Saturday, April 2, 2016

Sky's the limit for Alberta's little-known Angel Flight volunteer pilot service

Dr. Kerry Pawluski founded Angel Flight Alberta, a group of pilots who volunteer their time and planes to transport patients to and from remote communities to the city.



A post-hospital taxi ride home can be an uncomfortable sounding proposition, especially when the hospital is in Edmonton and home is Slave Lake.

That was the case for one woman who found herself in need of a lift Thursday after being discharged from the Grey Nuns Hospital. But thanks to a group of volunteer pilots, her return trip was a lot shorter and cheaper.

“Generally what happens is the hospital or medical facility, or whatever, has a client and they know that there is some need,” said Barton Pawluski, one of about 15 pilots who offer their planes and expertise as part of Angel Flight Alberta, a charitable organization that helps bridge the gap for people living in remote areas who need city health services.

“I’m acutely aware that Canada really does have two-tiered medicine in that there is urban and there is also rural medicine,” said Dr. Kerry Pawluski, Barton’s brother and founder of the service in Alberta. “Just to offset some of the stress to patients who are trying to get in for medical treatments or sometimes being repatriated to their home towns, we launched this volunteer pilot organization.”

Kerry, a physician who works at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Edmonton, came across a similar service that began in 2001 in B.C. and managed to use their model as a template for Alberta. They began offering the free flights in 2006 to people he says have “fallen through the cracks” and end up stranded at city hospitals.

Clients have ranged from those needing to get home after emergency medical evacuations from remote communities to scheduled appointments that are a long drive.

The company usually gets a call from a hospital or social worker asking about availability. They get the patient’s name, age and height, and then work out the details of the flight, which can depend on weather and pilot availability. They also make sure someone is at the destination to pick up the patient before flying out of Josephburg Airport east of Fort Saskatchewan.

Because the flights are not dealing with medical emergencies, pilots don’t need medical experience — Barton is an engineer — and the cost is a fraction of what a medevac would be. For example, the Slave Lake flight, which will cost less than $400, would easily cost in the thousands for a medevac trip.

Plus, the savings to hospitals, where patients take up beds as they recover for a potentially longer trip home, are large enough to make public funding sensible, Kerry said.

“This is a very modest cost in comparison to doing a medevac,” he said. “We need to ask the taxpayer, is this something that you and I are comfortable in paying for?”

For now, the company has managed to find corporate sponsors to offset its costs and co-operation with Alberta Air Ambulance has been positive.

What they need is for the public and medical practitioners to know they exist. Compared to its B.C. counterpart, which does about 240 flights a year, the Alberta group has done only 70 in their 10 years in the air. Alberta Health Services, on the other hand, performs about 7,000 fixed-wing medevac flights a year.

“We’ve built it and they haven’t come yet,” said Kerry, hoping some of its recent marketing will help.

“My end goal is to alleviate some of the stress that people are experiencing.”

Original article can be found here:  http://edmontonjournal.com

Mercy Medical Center in Dubuque Shows Off New AirCare 3 Helicopter



Mercy Medical Center in Dubuque held an open house on Saturday for members of the Dubuque and surrounding communities to see and tour AirCare 3, the state’s newest air ambulance service.

"We are very excited to bring air transport services to Dubuque in partnership with the University of Iowa," said Kay Takes, president of Mercy Medical Center. "The AirCare 3 team will provide timely, life-saving emergency transfers and care at the scene of an accident, 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. This new service raises the bar on the quality of emergency medical services in the region."

The AirCare safety crew members were at the open house, providing to visitors information about the helicopter. They described it as a "state of the art ambulance for the air."

"This is like a flying ICU or flying emergency department," said Joshua Stilley, Medical Director for AirCare 3. "The level of care or the capability of the care providers and the equipment on board gives a much higher capability than most ground ambulances are able to provide."

The helicopter has already been in use and has transported one patient. AirCare 3 will be able to quickly respond to flight requests for patients in northeast Iowa, northwest Illinois, and southwest Wisconsin.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kcrg.com

Kolb Twinstar Mk III, N1978M: Incident occurred April 02, 2016 near Colorado Springs East Airport (A50), Ellicott, El Paso County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N1978M 

 Date: 02-APR-16
Time: 17:57:00Z
Regis#: N1978M
Aircraft Make: KOLB
Aircraft Model: TWINSTAR
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03
City: EL PASO
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT EXPERIMENTAL KOLB TWINSTAR MARK III, FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR EL PASO, CO



A former Air Force pilot is OK after being forced to land his small plane on a dirt road in eastern El Paso County.

The incident happened just before 12:30 p.m. on South Baggett Road, two miles east of Highway 94.

The pilot told 11 News his engine quit while he was flying.

"I did pry the nicest landing I've ever done because I was trying to get everything right. Then I told everybody everything was fine," Retired Air Force Pilot Mike Couillard said.

The landing happened on the same day that a small plane crashed on a California freeway, then hit a car. One death and five injuries were reported in the accident. There are no reports of any other vehicles around when the plane landed on South Baggett Road Saturday.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kktv.com


An engine problem forced a small plane to make an emergency landing on a road in eastern El Paso County on Saturday afternoon, according to the Sheriff's Office.

The plane landed just after noon on the 3000 block of Flying View Runway in Ellicott, said Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Jacqueline Kirby. 

There were no reports of injuries or damages to the plane or property, she added.

Only the pilot was on board.

As of about 2:45 p.m., the plane was being removed out of the roadway, Kirby said.

Original article can be found here: http://gazette.com

Fatal U.S. Small Plane Accidents Declined in 2015: Industry officials expect dramatic improvements this year as regulatory changes take effect

The overall number of fatal crashes of small planes fell about 5% from the year before, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Here, a Beech C24R Sierra plane crashed at the Georgia Club golf course in Statham, Georgia, on December 20, 2015, killing the pilot.



The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
April 2, 2016 5:02 p.m. ET


The rate of fatal accidents involving small airplanes in the U.S. declined slightly last year, despite years of escalating efforts by industry and safety regulators to dramatically reduce private aircraft crashes.

In the data released Friday by the Federal Aviation Administration, there were 11.3 deadly general aviation accidents per one million flight hours during the fiscal year ending last September, roughly 3% below the three-year average.

The overall number of such accidents declined roughly 5% from the year before, while total fatalities fell nearly 12%. Those statistics cover everything from home-built aircraft to single-engine, propeller-driven planes to noncommercial turboprops.

However, industry officials say 2016 will usher in regulatory changes that are anticipated to result in more dramatic improvements. The revisions, among other things, are intended to accelerate installation of enhanced safety systems on private planes and ensure that new pilots have the necessary practical skills and theoretical knowledge.

This year could “really be a milestone” for general aviation because the FAA is slated to complete far-reaching “changes in how we certify both pilots and airplanes,” according to Jens Hennig, vice president of operations for the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, the segment’s primary trade group.

Such strategic moves “are the types of changes that can make a marked improvement in safety,” Mr. Hennig, who is a member of various expert advisory groups, said in an interview Saturday.

The most recent results, which were circulated among government and industry experts and put out on the FAA’s website, still meet the agency’s internal performance benchmarks and document a slight improvement after what the FAA said were “relatively static” numbers stretching back to the beginning of the decade.

The modest improvement, however, highlights the continuing challenges in significantly reducing the frequency of fatal accidents for the approximately 200,000 private aircraft registered nationwide.

The goal for the government and industry is to slice the fatal-accident rate by 10% between 2009 and 2018. So far, private aviation has largely relied on the same type of consensus-based, voluntary safety initiatives that have helped U.S. airlines and the FAA eliminate fatalities stemming from commercial plane crashes over the past eight years.

Airliners world-wide last year had a rate of less than two major accidents per million flight hours, but without a single passenger fatality on a jetliner stemming from pilot error, aircraft malfunctions, weather or other accidental causes, according to the International Air Transport Association.

With the release of its data, the FAA stressed that various initiatives are under way in conjunction with manufacturers and pilot organizations to target the root causes of accidents.

