Saturday, June 6, 2015

St. Clair Regional Airport (K39) May Get Another Tenant

It appears the city of St. Clair soon will have an additional tenant at its airport.

Mark Saunders, who lives just outside the city limits, appeared before the St. Clair Board of Aldermen on Monday for the third time requesting he be allowed to rent hangar space at the facility.

That third time may, indeed, be the charm.

Saunders presented the board, Mayor Ron Blum and City Administrator Travis Dierker with information from the Federal Aviation Administration indicating it has proof that Saunders is “the lawful owner of a Challenger aircraft.”

The city has been waiting for proof that Saunders actually owns an airplane before renting hangar space to him. During previous meetings, he had not been able to establish that proof.

“I’m only asking for one hangar at this time,” Saunders told the board and administration on Monday.

He said he may ask for more space later as he intends to purchase additional planes.

However, before the lease agreement is signed by the city, Saunders must receive an “N” number for his aircraft.

According to online information, the “N” number is the official registration number for a plane that identifies a civil aircraft in similar fashion to a licence plate on an automobile. In accordance with the Convention on International Civil Aviation, all aircraft must be registered with a national aviation authority and they must carry proof of this registration in the form of a legal document called a Certificate of Registration at all times when in operation.

In the United States, the registration number is commonly referred to as an “N” number because all aircraft registered have a number starting with the letter N.

An alphanumeric system is used because of the large number of aircraft registered in the country. An “N” number may only consist of one to five characters, must start with a digit other than zero, and cannot end in a run of more than two letters. In addition, “N” numbers may not contain the letters “I” or “O” because of their similarities with the numerals 1 and 0.

“It’s our prerogative to verify an ‘N’ number with the FAA,” Blum told Saunders at the meeting. “Once we get that number, we’ll get you a hangar.”

Dierker said he has spoken with Raymond J. Monier, who works for the regional FAA office in Kansas City.

“Once the paperwork is complete you will get assigned a temporary ‘N’ number,” Dierker told Saunders. “Then, we can proceed.”

The information Saunders gave the city on Monday included a memo from Monier indicating the FAA had its proof that Saunders does now own an aircraft.

It stated that the craft previously had no “N” number because it never was registered with the FAA.

“It may take several weeks to complete this (‘N’ number) process,” Monier wrote. “However, I can assure you the process has been put in place for this to occur. When the ‘N’ number is received, the aircraft will undergo a thorough inspection from an FAA maintenance inspector or an FAA designated maintenance inspector.”

The memo goes on to say that, “As a result of this inspection process it would be in the best interest of all parties involved if the aircraft could be in a hangar to expedite this process.”

According to information Saunders presented at the meeting, he purchased a Challenger ultralight aircraft in late May. It was built from a kit in 1995.

“I show us sending this without an engine,” information concerning the transaction states. “I assume he bought one at another source.”

Information also states that the purchaser’s name is Ivan Yoder from Villa Ridge.

A bill of sale from May 29 indicates Saunders bought the aircraft from Yoder.

In April, Saunders had told the board of aldermen, “I have two planes.”

He added at the time that he is in a “desperate situation” to put them somewhere.

He requested renting two hangars.

Blum told him in April that if he fills out the application and provides proof of ownership of the aircraft, the city would rent him hangar space at the airport.

Rent is $175 per month per space.

Saunders said during that April meeting that he understood there has been a law signed by President Barack Obama that allows the facility to close. On Monday, he again said he knew about the closure law.

There currently are five hangar tenants. Pilots will be given 30 days’ notice that they have to vacate the property.

Source:  http://www.emissourian.com

Flight Design CTSW, registered to KT Aviation LLC and operated by a private individual, N535CT: Accident occurred June 06, 2015 near Haskell Airport (2K9), Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
BFU Germany; Braunschweig
National Transportation Safety Board; Denver, Colorado 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N535CT

Location: Haskell, OK
Accident Number: CEN15LA258
Date & Time: 06/06/2015, 1258 CDT
Registration: N535CT
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 6, 2015, about 1258 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW, light-sport airplane, N535CT, preformed a forced landing shortly after departing the Haskell Airport (2K9), Haskell, Oklahoma. The pilot and a passenger received minor injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the off-airport landing. The airplane was registered to KT Aviation LLC, of Wagoner, Oklahoma, and was operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated from 2K9 and was destined for Hefner-Easley Airport (H68), Wagoner, Oklahoma, at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that they had flown from H68 to 2K9 earlier in the day. Prior to departing H68, he did a normal preflight inspection, with no discrepancies noted and about 28 gallons of automotive fuel.

After starting engine at 2K9, the pilot noticed the engine gauges were normal, but the charging system had an inadequate output, so he shut down the engine. After consulting a mechanic, he restarted the engine about 1245, with normal engine and charging indications.

During the initial climb from 2K9 about 500 to 600 feet above ground level, the engine starting "sputtering". The engine continued to run but not enough to maintain altitude. The pilot selected a field for the forced landing; various throttle settings failed to restore engine power and the choke was off. The airplane touched down in a muddy field and came to rest inverted.

