Monday, May 28, 2018

Frontier Airlines, Airbus A319, N943FR: Incident occurred February 16, 2020 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aircraft was at the gate boarding and struck by N301FR which was being towed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N943FR

Date: 16-FEB-20
Time: 01:55:00Z
Regis#: N943FR
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: FFT2127
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

Flight-sharing service shuttered by heavy-handed Federal Aviation Administration bureaucrats

By Michael Sargent and John-Michael Seibler - - Monday, May 28, 2018 

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

“Unfortunately, we are left with no choice but to shut down.”

So wrote the co-founder of Flytenow, a now-defunct flight-sharing service, in 2015. The service promised to connect thousands of private pilots flying small aircraft with travelers heading to myriad locations not well-served by the nation’s largest airports.

Such a service would be a boon for vacationers heading to distant beach, lake, or mountain destinations. But the service was grounded courtesy of arbitrary government action.

The Federal Aviation Administration effectively shuttered the business by reinterpreting a decades-old agency memo and reclassifying as “common carriers” private pilots who listed with on Flytenow.

The reinterpretation subjected the pilots to the same heavy-handed regulations applied to large commercial airlines. It was a 180-degree turn from the FAA’s own regulations, which allows private pilots to carry passengers willing to share the costs of the flight.

Pilots have long used bulletin boards to post upcoming flights, attracting passengers able to defray the flight’s expenses. Flytenow brought that practice into the 21st century by letting private pilots and would-be passengers join an online network posting flight plans.

But FAA bureaucrats decided that, while corkboard postings are fine, pixel postings are beyond the pale.

European regulators disagree. The European Aviation Safety Agency interpreted European Union cost-sharing regulations — which are nearly identical to the FAA’s rules — to permit companies like Flytenow to operate. A British-based entity called Wingly now maintains a community of 10,000 pilots serving 150,000 users primarily in Western and Southern Europe.

The FAA’s aberrant decision has denied benefits for the entire aviation industry, which faces a shortage of general aviation pilots, both private and commercial, whose numbers have fallen by more than 20 percent over the last decade. General aviation provides a pipeline of qualified pilots to regional airlines, some of which have had to cease operations due to the shortage.

Obtaining a private pilot’s license is expensive: about $9,500. Moving further to a commercial certification requires even greater more time and money. Introducing flight-sharing would help pilots mitigate the cost of obtaining and maintaining their certifications. Wingly has saved its member pilots over $600,000 since beginning operations in 2016. Furthermore, the service would provide much needed choice to consumers flying to rural or exurban areas, and could replace costly and wasteful federal subsidies currently designated for such purposes. As for safety, general aviation operations are likely the safest they have ever been.

There is hope for the flight-sharing industry. The Aviation Empowerment Act (S.2650), introduced by Sen. Mike Lee, Utah Republican, would revive online flight-sharing businesses in the U.S., restore clarity to a muddled area of the law, and spur more innovation.

The bill would adopt the FAA’s traditional definition of “common carrier” and authorize private pilots to share their flight plans, offer to transport property and up to eight people at a time, and maybe even make an honest dollar doing it.

The bill would not block the FAA from redefining common carriage if and when that became necessary. But it would force the agency to do so through the rule-making processes laid out in the Administrative Procedure Act, rather than through guidance, letters and other administrative maneuvering.

The proposal would further enhance the flight-sharing market by creating a new “personal operator” category. It would allow private pilots who operate only aircraft with eight or fewer seats to fly passengers or property without being subject to certain commercial airline regulations.

Existing airlines and unions may find that compensation issue controversial. But if people are willing to accept the risks, real or perceived, of flying with FAA-certified private pilots, why stand in their way?

The arbitrary nature of the FAA’s ruling and the benefits expected from expanding innovation in flight-sharing clearly justify rethinking the current treatment of the nascent industry.

If Congress chooses the status quo, then we can watch those benefits unfold in Europe while flight-sharing remains grounded in the United States.

