Sunday, February 12, 2017

2 beam laser light at sheriff’s helicopter, both arrested

Two men suspected of lighting up a Riverside County sheriff’s helicopter with a laser device were arrested, deputies said Sunday.

At about 7:10 p.m. Friday, the pilot of the helicopter reported that the cockpit was “illuminated several times by a high-powered laser device from a distance of one mile away,” according to Sgt. Mike Koehler.

Deputies later located the suspects near the intersection of Heacock Street and John F. Kennedy Drive, and identified them as Fernando Flores, 30, and Jesus Ceniceros-Acosta, 33, both residents of  Perris, Koehler said.

A laser pointing device capable of casting a beam of light approximately 1.5 miles was allegedly found in their possession, deputies said.

Both men were booked into the Robert Presley Detention Center and were being held in lieu of $10,000 bail.

Source:  http://mynewsla.com

Incident occurred February 12, 2017 at Bishop International Airport (KFNT), Flint, Genesee County, Michigan

FLINT, MI -- A Delta Airlines flight landed safely after an alert went out Sunday afternoon for a plane with an issue coming into Bishop Airport.

Flint Township police responded and firefighters were placed on alert around 3:30 p.m. Feb. 12 for the incident. A Flint Township fire official said the call was for an alert 2.

Alert 2 signifies an aircraft "known or is suspected to have an operational defect that affects normal flight operations to the extent that there is danger of an accident," according to an emergency guidebook for general aviation airports.

Pat Corfman, spokeswoman for Bishop, said Delta flight 4642 was on its way to Flint from Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota with 28 people on board. No one was injured during the incident.

A message left with Delta Airlines by MLive-Flint seeking comment on the issue was not immediately returned Sunday afternoon. 

Source: http://www.mlive.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, American Aviation Academy, N2179L: Fatal accident occurred February 12, 2017 in Ramona, San Diego County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: San Diego, California
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Phoenix, Arizona 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

American Aviation Academy Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2179L

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA063 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, February 12, 2017 in Ramona, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N2179L
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 12, 2017 about 1430 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 172S, N2179L, impacted terrain while maneuvering five miles north of Ramona, California. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and student pilot had minor injuries and the rear seated passenger was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The aircraft was registered to and operated by American Aviation Academy, Inc, Gillespie, California, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight. The flight originated from Gillespie Field Airport (SEE), Gillespie, California at about 1400.

The student pilot stated that he completed a weight and balance calculation, which was signed off by the CFI. After the preflight was accomplished and fuel was added to the airplane, an additional passenger boarded. After approaching the practice area and conducting training near a dirt strip, two consecutive simulated engine failure procedures were accomplished. While climbing out on the last simulated engine failure, the CFI instructed the student pilot to turn left in the direction of east. While in the turn with full power, the student pilot recognized rising terrain and the CFI took over control of the airplane. Subsequently, the airplane impacted a wooded valley about 5 miles north of Ramona, California. 


Examination of the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, revealed that the airplane impacted a large tree and steep terrain. The tree penetrated through the main cabin floor and roof. The main wreckage remained intact with the exception of the propeller assembly which was located near the main wreckage. The wreckage was relocated to a secure facility for further examination.



February 14, 2017 (Ramona) – A Cessna 172S Skyhawk registered to the American Aviation Academy and flying out of Gillespie Field as an instructor/student flight on Sunday crashed onto a mountainside in Ramona, killing Shaira Noor, 21, of Bangladesh. She had been training at the academy for nine months. Noor was in the backseat of the Cessna and was impaled by a tree on impact, which killed her instantly.

Two other occupants survived, climbing to an elevated area and using cell phones to call for help, the Sheriff’s department reports.

The Sheriff’s ASTREA helicopter and deputies from the Ramona substation found the crash and helped rescue the two survivors, who were transported to a local hospital. They had minor injuries and are expected to survive, according to Sergeant Andrew Mowins.  The deceased woman’s remains were recovered the next day.

Cause of the crash will be determined by an investigation conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

This is not the first time a flight from a Gillespie flight school has crashed.  At least two have fallen into nearby neighborhoods in the past couple of years.