An on-scene wreckage examination found substantial damage to the airplane's fuselage and damage to the airplane's landing gear. Fuel quality checks of the on-board fuel and the fuel facility were satisfactory. The wreckage was moved to a different location and a post-accident examination of the engine was conducted. Further examination revealed no water or debris were noted in the gascolator, the engine's left and right carburetor float bowls contained clean fuel, the sparkplugs appeared normal, and ignition spark was verified. A test run of the engine was conducted. The engine was started and run at idle before running up to power; no problems were noted during the engine examination or test run.

The airplane's EFIS (Electronic Fight Information System) and EMS (Engine Monitoring System), were removed for extraction of volatile memory (NVM). The memory in the EFIS was corrupted and no useful information could be obtained. The EMS contained an eight-minute recording of engine parameters for the accident flight. A review of the EMS data revealed the engine acceleration to high power, followed by fluctuations and a reduction in the engine rpms.

The NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division's full factual report is located in the public docket for this case.

The closest weather reporting station was located at the Okmulgee Regional Airport Okmulgee, Oklahoma, about 17 miles southwest from the accident site. At 1255, the station recorded wind from 150 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,700 ft agl, temperature 88° F, dew point 70° F, and an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice formation at glide power settings.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 56
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 303 hours (Total, all aircraft), 254 hours (Total, this make and model), 254 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/01/1980
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/01/1980
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 150 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH
Registration: N535CT
Model/Series: CTSW
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 07-05-01
Landing Gear Type: Unknown
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/14/2014, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 30 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 543 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: ROTAX
ELT:  C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS
Registered Owner: KT5 AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 80 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOKM, 720 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1755 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 234°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Haskell, OK (2K9)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: WAGONER, OK (H68)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1258 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: HASKELL (2K9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 588 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3710 ft / 30 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 35.834167, -95.665833 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA258

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 06, 2015 in Haskell, OK
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW, registration: N535CT
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 6, 2015, about 1258 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW, light-sport airplane, N535CT, impacted terrain and was substantially damaged during an off-airport forced landing at Haskell Airport (2K9), Haskell, Oklahoma. The pilot and a passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to KT Aviation LLC, of Wagoner, Oklahoma, and was operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing from 2K9, and was destined for Hefner-Easley Airport (H68), Wagoner, Oklahoma.

The pilot reported that during initial climb, while about 500 to 600 feet above ground level (agl), there was a sudden partial loss of engine power. The pilot was on left downwind leg when he executed a forced landing to a muddy field. The airplane came to rest inverted and the impact resulted in the almost complete separation of the empennage. There was a postimpact fuel spill, but there was no postimpact fire. Both occupants exited without assistance.

An on-scene wreckage examination showed adequate fuel was on-board. Fuel quality checks of the on-board fuel and of the fuel facility were satisfactory. The wreckage was moved to a different location and a postaccident test run of the engine was satisfactory. Several avionics components containing non-volatile memory (NVM), including engine performance data, were removed from the wreckage for examination and an extraction of useful data is expected.


The closest official NWS reporting location was about 17 miles southwest from the accident site at Okmulgee Regional Airport (OKM) Okmulgee, Oklahoma. At 1255 the Automated Surface Observation System at OKM reported wind from 150 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,700 feet agl, temperature 31 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 21 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.





HASKELL, Okla. —  A small plane has crashed in a field east of the Haskell Airport.

Two people were on board, and both made it out of the aircraft without sustaining major injuries.

Oklahoma Highway Patrol reports that a plane went down in a field east of the Haskell Airport. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft crashed off the field, and it is believed that engine problems caused the crash.

There were two people onboard, and both sustained only minor injuries.

The amount of damage is unknown at this time, and someone from the FAA will be sure to investigate.

Source:  http://www.fox23.com

Kimberly Gibbs: Curious change of Mile-Hi Skydiving plane routes on day of judge's visit

By Kimberly Gibbs

Ten years ago, if you had asked my opinion about skydiving or airplane noise I would have replied with complete indifference. All that changed about five years ago when I began to notice planes flying constantly over my neighborhood, about 8 miles from the airport. I later learned that they were skydiving jump planes — climbing steeply and noisily, circling constantly yet never going anywhere. After joining with other concerned citizens throughout Boulder County, our efforts to reduce the community noise impact eventually led to a lawsuit against the skydiving company. That lawsuit, Citizens For Quiet Skies et al. vs Mile-Hi Skydiving concluded on May 21, with Judge LaBuda ruling in favor of Mile-Hi.

A critical juncture in the trial involved the judge's site visit to observe Mile-Hi's flights, which are conducted within an established "flight box." The flight box encompasses an 85-square-mile area south of the Longmont airport and includes Hygiene, Niwot and Gunbarrel. In the days leading up to the site visit, Mile-Hi was observed dramatically changing its flight patterns and flying far outside the box, even though the owner testified that they must remain inside it at all times. As we suspected, during the site visit the plane flew several miles outside the box, all the way to Hall Ranch near Lyons, completely bypassing the Gunbarrel observation site. The flight tracks can be viewed on WebTrak (webtrak5.bksv.com/den3 beacon code 0331) at 3:35 p.m. May 2, 2015. If Mile-Hi was not concerned about the level of noise from their operation, then why would they make such an effort to avoid flying anywhere near the judge?

