignored continuing in-flight failures and “it decided unilaterally that some people would have to die if the inspections were not made especially in high time aircraft operated in harsh environments,” the lawsuit states.

Piper was aware of the crash in 1987 in which the wing fell of a plane doing pipeline patrol, killing the pilot, the lawsuit states. That crash was caused by a crack emanating from a bolt in the wing attachment fitting in a plane with about 7,500 flight hours, the lawsuit stated.

The FAA then issued an air worthiness directive for the planes based on conditions which could likely result in structural failure and death.

Inspections were conducted on 500 Piper aircraft and the cracks were found on two additional planes. Afterward, Piper lobbied the FAA to withdraw its directive which the FAA did, the lawsuit states. Piper also withdrew its own service bulletin.

The lawsuit accuses Piper of knowing pilots were being killed due to problems with the plane.

The lawsuit said the fatigue crack in the crash of the ERAU PA-28, also known as Piper Arrows, emanated from the same bolt and location as in the 1987 crash.

The lawsuit accuses Piper of “hiding the truth behind wing failures in the PA-28 aircraft” from pilots, owners and operators by requiring confidentiality in litigation. It also accuses the company of violating the public trust by being dishonest about the structural integrity of its aircraft.

Had the appropriate effective inspections been recommended by Piper and followed the crack would have been located and he wing repaired and replaced, the lawsuit states.

ERAU spokeswoman Ginger Pinholster said the college no longer flies the Pipers.

The Pipers were used because they were considered “complex” type aircraft to train on retractable landing gear. But three weeks after the crash, the FAA said pilots need not need to fly a complex type plane for their initial commercial pilot’s license.

“Last year, the FAA changed its pilot certification standards, which had previously required flight students to work with two particular classes of aircraft. The FAA rule change to the commercial pilot airman certification standards allowed us to remove the “complex” type of aircraft from our curriculum and streamline our overall fleet,” she wrote.

The FAA notice dated April 24, 2018, does not refer to the crash but it states that requiring a complex type aircraft, a class that includes retractable landing gears and other features, had become cost prohibitive for flight schools.

ERAU has 82 aircraft at its campuses in Daytona Beach and Arizona with 66 of those planes being Cessnas. The other planes are Diamonds and American Champion Decathlons.

Pinholster said there are no Piper aircraft in the fleet.

Original article ➤  https://www.staugustine.com



Lawrence McCarter
Investigator In Charge 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 
Federal Aviation Administration Accident Investigation and Prevention; Fort Worth, Texas
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida 
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Daytona, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N106ER


Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA18FA120
Date & Time: 04/04/2018, 0953 EDT
Registration: N106ER
Aircraft: PIPER PA28R
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On April 4, 2018, at 0953 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N106ER, collided with terrain following an in-flight breakup shortly after takeoff from Daytona Beach International Airport (DAB), Daytona Beach, Florida. The airline transport pilot and private pilot were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which departed DAB at 0927.

According to the operator, the private pilot was conducting his commercial pilot single-engine land practical test, and the airline transport pilot was acting as a designated pilot examiner (DPE).

Preliminary radar and voice communication data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the airplane flew to the southeast after departure; after maneuvering, it returned to DAB. The airplane entered the airport traffic pattern and performed a touch-and-go landing. While climbing out after the takeoff from runway 25L, air traffic control issued the pilot a discrete transponder code, and shortly after, the pilot asked if they could make a left turn to the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern. The controller responded by telling the pilot to continue upwind. Radar data indicated that the airplane climbed to 900 ft mean sea level at a groundspeed of 80 knots on a heading of 240° before radar contact was lost.

According to multiple witnesses, all located within 2,500 ft of the accident site, they saw the airplane flying normally, then watched as the left wing separated from fuselage. The fuselage impacted a field, while the wing descended separately and landed in an adjacent field.

According to FAA records, the pilot, age 25, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on June 17, 2016. He reported 201 hours of flight experience as of his most recent logbook entry on March 19, 2018.

According to FAA records, the DPE, age 61, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on April 5, 2017. At that time, he reported 27,600 total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA airworthiness and operator records, the airplane was manufactured on September 17, 2007 and was issued a standard airworthiness certificate in the normal category. It was a single-engine, low-wing, four-place airplane with a 200-horsepower, Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 four-cylinder engine and a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller. The airframe had accumulated 7,690.6 hours of operation at the time of the accident, and 28.3 hours since its most recent annual inspection, which was completed on March 21, 2018.

A surface observation weather report taken at DAB at 0953 indicated the wind was from 260° at 7 knots, the visibility was 10 statute miles, and few clouds at 25,000 ft. The temperature and dew point were 24°C and 19°C, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.03 inches of mercury.

The debris path was about 450 ft long, and the debris path began about 2 statute miles southwest of the departure end of runway 25L. The first items along the debris path included a rubber wing root seal and small pieces of window plexiglass, followed shortly thereafter by the left wing. The main wreckage impacted the adjacent field about 200 ft from the wing on a magnetic heading about 230°.

The forward portion of the fuselage, including the engine, exhibited significant impact-related damage. There was a strong odor of fuel at the site, and a large area of grass surrounding the wreckage was discolored. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage. An impression of the right wing leading edge was observed in the ground, and the right wing leading edge surface was crushed aft to the wing spar along the entire span of the wing. The flap and aileron of the right wing remained attached. The right landing gear was in the down and locked position.

The vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilator, and trim tab control surfaces remained attached. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder to the rudder pedals. Elevator control cable continuity was established through cuts made to facilitate the wreckage recovery from the control column to the elevator control surface. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the right aileron to the control column. Continuity of left aileron control cables was traced from the control column through fracture features consistent with tensile overload separation to the aileron.

The left wing separated from the fuselage near the wing root and exhibited mid-span buckling of the surface skin. The left wing flap remained connected and moved freely with no resistance. The left main landing gear was in the down and locked position. The left wing fuel tank remained intact and contained about 15 gallons of fuel.

The fractured left wing main spar portions, along with the box assembly and attached inboard end of the right wing main spar, were forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for detailed examination. Preliminary examination of the left wing main spar revealed that more than 80% of the lower spar cap and portions of the forward and aft spar web doublers exhibited fracture features consistent with metal fatigue (see figure 1).


Figure 1 - Left wing main spar lower cap fracture surface.

The remainder of the lower spar cap, spar web doublers, and upper spar cap displayed fracture features consistent with overstress fracture. The fatigue features originated at or near the outboard forward wing spar attachment bolt hole (see figure 2). None of the surfaces exhibited visible evidence of corrosion or other preexisting damage. The right wing also exhibited fatigue cracks in the lower spar cap at the same hole location extending up to 0.047-inch deep.



Figure 2 – Exploded view of left wing spar assembly and attachment bolts.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N106ER
Model/Series: PA28R 201
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DAB, 34 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 25000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Daytona Beach, FL (DAB)
Destination: Daytona Beach, FL (DAB) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 29.158611, -81.085000

https://youtu.be/-D5vCoWKgII 
Roy Williams of Airframe Components shows how to inspect the Piper Aircraft aft wing attach fittings, in Service Bulletin 1244B.

https://youtu.be/7WHNw289csE
Service bulletin 1006 talks about replacing fuel tanks in the Piper Aircraft wings. Airframe Components shows you how to check your wings to find out if you need this repair.