“We are only one and a half months into 2017 and Gillespie already has a fatality by a flight school,” says Robert Germann with Citizens Against Gillespie Expansion (CAGE), a vocal critic of flight schools at Gillespie. “Gillespie wants to increase the schools” and train air traffic controllers, he noted, adding, “Gillespie wants to be an instrumented rated airport which means aircraft/pilot training will be taking off/landing at all times of the day/night in bad weather. Is this smart for an airport surrounded by mountains/hills? These mountains are heavily populated.”

Germann also raised concerns over the flight school owner telling a group of citizens worried about low flying aircraft that “Flying is dangerous so live with us flying over your house; if you don’t like it, move.”  He fires back, “I then have a problem with his judgment on how he operates his flight school. Does he put his students in unsafe situations in unsafe aircraft?

Germann said he wants to know how many hours of instruction time the instructor had and whether maneuvers were appropriate in the situation given the altitude, terrain, age and power of the aircraft, and weight of the aircraft with three people aboard.






10News confirmed the flight student killed in the small plane crash near Ramona is Shaira Noor, 21, of Dhaka, Bangladesh.


Desai Shubham told 10News he was close friends with Noor and they flight trained together at American Aviation Academy.


Shubham said Noor wanted to be a professional pilot like her father in Bangladesh. She had been training at the San Diego school for about nine months. Shubham described Noor as reserved.


One of the last things Noor said to him was that she missed her family and her home. 


Noor was in the back seat of the Cessna Saturday afternoon during a flight training exercise when the plane crashed into the mountain near Ramona.


The instructor and another student were in the front.

As the Cessna came down, a tree speared through the plane, killing Noor instantly.


Story and video:  http://www.10news.com



RAMONA, Calif. - One woman was killed and two men were injured but survived a small plane crash in rough terrain north of Ramona Airport Sunday afternoon, authorities said. 

The plane took off from Gillespie Field Airport about 2:30 p.m as an instructor/student flight, according to sheriff's Sgt. Andrew Mowins.

On board were a male instructor and another man and the woman who was killed, Cal Fire spokesman Isaac Sanchez told City News Service.

The deceased 20-year-old woman -- whose name was being withheld pending notification of kin -- died at the scene, Sanchez said.

The two men who survived were 28 and 25 years old, he said.

They climbed to high ground and called for help after the aircraft crashed into the mountainside in Ramona, Sanchez said.

A witness called 911 at 2:30 p.m. to report the plane down, but it took sheriff's deputies and Cal Fire personnel about an hour to find the wreckage, Sanchez said.

Sheriff's deputies in the ASTREA helicopter found the crash site in an inaccessible area, near Pamo Valley in the Cleveland National Forest. ASTREA was working with a joint use Sheriff/Cal Fire helicopter to access the scene, Sanchez said.

The surviving instructor and flight student suffered minor injuries and were transported to a hospital for treatment after their rescue, Mowins said.

The woman's body remained at the scene and the medical examiner will be flown up Monday, according to Mowins.

Recovery efforts for the plane were suspended at nightfall and will resume Monday, Mowins said.

Source:  http://www.10news.com





SAN DIEGO- A 20-year-old woman is dead after a small plane crashed in an inaccessible area north of Romona, Cal Fire officials confirmed.

A 28-year-old male and a 25-year-old male survived the crash, however the extent of their injuries is unknown. The three individuals were flying out of the American Aviation Academy out of Gillespie Field, Cal Fire explained. It is unclear who was piloting the plane at the time of the crash.

A witness called 911 to report the plane down and Sheriff’s deputies were first dispatched on the ground and in the ASTREA helicopter to the area of 19100 Horizon View Dr. at 2:30 p.m., according to Lt. Andrea Arreola. After an initial search of the aircraft was unsuccessful authorities were forced to broaden their search.

It took deputies and Cal Fire personnel about an hour to find the wreckage according to Cal Fire PIO Isaac Sanchez.

Sheriff’s deputies in the ASTREA helicopter found the crash site in an inaccessible area, near Pamo Valley in the Cleveland National Forest. Astrea was working with a joint use Sheriff/Cal Fire helicopter to access the scene, Sanches said.