Confident in their victory following the whisper-quiet site visit flights, Mile-Hi embarked on a curious journey that same evening at about 7:25 pm, circling repeatedly around a plaintiff's home near Prairie Fire Circle (also on webtrak). This abusive conduct was completely in line with the credible testimony presented by a Mile-Hi pilot who claimed that the owner, Frank Casares, had personally directed him to buzz the home of a plaintiff and purposely create excessive noise.

Contrary to statements made by Mile-Hi's public relations firm, Mile-Hi has shown no interest in being a good neighbor — in fact, just the opposite. Since the trial's conclusion, Mile-Hi has significantly increased their activities, flying as many as 3 noisy turboprop jump planes concurrently. They are starting earlier in the morning and continuing later into the evening. The community noise impact will only increase unless their operation is regulated. And finally, in an effort to silence me, they have threatened a libel action for sharing this completely accurate information via social media (details on Facebook).

There is a solution to this important quality of life issue — we must regain local control over skydiving operations and noise regulation. If this is an important issue for you, we invite you to learn more at CitizensForQuietSkies.org.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.timescall.com/columnists/opinion

Incident occurred June 05, 2015 in Laredo, Texas

U.S. and Mexican authorities are seeking suspects after a U.S. Border Patrol helicopter was fired upon and forced to make an emergency landing in Laredo.  

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection helicopter was shot at Friday evening near La Bota Ranch, Webb County Sheriff Martin Cuellar said.

Cuellar said that out of the five shots, two were confirmed to have hit the helicopter.

Border Patrol spokesperson Sara Melendez said the helicopter landed safely and no injuries were reported.

It has not been confirmed if the shots were fired on the U.S. or Mexico side.

Source:  http://www.lmtonline.com

Incident occurred June 06, 2015 on the Ottawa River

A small float plane made an emergency landing on the Ottawa River early Saturday afternoon and its two occupants escaped with minor injuries, Gatineau firefighters say.

The emergency landing happened at about 12:30 p.m. on the Ottawa River.

The two people inside the plane were helped to shore by boaters who were nearby at the time.

The people in the plane suffered minor injuries and were taken to hospital, Gatineau police said.

On the Ontario side of the river, the scene was just east of Cumberland, Ont., near Canaan Road. On the Quebec side of the river, where the occupants of the plane were taken to, the scene was off du Fer à Cheval Road.

Source:  http://www.cbc.ca

Zenith 601XLB, N274AJ: Accident occurred June 06, 2015 near Alpine-Casparis Municipal Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N274AJ


Location: Alpine, TX
Accident Number: CEN15LA263
Date & Time: 06/06/2015, 0815 CDT
Registration: N274AJ
Aircraft: BELCHER CH601XLB
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test

Analysis 

The pilot/builder, an airframe and powerplant mechanic, stated that the engine had been experiencing low oil pressure and that he performed work on the oil system the day before the accident. On the day of the accident, he taxied the airplane for about 20 minutes and did not observe any anomalies. He then departed on a postmaintenance test flight. A few minutes after takeoff, the engine sputtered and experienced a total loss of power. The pilot selected a small open area in which to land. During the forced landing approach, the pilot saw wires across the flight path and attempted to fly under them. The airplane contacted the lowest wire and the airplane nosed down into a carport alongside a residence.

The pilot reported that he examined the engine after the accident. He stated that he failed to adjust the fuel flow after installing a high-pressure fuel pump, which resulted in insufficient fuel flow to the engine. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot/builder's failure to properly adjust the fuel flow, which resulted in reduced flow to the engine and a subsequent total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel pump - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Replacement - Owner/builder (Cause)

Factual Information

On June 6, 2015, at 0815 central daylight time, an amateur-built Belcher CH601XLB, N274AJ, collided with a residential carport following a loss of engine power in Alpine, Texas. The private pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a post-maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Alpine Casparis Municipal Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas, about 0810.

The pilot, who is an airframe and powerplant mechanic, built the aircraft. He stated the engine was experiencing low oil pressure and he worked on the oil system the day prior to the accident. On the day of the accident, he taxied the airplane for about 20 minutes and the engine operated normally during the taxi tests. He took off on the post maintenance test flight and the engine performed normally during the takeoff. A few minutes later, the engine started to sputter and lost all power.

The pilot selected a small open area in which to land. During the forced landing approach, the pilot saw wires across the flight path, so he elected to fly under them. The airplane contacted the lowest wire and the airplane nosed down into a residential carport.

The pilot reported that he examined the engine after the accident. He reported that he failed to adjust the fuel flow when he installed a high pressure fuel pump on the engine which resulted in insufficient fuel to the engine. 

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Emergency descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/30/2006
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/04/2014
Flight Time:  1366 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9 hours (Total, this make and model), 1272 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BELCHER
Registration: N274AJ
Model/Series: CH601XLB
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 6-7410
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/20/2014, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8.8 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-200
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: E38, 4514 ft msl
Observation Time: 0815 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Alpine, TX (E38)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Alpine, TX (E38)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0810 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Alpine Casparis Municipal (E38)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 4514 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 30.367500, -103.683611 (est)






NTSB Identification: CEN15LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 06, 2015 in Alpine, TX
Aircraft: BELCHER JIM B ZENITH 601XLB, registration: N274AJ
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 6, 2015, at 0820 central daylight time, an amateur-built Zenith 601XLB, N274AJ, collided with a residential carport in Alpine, Texas, following a loss of engine power during cruise flight. The sport pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to the pilot and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a post maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Alpine Casparis Municipal Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas, about 0810.