• Michael Sargent is a policy analyst specializing in transportation issues at The Heritage Foundation. John-Michael Seibler is a legal fellow in the think tank’s Institute for Constitutional Government.

Original article  ➤ https://www.washingtontimes.com

SkyWest Airlines on behalf of Delta Air Lines, Embraer ERJ-175, N285SY: Incident occurred November 19, 2019 at Sacramento International Airport (KSMF), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento

Aircraft struck a bird on takeoff.

SkyWest Airlines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N285SY

Date: 20-NOV-19
Time: 02:58:00Z
Regis#: N285SY
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: ERJ170
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: SKW3565
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CALIFORNIA

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Aeronca 0-58B Grasshopper, N47252; accident occurred May 28, 2018 in Tekamah, Burt County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N47252


Location: Tekamah, NE
Accident Number: CEN18LA199
Date & Time: 05/28/2018, 0930 CDT
Registration: N47252
Aircraft: AERONCA 58B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 28, 2018, about 0930 central daylight time, an Aeronca 58B, N47252, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Tekamah, Nebraska. The pilot and passenger received serious injuries; and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The airplane departed about 0845 from Tekamah Municipal Airport (TQE), Tekamah, Nebraska, on a local flight.

The pilot reported that he departed from his private airstrip located at his residence about 0700 and flew to TQE to pick up the passenger. While at TQE, he topped off the fuel and attached two American flags, which were about 3 ft X 5 ft in size, to the airplane's struts. He attached the flags because the flight was a "tribute flight" over two memorial services being held in the local area. The flight departed TQE about 0750 and proceeded to fly over Tekamah Cemetery, and then flew over to Summit Lake and circled it twice. They overflew some neighbors' homes and then went to the pilot's airstrip and landed around 0810. About 0830, he departed to fly over the Craig Cemetery at 0900, and he noted that the engine was running fine. However, while flying over Craig Cemetery, the pilot noticed the engine was not running properly, so he headed toward TQE, located about 8 nautical miles (nm) east, to drop off the passenger. He stated that the engine was getting worse en route to TQE and not developing full power, with maximum rpm around 1,500 rpm. Although the engine was not developing full power, he continued to fly to TQE, hoping he could make it to the airport. The airplane continued to descend, and it impacted a ditch located 3 nm from TQE during the forced landing. The pilot stated that he should have landed in a flat field when the opportunity was possible, instead he "kept flying into a situation where there were no options."

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the wreckage at the accident site. He stated that there were flat bean fields located near the accident site, but the wreckage was found in a ditch. There were no apparent landing or skid marks leading to the ditch. The examination of the wreckage revealed that the wooden propeller blade tips were broken. The propeller spinner exhibited features consistent with torque. He was able to rotate the engine crankshaft one revolution. The carburetor was separated from the mount but was held on by the throttle cable. The flight controls exhibited continuity from the cockpit to the flight control surfaces. Fuel was present in the fuel tanks.

The FAA inspector reported that he interviewed the pilot. During the interview, the pilot did not recall pulling carburetor heat ON. The pilot stated that he did not have a problem with carburetor icing before.

The examination of the engine confirmed drivetrain continuity when the engine was rotated. Thumb compression was observed on all four cylinders, although the compression on cylinders No. 1 and 2 appeared "weak." All magneto leads checked good and the engine timing was verified at 30° before top dead center (TDC). All spark plugs produced an electrical spark, although the spark plug gaps for No. 1B, 3T, 4B, and 4T were greater than .016 to 0.21 inch specified. The carburetor floats were checked for freedom of movement. The inspection of the throttle plate and throttle arm revealed no defects.