Rescue personnel set up a command post on Pamo Road. SDSO and FAA will take over investigation of crash.

Source:  http://www.cw6sandiego.com




RAMONA, Calif. – A small plane with three people on board crashed in rough terrain north of the Ramona Airport Sunday afternoon, according to authorities. 

A 20-year-old woman died in the crash while two men, ages 25 and 28, survived, authorities told FOX 5.

A witness called 911 at 2:30 p.m. to report the plane down, but it took sheriff’s deputies and Cal Fire personnel about an hour to find the wreckage, according to Cal Fire PIO Isaac Sanchez.

Sheriff’s deputies in the ASTREA helicopter found the crash site in an inaccessible area, near Pamo Valley in the Cleveland National Forest. ASTREA was working with a joint use Sheriff/Cal Fire helicopter to access the scene, Sanchez said.

Rescue personnel set up a command post on Pamo Road.

The identities of the people aboard the plane were not released.

Source:   http://fox5sandiego.com

A 20-year-old woman is dead after a small plane carrying her and two other people crashed in an inaccessible, remote area north of Ramona, Cal Fire officials confirmed. 

A 28-year-old man and a 25-year-old man survived the crash. The extent of their injuries is unclear. They were flying from the American Aviation Academy out of Gillespie Field, Cal Fire says. 

The Cessna 172 crashed Sunday afternoon north of the 19100 block of Horizon View Drive, according to San Diego County Sheriff's officials and Cal Fire officials. The area is north-northeast of Ramona on the side of a mountain, says Allen Kenitzer, media relations with the FAA. 

The crash is in a remote area, making it difficult for crews to access the plane.

The FAA and the NTSB will investigate. The cause of the crash is not known. 

No other information is available.

Source: http://www.nbcsandiego.com

 small plane crashed just north of Ramona on Sunday, killing a 20-year-old woman and injuring two others, a fire official said. 

The two men, ages 25 and 28, were taken to a hospital with moderate injuries.

The flight had originated at Gillespie Field in El Cajon. The plane was affiliated with the American Aviation Academy.

The report of the crash came in around 2:30 p.m., Cal Fire Capt. Issac Sanchez said. 

After an hour of searching, sheriff’s and fire officials found the crash site in Pamo Valley, near Ramona, Sanchez said. 

The site is inaccessible by ground, and first responders were flown to it.

Source:  http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

IAI Gulfstream G280, N228BA: Incident occurred February 12, 2017 at Hanscom Field Airport (KBED), Bedford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

http://registry.faa.gov/N228BA 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Boston, Massachusetts


Aircraft on takeoff went off the end of the runway into the grass. 

Date: 12-FEB-17
Time: 19:19:00Z
Regis#: N228BA
Aircraft Make: GULFSTREAM
Aircraft Model: G280
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: BEDFORD
State: MASSACHUSETTS



A corporate jet with five people on board slid off Runway 29 at Hanscom Field in Bedford yesterday afternoon when the pilot aborted takeoff, according to authorities.

“Everyone’s fine. There were no injuries,” said Matthew Brelis, spokesman for the Massachusetts Port Authority.

Brelis said there were two passengers and a crew of three on the IAI Gulfstream G280. Their identities were not immediately released. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the cause of the incident, which occurred at approximately 2:30 p.m. The  Federal Aviation Administration reported the IAI Gulfstream G280 was headed to Teterboro, New Jersey. It was not immediately clear why takeoff was aborted or if deteriorating weather was a factor.

The plane is registered to a Bank of Utah aircraft owner trust, according to Federal Aviation Administration records.


Source: http://www.bostonherald.com




It was a close call in Bedford, Massachusetts after an airplane slid off the runway at the Hanscom Field Airport on Sunday.

The IAI Gulfstream G280 was about to taking off just before 2:30 p.m. when the pilot put the departure on hold. The plane then skid off the runway and into the grass at Hanscom Field, according to officials from the Federal Aviation Administration.

The flight was on its way to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey. Five people were on board at the time, two passengers and three crew members, but officials from Bedford Fire Department say they all evacuated safely.