The pilot, who is also an airframe and powerplant mechanic and the aircraft builder, stated the engine was experiencing low oil pressure. He stated he worked on the oil system the day prior to the accident and taxied the airplane for about 20 minutes. The engine operated normally during the taxi tests. The following day he took off on the post maintenance test flight and everything operated normally. About 10 minutes after takeoff, the engine started to sputter then lost all power. 

The pilot selected a small open area in which to land. During the forced landing approach, the pilot saw wires across the flight path, so he elected to fly under them. The airplane contacted the lowest wire and the airplane nosed down into the carport alongside a residence.

Incident occurred June 06, 2015 at Bob Hope Airport (KBUR), Burbank, California

BURBANK, Calif. (KABC) -- The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a minor accident involving two Southwest Airlines planes at Bob Hope Airport in Burbank Saturday.

Flight 4721 was pushing back from the gate when it bumped wings with Flight 2183 on the tarmac.

None of the passengers onboard the Southwest Airlines flights to Sacramento and Phoenix were injured. 

Passengers deplaned the Boeing 737 aircraft and were loaded onto buses. They are currently being rebooked onto other flights.

Both planes were taken out of service for repairs and inspection. 

The accident did not affect other operations at the airport.

"Our employees are working as quickly as possible to re-accommodate all customers. Safety is our number one focus and we will conduct an internal review to identify the details surrounding today's event," a Southwest Airlines spokesman said.

Story and video: http://abc7.com

Cessna 182 Skylane, V3-HHT, Tropic Air: Accident occurred June 02, 2015 in the Caribbean Sea near Lighthouse Reef Atoll



Lindsay Garbutt, Director of Civil Aviation
~




The Department of Civil Aviation is proceeding with an official probe into a plane crash earlier this week involving a Tropic Air flight en route to the Bay Islands of Honduras. 

The investigation is set to continue as soon as the submerged aircraft is removed from the crash site. 

To do so requires a joint effort with the Department of the Environment, as well as a salvage company. 

On Tuesday evening, a Cessna 182 Skylane aircraft, piloted by Denfield Borland, flew out of the Phillip Goldson International Airport en route to Roatan when it began experiencing mechanical problems mid-flight.  

While Borland was able to relay that information to air traffic control at the P.G.I.A., he was unable to avoid an emergency landing.  

The aircraft, along with its pilot and two passengers, Honduran national Eddie Bodden and American national Arthur Rogers, dove into the Caribbean Sea near Lighthouse Reef.  

All three survivors escaped unharmed and were later rescued by a search party comprised of coast guard assets and Audubon Society park rangers sitting atop the aircraft. 

This afternoon, News Five sat down with Director of Civil Aviation, Lindsay Garbutt, who gave us more information on the inquiry.

Lindsay Garbutt, Director of Civil Aviation:   “We are going through an extremely thorough investigation.  This accident took place, as you know, at Lighthouse Reef, Half Moon Caye, several, many, many miles from Belize.  The airplane is in the water so there is a process that we are looking at now how we salvage this airplane so we can begin that part of our investigation.”

Isani Cayetano:  “What does that entail in terms of either deploying your resources into the area to retrieve the aircraft from the water?  What all does that take logistically or in terms of manpower or what have you?”

Lindsay Garbutt:  “Well first of all we’re working with the Department of the Environment to make sure and with a salvage company to make sure that the removal causes as little or no damage as possible to the environment.  Once that is done the plane is brought to Belize City and the department then goes through a careful investigation.  We are in contact with the manufacturers and whatever it is that we need to do in terms of the engine so we can get a thorough knowledge of exactly what occurred.”

Isani Cayetano:  “Would this be one of those cases where black box data is required to fully understand what transpired with the actual mechanical failure or what have you?”

Lindsay Garbutt:   “One of the reasons I said we are working with the manufacturers is that we are going to go through a very thorough process, whatever it is that they advise that is necessary that we can get an understanding of what the causes were we are going to do.”

Story and photos:  http://edition.channel5belize.com




Ayres S2R-T34 Thrush, Morris Ag Air, N4018Q: Fatal accident occurred June 02, 2015 near Blythe Airport (KBLH), California



Traver Ryan Buckelew


MORRIS EQUIPMENT LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N4018Q

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA176
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 02, 2015 in Blythe, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/28/2016
Aircraft: AYRES CORPORATION S2R T34, registration: N4018Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was conducting aerial application operations with the assistance of a spotter on the ground. The spotter saw the airplane fly over power lines along the perimeter of an adjacent field. The airplane then entered a nose-high attitude, consistent with the pilot’s normal practice of pushing the chemical toward the spreader doors. The airplane continued to climb in a near-vertical ascent until reaching about 500 ft above ground level, after which the airplane entered a nose-low vertical descent that continued to ground contact. An examination of the wreckage revealed that all major components were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was established. No unusual meteorological phenomena were reported by the closest weather station or observed by witnesses to the accident. It is likely that, during the nose-high maneuver, the airplane exceeded its critical angle-of-attack and experienced an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall.



HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 2, 2015, about 1040 Pacific daylight time, an Ayres Corporation S2R-T34, N4018Q, departed controlled flight and collided with terrain during a low pass in a field near Blythe, California. Morris Ag Air & Sons, Inc., was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The local aerial application flight departed about 1000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed.

