Saturday, April 14, 2018

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-700: Incident occurred April 14, 2018 at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (KMSY), Kenner, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana


As passengers got off Southwest flight 3461 Saturday afternoon many like Florida native Marie Wary are thankful just to be back on solid ground.

It all happened as the flight, flying from Fort Lauderdale, was trying to land at Armstrong International. The flight map shows the airport was located in the thick of the storm. WWL-TV's Lauren Bale was also on the flight.

“We came through the clouds and the plane was just tilting back and forth. It was going all over the place. People were screaming, people were crying,” said Bale.

Then, through the thunder and lightning, the pilot pulled up and circled eventually making it safely out of the storm landing in Panama City.

“The pilot was amazing,” said Wary. “He was very calm. He reassured us that he got this.”

“You couldn’t see anything. No visibility,” said passenger, Sharon Bikoundou. “Right as he was about to land he pulled back up.”

After a short stay on the ground, the flight finally made it back safely around 2:30 p.m.

Eyewitness News reached out to Southwest Airlines to see why the flight wasn’t canceled to begin with. A representative said safety is the company’s top priority. The airline also said the company is currently gathering reports from the flight and that they will be reaching out to all ticket holders.

Their full statement is below:

“Our top focus is Safety. Flight 3461 from Fort Lauderdale to New Orleans arrived about four hours behind schedule after persistent thunderstorms over New Orleans forced prolonged holding near New Orleans awaiting clearance from air traffic controllers followed by a refueling stop in Panama City before the completion of the journey. The Safety of our Customers and Employees as well the Safe operation of every flight is our highest priority.”

Story and video ➤ http://www.wwltv.com

Salado Airport (2TX) would be upgraded under proposal



SALADO — The future of this village is looking up — literally.

The owners of the Salado Airport, located just south of city limits, are proposing to upgrade the facility into a small general aviation airport. Currently, the airport is just a grass airfield and is used mostly for skydiving.

Village Administrator Don Ferguson said the owners have approached Salado and asked if it would be interesting in buying the airport. However, because of the cost that was not a possibility, Ferguson said.

“Then the discussions proceeded to exploring options,” the village administrator said.

Some of those options include what Ferguson mentioned to a joint partnership in which the village would own the runways, taxiways and the fueling facility while the current owners sell hangar space.

“That seems the favorable option at this stage of the game,” Ferguson said, stressing that talks are very preliminary and any action taken on the airport is still several years away.

There are some high hurdles before the airport can be upgraded.

“First things first: The airport must be deemed feasible by the state and must be on the state aviation plan,” Ferguson explained, adding the village will ask the Texas Department of Transportation to conduct a feasibility study. “This particular airport is not on the state aviation plan so we’re unable to move forward with the partnership at this point.”

If TxDOT determines the Salado airport qualifies for the aviation plan — and it is actually placed on the plan — Ferguson said the village would then be able to seek grants to help fund the airport’s development.

“The option that appears most workable at this point is one in which the village would go in secure grant funding to acquire runways, taxiways and a fueling facility while the current owners would maintain ownership of the hangar space and sell it to interested parties,” the village administrator said.

When the redevelopment of the Salado airport gets off the ground, Bell County will likely play a role if it stays outside the village limits. Last week, the Bell County Commissioners discussed the airport during a workshop meeting.

The current proposal shows a lack of access to the property as well as plans for the airport to rely on septic tanks, said Steve Eubanks, an engineering technician in the county Road and Bridge Department.

Because the airport is so far off in the future, Salado’s sewer and wastewater system will be operational. Ferguson said the village has told the owners that the airport would need to connect into the sewer and provide additional access onto the property.

Construction on the sewer began in January and is on track to be completed sometime in early 2019, according to the village of Salado.

Additionally, the airport would also need to be voluntarily annexed into the village, Ferguson said.

A unique feature of the proposed airport upgrades are the hangars. Some of the airplane hangars would feature a small living space for tenants.