Until the new rules fully take effect, however, safety experts will continue to emphasize pilot education to prevent accidents, particularly in which aviators stall aircraft or otherwise get overwhelmed in perfectly functioning planes. These “loss of control” accidents account for nearly half of all fatal crashes involving general aviation nationwide.

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board recently identified reducing such crashes as one of its top 10 priorities, citing that pilots and passengers “die at alarming rates every year due to a loss of control.”

Industry and government experts have identified more than two dozen safety enhancements, ranging from training to hardware, to combat loss of control accidents. On a wider scale, the FAA and general aviation groups are beginning to use voluntary safety reports to pinpoint and try to mitigate budding hazards. General aviation accidents and incidents are now being incorporated into broader, industrywide databases “to identify trends and look for system risks,” according to the FAA.

At a “safety summit” between the FAA and private-aviation representatives in Washington on Thursday, Michael Whitaker, the agency’s No. 2 official, said the private-aviation segment’s fatal accident rate was beginning to decline, yet still more than 380 people died in general aviation crashes last year.

“While we still have more work to do,” said Mr. Whitaker, “government and industry are building on our momentum and commitment to improve general aviation safety.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA075
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 20, 2015 in Winder, GA
Aircraft: BEECH C24R, registration: N2074P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 20, 2015, about 1430 eastern standard time, a Beech C24R, N2074P, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain in Winder, Georgia. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane took off from Jackson County Airport (19A), Jefferson, Georgia at 1359 eastern standard time. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Barrow County Airport (WDR), Winder, Georgia. The airplane was owned by Bryant and Bryant Aviation Inc. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the flight originated at Gwinnett County-Briscoe Field, (LZU) Lawrenceville, Georgia, earlier during the day of the accident and flew to 19A, where the pilot made one practice approach and then flew towards his intended destination of WDR.

Several witnesses observed the airplane flying overhead and watched as it contacted the tops trees adjacent to a fairway at a golf course. They stated the left wing was low and the airplane was losing altitude "very quickly." Also, the airplane impacted nose first and flipped 180 degrees, facing in the opposite direction. In addition, one witness stated the engine was sputtering prior to impact.

Examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed that the landing gear was down, and the flaps were in the full up position. The propeller showed no signs of power, no twisting gouges or nicks were present on any of the blades. Two propeller blades were bent aft near the hub and one propeller blade was straight. There was no smell of fuel on scene, however the left fuel tank was breached in several areas and the right tank was dented. Both fuel tanks were empty upon further examination. During the initial examination of the engine and airframe, there were no anomalies noted. Cable continuity was established to all flight control surfaces from the cockpit.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, which was issued on October 23, 2014. He also held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued February 4, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 7,000 total hours of flight experience.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle gear airplane, serial number MC608, was manufactured in 1978. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-A1B6, 200-horsepower engine, equipped with a three-bladed McCauley propeller, Model B3D36C429. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 10, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 3,926 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 477 hours since major overhaul.

The airframe and engine were retained for further examination.

Globe GC-1B Swift, N78140: Incident occurred April 02, 2016 in Caldwell, Orange County, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N78140 

Date: 02-APR-16
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N78140
Aircraft Make: GLOBE
Aircraft Model: GC1B
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA FSDO: FAA Greensboro FSDO-39
City: CALDWELL
State: North Carolina

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, NOSED OVER, CALDWELL, NC



CALDWELL, N.C. (WNCN) — For the second time in a week, a single engine plane has made an expected landing in the Triangle area.

On Saturday afternoon, a single-engine plane landed during an emergency in Orange County near Caldwell.

The incident happened at 3:50 p.m. on private land along Walker Field Road in Orange County.

The pilot was not seriously hurt in the crash, which left the plane upside down in grass on a large open field near Caldwell, which is located at the junction of North Carolina Highway 57 and North Carolina Highway 157.

The cockpit of the plane, which had “Carolina Girl” stenciled on the side, appeared to be smashed when the plane ended up upside down.

On Tuesday morning, a pilot was also unhurt when he landed a small plane during an emergency on the shoulder of Interstate 540 near Leesville Road in Raleigh.

Original article can be found here: http://wncn.com

ORANGE COUNTY, N.C. (WTVD) -- One person was injured after a small plane crashed and overturned Saturday afternoon in northern Orange County.

It happened in the 1100 block of Walker Field Road. Officials say the person had a head injury but was up and walking around. No details on the victim's condition were released.

Local fire departments responded. No word yet on what caused the crash.

This is the second time this week a small plane has crashed in the Triangle. On Tuesday, a pilot made an emergency landing on I-540 during rush hour.

Original article can be found here:  http://abc11.com

Ginny B, N349E: Accident occurred April 02, 2016 near Stallone Airport (9NJ5), South Harrison Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N349E


NTSB Identification: ERA16LA153
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 02, 2016 in South Harrison Township, NJ
Aircraft: BUTTERHOF ANTHONY J GINNY B, registration: N349E
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 2, 2016, about 1530 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Ginny B, N349E, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in South Harrison Township, New Jersey. The pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight from Alloway Airfield (NJ02), Alloway, New Jersey. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, who also held an airframe and powerplant (A&P) certificate, the flight was the first since he overhauled and installed a Continental O-200 engine. The pilot took off about 1500, and headed north from the airport. About 30 minutes later, the engine experienced a sudden and complete loss of power, and the pilot could not get it restarted. The pilot then completed a forced landing to a grassy field, where the airplane nosed over. The airplane's wing spar, vertical stabilizer, and right wing struts were substantially damaged.

The pilot and another A&P rated mechanic subsequently performed a conditional inspection on the airplane, where they found that fuel had leaked from the gascolater between the glass cup and the metal frame. They also noted that the bale clamp was not safety-wired, which allowed it to loosen and relax the seal between the gascolator glass cup and its metal frame.



SOUTH HARRISON TOWNSHIP — A small plane crashed into a field in South Harrison Township Saturday afternoon, authorities said.

The private plane overturned, but the pilot had only minor injuries, according to the Gloucester County emergency communications center. He was not taken to the hospital. 

The crash was reported near Monroeville and Lincoln Road around 4 p.m. 

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane flipped after it landed while the county emergency response center described the incident as a crash. 

"The plane experienced an engine-related problem," the FAA said in a statement. 

FAA officials and police were investigating. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.nj.com




A pilot was injured after a small aircraft crashed in South Harrison Township, Gloucester County Saturday afternoon.

The aircraft went down and overturned near Monroeville and Lincoln roads.

Responding crews were able to remove the pilot. 

Officials have not yet revealed his or her condition. 

The pilot was the only person inside the aircraft. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

Lancair IV-P, N438Y: Fatal accident occurred April 02, 2016 in Fallbrook, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

DENNIS HOGGE: http://registry.faa.gov/N438Y

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA San Diego FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA091
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 02, 2016 in Fallbrook, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/15/2017
Aircraft: NOKES MATTHEW LANCAIR IV P, registration: N438Y
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 5 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

About 15 minutes after departing on the cross-country flight, the experimental, amateur-built airplane experienced a loss of engine power, and the private pilot considered landing on a 550-ft-long airstrip for remote-controlled aircraft. After observing numerous people on and near the runway, he subsequently decided to land on an interstate highway. Upon touching down with the landing gear retracted, the airplane slid into a car parked on the paved shoulder of the highway, fatally injuring one of the car's occupants. Video footage captured by a cell phone inside the airplane showed normal engine indications before the accident. A video taken shortly thereafter did not capture the instrument panel or engine indications; however, the engine could be heard surging. 

The airplane was equipped with fuel tanks in the left and right wings, as well as a fuselage tank. The right and left wing tanks each had a capacity of 52 gallons, and the capacity of the fuselage tank was 33 gallons. The fuel system was configured so that the left wing tank connected to the fuselage tank, and the engine would draw from the fuselage tank. The fuselage tank did not have a dedicated fuel quantity gauge; the pilot stated that he knew it was full when the wing tank gauge began to indicate above zero. The pilot stated that before departing on the accident flight, the left fuel tank quantity gauge indicated 1 gallon, which corresponded to 34 gallons available. 