The pilot was in radio contact with a spotter, who witnessed the accident and was also employed by the operator. He stated that the pilot departed about 0730 and had already sprayed one load of chemical. The pilot then reloaded and sprayed two fields (named P4 and P5) until the hopper was empty. The spotter then drove ahead to the next field to be sprayed, P2, and expected the airplane to reload at the airstrip and then come to spray P2. The pilot made a transmission to the spotter asking what the wind conditions were at the field. The spotter replied by telling him that there was a light wind from the southwest.

The spotter further stated that he witnessed the airplane coming from the south and clear the powerlines on the south perimeter of the field. The airplane then pitched in a nose-high attitude consistent with the pilot's normal operation of pushing the chemical toward the spread doors. The airplane continued to climb in a near vertical ascent until reaching about 500 feet above ground level (agl), at which point it transitioned into a nose-low vertical descent and collided into the field.

The operator stated that the pilot was likely en route back to the airstrip to reload fertilizer in the hopper when the accident occurred. He would have not been applying in the field area where he crashed.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION.

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the pilot, age 47, held a commercial pilot and certified flight instructor certificates and airplane ratings for single engine and multiengine land, as well as instrument flight. The pilot was issued a second-class medical certificate on November 18, 2014, with the limitation that he must have glasses for near vision.

The pilot's personal flight records were not recovered. On his last application for a medical certificate the pilot reported a total flight time of 5,000 hours of which 300 hours occurred in the 6 months prior to that date.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The low-wing, tailwheel equipped, fixed-gear airplane, was an Ayres Corporation (Thrush) S2R-T34, serial number T34-021, manufactured in 1980. It was powered by a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-34AG driving a Hartzell HC-B3TN-3D constant-speed propeller. No maintenance records were recovered for the airplane.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather observation station was located in Blythe, which was located 3 miles west of the accident site. About 10 minutes after the accident, the station reported a clear sky with the surface wind variable at 4 kts. No unusual meteorological phenomena were reported by the station or observed by witnesses to the accident.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main wreckage was found at the following approximate global positioning system (GPS) coordinates: 33 degrees 35 minutes 19 seconds north latitude by 114 degrees 39 minutes 59 seconds west longitude. The accident site elevation was about 260 feet mean sea level.

The airplane came to rest in an agricultural field and the entire wreckage was located in the immediate vicinity. Situated about three miles west of the airport, the accident site was at the southeast corner field adjacent to an east-west paved road to the south and a north-south dirt road that made up the eastern border of the field. In the 75 ft between the accident site and the paved road was a dirt area where a row of powerlines paralleled the road. Immediately south of the paved road was a 30-foot-wide irrigation canal, which was oriented in an east-west direction and the south bank was bordered with trees.

The wings came to rest inverted and remained affixed to the fuselage. The leading edges of both wings were uniformly crushed aft and the skin was folded over itself in an accordianed appearance. A ground scar with the similar shape and dimensions as the leading edges of the wings, was located under the wreckage and oriented parallel to the paved road and powerlines. The crater in the middle of that ground scar was about four feet deep and contained portions of the propeller blades. The empennage was found partially intact and "scorpioned" forward over the wings. The rudder was attached to the vertical stabilizer and intact. The horizontal stabilizer and elevator control surfaces remained attached. All control surfaces were accounted for at the accident site.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed by the County of Riverside Sheriff-Coroner. The autopsy report concluded that the death was the result of injuries sustained in the accident. The FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted a toxicological examination. The report was negative for cyanide, volatiles (ethanol), carbon monoxide, and drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The airplane was equipped with a Satloc M3 DGPS global positioning system (GPS) recording device. The returns were recorded every 2 seconds and spanned from the first hit recorded for the flight at 0954:45 to the hit at 1039:32. A review of the return revealed that the airplane flew over several fields and then at 1039:10 exited the field area and headed north. For the last 20 seconds of the data, the airplane maintained an altitude of about 400-420 ft above ground level (agl) maneuvering about 110 to 120 kts. The accident site was located about 1,350 ft north of the last recorded hit.

The wings had been removed during recovery. The control surfaces remained attached to the wings. All separation points were along jagged and angular planes. Rod ends were bent at fracture points. The leading edges were crushed aft. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the control surfaces. The propeller blades that remained attached to the hub were bent and twisted.

Following the accident, a sample of the fuel from Morris Ag Air's fuel truck was submitted to a laboratory for testing. The analysis of the sample fell within the correct specifications.

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA176
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 02, 2015 in Blythe, CA
Aircraft: AYRES CORPORATION S2R T34, registration: N4018Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 2, 2015, about 1045 Pacific daylight time, an Ayres Corporation S2R-T34, N4018Q, departed controlled flight and collided with terrain during a low pass in a field near Blythe, California. Morris Ag Air & Sons, Inc., was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The local aerial application flight departed about 1015. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed.

The pilot was in radio contact with a spotter, who witnessed the accident and was also employed by the operator. He stated that the pilot departed about 0730 and had already sprayed one load of chemical. He reloaded and sprayed two fields with the accident location intended to be the last spray of that trip. The spotter had driven ahead to the accident field and was waiting for the airplane to come from the southerly adjacent field. The pilot made a transmission to the spotter asking what the wind conditions were at the field. The spotter replied by telling him that there was a light wind from the southwest.