With Salado and Central Texas in the middle of an economic development boom, the time is right for a development, such as this, Ferguson said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.tdtnews.com

Air Tractor Inc AT-402, N1016G, registered to and operated by a private individual: Fatal accident occurred July 29, 2016 near Sac City Municipal Airport (KSKI), Iowa

Mark James Watson 
 January 26, 1972 - July 29, 2016

Mark owned and operated Watson Ag Aviation, specializing in crop dusting. Flying was Mark's passion. Mark began flying in 2006 and obtained his private pilot's license. He was an accomplished pilot and continued to further his endorsements adding Private, Commercial, Instrument, Seaplane and Tail Wheel and also held his A&P. He loved driving his semi-truck and riding his motorcycle. His biggest joy was his time spent with his wife, his dogs and his many friends. 
~

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Ankeny, Iowa
Air Tractor; Olney, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1016G

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Sac City, IA
Accident Number: CEN16LA292
Date & Time: 07/29/2016, 0914 CDT
Registration: N1016G
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 402
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

Analysis

The commercial pilot was performing an aerial application flight to an area that a ground crewman described as a "wire farm" due to the number of power lines present. The pilot did not complete a circling pass over the target field to identify hazards before descending for the first aerial application pass. The pilot flew over a set of power lines, activated the airplane's spray function, and completed one pass to the north. The airplane then climbed and made a left turn before descending toward the west side of the target field for a pass to the south. The pilot completed a pass on the west side, then impacted power lines on the south side of the field. The airplane continued south and impacted a corn field, where it came to rest upright. The top of the vertical stabilizer and the rudder were found near the power lines.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed evidence of multiple wire strikes to the canopy, wire protection system, and empennage. At least one wire was deflected over the canopy, along the wire deflector cable, and cut through the vertical stabilizer and rudder. At least one wire impacted the aluminum wire protection bar and the cockpit structure consistent with the wire not deflecting over the canopy. The examination did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate clearance from power lines. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to circle over the field to identify hazards before beginning the aerial application. 

Findings

Personnel issues
Identification/recognition - Pilot (Cause)
Flight planning/navigation - Pilot (Factor)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Wire - Awareness of condition (Cause)
Wire - Effect on equipment (Cause)
Wire - Decision related to condition (Factor)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering
Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT) (Defining event) 

On July 29, 2016, at 0914 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-402 airplane, N1016G, collided with power lines and impacted terrain near Sac City, Iowa. The commercial rated pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The airplane departed Arthur N Neu Airport (CIN), Carroll, Iowa, at 0902 and was spraying in the area of Sac City Municipal Airport, (SKI), Sac City, Iowa.

The pilot's ground crewman stated that he met the pilot at CIN about 0830 and loaded the airplane with 375 gallons of liquid applicant and 130 gallons of fuel and noted that the airplane was almost fully loaded and was within the specified limitations. He added that the pilot did not seem concerned about him running late that morning. The pilot did not seem rushed or nervous, which was unusual for him, and he also seemed complacent about the flight. He has always known the pilot to circle above a field and scan for hazards before starting an aerial application flight. He described the area near the accident site as a "wire farm" because of the amount of power lines present.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane impacted a corn field one-mile south of SKI. Power lines were found downed near the accident site.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/20/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/29/2015
Flight Time:  1746.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 414.1 hours (Total, this make and model), 10 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

A review of the pilot's logbooks and flight data revealed that he had accumulated 1,746.2 total flight hours and 414.1 hours the Air Tractor AT-402. The pilot had flown 114.5 hours in the preceding 30 days, all of which were in the accident airplane. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AIR TRACTOR INC
Registration: N1016G
Model/Series: AT 402
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1989
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 402-0720
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 108 Hours
Engines: Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 7008.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-27
Registered Owner: Mark J Watson
Rated Power: 680
Operator: Watson Ag Aviation LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSLB, 1488 ft msl
Observation Time: 0915 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 321°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 30°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CARROLL, IA (CIN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sac City, IA (SKI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0902 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: SAC CITY MUNI (SKI)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 1249 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  42.360000, -94.984722 (est)

The main wreckage was located in a corn field about one mile south of SKI. The field being treated was north of the accident site. A large set of power transmission lines ran east to west along the southern border of the target field (figure 1). The power lines and supporting tower structures were 80 to 90 ft tall and the power lines sagged in between each tower. A farm house and several farm buildings were located south of the power lines. 



Figure 1 – Google Earth overview of the accident location and flight path


The wreckage debris path was oriented north to south and featured a swath cut through the mature corn, which continued to the main wreckage. The main wreckage was about 900 ft south of the power lines and 75 ft south of the initial impact area. There was a smell consistent with jet fuel and agricultural chemical around the site and the ground was damp. There was no evidence of fire. The debris path was relatively straight and began with the entire rudder on a gravel road underneath the power lines. A portion of the vertical stabilizer was found next in the debris path on the north side of the farm house. Next was the swath of cut corn and the initial ground impact point, which included debris from the bottom of the airplane (figure 2).