Massport along with the Bedford Fire Department are now working hard to clear the scene.

The FAA is investigating.

Story and video:   http://www.necn.com

BEDFORD, Mass. - A small plane slid off the runway Sunday at Hanscom Field during the snow storm. 

The FAA said the IAI Gulfstream G280 was about to take off around 2:30 p.m.. but the pilot aborted and then the plane slid off the runway. 

The Gulfstream went into the grass off of runway 29. Injuries are unknown at this time. 

The plane is registered to Bank of Utah Trustee. 

The flight was headed to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.

Source:  http://www.fox25boston.com

BEDFORD, Mass.  — A small plane with five people aboard aborted takeoff and slid off a runway at a Massachusetts airport in a flight that was headed to New Jersey. No injuries were reported.

Authorities say the accident happened at about 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Hanscom Field in Bedford, about 20 miles northwest of Boston. Officials say the flight was headed to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.

Officials say the IAI Gulfstream G280 slid into a grassy area off the runway.

It wasn’t immediately clear if the snowstorm on Sunday played a role.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Source:  http://whdh.com

BEDFORD, Mass. —   A plane slid off the runway at Hanscom Field during Sunday's winter storm.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a IAI Gulfstream G280 aircraft slid off the end of runway 29 at 2:30 p.m.

The plane ended up in the grass and had just aborted takeoff right before the incident.

The flight was heading for Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.

Massport said 5 people were on board. No one was injured.

The FAA is investigating. 

Source:  http://www.wcvb.com

It was a close call in Bedford, Massachusetts after an airplane slid off the runway at the Hanscom Field Airport on Sunday.


Source:  http://www.necn.com


BEDFORD (CBS) — A private plane skidded off a runway at Hanscom Field Sunday afternoon.

Massport said the incident happened shortly before 2:30 p.m. The IAI Gulfstream G280 had two passengers and three crew members on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the pilot aborted takeoff right before the incident occurred. The FAA said the plane was scheduled to fly to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.

No injuries were reported from the incident. The FAA is investigating.

Source:  http://boston.cbslocal.com

Captain Doron: Let's fly west today in Cessna 150


  Video published on February 12, 2017 
By Captain Doron

Stolp SA-300 Starduster Too, N411TM: Fatal accident occurred August 16, 2014 near Swansboro Country Airport (01CL), Placerville, El Dorado County, California



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N411TM

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA348
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 16, 2014 in Placerville, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/26/2017
Aircraft: CLIFF STARDUSTER II SA300, registration: N411TM
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While on approach for landing, the private pilot initiated a go-around on short final due to gusty crosswind conditions. During the climbout, the pilot reported that the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power. The airplane subsequently collided with terrain, seriously injuring the pilot and fatally injuring the passenger. Postaccident examination of the engine and airframe revealed no evidence of any preexisting mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

Blood samples from the pilot tested positive for methamphetamine and its active metabolite, amphetamine. The methamphetamine was found at high levels, indicative of abuse. It is likely that the pilot was impaired by the psychoactive effects of illicit methamphetamine use at the time of the accident, which impaired his ability to maintain control of the airplane during the go-around attempt. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during a go-around in gusting wind conditions following a partial loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined, because postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s impairment due to his recent use of methamphetamine. 




HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 16, 2014, about 1840 Pacific daylight time, a Starduster Too SA300, N411TM, an experimental biplane, collided with terrain while maneuvering near the Swansboro Country Airport (01CL), Placerville, California. The private pilot was seriously injured and the passenger was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered and operated by the pilot under provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The cross-country flight originated from Reid-Hillview Airport of Santa Clara County (RHV), San Jose, California at an unknown time.

According to the pilot, he was inbound for landing at the 01CL, where he was planning to be involved in a fly-in. He reported that he initiated a go-around on short final for runway 9 due to gusty crosswind conditions. On climbout, about a 1/4 mile from the departure end of runway 9, the pilot experienced a partial loss of engine power. He further reported that he verified all engine control positions and the fuel selector was on the main tank. Despite his actions to regain engine power, he was unable to maintain airspeed and collided with wooded terrain about a mile from 01CL.