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. A test run of the engine at low, intermediate, and high power settings was successful.

The fuselage tank was breached during the accident, and an undetermined quantity of fuel leaked out. The gascolator did not contain any fuel, and the line from the gascolator to the engine-driven fuel pump, as well as the fuel inlet line to the fuel manifold, contained no fuel. The lack of fuel in these areas, coupled with the engine surging heard on video, may be an indication of fuel starvation; however, since the investigation was unable to determine the total quantity of fuel on board the airplane, the reason for the loss of power and engine surging could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

A loss of engine power during cruise for reasons that could not be determined because examination of the airplane did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 2, 2016, about 0915 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Nokes Matthew Lancair IV P, N438Y, made a forced landing, and collided with a parked car on the shoulder of Interstate 15 near Fallbrook, California. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and his wife/ passenger sustained serious injuries; one occupant of the car sustained fatal injuries, and the other three occupants sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal flight departed Gillespie Field (SEE), San Diego, California, about 0900 en route to French Valley Airport, Murrieta/Temecula, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

A private pilot witness was in the airplane pit area at the paved Palomar RC (remote control) Flyers flying strip northeast of the intersection of Interstate 15 (I-15) and Highway 76. He heard the airplane, and looked behind him toward Highway 76. He observed an airplane flying at an estimated 75 feet above ground level or a little higher as it crossed the landing field at a very low power setting. He thought that it may be at idle, but sounded to be running smoothly. The airplane seemed to be somewhat paralleling I-15, but over their field. It continued descending around the trees and toward the freeway. It went out of sight, but the landing gear and flaps were up. The airplane appeared to him to be at the perfect attitude and very under control to get the maximum glide distance. He estimated that the speed of the airplane was 60 to 75 mph. Even when the airplane descended around the trees and out of his view, it appeared to be well under control.

Another witness at the strip estimated the altitude over the strip at 100 feet with the engine at idle and the propeller turning. The landing gear and flaps were up. Just before the airplane reached large trees between the strip and the freeway, the airplane went into a right bank, and missed the trees. It continued descending to I-15 until it went out of sight. He did not hear the airplane impact the ground or any other vehicle.

The pilot stated that the engine lost power, and he considered landing on a short 550-foot remote controlled aircraft strip. He intended to land with the landing gear in the up position to shorten the landing distance; however, he was concerned about flipping over when running off the end of the runway. He observed numerous people on and near the runway, and decided to land on the freeway.

Witnesses on I-15 observed the airplane land, and contact the car. One noted that the landing gear was up. The pilot's wife/passenger stated that one person was trying to help her out, and told her that there was a lot of gasoline, and she had to move. Some witnesses helped the pilot and his passenger out of the airplane; they did not report a strong odor of fuel, or observe a large pool of liquid. One witness, who arrived before the fire department, smelled fuel, and estimated that 10 gallons of liquid was on the pavement. The pilot provided a photo that showed two streams of fluid on the highway, but the quantity and type of fluid could not be determined. One witness stated that he did not fear for his safety. The first arriving Fire Chief Officer on scene reported that he observed a small spot of unknown fluid coming from the fuselage area by the wing that expanded out about 5 feet by 5 feet. Another fire department person noted enough liquid to dampen the soil near the cockpit, however he couldn't tell if this was fuel or water from a fire hose that was nearby.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 62-year-old pilot reported that he held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot held a third-class medical certificate issued on August 18, 2015. It had the limitation that the pilot must wear corrective lenses. He had a Statement of Demonstrated Disability (SODA) 30D09235 dated October 9, 1992, for no useful vision in the left eye. The SODA was issued on October 21, 1992, after the pilot successfully completed a medical flight test.

The pilot held a Repairman Experimental Aircraft Builder certificate.

The pilot reported that he had a total flight time of 4,750 hours, and had logged 0 hours in the previous 90 days. He reported 1,200 hours in this make and model. He completed a flight review on November 11, 2015.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat low-wing retractable-gear airplane, serial number LIV-298, had an original special airworthiness certificate issued on January 29, 2000. A special airworthiness certificate was issued to the pilot/current owner on February 2, 2010. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the registration on the airplane was issued on February 2, 2010, with an expiration date of December 31, 2013. The registration and airworthiness certificate were not identified in the wreckage. Maintenance logbooks were not located.

The pilot reported that the airplane had a total airframe time of 350 hours at the most recent condition inspection in November 2015.

The engine was a Continental Motors Inc. (CMI) TSIO-550E, serial number 803031. The pilot reported that the total time recorded on the engine at the most recent condition inspection was 350 hours.

The pilot stated that there were no unresolved maintenance issues prior to the flight, and no issues were detected during start, taxi, run-up, or takeoff.

Fueling records at Jet Air Systems, El Cajon, California, established that the airplane was fueled on April 1, 2016, with the addition of 5.0 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel. The pilot stated that the previous flight was in March 2016, and was a 1.25 hour round robin. He explained that the airplane had an auxiliary fuel tank on the belly that he had installed after purchasing the airplane; it was plumbed in with the left wing tank. The left wing tank had a placard on the filler cap indicating 75 US gallons; the right wing tank had a placard on the filler cap indicating 52 US gallons. The filler ports were near the outboard end of each wing. The pilot stated that the 75 gallons meant that he had a 10 gallon reserve when the left tank and the belly tank were full. As fuel was added, he knew that the center tank was full (33 gallons) when the left fuel gauge began to indicate. He confirmed that he had 5 gallons of fuel added to the left wing tank on April 1, and he observed 1 gallon on the left fuel tank gauge. He stated that there was still an indication of 1 gallon when he started the engine for the accident flight, and that there were 34 gallons of fuel on board. There was no fuel quantity gauge for the belly tank, and one was not required; there was no provision to visually or manually quantify the amount of fuel in the tank.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

An automated surface weather observation at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Air Station (KNFG), Oceanside, California (elevation 78 feet msl, 10 miles southwest of the accident site) was issued at 0854 PDT. It indicated wind from 180 degrees at 3 knots, 5 miles visibility with haze, sky clear, temperature 13 degrees C, dew point 09 degrees C, and an altimeter setting at 30.18 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Refer to the on-site examination report included in the public docket for further details.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) and inspectors from the FAA examined the wreckage on site.

The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a ground scar with blue paint transfer marks from the belly of the airplane. After the ground scar was a series of propeller strike marks perpendicular to the flight path.

The nose of the airplane collided with the left rear portion of the trunk at an angle from the left to right, and intruded into the right back seat area of the parked car. The airplane pushed the car off the freeway shoulder into the adjacent dirt area. The airplane's three-bladed propeller and engine remained enmeshed with the car.

The California Highway Patrol utilized a GPS 900 RTK Rover to map the accident site, and a complete diagram is part of the public docket for this accident. The airplane slid for 272 feet, and there were no scars for another 308 feet until the airplane impacted the car. The two vehicles then moved another 100 feet together as a merged unit.

Investigators established control continuity for the ailerons, elevators, and rudder.

The airplane was oriented with the left wing a few degrees low, and the fuel caps were near the outboard edge of each wing. In this left wing low position, investigators measured about 1 inch of fluid in the left wing; they observed no fluid in the right wing. Moving the right wing to a low position still did not reveal evidence of fluid. While preparing the airplane to move it to a safer location than the side of the freeway, a small amount of fluid was observed dripping from the right wing root. After moving the airplane to a safer location, the IIC was not able to drain any fluid from the gascolator. Prior to wing removal, the IIC drained approximately 1 quart of a clear blue fluid that smelled like aviation gasoline from each wing sump. A water paste test did not change color indicating there was no water contamination in either sample.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot stated that he had adequate sleep, had not consumed alcoholic beverages, and was not taking any medications or supplements.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The IIC and an investigator from CMI examined the wreckage at Air Transport, Phoenix, Arizona, on April 26, 2016. A full report is contained within the public docket for this accident.