At 0854, the surface weather observation at TQE was wind 260° at 3 kts; 10 miles visibility; few clouds at 8,500 ft; temperature 26° C; dew point 18° C; altimeter 29.92 inches of mercury. Based on the temperature and dew point about the time of the accident, the conditions were favorable for serious carburetor icing at glide power.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/16/2016
Flight Time:  912.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 153.6 hours (Total, this make and model), 852.2 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AERONCA
Registration:   N47252
Model/Series: 58B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1944
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 058B-9843
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/10/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1260 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2668 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-170-3
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TQE, 1026 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0854 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 95°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 8500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 260°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tekamah, NE (TQE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Tekamah, NE (TQE)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0845 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  41.768611, -96.241389

Location: Tekamah, NE
Accident Number: CEN18LA199
Date & Time: 05/28/2018, 0915 CDT
Registration: N47252
Aircraft: AERONCA 58B
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 28, 2018, about 0915 central daylight time, an Aeronca 58B, N47252, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Tekamah, Nebraska. The pilot and passenger received serious injuries; and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The airplane departed about 0830 from Tekamah Municipal Airport (TQE), Tekamah, Nebraska, on a local flight.

At 0854, the surface weather observation at TQE was wind 260° at 3 kts; 10 miles visibility; few clouds at 8,500 ft; temperature 26° C; dew point 18° C; altimeter 29.92 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERONCA
Registration: N47252
Model/Series: 58B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TQE, 1026 ft msl
Observation Time: 0854 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 8500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Tekamah, NE (TQE)
Destination:  Tekamah, NE (TQE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  41.768611, -96.241389

TEKAMAH, Nebraska  — Authorities are investigating a plane crash in a bean field near Tekamah on Monday.

Two men were in the plane at the time of the crash and were transported to a nearby hospital. 

The victims have been identified as Dennis Westergaard, 62, and Delmar Chamberlain, 87.

The Tekamah Police Department, Tekamah Fire Department and Craig Fire Department responded to the scene.

The Burt County Sheriff's Department is investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.ketv.com

May 22, 2018  

Tekamah to greet guests:  Ceremonies and celebrations

Recent temperatures approaching 90 notwithstanding, the unofficial start of summer arrives this weekend.

While the Memorial Day holiday signals a change in wardrobe for many, most of the area’s holiday observances remain the same.

Families gather to remember loved ones at ceremonies and cemeteries, graduates return to their hometowns for banquets and the chance catch up with friends from long ago.

The weekend’s last ceremony is the annual Memorial Day Program at Tekamah Cemetery.

The program, sponsored by the local veterans organizations, begins at 8 a.m. at the VFW plot in the northeast corner of the cemetery.

Retired Air Force general Tom Tobin will be the featured speaker.

In addition to the many American flags that adorn the cemetery at this time of year, another more recent addition also will be on display. Tekamah Veterans Association has placed a white steel cross at the grave of every veteran. More than 680 of the crosses dot the cemetery. Veterans buried there range from the Civil War forward.

The service also will feature a fly-over by Craig pilot Dennis Westergaard in a vintage military aircraft—a 1944 Aeronca Defender. The aircraft is a two-seat light observation airplane that was used for rapid communications and in support of ground forces. Tekamah veteran Delmar Chamberlain will again fill the second seat.

Following the firing squad, the playing of taps and the benediction, coffee and rolls will be served at the Vets Hall downtown.

In Herman, holiday observances start at 9 a.m., followed by a service at the cemetery.

In Decatur, ceremonies start at 9:30 a.m. with community singing at City Hall. A program follows at 10 with concluding ceremonies at Hillcrest Cemetery.

Services in Craig will be held at 9:00 a.m. at the cemetery. Services also are planned in Craig, Oakland and Lyons.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.agupdate.com

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Cessna 150M, N6AF; fatal accident occurred May 27, 2018 near Bainbridge Island, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6AF

Location: Bainbridge Island, WA
Accident Number: WPR18LA151
Date & Time: 05/27/2018, 1705 PDT
Registration: N6AF
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 27, 2018, about 1705 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 150M airplane, N6AF, was substantially damaged when it impacted water near Bainbridge Island, Washington. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the passenger, before departure from Harvey Field Airport (S43), Snohomish, Washington, the pilot used his iPad for navigation via the ForeFlight application. They took off and landed at Vashon Island, Washington.