A witness that has flown out of 01CL for the last 22 years reported that she had invited the pilot of the accident airplane to a fly-in that weekend at the private airport. She spoke with the pilot the day prior to the accident and reviewed airport information with him. She said this was his first time visiting 01CL, and that runway 9 is the normal landing runway, and usually has a right quartering tailwind near the ponds adjacent to the runway. She explained that the wind socks at either end of the runway will often show opposite wind directions. She further reported that the winds on the day of the accident were inconsistent in direction, intermittent and gusty; several arriving aircraft had to do go-arounds. She stated that she observed the accident airplane shortly after the go-around, depart at a normal climb rate and experience gusty winds as the airplane passed over midfield.

Another witness located near midfield, on the north side of the runway, saw the accident airplane on final. He stated that the wind was erratic and coming from the southwest. As the accident airplane came in on final the winds increased to about 10 knots and subsequently the airplane initiated the go-around. The airplane continued above the runway at about 60 feet agl before he lost sight of it behind trees.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the 55-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in October, 23, 2013, with limitations that he must have available glasses for near vision. His most recent flight review was conducted on August 7, 2013.

The pilot reported that he had accumulated 342 flight hours in the accident airplane model, and 62 of those hours in the previous 90 days. He reported a total flight experience of 432 flight hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, a 1974 Starduster Too SA300, serial number 1, was a bi-wing, conventional fixed gear, tandem seat, experimental amateur-built airplane, made primarily of wood construction. The airplane was powered by a 200 horsepower Lycoming IO-360-A1B engine, serial number L-12357-51A, and equipped with a Hartzell, 2-bladed propeller.

According to the pilot, the date of the last annual inspection was completed on July 15, 2014, with an airframe total time of 726 hours.

The airplane logbooks were not available during the investigation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A review of recorded data from the Placerville Airport (PVF), Placerville, California, automated weather observation station, located 6 miles southwest of the accident site, revealed at 1835, wind was from 280 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 30 degrees Celsius, dew point 2 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.07 inches of mercury.

Using the reported weather conditions at PVF and the elevation of the accident site, which is 2,870 feet mean sea level (msl), the calculated density altitude was about 5,149 feet.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Swansboro Country Airport (01CL), Placerville, California, is a privately owned, non-towered airport and it has one runway; designated 9/27, with a left traffic pattern. The runway is measured about 3,100 feet by 50 feet and the airport is at an elevation of 2,594 feet msl.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest upright on a road in hilly wooded terrain. The main wreckage was positioned near a small embankment adjacent to the road. Surrounding the site are 20-foot tall trees of which none made contact with the airplane. The first responders removed the upper wing for the extraction of the forward seated passenger. The first responders cut fuel lines and control cables while removing the upper wing. The smell of fuel was evident during the first responder's actions.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

According to the FAA files, the pilot received his first aviation medical certificate in 1989 (records from this exam are not available) and then applied for a medical certificate again in 2009. At that time, he reported an appendectomy and a driving under the influence (DUI) conviction in 1988; he continued to report these events and surgery for a thumb injury thereafter but never reported any chronic medical conditions or medication use to the FAA.
The pilot was transported to Sutter Roseville Medical Center for treatment of his injuries. Records from the pilot's hospitalization following the accident were reviewed. The pilot reported hypertension and regular use of a beta blocker to treat it to his treating physicians. He denied using illicit drugs. Although urine testing for drugs of abuse was ordered, no specimen was received in the hospital laboratory and the order was therefore canceled. A blood sample from the pilot while undergoing treatment was obtained by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) and subsequently sent to the FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

CAMI performed toxicology tests on the sample provided. According to CAMI's report, carbon monoxide and cyanide were not tested due to insufficient sample for analysis. Volatiles and drugs were tested, and had positive results for 0.027 (ug/ml, ug/g) amphetamine, 0.233 (ug/ml, ug/g) methamphetamine, and unspecified level of Atenolol was also detected.