The wreckage examination revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airframe or engine.

Airframe

The airplane was equipped with a belly tank, but it was ground down and breached. The belly drain was scraped.

The fuel selector valve (FSV) was labeled L, R, and OFF/OFF. The fuel line from the left wing fuel tank was connected to the belly tank, which in turn was connected by a separate line to the FSV. The right wing tank fuel line connected directly to the FSV. The outlet from the FSV connected to an electric fuel pump located on the right side wall of the cabin. A line went through the firewall to connect the electric fuel pump to the gascolator, which had a line connecting it to the engine. The return line from the engine was connected directly to the FSV, which had a separate line going directly to each (left and right) wing fuel tank.

The fuel quantity gauge had two indicators ranging from E to F on the left and right sides of the gauge.

The air filter was clean.

Engine

There were no holes in the crankcase or cylinders that indicated a catastrophic failure of the engine.

Investigators left the engine in place on the airframe. They manually rotated the crankshaft with the propeller. The crankshaft rotated freely; the valves moved approximately the same amount of lift in firing order, and the gears in the accessory case turned freely.

A borescope inspection revealed no mechanical deformation on the valves, cylinder walls, or internal cylinder head.

The inlet for each turbocharger compressor was clear, and the rotors for each one turned freely.

Investigators disconnected the fuel line from the gascolator to the engine driven fuel pump, and nothing drained from the line. They then disconnected the fuel inlet line to the fuel manifold valve on top of the engine, and nothing drained from the line.

Recovery personnel installed a two-bladed propeller on the engine, and made other modifications to facilitate an attempt to run the engine (see the follow-up exam notes in the public docket).

The engine was started and run at low, intermediate, and finally at a high power setting. The engine was run a total of several minutes with no anomalies noted.

Propeller

All three propeller blades remained attached at the hub, but were loose, and rotated in the hub. They were all bent aft, and all three tips curled aft.

Fuel System

A detailed examination of the fuel system was completed on June 28, and the examination report is in the public docket; no anomalies were noted. The aft portion of the belly tank had a vent line going to a solenoid valve, which in turn was connected to a line exiting the belly skin of the airplane aft of the belly tank. Blowing into the vent with electrical power off, air could be heard going into the belly tank.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Video Study

A cell phone in the airplane contained media recordings of portions of the flight. An NTSB recorder's specialist in the Office of Research and Engineering viewed the images, and provided a written report, which is in the public docket for this accident. Pertinent parts of the report follow.

The phone captured 42 relevant media files, 23 still images and 16 video files. In some media files, the entire instrument panel was captured; in others, only portions of the instrument panel were captured. Only events pertinent to the accident were summarized.

The video files included start, taxi, takeoff, and cruise. Videos showed the airplane at different altitudes increasing from 1,500 feet up to 3,500 feet.

A still file showed the airplane in nearly level flight about 3,000 feet msl. Airspeed was 175 knots, heading was 315 degrees, manifold pressure was 26.8 psi, rpm was 2,480, fuel pressure 11 psi, oil pressure 55 psi, fuel flow 18.1 gph, and oil temperature was 178° F. The cylinder head temperature (CHT) was within that particular instrument's green limits. A clock showed a time of 19 minutes and 35 seconds. Another still taken several minutes later showed the airplane at 3,500 feet, on a direct route GPS track to French Valley Airport, which was 27.4 nm away.

A video began 28 minutes after startup; 3 seconds into that recording, the engine was heard making a surging noise. The pilot's hand was on the throttle then moved away as if to manipulate something on the instrument panel. No engine instruments were captured in the recording, and the GPS showed that the airplane was no longer on a direct track to the programmed waypoint. Eight seconds into the recording, the passenger appeared to put the phone down. No other useful visual information was captured; the recording ended 4 seconds later, and the engine was still surging.

Radar Study

Recorded radar data tracked the flight from about 1 minute after departure until the airplane approached the accident site. The airplane turned to the north, and remained to the east of Interstate 15. About 5 minutes prior to the accident, the airplane was nearly abeam the accident site at a mode C reported altitude of 3,700 feet msl. About 1 minute later, the target began a left 100-degree turn at 3,900 feet. About 1 minute later, it was descending to the west as it crossed Interstate 15 below 3,600 feet, and continued a descending turn to the south to parallel the freeway. It continued descending on a straight southerly course for about 1 minute; it then began a left turn, crossing the freeway at 1,700 feet. The turn was over 180 degrees, and the last data point was near the accident site with the target at 600 feet.

Amateur Built


According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 20-27F, Certification and Operation of Amateur-Built Aircraft, "Amateur builders are free to develop their own designs or build from existing designs. We do not approve these designs and it would be impractical to develop design standards for the wide variety of design configurations, created by designers, kit manufacturers, and amateur builders."

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA09
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 02, 2016 in Fallbrook, CA
Aircraft: NOKES MATTHEW LANCAIR IV P, registration: N438Y
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 5 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 2, 2016, about 0915 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Nokes Matthew Lancair IV P, N438Y, collided with a parked car on the shoulder of Interstate 15 near Fallbrook, California. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries; one occupant of the car sustained fatal injuries, and the other three occupants sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal flight departed Gillespie Field (SEE), San Diego, California, about 0900; the destination has not yet been established. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses observed the airplane approaching the freeway, and noted that the engine sound was quiet.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) and inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) examined the site. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a 12-foot-long ground scar with blue paint transfer marks from the belly of the airplane. About 10 feet after the ground scar was a series of propeller strike marks perpendicular to the flight path. Between the fourth and fifth strike marks (about 11 feet), another ground scar with blue paint transfer marks started. This ground scar was continuous to the wreckage.The nose of the airplane collided with the left rear portion of the trunk at an angle from the left to right, and intruded into the right back seat area of the parked car. The airplane pushed the car off the freeway shoulder and into the adjacent dirt area. The airplane's three-bladed propeller and engine remained enmeshed with the car.

Investigators established control continuity for the ailerons, elevators, and rudder.

The airplane was removed to a secure location for further examination.




SAN DIEGO - A man who survived after a plane crashed into his car on I-15 says he is prepared to file a lawsuit after the full investigation is complete.

Jason Soule stood in his living room holding the shattered derby helmet that once protected his head.

"It's a symbol of that day," he said.

The helmet is now in pieces from the plane crash on the I-15 Freeway in Fallbrook, like many aspects of Soule's life.

"The next thing I know, I'm sitting on the dirt in front of the car like 'holy crap is that an airplane sticking out of the car?'"

The crash killed 38-year-old Antoinette Isbell. The group of four roller derby skaters were headed to LA to compete on April 2.

"In the trauma center they opened me up and put two plates and 14 screws on my scapula," he said.

Soule spent the weekend in surgery.

Soule is a scuba diver. He makes a living doing mechanical maintenance on yachts. He needs his shoulder to get back to normal, so he can get back in the water.
 
"I'm not sure how it is going to affect me or if I'm ever going to be the same," he said tearfully.

His lawyer is prepared to file a lawsuit when investigators point a finger, but in the meantime he's pulling from retirement funds and counting on a GoFundMe account.

Although the pilot Dennis Hogge has no insurance or registration, none of this has hardened Soule's heart.
 
"I don't like to hold hate in my heart," he said.


Story and video:  http://www.10news.com





Three of the five victims whose car was struck by a small aircraft said they’re struggling with mounting medical bills because the pilot was uninsured and his plane was not registered or properly inspected for years. 

One person died and five were hurt on April 3 when a single-engine, two-seat Lancair IV crashed into a car on Interstate 15 near State Route 76.

Attorneys for both the survivors and the pilot confirm that the pilot is uninsured.

“Disbelief. I’m not going to lie. It makes me angry someone can do that,” said Emily Boesmiller-Hoch, one of the people in the car.

“I don’t know if there’s the airport of FAA or somebody who needs to be regulating who’s flying around in the air,” said Jason Soule, another survivor.