After takeoff from Vashon Island, while flying over the water, the passenger told the pilot that she thought the airplane was too low. The pilot replied that they were fine and that they were able to fly safely 200 ft above the water. The passenger stated that the pilot looked down at the iPad and she saw him push the flight control yoke forward. The airplane subsequently impacted the water and flipped over. The passenger reported that she blacked out for a short time. When she regained consciousness, she saw the pilot still restrained by his seat belt and slumped over; he appeared to be unconscious. The passenger was able to egress on her own as the airplane began to sink. The passenger reported that there were no mechanical problems with the airplane before the impact. An individual on a boat in the area of the accident site saw the splash of water when the airplane impacted the water, marked the location via a GPS device, and rescued the passenger.

A witness on the shore was looking out toward the water when she saw a low-flying airplane. The airplane came into view and was descending in a nose-low attitude. She initially thought it was going to skim the water and perform a loop, but the airplane continued its descent until it impacted the water. The airplane flipped over and quickly sank.

Radar data captured the airplane as it departed to the south from Vashon Island, then turned northbound over the waterway on the west side of Vashon Island. The flight continued north over the water at an altitude of about 700 ft mean sea level (msl) until radar contact was lost about 0.1 nautical mile from the accident site.

Search efforts on the day of the accident were unsuccessful in locating the wreckage. On June 14, an independent dive team located the wreckage inverted on the sea floor at a depth of 176 ft below the surface. The airplane was not recovered at that time. When the dive team returned to recover the wreckage, it was no longer at that location and could not be located again.

The pilot's remains were not recovered. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:No 
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/16/2016
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N6AF
Model/Series: 150M M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 15076185
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSEA, 434 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1653 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 151°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Snohomish, WA (S43)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Bainbridge Island, WA
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 47.723889, -122.543889 (est) 



Lee Elliott, 70, and his girlfriend Joan Burns were sightseeing over Elliott Bay near Bainbridge Island in the Cessna 150M on May 27th, 2018 when the aircraft crashed.

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND — Flying low over Puget Sound, the Cessna 150M dipped toward the water, slammed down, flipped and began to sink, just off Bainbridge Island.

The plane's passenger managed to escape but suffered serious injuries. Its pilot was not so fortunate. His remains were not recovered, according to a factual investigation report released about the May 27, 2018, crash by the National Transportation Safety Board, which reviews transportation crashes.

The pilot was identified as 70-year-old Lee Elliott, a carpenter from Edmonds, following the crash. The report noted that his passenger, who was identified by Seattle media at the time as his girlfriend, was seriously injured and was taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

Details in the report paint a picture of a beautiful May weekend day. The crash occurred during daylight hours, at about 5 p.m. No precipitation was falling, there was "no obscuration." The temperature was a seasonal 59 degrees. Winds were blowing at 6 knots.

No fire or explosion were noted, and Elliott’s passenger would tell investigators that there had been no mechanical problems with the plane before it went down.

The two took off from Snohomish and landed on Vashon Island, according to the report. Then: “After takeoff from Vashon Island, while flying over the water, the passenger told the pilot that she thought the airplane was too low. The pilot replied that they were fine and that they were able to fly safely 200 ft above the water. The passenger stated that the pilot looked down at the iPad (used for navigation) and she saw him push the flight control yoke forward. The airplane subsequently impacted the water and flipped over.”

The plane went down near the mouth of Eagle Harbor.

The Seattle television station KIRO 7 reported in 2018 that, according to family, the two had been on a sightseeing tour over Elliott Bay and had descended to get a closer look at a group of seals near the shore. That information is not mentioned in the factual report released by the NTSB on Monday.

“He loved to fly,” Elliott’s brother, Scott, told KIRO then. “To be honest with you, it was the way he would have wanted to go."