Figure 2 – Main wreckage and debris path

The forward wall of the cockpit was part of the hopper structure and was laying adjacent to the fuselage. The instrument panel remained mostly intact and undamaged. The Hobbs meter mounted in the instrument panel showed 7,008.3 hours. The center fuselage between the firewall and the cockpit was crushed. The fuselage was bent, twisted left, and came to rest next to the left wing. The horizontal stabilizers and elevators exhibited minimal damage and remained attached to the aft fuselage. The lower portion of the vertical stabilizer remained attached to the empennage and exhibited a jagged horizontal cut at the top (figure 3). 



Figure 3 – Left rear view of the main wreckage

The right and left wings remained connected at the center splice joint. There were no prominent impact marks on the leading edge or upper surface of the wings. The bottom of the wings exhibited impact damage. The outboard section of the right flap was bent under the inboard half of the flap. The left and right ailerons and flaps remained installed in their respective positions. Both wing fuel tanks were breached at the inboard ends. The fuel caps were in place and secure. 

The elevator controls were impact damaged, but continuous from the control stick to the elevators. The elevators were attached to the horizontal stabilizers at the hinge points. The rudder pedals remained attached to their pivot points with the rudder cables and adjustment brackets in place. The rudder cables were continuous to the aft fuselage where they were found separated and exhibited signs of tension overload. About 15 inches of the aft end of the rudder cables remained attached to the rudder and exhibited signs of tension overload. The horn plate remained installed on the bottom of the rudder, but was bent into a "U" shape.

The control stick remained attached to the floor-mounted torque tube which remained attached to the left aileron control tube through the upper pushrod and fuselage bellcrank. The trailing edge push rod was bent and separated near the inboard end and the rod end bearing remained attached to the bellcrank. From the push rod separation, the controls were continuous to the left aileron control horn. From the cockpit torque tube, the right aileron controls were continuous through the upper pushrod and fuselage bellcrank. From the fuselage bellcrank, the controls were continuous to the right aileron, except the inboard end of the pushrod that was separated where the wing was pulled away from the fuselage. The flap actuator was found in the retracted position. The trim system sustained impact damage but remained continuous and attached at all connections. 

The main landing gear separated from the fuselage. The left wheel and gear spring were found near the initial impact point in the debris path. The right gear spring was found near the left wingtip of and the right wheel on the right side of the fuselage. The tailwheel assembly separated from the tail spring.

The four-point pilot restraint system remained fastened and the lap belt had been cut by first responders on the left side of the buckle. The shoulder harness straps had separated from the attachment points at the lap belt. Slight fraying of the shoulder harnesses was noted near the top of the seatback with no evidence of overstress failure. 

The engine sustained impact damage and remained attached to the respective engine mounts. The engine exhaust housing was impact damaged. The engine had separated at the "C" flange, revealing the interstage baffle and the power turbine wheel. The power turbine had damage to all blades and the interior of the engine showed significant rotational scoring signatures. The propeller hub and spinner remained attached to the engine flange. Only one propeller blade remained attached to the propeller hub. The two other blades were not found at the scene. The FAA Inspector stated that the two missing blades had been present in the debris field on his previous visit to the scene on the day of the accident. 

The airplane was equipped with a single curved acrylic wind screen. There was an aluminum bar in front of the wind screen and a deflector cable connected the top of the canopy to the top of the vertical stabilizer, which were installed to add protection against wire strikes. 

The aluminum bar was found separated from its lower base in the debris field and was bent to the left into a rough V-shape with an inside angle about 45°. At the upper end, the tubular support structure had separated from the cockpit structure and remained attached to the bar. A 6 ft piece of the deflector cable remained attached to the top of the bar. The bar had a chamfered edge on the right side that ran the entire length of the bar. The cable that was attached to the bar exhibited abrasion and damage (figure 4). 



Figure 4 – Damaged wire strike protection bar

The upper right corner of the cockpit structure exhibited cylindrical abrasions and damage. Scratches and front to back damage was noted on the top of the canopy where the aftermarket GPS antenna had separated. The top 15 inches of the vertical stabilizer was separated and exhibited a jagged horizontal cut from front to back with impact damage on the leading edge near the cut; a portion of the deflector cable remained attached to the top. The rudder exhibited a 4-inch gouge into the vertical hinge line, which lined up with the cut of the horizontal stabilizer. The rudder horn remained attached to the rudder and was distorted about 90° down, and the aft ends of the rudder control cables remained attached. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Iowa Office of the State Medical Examiner, Ankeny, Iowa, completed an autopsy on the pilot and the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory conducted toxicology testing, which was negative for ethanol and drugs. 