The spotter further stated that he witnessed the airplane coming from the north and clear the powerlines on the south perimeter of the field. The airplane then pitched in a nose-high attitude consistent with the pilot's normal operation of pushing the chemical toward the spread doors. The airplane continued to climb in a near vertical ascent until reaching about 500 feet above ground level (agl), at which point it transitioned into a nose-low vertical decent and collided into the field.

The pilot of a crop duster who died Tuesday when his plane crashed into an alfalfa field near Blythe has been identified as Yuma native Traver Ryan Buckelew.

A witness told deputies from the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department-Colorado River Station that the plane was spraying an alfalfa field with herbicide about 10:49 a.m. when it crashed in the field located along Seeley Avenue, west of Neighbours Boulevard, in an unincorporated area near Blythe.

Upon arrival, deputies and emergency personnel located the plane down with the pilot still inside, who was pronounced dead at the scene. 

The area was cleared of all personnel until members of the Riverside County Hazardous Materials Team could decontaminate the location. Once decontaminated, the scene was turned over to investigators.

Personnel from Cal Fire, Riverside County Sheriff’s Department-Colorado River Station, BLM, the coroner’s office, hazardous materials team, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to investigate the crash.

The crash’s cause will be determined by the NTSB and FAA.

Buckelew, 47, grew up working in agriculture in the Yuma Valley and combined his love of flying with crop dusting, according to an obituary with Desert Valley Mortuary.

A funeral service will be held on June 14 at 11 a.m. at Desert Valley Mortuary, 138 N. Avenue B, Somerton.

Traver Ryan Buckelew of Yuma, Arizona
Born: October 28, 1967
Died: June 02, 2015

Obituary

Yuma native, Traver Ryan Buckelew tragically died in an ag plane accident on June 2nd in Blythe, California. Traver was born on October 28, 1967 to Roberta and Gary Buckelew. 

He grew up working in agriculture in the Yuma Valley and combined his love of flying with crop dusting. Traver’s passion was his Cessna 172, and his Scottie dogs, especially Baron. Traver was an avid runner and loved hiking Telegraph Pass. Traver had a great many friends and will be remembered as a kind, generous and loyal man. 

Traver was preceded in death by his father Gary Buckelew. He is survived by his wife Brandi, his mother Roberta Buckelew, sister Dana Hewitt (Brian), brother Brent Buckelew (Mario), nephew Erik Hewitt (Danielle), great-nephew Merrik Hewitt, and many cousins. 

A funeral service will be held on Sunday, June 14th at 11:00 AM at Desert Valley Mortuary 138 N. Avenue B, Somerton, Arizona 85350 with minister Tamara Wagner officiating. Interment will follow at Yuma Pioneer Cemetery. 

Pallbearers will be Brent Buckelew, Justin Buckelew, Erik Hewitt, Rick Smith, Tom Bastien, Marcos Moore, Miles Morris, Phil Ekdahl, Ed Whitehead, Ryan McGuire, Cesar Dominguez, Les Briggs, Erik Lohman, Ronnie Van Why, Carvin Bryant,and Johnny Massey.

Friday, June 5, 2015

Rebel, N914FM, KJ Enterprises: Fatal accident occurred June 05, 2015 at Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE), Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

KJ ENTERPRISES: http://registry.faa.gov/aN914FM  

FRANK L. MORSE REBEL

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 05, 2015 in Eagle, CO, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/15/2016
Aircraft: MORSE FRANK L REBEL, registration: N914FM
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was landing the experimental, amateur-built airplane in gusty, crosswind conditions. Witnesses observed the airplane enter a sharp left turn away from the runway at a very low altitude, overfly the airport taxiway and ramp area, then impact a hangar on the airport property. A witness stated that “the wind caught [the airplane]” as it was landing. The airplane had a stated crosswind limitation of 15 knots. Based on recorded wind data, the calculated crosswind component was between 13.7 knots and 16.8 knots. Examination of the airplane wreckage did not reveal any anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. The accident sequence is consistent with the pilot losing control of the airplane while landing in gusty, crosswind conditions that likely exceeded the recommended crosswind limitation of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane while landing in gusty, crosswind conditions that likely exceeded the recommended limitation of the airplane.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 5, 2015, at 1647 mountain daylight time, a Morse Rebel experimental amateur-built airplane, N914FM, impacted a hangar and parking ramp at the Eagle Regional Airport (EGE), Eagle, Colorado. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. There were no ground injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal, cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated without a flight plan. 

GPS data recovered from an avionic device found in the wreckage recorded three flights on the day of the accident. The first flight data began at 08:11:12 in south-central Minnesota. Enroute stops were recorded from 09:25-09:50 at Martin Field Airport (7K8), Iowa, and from 12:57-13:40 at Holyoke Airport (HEQ), Colorado. The flightpath tracked from HEQ to the West-Northwest before turning southwest near Walden, Colorado, towards EGE.