FAA documents provided by the survivors’ attorney, Christian Hulburt, show that in 2013, the FAA notified Dennis Hooge his plane’s registration was about to expire. In 2014, the FAA sent him another letter saying it expired and “the airworthiness certificates no longer support the operation of the aircraft.”

“This has been one of the most disturbing cases,” said Hulburt.” Because it’s such an obvious case of clear liability, catastrophic injuries and irresponsible behavior and apparently nothing that anyone can do about it."

Hulburt said he also tried filing a claim with the victims’ uninsured driver insurances, but it was rejected.

NBC 7 spoke to the pilot’s attorney, Michael McCabe. He said the lack of insurance and registration was an oversight by his client. He said he's in the process of locating a crash witness who saw the car pull over to the side of the road. McCabe said the car on the shoulder was to blame for the accident. That's a statement the victims’ attorney said is inaccurate.

“When people are irresponsible, they need to be held accountable for what they did,” said Aaron McCann who also survived the crash.

Soule said he risks being evicted from his home because he’s unable to work and get financial support from the pilot’s insurance. A GoFundMe page has been created to help him.

The NTSB is still investigating what caused the plane to malfunction.


Story and video: http://www.nbcsandiego.com



SAN DIEGO - Friends of Antoinette Frances Isbelle, 38, said it’s still unimaginable she’s gone.


Isbelle died Saturday after a plane crashed into a car she was riding in on the I-15 freeway near Fallbrook.


“All of us friends just keep saying, we can't believe it,” said Shane Zelm.


He said he’s been friends with Isbelle, who went by Toni, for almost 20 years. He said the thought of losing her has been unbearable.


“Just a surreal experience to think something like that could happen,” said Zelm.


Zelm said they bonded through music.


“Playing Deftones and Korn, they were favorite bands of hers, that's how our friendship really kind of really came together,” said Zelm.


But these days, Zelm said fun for Toni meant skating with the San Diego Roller Derby team.


“She made it from the B squad to the A squad,” said Zelm.


He said she joined the Starlettes team several years ago. Her nickname, Rockalicious.


“She's just a rocker, she's a rock and roll girl, so rockalicious describes a lot,” said Zelm.


But on Saturday, Toni, who was sitting in the back of a Nissan 4-door sedan, was crushed to death after a plane slammed into it on the I-15. Officials said the pilot did not have his landing gear down.


“She's going to be very missed,” said Zelm.


And as Zelm thinks back to their years of friendship, he said the outpouring of support has helped him and her family.


If you would like to donate to Toni's funeral service fund, click here.

Original article can be found here: http://www.10news.com



One person was crushed to death and five are injured after a small plane crashed into a car on a San Diego freeway, officials confirmed to NBC 7 San Diego. 

The single-engine, two-seat Lancair IV crashed into a car on Interstate 15 North near State Route 76 at approximately 9:15 a.m. Saturday morning, about 50 miles north of San Diego.

“One witness stated that they didn't hear the engine of the plane. Witnesses are saying without question the plane appeared to be having mechanical issues,” Chris Parent of CHP said.

The driver, identified as Aaron Meccann, had pulled over to sync his Bluetooth when the plane crash landed in the fourth lane of the freeway, sliding 250 feet and hitting the back of the Nissan, CHP authorities on scene said. CHP officials said there was no evidence landing gear was deployed and it appeared the plane had mechanical issues. 

Authorities on scene told NBC 7 San Diego that a 38-year-old woman, identified as Antoinette Frances Isbelle, was sitting in the back passenger seat and was crushed to death at impact. Meccann, 43, who had pulled over to sync his Bluetooth, was taken to Palomar Hospital with lacerations above his eye; a 45-year-old female sitting in the front left passenger seat was taken to Sharp Linda Vista; a 36-year-old man sitting in the back passenger seat was taken to Sharp Linda Vista Hospital.

The pilot, a 60-year-old man, suffered severe head trauma, CHP officials said; his injuries are considered life-threatening. He was taken to Palomar Hospital. The passenger in the plane, a woman in her 50s, suffered non life-threatening injuries and was taken to Palomar Hospital.

Chris Saunders, a Palomar Hospital spokesman, said the extent of the victims' injuries and their conditions are unknown as they are in the ER. 

Crews worked to clean up a fuel leak from either the plane or car following the crash. 

Jacob Duncan was heading to work when he noticed a plane that appeared to be having trouble leveling out approaching the freeway.

“The plane touched down about 40 feet behind my car and it slid about another 40 feet,” Duncan recalled in an interview with NBC 7.

“One car was stopped on the shoulder,” he said. “It slammed right into the back of them.”

Duncan hopped out of his vehicle and with the help of other passersby tried to help the people in the aircraft and the vehicle.

Erika Uribe-Muñoz witnessed the crash and commented on NBC 7's Facebook page.

"We were on the opposite side of the freeway, we saw it as it was coming down to crash, pretty scary," she said.

Cyndi Young also saw the crash. "Was scary," she posted on our FB page. "Went right over our heads. Saw it hit the ground."

A Sig Alert was issued for the area as crews respond to the scene. Traffic quickly backed up in the area. 

Duncan said in hindsight, it was obvious the pilot didn’t have much control of the plane and was trying his best to avoid the vehicles on the road.

If the car hadn’t been stopped on the freeway, Duncan said, he thinks the crash would’ve been avoidable.

“The pilot really I believe was trying his best,” he said.

Isbelle was a member of the San Diego Roller Derby according to the 'Aftershocks.' The team posted condolences on their Facebook page Saturday saying: 

"We are hit very hard with the passing of Toni "Rockalicious" Isbelle. She was a great part of our family. Condolences to our sister league San Diego Roller Derby. Your big brothers will always be here for you for anything that you need. We love you Rockalicious!"

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcsandiego.com


A small plane that slammed into a car after landing on Interstate 15 in Fallbrook on Saturday killed a San Diego roller derby skater sitting in the vehicle's back seat, authorities said.

The woman was identified by the Medical Examiner’s Office as Antoinette “Toni” Frances Isbelle, 38, of San Diego. Isbelle was a member of the Starlettes roller derby team under the nickname “Rockalishous.”

The Lancair IV-P, amateur-built experimental airplane, landed in the northbound slow lane of the freeway, about a mile north of state Route 76 at 9:15 a.m., said California Highway Patrol Officer Chris Parent.

It skidded about 250 feet and plowed into the back of a 2015 Nissan Sentra carrying the roller derby skaters. Parent said the driver, Aaron Mccann, 42, of Escondido, had stopped on the shoulder to sync his Bluetooth when the plane struck the car.

Witnesses rushed to the wreckage to help victims.

“Witnesses said the plane was banking east of the freeway in apparent distress, then banked from the west as it headed north,” Parent said. He said one motorist reported not hearing the engine before the aircraft landed.

Greg Wilson of Fallbrook, a member of Palomar RC Flyers club, was among several people clearing weeds at a nearby model airplane airfield when the Lancair IV made a low pass overhead. Wilson said he suspected the pilot spotted or knew of the paved model runway and thought he could land there. But then the plane made a turn and descended to the freeway.

The pilot, Dennis Hogge, 62, of Jamul, suffered major facial injuries. His passenger, a woman in her 50s, suffered a large laceration on her neck and underwent surgery later in the day, Parent said. He did not know her name or relationship to Hogge.

Mccann suffered a cut over one eye. Jason Soule, 43, suffered a broken shoulder and Emily Boesmiller-Hoch, 36, had an injured leg, Parent said.

Mccann is a member of the Aftershocks, as “Rowdy Rodbuster,” and Soule skates as “Vanilla Gorilla,” according to their Facebook pages.

Hundreds of friends, fans and other derby skaters flocked to the San Diego Roller Derby’s Facebook page to mourn Isbelle’s death.

“Thank you to all our friends and family who have been so supportive today in the aftermath of the horrific accident that involved two of our league members and two of our brothers at San Diego Aftershocks,” the league posted. “We are still processing and grieving at this time and we thank you for your condolences.”