Additional Information

GPS Device Downloads

A Satloc M3 Bantam GPS and a Garmin aera 510 GPS were found in the wreckage and were sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for download. The combined data from the two devices was plotted on Google Earth (figure 1 and 5). The red flight path originates from the southeast and continues directly to the target field without any evidence of an initial circling pass. The areas of green represent the flight path when the airplanes spray function was on. The white lines represent the power lines that cross the flight path west to east.

Figure 5 – Google Earth overlay of accident flight path 

Power Line Markers

A few round, orange objects, similar to high visibility power line markers, were observed on the road near the accident site by a nearby landowner. The power company reported that no markers were installed on the power lines. The power company could not find any documentation to prove there were high visibility power line markers installed prior to the accident. As a result of the accident, the power company installed several high visibility power line markers on the new power lines.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA292
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, July 29, 2016 in Sac City, IA
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 402, registration: N1016G
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 29, 2016, about 0915 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-402 airplane, N1016G, impacted power lines and terrain near Sac City, Iowa. The commercial rated pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The airplane departed Arthur N Neu Airport (CIN), Carroll, Iowa, about 0900 and was spraying in the area of Sac City Municipal Airport, (SKI), Sac City, Iowa. 

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane impacted a corn field one mile south of SKI. Static power lines were found downed near the accident site. 

At 0915, the automated weather observation at Storm Lake Municipal Airport (SLB) Storm Lake, Iowa, located about 18 miles northwest of the accident site recorded wind from 030 degrees at 6 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 20 degrees C, dew point 16 degrees C, and altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury. There were no known witnesses to the accident.

Incident occurred April 14, 2018 at Blue Grass Airport (KLEX), Fayette County, Kentucky

LEXINGTON, Ky. (LEX 18) — A flight from Detroit to Orlando, Florida, was diverted Saturday morning to Blue Grass Airport because of a medical emergency.

Airport spokeswoman Tiffany Hart says the flight safely landed at the regional Lexington airport.

Hart said the passenger was taken from the flight and transported to an area hospital. She said she could not provide details about the nature of the medical issue or the passenger's condition.

Hart said the jet returned to the skies with its remaining passengers, continuing to its Florida destination.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.lex18.com

BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, N167BL, registered to Sport Flying USA Inc and operated by an individual: Accident occurred July 24, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N167BL 

Location: Oshkosh, WI
Accident Number: CEN16LA283
Date & Time: 07/24/2016, 1805 CDT
Registration: N167BL
Aircraft: BRISTELL E-LSA
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Business

Analysis 

The accident airplane was the trailing airplane in a flight of two landing on runway 36L at Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture when the accident occurred. The pilot reported that, while on final approach, he heard an air traffic control transmission telling a canard airplane to land on runway 36R. Mistaking the transmission for 36L, the pilot stated that he began to look for the canard airplane, which diverted his attention from the lead airplane and resulted in a loss of separation. As he approached the lead airplane's right wing, he reduced the engine power and pitched up to slow his airplane. He stated his airplane banked "hard to the right;" he corrected by banking to the left, which, combined with the airplane's nose-high pitch attitude, resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Although the pilot stated that he was directly behind and below the lead airplane, and encountered the airplane's wake turbulence and prop wash, a GoPro camera mounted on the left wing of the accident airplane showed that the airplane remained behind and above the lead airplane; therefore, it is unlikely that the accident airplane encountered wake turbulence. The GoPro footage was consistent with the accident airplane slowing then subsequently experiencing an aerodynamic stall. It is likely that the pilot slowed the airplane excessively as he attempted to maintain separation and exceeded the airplane's critical angle of attack.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack on short final approach, which resulted in an inadvertent aerodynamic stall and subsequent loss of control. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's distraction with other traffic in the area.

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

On July 24, 2016, at 1805 central daylight time, a BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, collided with the terrain following a loss of control while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to Sport Flying USA, Inc., and was operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The last leg of the cross country flight originated from the Watertown Municipal Airport (RYV), Watertown, Wisconsin, at 1630.

The airplane was the trailing airplane in a flight of two that were landing on runway 36L at OSH during Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture. The pilot in the lead aircraft stated they were cleared to land on the purple dot. The purple dot was located 3,052 ft down the 8,002 ft long runway. He did not see the accident occur.

The accident pilot stated he turned onto final approach for runway 36L, and was established with 20 ° of flaps at 65 knots. He then heard an air traffic transmission telling a canard airplane to land on runway 36R not 36L. The pilot stated he began to look for the canard airplane which took his attention off the lead airplane resulting in a decrease of the separation between the airplanes. He stated he got within 10 ft of the lead airplane's right wing at which time he reduced the engine power and pitched up to slow his airspeed. The pilot stated that was then directly behind the lead airplane and below his altitude, when he encountered the lead airplane's wake turbulence and prop wash, and his airplane banked "hard to the right". He corrected by banking to the left, but must have had back pressure on the stick and the airplane stalled. The pilot stated he was about 150 ft above the ground when the loss of control initially occurred.