NTSB spokesman Terry Williams said the agency’s final report on the incident, which will have an analysis of the facts released in this week’s report and will have a determination of cause, will be released in the coming weeks.

A shoreside witness told investigators she had seen a low-flying plane that was descending and initially thought the plane was going to skim the water and perform a loop. But the plane continued its descent until it hit the water.

“The airplane flipped over and quickly sank,” the report said.

Inside the plane, the woman had blacked out. When she came to, she saw Elliott was slumped over, still restrained and appeared to be unconscious. She was able to escape the sinking craft and was rescued by a boat that had been near the crash site, but Elliott was presumed dead after a search.

The Coast Guard and other boaters in the area searched the area but were unsuccessful in locating Elliott or the wreckage. The search was called off the next day.

In June, a dive team located the hulk inverted on the seafloor, around 180 feet below water, the report noted. When the team returned to recover the wreckage, the plane was no longer at the location they had found it previously and could not be located again. Elliott’s remains were not recovered.

https://www.kitsapsun.com





BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, Wash. - The Coast Guard has suspended its search for a 70-year-old man missing after a small plane crash in Bainbridge Island's Eagle Harbor.

Crews have been searching the harbor and surrounding area since Sunday afternoon, when the Cessna 150 two-seater aircraft plunged into the 100-foot-deep water there and sank.

A woman who was aboard the plane was rescued soon after the crash by Good Samaritans who jumped into their boats and headed to the crash site. Coast Guard officials said the injured woman, believed to be in her 60s, was found bleeding and floating in the water. She was taken to Harborview Medical Center in critical condition.

But the 70-year-old man who was aboard the plane could not be found. The Coast Guard and other agencies searched throughout Sunday night and Monday morning, assisted by members of Seattle Harbor Patrol, North Kitsap Fire and Rescue, Bainbridge Police Department and about 20 Good Samaritan vessel crews.

A crew aboard the Kitsap Marine 81, a North Kitsap fire-rescue vessel, used a side-scan sonar to search the area but were unable to locate the sunken aircraft.

Searches were also conducted along the shores of the Eagle Harbor entrance, southern Bainbridge Island, and from Blakely Harbor to Restoration Point.

The search was finally suspended at around 2 p.m. Monday.

Coast Guard officials said they have been in touch with the families of the two plane crash victims.

"We extend our deepest condolences to those affected by this tragedy, as well as thank all of our partner agencies and community members who assisted with search efforts for their dedication and service to the public," the Coast Guard said in a prepared statement.

No pollution, no debris and no impact on marine traffic has been reported at the location and surrounding area of the crash, Coast Guard officials said.

The National Transportation Safety Board announced Sunday that it will investigate the crash.


http://komonews.com

"We've suspended the search for the missing man from the plane crash off Bainbridge Island, Washington.  Coast Guard command personnel have been in contact with the families of those involved in this unfortunate event. We extend our deepest condolences to those affected by this tragedy, as well as thank all of our partner agencies and the community members who assisted with search efforts for their dedication and service to the public."

- United States Coast Guard Pacific Northwest


A Bainbridge Island Police Department boat crew searches for a 70-year-old man who went missing after his plane crashed in the water off Bainbridge Island, Washington, May 27, 2018.

Search efforts also included members of the Coast Guard, Seattle Harbor Patrol, North Kitsap Fire and Rescue, Seattle Fire Department and around 20 good Samaritan vessel crews.

U.S. Coast Guard photos by Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin Lay.


SEATTLE — The Coast Guard on Monday afternoon suspended the search for a 70-year-old man missing from a plane crash in Eagle Harbor, off Bainbridge Island. 

“Coast Guard command personnel have been in contact with the families of those affected by the incident, and we extend our deepest condolences to those affected by this tragedy, as well as thank all of our partner agencies and community members who assisted with search efforts for their dedication and service to the public,” the Coast Guard said in a news release.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound were notified at 5:13 p.m. Sunday that people aboard a vessel in the area saw a plane crash into the water near Eagle Harbor and they were able to rescue a woman found bleeding and floating in the water.