Mccann posted on his page: “I am so grateful for the derby community, and my friends that offered support. I truly wish today could just start over. It’s a sad day and I’m just working on processing it all.”

The Lancair is a four-seat, homebuilt plane. Production was stopped on the IV model kits in 2012.

Hogge is the plane’s registered owner, although Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane’s registration had expired. He was certified in 1991 as a repairman and builder of experimental aircraft and received his private pilot’s license in 2010, records show.

“He’s a master craftsman,” said Matt Nokes, 53, of Cardiff, who has known Hogge for more than a dozen years.

Nokes, a former Major League Baseball player, owned the Lancair IV before Hogge did, and Hogge later brokered the deal when Nokes sold it to a company.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.latimes.com




FALLBROOK — A small plane landed on northbound Interstate 15 in Fallbrook Saturday morning and slammed into the back of a car carrying San Diego roller derby members, killing a woman in the back seat, authorities said.

She was identified by the Medical Examiner’s Office as Antoinette “Toni” Frances Isbelle, 38, of San Diego. Isbelle was a member of the Starlettes roller derby team under the nickname “Rockalishous.”

The plane, a single-engine blue and white Lancair IV, landed in the slow lane of the freeway, about a mile north of state Route 76 at 9:15 a.m, said California Highway Patrol Officer Chris Parent.

It skidded about 250 feet and plowed into the back of a 2015 Nissan Sentra carrying the roller derby skaters. Parent said the driver, Aaron Mccann, 42, of Escondido, had stopped on the shoulder trying to sync his Bluetooth with his vehicle when the plane struck the car.

Witnesses rushed to the wreckage to help victims.

“Witnesses said the plane was banking east of the freeway in apparent distress, then banked from the west as it headed north,” Parent said. He said one motorist reported not hearing the engine before the aircraft landed.

Greg Wilson of Fallbrook, a member of Palomar RC Flyers club, was among several people clearing weeds at a nearby model airplane airfield when the Lancair IV made a low pass overhead. He suspects the pilot spotted or knew of the paved model runway and thought he could land there, Wilson said. But then the plane made a turn and descended to the freeway.

The Lancair’s pilot Dennis Hogge, 62, of Jamul, suffered major facial injuries. His passenger, a woman in her 50s, suffered a large laceration on her neck and underwent surgery later in the day, Parent said. He did not know her name or relationship to Hogge.

Mccann suffered a cut over one eye. Isbelle was in the back seat and took most of the force of the impact. San Diego residents Jason Soule, 43, suffered a broken shoulder and Emily Boesmiller-Hoch, 36, had an injured leg, Parent said.

Mccann is a member of the Aftershocks, as “Rowdy Rodbuster,” and Soule skates as “Vanilla Gorilla,” according to their Facebook pages.

Hundreds of friends, fans and other derby skaters flocked to the San Diego Roller Derby’s Facebook page to mourn Isbelle’s death.

“Thank you to all our friends and family who have been so supportive today in the aftermath of the horrific accident that involved two of our league members and two of our brothers at San Diego Aftershocks,” the league posted. “We are still processing and grieving at this time and we thank you for your condolences.”

Mccann posted on his page, “I am so grateful for the derby community, and my friends that offered support. I truly wish today could just start over. It’s a sad day and I’m just working on processing it all.”

The Lancair is a four-seater, homebuilt plane. Production was stopped on the IV model kits in 2012.

Hogge is the plane’s registered owner, although Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane’s registration had expired. He was certified in 1991 as a repairman and builder of experimental aircraft and received his private pilot’s license in 2010, records show.

“He’s a master craftsman,” said Matt Nokes, 53, of Cardiff, who has known Hogge for more than a dozen years.

Nokes, a former Major League Baseball player, owned the Lancair IV before Hogge did, and Hogge later brokered the deal when Nokes sold it to a company.

It’s not the first time this plane has made an emergency landing on I-15.

Nokes was piloting it in 2000 when he took it down onto southbound lanes in Rancho Bernardo because of a fuel-flow problem that caused the plane to lose power.

Nokes said he flew above freeway traffic at 120 mph, giving the cars behind the plane a chance to see him. Then he slowed the plane’s speed and landed smoothly, taxiing off the shoulder without blocking traffic.

It was his second flight in the high-performance, experimental aircraft, which was built for him by a professional. In an interview Saturday, Nokes said the engine manufacturer never figured out what went wrong but replaced the malfunctioning part.

San Diego police and California Highway Patrol officers escort a Lancair IV-P experimental airplane southbound on I-15 where it made emergency landing after developing engine trouble in 2000. The plane was piloted by Matt Nokes.


“It was beautiful, a work of art,” he said of the plane.

He said he flew it regularly, including to ballgames, and sold it in 2004 through Hogge, to a company. At some point it ended up sitting in the hot sun somewhere for years until many parts, including the wings and stabilizers, warped and had to be rebuilt or replaced, Nokes said. Hogge at some point acquired the plane.

Several lanes of the northbound freeway were closed for hours Saturday, tangling traffic for miles. Southbound traffic was also jammed due to curious onlookers, as well as Old Highway 395 that parallels the freeway.

The plane, partially in some bushes, was moved completely to the shoulder about 5 p.m., after federal aviation investigators surveyed the scene and the car was towed away. The plane will remain there until it can be towed to Arizona for the investigation being conducted by the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) - 6:20 p.m. - Officials have identified the victim killed in the deadly plane crash as 38-year-old Antoinette Isbelle of San Diego. The car that was crushed in the incident was pulled over to the side of the road so the driver could connect his Bluetooth device to his vehicle. 

The FAA has cleared the plane off of the Interstate 15, clearing significant delays on the northbound freeway lanes that lasted for hours. 

3:35 p.m. - The pilot of the plane has been identified as 62-year-old Dennis Hogge of Jamul, CA. 

1:20 p.m. - A single-engine Lancair IV aircraft crashed into a 4-door Nissan pulled over to the shoulder, skidding approximately 250' across the northbound Interstate 15 before crushing and killing a 38-year-old woman in the rear right passenger seat. Three other passengers in the car suffered injuries, though none were considered potentially fatal. 

The 60-year-old pilot was transported to Palomar Hospital with life-threatening injuries described as severe head trauma. The 50-year-old passenger in the plane with him was hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries. 

Firefighters extricated a 45-year-old woman who was riding in the front passenger seat of the car. The 42-year-old driver and 36-year-old passenger in the left rear seat did not need extrication, according to North County Fire spokesman John Buchanan. Fire responders also contained a fuel leak before it caught fire. 

11:25 a.m. - The person killed in the plane crash was a female seated in the backseat of the rear passenger side of the vehicle that was struck, approximately 20-to-30 years of age, according to the CHP. The pilot of the plane — identified as a 60-year-old male — suffered life threatening injuries and was transported to Palomar Hospital, according to North County Fire spokesman John Buchanan. 

None of the other injuries sustained were considered life-threatening, according to officials. 

A witness on the scene indicated he did not hear the plane's engine as it descended, the CHP said, though details remain unconfirmed until the Federal Aviation Administration conducts a full investigation. 

10:54 a.m. - A small plane crashed into a car on Interstate 15 Saturday morning in Pala Mesa, killing one person and leaving five others hospitalized, authorities said. One person, who was in the car that was struck, was pronounced dead on scene, according to spokesman John Buchanan. 

California Highway Patrol received a call at 9:15 a.m. from a motorist who witnessed the plane landing on northbound I-15, near State Route 76, the CHP reported. 

Eight North County Fire Protection District units were sent to the scene, Motorists are warned to avoid the area since officials expect long-term traffic problems in both directions while authorities investigate the scene, Buchanan said. Federal Aviation Administration officials have asked first responders to leave the crashed plane untouched so they can conduct their own investigation of the incident. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.kusi.com



FALLBROOK, Calif. -- A small plane crashed into a car parked on the shoulder of Interstate 15 in the Pala Mesa area of North County this morning, killing a woman and sending five others to local hospitals, authorities said.