Witnesses reported the airplane was low and slow as it approached the runway. They stated it stalled, rolled left, and descended to impact with the terrain.

A GoPro camera was located amongst the wreckage. The 128GB Micro SD card was retrieved from the camera and downloaded by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. It was determined that the camera was mounted on the left wing. A summary of the video was prepared and is attached to this report. The lead airplane was visible in front of the accident airplane as they approached the airport. At one point while the airplanes were descending and approaching the airport, the accident airplane was about the same altitude as the lead airplane. Both airplanes then made a left turn [onto base leg] at which time at least two other airplanes were visible in the distance ahead of the lead airplane. At this point the lead airplane was below the altitude of the accident airplane. Both airplanes then made another left turn onto final approach. About 27 seconds after the accident airplane was established on final approach, the distance between the accident airplane and the lead airplane began to reduce. Other than the lead airplane, no other flying airplanes were visible on approach to either runways 36L or 36R. The distance between the two airplanes continued to reduce. The lead airplane was at or below the attitude of the accident airplane until the accident airplane entered a left bank and began to descend. The left bank continued to increase such that the airplane was nearly inverted as it descended to ground impact.

The air traffic control audio recording was reviewed by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge. At 03:00 [lapsed recording time, minutes (MM): seconds (SS)], the controller cleared a canard airplane to land on runway 36L. About 31 seconds later, the controller changed the canard's landing runway to 36R. At 04:04, a second canard pilot requested landing on runway 36R and 14 seconds later, it was cleared to land on runway 36R. About 15 seconds later, the controller cleared the accident airplane and his lead airplane to land on runway 36L. At 04:42, the controller instructed the canard airplanes to keep rolling to the end of the runway. At 05:00, the accident is announced over the radio.

A damaged SD card from a Garmin GPS was also retrieved from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. The card was cracked through its memory chip which prevented data recovery from the card.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam: 
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  361 hours (Total, all aircraft), 150 hours (Total, this make and model), 314 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BRISTELL
Registration: N167BL
Model/Series: E-LSA
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 167-2015
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/22/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 35 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912 IS
Registered Owner: Sport Flying USA, Inc.
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Sport Flying USA, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OSH, 808 ft msl
Observation Time: 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 290°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Watertown, WI (RYV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1630 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Wittman Regional Airport (OSH)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8002 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  43.961111, -88.556944

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA283
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: BRISTELL E-LSA, registration: N167BL
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, at 1805 central daylight time, a BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, collided with the terrain following a loss of control while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to Sport Flying USA, Inc. and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which not operated on a flight plan. The last leg of the cross country flight originated from the Watertown Municipal Airport (RYV), Watertown, Wisconsin. 

The airplane was one in a flight of two that were landing on runway 36L at OSH during Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture. The pilot in the lead aircraft stated they were cleared to land on the purple dot located 3,052 feet down the 8,002 foot long runway. He did not see the accident occur.

Witnesses reported the airplane was low and slow as it approached the runway. They stated it stalled, rolled left, and descended to impact with the terrain.

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-700: Incident occurred April 14, 2018 at Nashville International Airport (KBNA), Tennessee

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- A plane leaving Nashville International Airport is diverted today after an issue with it's tires is discovered.

Southwest Airlines flight 3156 bound for New Orleans returned to Nashville just after 1 p.m. after "indications of an issue with the landing gear tires upon takeoff," according to a Southwest Airlines spokesperson.

The plane landed safely and no injuries are reported to any of the 135 passengers.

Southwest Airlines released a statement:

Each component of the landing gear is designed with redundant, multiple tires, and our pilots are trained to deal with these types of landings.

The passengers were put on another plane.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://fox17.com

Cessna 182J Skylane, N2644F, registered to and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred July 19, 2016 near Parker County Airport (KWEA), Weatherford, Texas



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2644F



Location: Weatherford, TX
Accident Number: CEN16LA270
Date & Time: 07/19/2016, 0903 CDT
Registration: N2644F
Aircraft: CESSNA 182J
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

The private pilot stated that, shortly after takeoff and while 300 to 500 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a loss of power when he activated the flap switch. The pilot troubleshot the loss of power and attempted to restart the engine; the engine restarted momentarily, then lost power again. The pilot did not pull the boost cutoff control. During the emergency landing, the airplane collided with a barbed wire fence and impacted several trees.