The NTSB Chief Medical Officer reported that Methamphetamine is a Schedule II controlled substance and is available in low doses by prescription to treat ADHD, ADD, obesity, and narcolepsy. Oral doses typically produce blood levels in the range of 0.02-0.05 ug/ml. Levels above 0.20 ug/ml indicate abuse. Users seeking the intense euphoria produced by higher levels typically snort, smoke, or inject the drug and may reach levels above 2.00 ug/ml.

Methamphetamine levels reach peak blood concentration differently depending on mode of administration. Peak blood methamphetamine concentrations occur shortly after injection, a few minutes after smoking, and around 3 hours after oral dosing. Peak plasma amphetamine concentrations occur around 10 hours after methamphetamine use. The half-life of methamphetamine is about 10 and 12 hours and the half-life of amphetamine is between about 8 and 14 hours.

Symptoms of recreational methamphetamine use follow a typical pattern. In the early phase users experience euphoria, excitation, exhilaration, rapid flight of ideas, increased libido, rapid speech, motor restlessness, hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, insomnia, reduced fatigue or drowsiness, increased alertness, a heightened sense of well-being, stereotypes behavior, feelings of increased physical strength, and poor impulse control. In addition, the heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate increase and they may have palpitations, dry mouth, abdominal cramps, twitching, dilated pupils, faster reaction times, and increased strength. As the initial effects wear off users commonly experience dysphoria, restlessness, agitation, and nervousness; they may experience paranoia, violence, aggression, a lack of coordination, delusions, psychosis, and drug craving. Blood levels cannot be used to distinguish among phases of methamphetamine use.

Methamphetamine and amphetamine are central nervous system stimulants and schedule II controlled substances used in prescription medications that treat narcolepsy, attention deficit disorder, and for weight control. Methamphetamine has high abuse potential due to its early euphoric effects; amphetamine is one of its metabolites. Following methamphetamine use, a greater proportion of the drug is excreted unchanged in urine than is excreted as amphetamine.

Symptoms following use occur in phases:

"Early phase –

Psychological: Euphoria, excitation, exhilaration, rapid flight of ideas, increased libido, rapid speech, motor restlessness, hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, insomnia, reduced fatigue or drowsiness, increased alertness, heightened sense of well-being, stereotypes behavior, feelings of increased physical strength, and poor impulse control.

Physiological: Increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, increased respiration rate, elevated temperature, palpitations, irregular heartbeat, dry mouth, abdominal cramps, appetite suppressed, twitching, pallor, dilated pupils, horizontal gaze nystagmus at high doses, faster reaction time, increased strength, and more efficient glucose utilization.

Late phase –

Psychological: Dysphoria, residual stimulation, restlessness, agitation, nervousness, paranoia, violence, aggression, lack of coordination, pseudo-hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, and drug craving.

Physiological: Fatigue, sleepiness with sudden starts, itching/picking/scratching, normal heart rate, and normal to small pupils which are reactive to light."

The time to onset of symptoms and to their end depends on the method of use; oral ingestion is slower and has lower peak blood levels but longer period of action than snorting, smoking, or injecting the drug. Withdrawal in chronic users or after a binge is associated with depression, fatigue, and strong cravings. Long term use can result in insomnia that may persist through at least month(s) long periods without the drug.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The postaccident examination of the recovered wreckage was conducted on September 3, 2014, at the facilities of Plain Parts Enterprises, Pleasant Grove, California, by the NTSB IIC, and the FAA. The postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Airframe Examination

Examination of the recovered airframe revealed that the forward fuselage was crushed and buckled. The engine and propeller assembly remained intact and was removed from the airframe prior to the examination by the recovery crew. The firewall was crushed rearward into the forward seat area. The engine support structure was bent and buckled. Numerous cuts were noted to the wing interplane struts and tension members. Both sides of the upper wing from outboard of the inboard interplane struts to the tip were bent downward. The lower wings were bent downward from the wing root to the tip. The main landing gear assembly was bent rearward along the fuselage.