The North County Fire Protection District transported five patients, three to Palomar Medical Center in Escondido and two to Sharp Memorial in Kearny Mesa. Antoinette Frances Isbelle, 38, of San Diego County, was a passenger in the right rear seat of the car and was pronounced dead at the scene, spokesman John Buchanan said.

The four occupants of the car were local roller derby athletes on their way to a match in San Fernando Valley. Isbelle was a member of San Diego Roller Derby.

The pilot of the Lancair IV, single-engine low-wing plane was hospitalized with life-threatening injuries described as severe trauma to his head.

He was identified by a CHP spokesman as Dennis Hogge, 62, of Jamul. His 50-year-old female passenger was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and underwent surgery this afternoon.

A motorist called the California Highway Patrol at 9:15 a.m. and reported witnessing a plane landing on northbound I-15, just south of State Route 76, the CHP reported.

The Nissan 4-door sedan was parked on the shoulder of the freeway so the driver could sync his Bluetooth with the car, Buchanan said. The plane skidded along the slow lane of the freeway for about 250 feet before crashing into the rear of the car, crushing Isbelle in the back seat.

It took firefighters about 25 minutes to extricate the 45-year-old woman who was riding in the front passenger seat of the car. The 42-year-old male driver and 36-year-old male passenger in the left rear seat did not require extrication, according to Buchanan.

Firefighters were able to contain a fuel leak before it caught fire since they arrived on scene from their station located less than a mile from the crash, Buchanan said.

“It's amazing that there weren't more injuries,'' he said.

Federal Aviation Administration officials told first responders not to move the plane until they arrived to begin their investigation. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, according to Ian Gregor, public affairs manager of the FAA's Pacific Division.

A large number of people witnessed the crash, Buchanan said. Many of them reported not hearing anything that would indicate engine trouble, but said the way the plane was banking to the east, then to the west before hitting the ground indicated it was in some kind of trouble.

The Lancair IV is a homebuilt propjet aircraft with retracting landing gear that seats four including the pilot, and ceased production in 2012. It appeared from the crash scene that the landing gear had not been deployed, according to an official. FAA records indicate the aircraft was categorized as experimental and was amateur built and that its FAA registry had expired.

Three lanes on the northbound side of the freeway remained open, but the CHP issued a SigAlert for the area, warning motorists to stay away as traffic problems were expected to last for hours. Traffic on I-15 was backed up for miles in both directions and surface streets in the area were also clogged.

The slow lane was expected to remain closed until investigators could remove the plane and car wreckage, according to CHP spokesman Chris Parent. The NTSB had arrived on scene by late afternoon and was in the process of removing the plane, Parent said.

All lanes were expected to be re-opened by early evening.

Story and video: http://fox5sandiego.com








A small plane crashed into a car parked on the shoulder of Interstate 15 in the Pala Mesa area of North County Saturday morning, killing one person and sending five others to local hospitals, authorities said.


The North County Fire Protection District transported five patients, three to Palomar Medical Center in Escondido and two to Sharp Memorial in Kearny Mesa. A woman who was a passenger in the right rear seat of the car was pronounced dead at the scene, spokesman John Buchanan said. She was 38 but has not yet been identified by name.


The driver of the car was identified as Aaron Meccann, 42, or Escondido. The front-seat passenger was identified as Jason Soule, 43, of San Diego.


The pilot of the  Lancair IV-P, amateur-built experimental airplane, 62-year old Dennis Hogge, was hospitalized with life-threatening injuries described as severe trauma to his head. The 50-year-old woman who was his passenger was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries.


A motorist called the California Highway Patrol at 9:15 a.m. and reported witnessing a plane landing on northbound I-15, just south of State Route 76, the CHP reported.


The Nissan 4-door sedan was parked on the shoulder of the freeway, Buchanan said. The plane skidded along the slow lane of the freeway for about 150 feet before crashing into the rear of the car, crushing the woman in the back seat.


It took firefighters about 25 minutes to extricate the woman in her 30s who was riding in the left rear passenger seat of the car. 


Firefighters were able to contain a fuel leak before it caught fire since they arrived on scene from their station located less than a mile from the crash, Buchanan said.


"It's amazing that there weren't more injuries," Buchanan said.


Federal Aviation Administration officials told first responders not to move the plane until they arrived to begin their investigation.


The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, according to Ian Gregor, public affairs manager of the FAA's Pacific Division.


A large number of people witnessed the crash, Buchanan said. Many of them reported hearing a sputtering engine before the plane went down.


John Marshall was driving on the I-15 when he saw the plane go down.


He pulled over, got out of his car, and ran to help those injured.


Marshall said there was a pilot and female passenger inside the plane. He and a couple other people tried to get the plane door open, but it was jammed.


Marshall got a hammer from his tool box in his car and "busted out the window" to help the pilot.


The two left lanes on the northbound side of the freeway remained open, but the CHP issued a SigAlert for the area at 10:30 a.m., warning motorists to stay away as traffic problems were expected to last for hours.



Original article can be found here:   http://www.10news.com









A small plane crashed into a car parked on the shoulder of Interstate 15 in the Pala Mesa area of North County Saturday morning, killing a 38-year-old woman and sending five others to local hospitals, authorities said.


The North County Fire Protection District transported five patients, three to Palomar Medical Center in Escondido and two to Sharp Memorial in Kearny Mesa.


Antoinette Frances Isbelle, 38, who was a passenger in the right rear seat of the car was pronounced dead at the scene, spokesman John Buchanan said.


The driver of the car was identified as Aaron Meccann, 42, or Escondido. The front-seat passenger was identified as Jason Soule, 43, of San Diego.


The pilot of the Lancair IV, single-engine low-wing plane, 62-year old Dennis Hogge, was hospitalized with life-threatening injuries described as severe trauma to his head. The 50-year-old woman who was his passenger was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries.


A motorist called the California Highway Patrol at 9:15 a.m. and reported witnessing a plane landing on northbound I-15, just south of State Route 76, the CHP reported.


The Nissan 4-door sedan was parked on the shoulder of the freeway, Buchanan said. The plane skidded along the slow lane of the freeway for about 150 feet before crashing into the rear of the car, crushing the woman in the back seat.


It took firefighters about 25 minutes to extricate the woman in her 30s who was riding in the left rear passenger seat of the car. 


Firefighters were able to contain a fuel leak before it caught fire since they arrived on scene from their station located less than a mile from the crash, Buchanan said.


"It's amazing that there weren't more injuries," Buchanan said.


Federal Aviation Administration officials told first responders not to move the plane until they arrived to begin their investigation.


The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, according to Ian Gregor, public affairs manager of the FAA's Pacific Division.


A large number of people witnessed the crash, Buchanan said. Many of them reported hearing a sputtering engine before the plane went down.


John Marshall was driving on the I-15 when he saw the plane go down.


He pulled over, got out of his car, and ran to help those injured.


Marshall said there was a pilot and female passenger inside the plane. He and a couple other people tried to get the plane door open, but it was jammed.


Marshall got a hammer from his tool box in his car and "busted out the window" to help the pilot.


The two left lanes on the northbound side of the freeway remained open, but the CHP issued a SigAlert for the area at 10:30 a.m., warning motorists to stay away as traffic problems were expected to last for hours.


Original article can be found here: http://www.10news.com













UPDATE: Sunday, April 3, 8 a.m.

The victim who died in as a result of the plane crash that occurred Saturday, April 15 at 9:15 a.m. on Interstate 15 has been identified as Antoinette Isbelle, 38, of San Diego.  The relationship between Isbelle and the other three in the car is unknown at this time.

Isbelle was sitting in the backseat of the vehicle that had pulled over to sync their phone to a wireless device. According to a San Diego County Coroner’s press release, she “was the rear seat passenger in a sedan that was stopped on the right shoulder of the ISR 15, N. of Old Hwy 395.