The airplane flew a visual approach to land on runway 25 at EGE. During the approach the tower controller provided the pilot the current wind direction and velocity of 220 degrees at 21 knots, gusting to 26 knots. A witness observed the airplane very near to the runway during landing when "the wind caught [the airplane]". The airplane climbed away from the runway and completed an approximately 180 degree, rapid left turn. The airplane's flight path overflew the airport parking ramp on an easterly heading, mostly wings level, and in a slightly nose high attitude until just before it impacted the west face of hanger number four on the airport property. Before impact, the airplane began a left descending roll and hit the hanger in a left bank of about 75 degrees and approximately thirty-five feet above the ground. The airplane subsequently fell to the parking ramp and came to rest inverted. First responders told investigators it was not raining when they first reached the airplane, but it started raining within a few minutes of their arrival. 

Security camera footage captured portions of the accident flight, and the footage confirmed the witness reports. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 68, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, and instrument airplane. The pilot also held a mechanic – airframe and powerplant certificate. The pilot's current pilot log book was not located; however, a pilot log book was located with the last entries dated September 2, 2011. As of that date, the pilot had logged a total of 2,536.5 hours. The pilot's last 3rd class airman's medical certificate was dated February 4, 2013. The pilot claimed 3,000 total flight hours and 50 flight hours in the past 6 months on that application.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single engine, high wing, two-seat, fixed gear airplane, serial number 0147R, was assembled in 1996. It was powered by a Lycoming D-320 engine, serial number 3556-27, that drove a composite, two-bladed Props, INC. 74x746 propeller. The airplane's last condition inspection was accomplished on February 15, 2015, at a recorded tachometer time of 215.9 hours. The airplane was equipped with a flaperon system.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1650 MDT, KEGE reported a wind from 200° at 18 knots with gusts to 22 knots, visibility ten statute miles or greater, light rain, overcast cloud base at 7,000 feet above ground level (agl), temperature of 20° Celsius (C) and dew point temperature of 16°C, altimeter setting 30.16 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Eagle Regional Airport (EGE) is a public airport located at measured altitude of 6,547 feet mean sea level. It has one runway; runway 7/25, 9,000 feet by 150 feet, of asphalt construction.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted the west facing front of a metal-sided hangar about thirty-five feet above the ground and subsequently fell to the parking ramp. The airplane came to rest inverted. The wreckage was removed to a secure location and examined. Flight control continuity was verified to all flight controls, and no pre-impact anomalies were noted with any airplane systems or the engine. The position of the airplane's flaperon handle could not be determined due to impact damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was authorized and conducted on the pilot by the Rocky Mountain Forensic Services, PLLC, Loma, Colorado. The cause of death was the result of multiple injuries sustained in an airplane accident. 

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Results were negative for all substances tested for.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The following devices containing non-volatile memory (NVM) were recovered from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Division for examination: 

Device Manufacturer/Model: iFly GPS 720

Serial Number: Unknown.

The iFly GPS 720 exhibited damage due to impact forces. No accident related data was recorded on the device's internal memory.

Device Manufacturer/Model: AvMap Ultra 

Serial Number: 4120423 

The AvMap Ultra exhibited major damage due to impact forces. No accident related data was recorded on the device's internal memory. 

Device Manufacturer/Model: SD Memory Card 

Serial Number: BI1401222811D 

The SD memory card exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces, but no accident related data was recorded on the device.

Device Manufacturer/Model: HTC One M8 Phone 

Serial Number: 310003202964795

The HTC One M8 phone exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces. Nine photographs from the accident flight were recovered from the phone. Timing of each of the photos was established using the metadata embedded in the image files, and the timing ranged from 1635 to 1638 MDT. 

Device Manufacturer/Model: Samsung Galaxy Tab (Black) 

Serial Number: R52G10SC1WB 

The Samsung Galaxy Tab (Black) exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces. The internal memory was recovered using laboratory hardware and software. GPS data was recovered that captured each leg of the cross-country flight that occurred on the day of the accident, beginning at 08:11:12 and ending at 16:49:53.

Device Manufacturer/Model: Samsung Galaxy Tab (White) 

Serial Number: R52FB0DLAZH 

The Samsung Galaxy Tab (White) exhibited major damage due to impact forces. Due to the damage, no data could be recovered from the device.

Device Manufacturer/Model: Apple iPad 

Serial Number: DMPJ75EEDNQT 

The Apple iPad exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces. No accident related data was recorded on the device.

Performance Study:

A Performance Study was conducted utilizing GPS data obtained from the Samsung Galaxy Tab (black) and weather data recorded at EGE at 1650 MDT. The GPS data reflected the accident flight, which originated at Holyoke Airport in Holyoke, Colorado at about 13:43 MDT. The flight duration was three hours and five minutes. The weather at EGE at 1650 was reported as 10 statute miles visibility, overcast skies at 7,000 feet, light rain, and winds from 200 degrees at 18 knots, gusting to 22 knots.

The aircraft approached runway 25 at an equivalent airspeed of 75 knots (kts) and slowed to 65 kts as it crossed the runway threshold. The equivalent airspeed calculation relied on the 18 kts wind report; the reported gusting winds up to 22 kts would change the equivalent airspeed. The final 400 ft of descent was done along a glide slope of 4.7 degrees. Runway 25 has a four light precision approach path indicator (PAPI) with a 3.0 degree glide path. The aircraft's rate of climb (descent) during this final portion of the flight was between -600 and -800 ft/min.