The aircraft was reported as a 1974 two-seater, fixed-wing, single-engine airplane, with two people aboard and crashed in the water that’s about 100-feet deep. The injured woman, believed to be in her 60s, was found floating at the crash location and was taken to Harborview Medical Center in reportedly critical condition.

The circumstances behind the crash are still unknown at this time.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will now carry out an investigation.

http://q13fox.com



A small plane crashed in Eagle Harbor on Sunday near the Bainbridge Island ferry terminal.

Two people were onboard the plane when it crashed.

A 60-year-old woman was rescued and transported to Harborview Medical Center, where she is in critical condition. 

A 70-year-old man remains missing, according to the Coast Guard. 

The plane was reported down after 5 p.m. Sunday.

The Coast Guard identifies the aircraft as a '4-cycle, two-seater, single engine' plane built in 1974. 

Allen Kenitzer with the Federal Aviation Administration says it crashed and sank in Eagle Harbor under 'unknown circumstances.'

The Coast Guard launched a rescue helicopter from Port Angeles and a boat crew from Station Seattle to aid in the search. 

The Seattle Fire Department also sent a crew to assist local agencies.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will continue the investigation. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.king5.com

Cirrus SR20, N67Y: Accident occurred May 27, 2018 at Houston Executive Airport (KTME), Brookshire, Waller County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aircraft departed runway 18, lost altitude and crashed.

Southwest Aviation Specialties LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N67Y

Date: 27-MAY-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N67Y
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

A single-engine plane leaving Houston Executive Airport crashed on the airport grounds Sunday afternoon.

The pilot received only minor injuries, said Andrew Perry, the airport's executive director, "but the airplane is majorly damaged."

The pilot was the only person on board, Perry said.

The plane was departing the runway when the crash occurred, according to a statement from the Federal Aviation Administration.

"He was taking off and someone lost control and ended up on the east side of the airport in the field," Perry said.

The plane was a Cirrus SR20, a high-performance four-seater with a single engine.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate to determine the cause of the crash.

Perry did not release the pilot's name but said he was visiting Houston.

Original article ➤ https://www.houstonchronicle.com

Van’s RV-6A, N4269Y: Fatal accident occurred May 27, 2018 near Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Sonoma County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4269Y 

Location: Petaluma, CA
Accident Number: WPR18FA150
Date & Time: 05/27/2018, 1600 PDT
Registration: N4269Y
Aircraft: MORRISON MARVIN E JR RV 6A
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 27, 2018, about 1600 Pacific daylight time, a Marvin E. Morrison experimental amateur-built RV-6A airplane, N4269Y, was destroyed following a loss of control and impact with terrain shortly after takeoff from Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Petaluma, California. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight was originating at the time, and was destined for Lincoln Regional/Karl Harder Field (LHM), Lincoln, California.

According to a witness who observed the accident, shortly after taking off, and at an altitude of about 800 ft above ground level, the airplane's engine backfired and a drop in the engine rpm was heard; this was followed by smaller backfire sounds from the engine. The witness stated that it appeared that the pilot then made a turn to return to the airport. As the turn continued, the airplane's right wing entered a full stall, which was followed by the airplane entering a spin and impacting terrain.

The airplane was recovered to a secured facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MORRISON MARVIN E JR
Registration: N4269Y
Model/Series: RV 6A A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: BRISTOW RICHARD A
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: O69, 90 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Petaluma, CA (O69)
Destination: Lincoln, CA (LHM) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.265278, -122.611667

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Richard Bristow, left, assists Adam Zimmerman’s 11-year-old son in working on his aircraft. Bristow and his wife, Sue, were identified by aviation enthusiasts as the two people killed in a plane crash that occurred Sunday afternoon in Petaluma.