An electronic engine monitor provided data from the accident flight. There were several noticeable voids in the engine monitor data, indicative of electrical power interruptions to the device. The final electrical power interruption occurred about the time of the accident. The investigation was unable to determine a reason for the electrical power interruptions to the engine monitor other than the cycling of the avionics switch. The airplane's electrical system could not be functionally tested due to impact damage.

Four engine test runs were conducted, revealing no anomalies. During the tests, the battery voltage displayed 13 to 15 volts, and the ammeter did not show a discharge. Examination of the airplane revealed that the aftermarket supercharger drive belt was improperly installed upside down. The fuel inlet screen contained a small amount of multicolor organic material similar to tree leaves. The presence of organic material did not adversely affect the engine test runs, and likely was the result of the impact with trees during the accident sequence.

According to the emergency procedures provided by the supercharger manufacturer, the supercharged engine can be operated during a loss of electrical power by pulling the boost cutoff control. Pulling the boost cutoff control results in gravity-fed fuel supplying the engine at un-boosted manifold pressure and allows operation as a normally-aspirated engine. Further, if the boost cutoff control is not pulled when electrical power is lost, surging occurs as the carburetor bowl empties and refills and will continue as long as fuel is available in the fuel system. The surging stops when the boost cutoff control is pulled. It is likely that, had the pilot pulled the boost cutoff control, the engine would have stopped surging and engine power would have been restored. The pilot stated he was not trained in the operation of the supercharger; however, the airplane flight manual supplement contained information regarding supercharger operation and emergency procedures. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
An electrical system malfunction for reasons that could not be determined, and the subsequent loss of engine power due to the loss of the electrical boost pumps. Also causal was the pilot's improper emergency action following the loss of engine power due to his lack of knowledge regarding the engine's supercharger system. 

Findings

Aircraft
Electrical power system - Malfunction (Cause)
Recip eng supercharger - Capability exceeded (Cause) 

Personnel issues
Knowledge of procedures - Pilot (Cause)
Knowledge of equipment - Pilot (Cause)
Identification/recognition - Pilot (Cause)
Forgotten action/omission - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Emergency descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Off-field or emergency landing

Initial climb
Loss of engine power (partial) (Defining event)
Electrical system malf/failure

On July 19, 2016, at 0903 central daylight time, a Cessna 182J airplane, N2644F, experienced a loss of engine power after departure and the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field near Weatherford, Texas. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and the second passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was operated without a flight plan. The flight was departing from Parker County Airport (WEA), Weatherford, TX, and was en route to Pecos Municipal Airport (PEQ), Pecos, Texas.

The pilot reported that he had departed from Denton Enterprise Airport (DTO), Denton, Texas, which was about 36 miles northeast of WEA. He landed at WEA and two passengers boarded the airplane while the engine continued to operate. He then taxied to the runway and noted that all the instruments showed normal operations, including the JPI engine data monitor (EDM) 700. He extended the flaps 10° for takeoff, increased the engine power to 29 inches of engine manifold pressure and 2,600 rpm, and lifted off at 60 to 65 mph. After takeoff, he retracted the flaps and noticed that the avionics turned off. He cycled the avionics master switch, but the avionics did not turn on again. About 40 seconds after takeoff while 300 to 500 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a loss of power. He attempted to troubleshoot the loss of power and to restart the engine; the engine restarted for about two seconds and then lost power again. The pilot did not remember if the engine ever experienced a total loss of power since he was concentrating on flying the airplane. He also did not remember if he ever pulled the boost cutoff control. He did not continue to troubleshoot the issue since his altitude was low and made a shallow bank towards a field for an emergency landing. During the landing, the airplane collided with a barbed wire fence, continued into a field, impacted several trees and came to rest on a road. When the airplane came to rest, the pilot noted that fuel was pouring out of the fuel tanks all over the occupants. The pilot and two passengers exited the airplane.

A witness, who was working in a field north of the accident site, stated that he heard an airplane engine overhead. He observed the accident airplane in a descent, apparently attempting to land in a pasture when it hit a fence in the middle of the pasture. He called 911 and drove to the accident site. He observed three occupants who were already out of the airplane and noticed that fuel was pouring out of the wings onto the ground.

The pilot stated to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, that one of the passengers recalled hearing the engine regain power just before touching down in the field.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/27/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/27/2015
Flight Time: 139 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2644F
Model/Series: 182J -
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18256744
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/20/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6336.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R25A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

A Forced Aeromotive Technologies (FAT) supercharger was installed on the airplane in May 2004 under supplemental type certificate (STC) SE10233SC and STC SA10232SC.