According to a San Diego County Coroner’s press release, she “was the rear seat passenger in a sedan that was stopped on the right shoulder of the ISR 15, N. of Old Hwy 395,” when the plane which had experienced engine trouble and attempted to land on northbound Interstate 15, skidded approximately 250 feet, smashing into the rear of the car.

“The plane landed, hopped, and skipped before striking the rear, right side of the vehicle,” North County Fire Public Information Officer John Buchanan said. “The impact caused the trunk area of the vehicle to be pushed up into the passenger area and killed the passenger riding in the rear, right-side passenger seat.”

Isbelle was pronounced dead at the scene.

Five others were injured in the accident, including the pilot, Dennis Hogge, 62, of Jamul, who received life-threatening injuries described as severe trauma to his head. His 50-year-old female passenger was hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries and underwent surgery Saturday afternoon.

Also injured were the unidentified driver of the Nissan and two other passengers, also unidentified.

“The driver of the passenger vehicle, a 42-year-old male was also taken to Palomar with non-life-threatening injuries,” said Buchanan. “Two passengers in the vehicle, a 45-year-old male, and a 36-year-old female were taken to Sharp Memorial Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.”

The FAA is investigating the crash.

UPDATE: Saturday, April 2

FALLBROOK – A small, private aircraft Lancair IV, single-engine low-wing plane, made an emergency landing onto northbound Interstate 15 in Fallbrook this morning, killing a woman and injuring five other individuals.

The crash occurred Sat., April 2, at approximately 9:15 a.m. on the freeway just north of State Route 76, forcing the California Highway Patrol to issue a Sig Alert due to heavy congestion throughout the area.

The pilot was identified by a CHP spokesman as Dennis Hogge, 62, of Jamul.

According to North County Fire public information officer John Buchanan, the pilot attempted to make an emergency landing in the number four lane of the northbound side of the freeway but struck a vehicle in the process. The downed plane ended up on the right side of the roadway, in the number three and four lanes of traffic.

“There was a passenger vehicle, a Nissan 4-door sedan, that had pulled over on the (east) shoulder of the freeway and the occupants were trying to sync their phone to a wireless device,” said Buchanan.

The plane landed, hopped, and skipped before striking the rear, right side of the vehicle,” he said. “

The impact caused the trunk area of the vehicle to be pushed up into the passenger area and killed the passenger riding in the rear, right-side passenger seat.” The fatally injured female passenger was pronounced dead at the scene, spokesman John Buchanan said. Her identity was not released, but she was believed to be a 38-year-old San Diego resident.

Buchanan said in addition to the fatality, five people were injured in the incident.

The pilot was taken to Palomar Medical Center with life-threatening injuries described as severe trauma to his head. His 50-year-old female passenger was hospitalized with non-life- threatening injuries and underwent surgery this afternoon.

“The driver of the passenger vehicle, a 42-year-old male was also taken to Palomar with non-life-threatening injuries,” said Buchanan. “Two passengers in the vehicle, a 45-year-old male and a 36-year-old female were taken to Sharp Memorial Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.”

It took firefighters about 25 minutes to extricate the 45-year-old woman who was riding in the front passenger seat of the car. The 42-year-old male driver and 36-year-old male passenger in the left rear seat did not require extrication, according to Buchanan.Firefighters were able to contain a fuel leak before it caught fire since they arrived on

Firefighters were able to contain a fuel leak before it caught fire since they arrived on scene from their station located less than a mile from the crash, Buchanan said.The incident brought a flood of 911 calls to CHP emergency communications dispatchers from motorists and witnesses who saw the aircraft emergency.

The incident brought a flood of 911 calls to CHP emergency communications dispatchers from motorists and witnesses who saw the aircraft emergency.

“It’s amazing that there weren’t more injuries,” he said.

Federal Aviation Administration officials told first responders not to move the plane until they arrived to begin their investigation. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board (NASB) will investigate, according to Ian Gregor, public affairs manager of the FAA’s Pacific Division.A large number of people witnessed the crash, Buchanan said. Many of them reported not hearing anything that would indicate engine

A large number of people witnessed the crash, Buchanan said. Many of them reported not hearing anything that would indicate engine trouble but said the way the plane was banking to the east, then to the west before hitting the ground indicated it was in some kind of trouble.

The Lancair IV is a homebuilt propjet aircraft with retracting landing gear that seats four including the pilot and ceased production in 2012. It appeared from the crash scene that the landing gear had not been deployed, according to an official.

Three lanes on the northbound side of the freeway remained open, but the CHP issued a SigAlert for the area, warning motorists to stay away as traffic problems were expected to last for hours. Traffic on I-15 was backed up for miles in both directions and surface streets in the area were also clogged.

The slow lane was expected to remain closed until investigators could remove the plane and car wreckage, according to CHP spokesman Chris Parent. The NTSB was expected to arrive on scene by late afternoon and remove the plane, Parent said.

PREVIOUS STORY:

FALLBROOK –  A plane crash onto Interstate 15 freeway just north of Interstate 76, has forced the California Highway Patrol to issue a Sig Alert and caused major traffic congestion throughout the area. The emergency landing brought a flood of 911 calls to CHP emergency communications dispatchers from motorists and witnesses who saw the aircraft emergency Saturday, April 2.

The CHP incident log is reporting that multiple callers reported seeing the plane crash into at least one vehicle at about 9:15 a.m., when it attempted to make an emergency landing onto the northbound lanes of traffic on the freeway. Initial reports say two people were in the plane, which was described as a small, white and blue jet and four people were in the vehicle the plane struck. The condition of those involved the accident is unknown at this time, though initial reports say one person died in the crash.

After crashing into the vehicle on the freeway, the downed plane ended up on the right side of the roadway, in the number three and four lanes of traffic. 

According to CHP officials, the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and officials are responding to the location to conduct an accident investigation. FAA officials have requested the plane not be moved from its current location on the freeway until their arrival. 

As of 10:35 a.m., traffic on the southbound lanes of traffic is slow and heavy, as motorists slow to see the downed aircraft. The number one and two lanes of northbound traffic are moving slow, however, the number three and four lanes of traffic have been diverted and funneled down to just two lanes.

Early details:

One person was killed and five injured at about 9:15 a.m. this morning as a private aircraft crash landed onto I-15 Northbound between SR 76 and Pala Mesa Dr. in Fallbrook.

According to North County Fire, the plane hit a vehicle in the rear and killed one person in the vehicle. There are five other people in the incident and they’ve all been transported to medical facilities.

The Northbound 15 is still reduced to one lane of travel. Anyone traveling northbound on I-15 should find an alternate route.

Original article can be found here:  http://myvalleynews.com

SAN DIEGO (CNS) - A memorial will be held Monday night to remember a 38-year-old roller derby skater killed when a small plane crashed into the car in which she was a passenger on Interstate 15 in the Fallbrook area over the weekend.

Antoinette Frances Isbelle, a Starlettes team member who skated as "Rockalishous," was in the backseat of a Nissan sedan that was struck by the troubled Lancair IV single-engine plane as it was attempting to land alongside the freeway near Old Highway 395 Saturday morning. The car's driver had momentarily pulled to the roadside to sync a Bluetooth device, authorities said.

Three other local roller derby skaters were injured in the crash, along with the plane's 62-year-old pilot and 50-year-old passenger.

The San Diego Roller Derby identified the three skaters involved in the accident using their nicknames Rowdy Rodbuster, Vanilla Gorilla and Witchy
Wife. Tonight's event at Skateworld San Diego in Linda Vista will also raise money to help in their recoveries.

"In the aftermath of the tragic accident involving members of our San Diego roller derby community, we want to honor our fallen teammate and support our injured derby family during this difficult time," roller derby officials said in a statement.
   
Several people who witnessed the crash told investigators they didn't hear anything that would indicate engine trouble, but the way the plane had banked was a sign of trouble, according to fire officials. It's landing gear had apparently not been deployed.

The National Transportation Safety Board has launches an investigation into the plane crash. A preliminary report is expected this week, but it could take authorities up to a year to complete their investigation, according to NTSB spokesman Terry Williams.