Two people killed in a weekend plane crash near Petaluma Municipal Airport were identified as a married couple from Carmichael (Sacramento County), according to fellow aviation enthusiasts.

Richard and Sue Bristow, both 67, were killed Sunday afternoon after their RV-6 single-engine plane crashed a little more than half a mile east of the airport.

Adam Zimmerman, 43, said he met Richard Bristow about a month ago, when his 11-year-old son participated in a Young Eagles event, which connects children with pilots who donate their aircraft and time to do an orientation flight.

Richard Bristow “was the nicest, warmest guy anyone could hope to meet,” Zimmerman said, adding that the pilot was engaging and encouraging of his young son during his first flight.

“The impact he had on my son and I won’t be forgotten,” Zimmerman said. “We joined their (Experimental Aircraft Association) chapter in large part because of him.”

The cause of Sunday’s crash has not yet been determined and could take months, said Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The NorCal Flight Center, an aviation school in Lincoln (Placer County) where Richard Bristow spent time flying, posted a statement on Facebook about the couple.

“Our thoughts and prayers go to the family of our friend Richard Bristow and his wife. Unfortunately, their RV-6 lost power as they departed Petaluma. He was a huge contributor here at the airport, and he and his wife will be missed greatly,” the post said.

Officials for the aviation school and family members did not respond to a call for comment.

The crash occurred on East Washington Street near Old Adobe Road, about 1,000 yards east of the airport, said Allen Kenitzer, an FAA spokesman.

The RV-6 is a two-seater plane built from a kit by Van’s Aircraft. The aircraft was first introduced in 1986 and has a top speed of about 200 mph.

Ross Aimer, a retired United Airlines pilot and CEO of Aero Consulting Experts, an aviation consulting firm, said the RV-6 is “a high-performance airplane capable of aerobatics.”


Story and video ➤ https://www.sfgate.com

Pilot Richard Bristow and his wife Susan Bristow



CARMICHAEL -- Loved ones say a Carmichael couple was killed Sunday when their plane struggled after takeoff from the Petaluma Municipal Airport.

Richard Bristow was a pillar of the Sacramento region's real estate scene for decades. His legacy loomed large, even past retirement seven years ago.

Now the passion friends say he funded with real estate has taken the Carmichael man from everything he loved.

"I was shocked. I mean, I didn't... I knew he liked to fly. I know that he had built his own planes and I know he had some issues with it a few years ago," said friend Greg Varozza. "But you never expect anybody to have that kind of a thing... I thought it was a joke at first."

Loved ones say Bristow and his wife, Sue, were killed Sunday when their single-engine Van's RV-6 struggled after takeoff from Petaluma Municipal Airport and appears to have crashed as Richard tried to return to the tarmac.

"Pilots train that if you have engine trouble after takeoff, you try to turn back. But you can easily stall the plane and I'm guessing that that may have been what happened," said the Bristows' friend Dean Rinker.

When Rinker was learning from him years ago, the men took to the skies in Richard Bristow's Mooney. Before Bristow shared his love of flying with Rinker, the successful real estate agent mentored him on the ground in his Keller-Willams office in Fair Oaks.

As a young agent, Varozza says Richard Bristow told him, "not to sit down and relax. To treat it like a business and work it." He told FOX40 he can't believe that dynamic spirit is gone.

At the Bristow home, a mat at the front door welcomes visitors with a joke: "A pilot and a normal person live here."

"It's sad to see somebody die, you never want to see that. It's a little bit better knowing that they died doing what they loved truly the most and that's flying," Varozza said. "But we're gonna miss him and Sacramento real estate, Sacramento in general, is not quite as good now because he's gone."

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash.


Story and video ➤  http://fox40.com


Two people died Sunday after a small plane crashed on a road in Petaluma, according to the Petaluma Fire Department.