About 18 seconds after crossing the threshold, about 1,200 feet down the runway, the aircraft turned sharply to the left. The aircraft departed the runway, crossed over a taxiway, and continued over the ramp before impacting the hanger. During the final 40 seconds of flight the aircraft crossed the threshold at an equivalent airspeed of 64 kts (groundspeed was 54 kts) and slowed to just above 40 kts (30 kts groundspeed) when it began to turn to the left. As the aircraft left the runway, its airspeed increased until it was about 67 kts (64 kts groundspeed) as it crossed over the taxiway.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

The Pilot's Operating Manual stated the maximum recommended crosswind as 15 knots at 90 degrees. Based on recorded wind data, the calculated crosswind component was 13.7 knots, 16.8 knots with gusts.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 05, 2015 in Eagle, CO, CO
Aircraft: MORSE FRANK L REBEL, registration: N914FM
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 5, 2015, at 1647 mountain daylight time, a Morse Rebel experimental amateur-built airplane, N914FM, impacted a hangar and parking ramp at the Eagle Regional Airport (EGE), Eagle, Colorado. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. There were no ground injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal, cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated without a flight plan. 

The airplane flew a visual approach to land on runway 25 at EGE. During the approach the tower controller provided the pilot wind direction and velocity of 220 degrees at 21 knots, gusting to 26 knots. A witness observed the airplane very near to the runway during landing when "the wind caught [the airplane]". The airplane climbed away from the runway and an approximately 180 degree left turn occurred. The airplane overflew the airport parking ramp on an easterly heading, mostly wings level, and in a slightly nose high attitude until just prior to impacting the west face of hanger number four on the airport property. Prior to impact, the airplane began a left descending roll and hit the hanger in about 75 degrees left bank about thirty-five feet above the ground. The airplane subsequently fell to the parking ramp and came to rest inverted. First responders told investigators it was not raining when they first reached the airplane, but it started raining within a few minutes of their arrival. 

The weather at EGE at 1650 was reported as 10 statute miles visibility, overcast skies at 7,000 feet, light rain, and winds from 200 degrees at 18 knots, gusting to 22 knots.

Karl Hipp, 68, of Crawford, has been identified as the victim in Friday afternoon's single-engine place crash at the Eagle County airport.


This was Karl Hipp's plane. He died in a Friday afternoon crash at the Eagle County airport.



GYPSUM — A Delta County man died Friday afternoon when his single-engine experimental plane crashed into the front of a hangar at the Eagle County Regional Airport.

Karl Hipp, 68, of Crawford, was pronounced dead at the scene, said Kara Bettis, Eagle County coroner.

Another person, a female, was injured and taken by ambulance to the Vail Valley Medical Center.

Hipp and the woman were the only two in the Rebel aircraft.

Hipp owned Balzout Aviation and operated out of an airport in Delta County. On his LinkedIn page, he lists his occupation as “airport bum.”

The FAA lists him as a commercial pilot certified to fly multi-engine aircraft.

He also owned and operated Karl Hipp Designs Rustic Lamps and manufactured rustic wrought iron table lamps, floor lamps, rawhide lamp shades, forged iron lamps, wall sconces and chandeliers.

Hipp is listed as a vice president with Comanche Flyer Foundation Inc. in Indiana.

UNDER INVESTIGATION

Why he was flying to the Eagle County airport and what caused the crash remains under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The plane touched down on the runway in gusting winds at about 4:50 p.m. Friday.

Witnesses said after the plane touched down, it might have caught a gust of wind. It went into the air again, banked hard to the left and veered about 1,000 feet south of the runway, witnesses said.

It did not clear the Vail Valley Jet Center’s hangar No. 4 and hit just above the front doors, punching a large hole in the outside wall.

There was no one in the hangar at the time of the crash, witnesses said.

Witnesses said they could hear the plane’s engine struggle and stall, then stop completely when it hit.

Airport fire fighters and emergency personnel were on the scene in moments.

The runway at Eagle County Regional Airport has since reopened.

Eagle County Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting, Eagle County Paramedic Services, Eagle County Sheriff and Gypsum Fire District responded.

Source:  http://www.aspentimes.com





GYPSUM — A small experimental plane crashed into the front of a hangar at the Eagle County airport Friday afternoon, killing one person and injuring another, authorities said.

The plane, a Rebel experimental aircraft, was headed east when it touched down on the runway at about 4:50 p.m. Friday, witnesses said.

Witnesses said after the plane touched down, it went into the air again and veered to its right about 1,000 feet south of the runway, where it crashed into the front of the Vail Valley Jet Center’s hangar No. 4, just above the massive front doors.

Witnesses said they could hear the plane’s engine struggle and stall, then stop completely when it hit.

The plane punched a large hole in the front of the hangar and fell straight down in front of the door.

Airport firefighters and emergency personnel were on the scene in moments, pulling the survivor from the wreckage and sending that person by ambulance to the Vail Valley Medical Center.

There were only two people in the plane, authorities said.

Their identities are being withheld pending the notification of the next of kin.

PLANE’S ORIGIN UNKNOWN

The plane’s origin and destination are not yet known, said Kris Friel, Eagle County communications director.

The runway at Eagle County Regional Airport has since reopened.

The National Transportation Safety Board  and Federal Aviation Administration will take over investigation of the crash. Eagle County Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting, Eagle County Paramedic Services, Eagle County Sheriff and Gypsum Fire District responded.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.postindependent.com