On June 20, 2016, an annual inspection was completed at a tachometer time of 2,245.3 hours. During the inspection the maintenance personnel "checked and adjusted supercharger belt as per Force Air Tech service instructions." 

The pilot stated he was not trained of the operation of the supercharger by the manufacturer or the previous airplane owner after he purchased the airplane, nor was he required to do so. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNFW, 608 ft msl
Observation Time: 0852 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 78°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 25000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Weatherford, TX (WEA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: PECOS, TX (PEQ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0901 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: PARKER COUNTY (WEA)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 991 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2892 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 32.727222, -97.682222 (est) 

The responding FAA inspector reported that the left wing was folded over the top of the fuselage and the right wing was bent aft. The top of the cabin area had been opened and displaced aft. The fuselage was bent upward near the front seats. 

Accident airplane

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine was conducted by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge (IIC), with technical representatives from Textron Aviation and Continental Motors, after recovery from the accident site. The engine was intact with no noticeable external damage. It was equipped with a FAT belt driven supercharger system that included two fuel boost pumps between the airframe fuel line and the engine carburetor. The top spark plugs and cylinder rocker covers were removed and the crankshaft was manually rotated with continuity confirmed to all cylinders and to the rear of the engine. The chromed cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope; all cylinder domes and pistons exhibited normal combustion deposits. All intake and exhaust valves were in place and free to move; suction and compression was confirmed in each cylinder. The magneto timing was checked and both magnetos were found to be timed at 22° before top dead center, which was normal timing. The top spark plugs exhibited normal wear signatures and dark deposits in the electrode areas. The air intake filter was clean and clear. The oil filter was in place and not damaged. The filter was opened and contained no debris or metal deposits in the filter element. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft. Both propeller blades were bent and twisted aft and exhibited chordwise scratches and polishing. The cowl flap lever was positioned to OPEN. The carburetor heat control knob was full forward. The boost cutoff control knob was full forward and was not labeled on the instrument panel. The rudder and elevator flight control cables were continuous and undamaged. The left and right wings had been removed during the recovery process. The aileron flight control cables exhibited multiple overload separations. One portion of the left aileron control cable had been cut during the recovery process.

The flap motor was energized with an external battery and operated the flaps normally. The flaps were found extended 10°. Due to impact damage and the displacement of the airplane during recovery the entire electrical system could not be functionally tested.

An engine test run was conducted by the NTSB IIC and technical representatives from Textron Aviation, Continental Motors, and FAT. Prior to the test run procedures, the engine was examined. The gascolator screen was removed and was clean and clear of contaminants. The fuel inlet screen was removed from the carburetor and contained a small amount of multicolor organic material similar to tree leaves. The airplane had been stored outdoors at the storage facility.

An external fuel source was connected to the airframe fuel line and the engine was started and test run several times. The engine operated at full power performance according to the STC operating specifications. The alternator inoperative and low fuel pressure lights were pressed and illuminated as expected. The lights did not illuminate during the engine test runs. The ammeter remained near zero and did not show a discharge.

After the test runs were completed the carburetor was removed and examined. The carburetor was in place and not damaged. The throttle and mixture controls remained connected appropriately and were free to move. The unit was disassembled and the bowl was clean and clear. The floats and needle valve were attached and were free to move. The needle valve seat was clean and clear.

Also following the test runs, the engine cowling was opened to facilitate further examination of the engine compartment. The supercharger drive belt was installed on the idler gear inside out.

Additional Information

FAT Supercharger Information

The Airplane Flight Manual Supplement (AFMS) states that the supercharger supplies boosted engine induction air (figure 3) so it is necessary to boost fuel pressure to ensure an unimpeded flow of fuel through the carburetor. The two fuel pumps supply fuel to the carburetor at the required pressure. Either pump will independently supply sufficient fuel pressure for engine operation, but two are installed to provide backup in case of a pump failure. According to the STC manufacturer, as the fuel level in the carburetor changes, air flows in and out of the fuel bowl through a passage inside the mouth of the carburetor. When the supercharger is installed, this air passage becomes pressurized and at power levels above 1,700 rpm, the pressurized air in the fuel bowl pushes the fuel out and back to the fuel tank. The electric fuel boost pumps counter the air pressure so that the fuel enters the float chamber correctly.