The single-engine plane, which went down about 4:05 p.m. on East Washington Street near Old Adobe Road, was trying to land at Petaluma Municipal Airport but came up short, according to an official with the Federal Aviation Administration.

Police said the plane had taken off from the airport moments earlier and was attempting to return.

The two people who died were the only occupants on the plane, and no one on the ground was injured, officials said.

The plane was registered to a Richard Bristow of Carmichael, California, near Sacramento. Bristow’s brother told NBC Bay Area it was Bristow flying the plane, and his wife was the passenger. But the two victims have not been officially identified by authorities.

Witnesses said they heard the plane make a popping sound, and then the engine sputtered before the plane went down.

Dominic Borgo and Micah Combs work at the golf course across the street from the airport. They said the plane was making strange noises right after takeoff.

"It was almost like it was choppy, like the engine was choppy and not fully running," Borgo said.

"We saw it as it was going up in the air, and we noticed that it was sputtering quite a bit," Combs added. "And then we saw it was quickly falling."

The crash occurred about a half-mile from the airport runway. 


Story and video ➤ https://www.nbcbayarea.com





Giorvi Alvarez was sitting Sunday in front of his house about 4 p.m. when he heard a single-engine plane sputter after taking off from the next door Petaluma Municipal Airport.

“The engine started failing,” Alvarez, 39, said. “It let out three or four ‘pop-pops.’ ”

The plane turned around and headed back toward the airport when it suddenly crashed about a thousand yards east of the airport on East Washington Street near Old Adobe Road, Alvarez said.

Both the pilot and passenger were killed.

“The engine stopped and it went nose down,” said Alvarez, who jumped into his car and raced a quarter-mile down Parkland Way to the crash site, joining several Rooster Run Golf Course employees who tried to render aid.

The engine landed on the north side of the street, while the rest of the aircraft slid across to the south side.

Petaluma police Lt. Brian Miller said multiple witnesses called 911 after seeing the plane come down.

“Our initial reports tell us that it took off from our airport and may have been attempting to return,” he said.

The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office and Petaluma police and firefighters responded to the crash.

Authorities have not released their identities.

Alvarez described the two people in the plane — a man and a woman — as being in their 50s or 60s.

According to Allen Kenitzer, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane was a Van’s RV-6, a two-seat, single-engine, low-wing homebuilt airplane sold in kit form.

A witness, Sean O’Brien, described in an email that the plane took off from runway 29.

“As he (pilot) banked into the turn, his right wing went in to full stall and the RV-6 started to spin in to the ground,” O’Brien wrote. “The pilot almost recovered from the spin as he hit the golf course fence and plowed his Van's RV-6A into the road.”

The cause of the crash is unknown, Petaluma Fire Battalion Chief Mike Medeiros said in a statement.

Miller said officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were on the scene investigating. The National Transportation Safety Board could not be reached for more details Sunday night.

Petaluma police closed the area of East Washington from Adobe Road to Executive Drive for several hours to deal with the crash’s aftermath.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.pressdemocrat.com















PETALUMA, California  -- Fire officials have confirmed that two people died after a plane crashed near the Petaluma Municipal Airport Sunday afternoon.

The crash happened in the area of E. Washington Street between Adobe Road and Executive Drive shortly after 4 p.m.

The airport is about 1,000 yards away from the scene scene. A Federal Aviation Administration official says the plane that crashed was a Van's RV-6A.

"You heard the plane take off and as soon as it got over the golf course, you could hear it sputtering. It didn't sound right. Then his engine caught on for maybe two or three seconds, started sputtering again and then he made a right turn going back towards the airport. And next thing you know, the plane went sideways and then went straight down and all you could hear was the loud thud into the concrete," witness Ed Anzore said.

There are still investigators on the scene. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are looking into exactly what happened. It is unclear at this point in the investigation why the plane crashed.

All roads in the area of E. Washington Street between Adobe Road and Executive Drive are now open following the crash.

No further information is available about the victims' identities.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://abc7news.com