FAT Supercharger Diagram

The AFMS further states that in the event of a complete electrical failure (alternator or battery), the engine can be operated using gravity-fed fuel at un-boosted manifold pressure using the boost cutoff control. When the boost cutoff control is pulled, pressurized air from the supercharger is dumped into the engine compartment before reaching the carburetor. This lowers the carburetor's requirement for pressurized fuel and allows operation as a normally-aspirated engine. The STC owner added that, during a complete electrical system failure, the effect would be the same as turning off the fuel boost pumps. With the fuel boost pumps off and engine power above 1,700 rpm, the carburetor fuel bowl would empty in 5 to 10 seconds. With the fuel bowl empty, the engine would begin to lose power; as the engine rpm decreases the supercharger boost also decreases and fuel begins to enter the fuel bowl again. The engine power would surge back and the cycle would repeat. The whole cycle would take less than 10 seconds and would continue as long as fuel was available in the fuel system. The cycle could be stopped by pulling the boost cutoff control. If the engine cannot be restarted during an engine failure the boost cutoff control should be pulled.

According to the AFMS, the maximum manifold pressure is 28 inches of mercury. The boost cutoff control is used only in emergency situations whenever both fuel boost pumps become inoperative.

Engine Failure Procedures

If the engine failure in-flight procedures are unsuccessful in restarting the engine, and the low fuel pressure light is illuminated, the AFMS states the following:

Boost Cutoff – Pull Fully
Mixture – Full Rich
Propeller – Full
Throttle – Full
Power – See Warning Below
Follow in-flight low fuel pressure procedures to land as soon as practical

WARNING: To increase power, use the throttle first. When full throttle is reached and more power is needed, slowly push in the boost cutoff control, but no not exceed boost cutoff manifold pressure limitations. To decrease power, pull the boost cutoff control first. When boost cutoff control is out fully and a further reduction in power is needed, use the throttle control to reduce power. If this is not followed, engine power fluctuations may occur. If power fluctuations do occur, pull boost cutoff control out fully and apply full throttle, then continue making power changes as described above.

Excerpts from the AFMS can be found in the public docket associated with this accident report.

JPI Engine Data Monitor (EDM) 700

The EDM was downloaded by the NTSB Recorders Laboratory. The recorded data revealed that the engine parameters were all normal. There were several noticeable voids in the data indicative of electrical power interruptions to the device. The final electrical power interruption occurred from 09:01:47 to 09:04:37, which was during the time of the accident.

The EMD was downloaded again after the engine test runs. The data did not reveal any anomalies and the battery voltage was 13 to 15 volts, which is a normal voltage.

Garmin Aera 796 GPS

The GPS was downloaded by the NTSB Recorders Laboratory. The recorded data revealed 12 sessions, which included the two flights on the accident day. The accident flight data was plotted for geographical representation.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA270
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Weatherford, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 182J, registration: N2644F
Injuries: Unavailable

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 0900 central daylight time, a Cessna 182J, N2644F, experienced a loss of engine power after departure and the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field near Weatherford, Texas. The private rated pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries, another passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The flight was departing from Parker County Airport (WEA), Weatherford, TX and was en route to Pecos Municipal Airport (PEQ), Pecos, Texas. 

The pilot reported that he previously departed from Denton Enterprise Airport (DTO), Denton, Texas, which was about 36 miles northeast of WEA. He landed at WEA and his two passengers boarded airplane on the right side while the engine continued to run. He then taxied to the runway and noted that all the instruments showed normal operations, including the engine data monitor (EDM) 700. He applied 10 degrees of flaps for takeoff, noted 29 inches of engine manifold pressure and 2,600 RPM, and lifted off at 60 to 65 mph. After takeoff he retracted the flaps and noticed that the avionics turned off. He cycled the avionics master switch, but the avionics did not turn on again. Seconds later, about 300 to 400 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a total loss of power. He attempted to troubleshoot the loss of power and to restart the engine; the engine restarted for about two seconds and then lost power again. The pilot made a shallow bank towards a field for an emergency landing. During the landing, the airplane collided with a fence and redirected the airplane to the right. The airplane continued into a group of trees and came to rest on a road. When the airplane came to rest, the pilot noted that fuel was pouring all over the occupants. The pilot and two passengers egressed from the airplane. 

A witness to the accident stated he was working in a field north of the accident site when he heard the sound of an airplane engine overhead. He observed the airplane in a descent and it attempted to land in a pasture when it hit a fence in the middle of the pasture. He called 911 and drove to the accident site. He observed three occupants who were already out of the airplane and noticed that fuel was pouring out of the wings onto the ground. 

The photos from the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left wing was folded over the top of the fuselage and the right wing was bent aft. The top of the cabin area had been opened and displaced aft. The fuselage was bent upward near the front seats. The airplane has been retained for further examination.