The main fuel tank located forward of the passenger seat separated from the main wreckage. The main tank was deformed with separations at the welds. Internal surface areas were visible. The main tank fuel cap was removed and the seal was undamaged. The auxiliary tank remained attached to the upper wing. The fuel cap was removed and the cap seal was undamaged. The auxiliary tank vent line was unobstructed. The lower side of the wing structure below the auxiliary tank was broken and detached on the right side. The tank was removed and crush damage was noted to the forward corners. Fuel staining was visible near the sending unit area. The fuel selector valve remained attached to the firewall and the control rod separated from the valve. The position of the valve was obtained by applying compressed air and was found in the "Main" position. The gasculator remained attached to the firewall and was undamaged. The gasculator bowl was found safety wired backwards. The gasculator bowl was removed and a small amount of fuel was noted. Water detection paste revealed no water. The gasculator screen was clear of debris.

The rear seat instrument panel was crushed forward and all instruments remained intact. The tachometer displayed 0 rpm and 790.32 hours. The manifold pressure read at 30 in-hg and fuel flow at 0. The altimeter read 680 feet and the Colesman window was set to 30.12.

Control cable continuity was established from the cabin area to the engine control levers through several cuts by first responders and by recovery efforts. All cables had impact damage between the firewall and engine. The throttle, mixture and propeller control levers were found in the full forward position.

The tail section was removed from the fuselage during the recovery efforts at the accident site. The tail section was undamaged.

Engine Examination

The engine was fracture-separated from the engine mount assembly. During recovery efforts the engine was separated from the main wreckage by cutting various tubes, lines and cables.

The propeller governor separated from the accessory section and remained attached to the engine by oil lines. The propeller governor mounting flange and a portion of the drive coupling remained attached to the engine. The magnetos were undamaged and remained attached to the engine. The ignition leads had impact damage and several separations. The upper spark plug attachments at both number three and four cylinders separated from the sparkplugs. The shell section of the number three and four spark plugs was missing. The engine driven fuel pump had impact damage and remained attached to fuel lines. The fuel pump lever arm and mounting flange remained attached to the engine. The fuel pump was disassembled and no anomalies were noted. The alternator and mounting assembly had impact damage. The oil cooler and starter had impact damage and was removed from the engine to facilitate the rotation of the crankshaft. The upper sparkplugs were removed and had (Worn Out-Normal) wear conditions when compared to the Champion AV-27 chart. The upper sparkplug electrode areas had light grey deposits.

The crankshaft was rotated by hand and all cylinder compression and valve continuity was obtained. The number four cylinder exhaust and the number one inlet pushrods and housings had impact damage and the associated rocker arms did not move during the crankshaft rotation. Gear continuity was established from the crankshaft to the accessory section. The magneto impulse coupling engaged during crankshaft rotation but no spark from the leads was noted. The magnetos were removed and the drive shafts were rotated with the use of an electric drill and spark was obtained from the damaged ignition leads. The fuel injection servo inlet screen was removed and fuel was present during its removal. The injector brass plug was tight and safetied and the diaphragm stem was intact. The flow divider was undamaged and disassembled. The diaphragm, spring and valve were undamaged and showed normal operating signatures. No fuel was noted in the fuel inlet line to the flow divider or in the valve assembly.

The propeller assembly remained attached to the engine and had impact damage to both blades. The blade marked "A" had a slight aft bend from near the hub to the tip. The blade had leading edge gouging near the tip and the cambered side had cord-wise scratches. The blade marked "B" had aft bending and a decreased pitch twist at its mid-section to the tip and chord-wise scratches near the tip. The spinner dome was crushed and was torn near both blade hubs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The pilot reported that 7 flight hours prior to the accident, during climbout at full throttle, he experienced a sudden loss of power for about two seconds. After he had the airplane examined, there was no cause found that would have resulted in the power loss.

Following the accident, the FAA asked the pilot to report on his injuries and then initiated an enforcement action against him. The pilot surrendered his medical certificate and his airman certificate to the FAA in December, 2014, announcing his intention never to fly again.

World famous aviator Dick Rutan flew into Paso Robles Municipal Airport (KPRB) for a special visit

Dick Rutan came to the Central Coast to visit a friend. He was actually supposed to arrive on Thursday but the rain caused his trip to be delayed.

The former Air Force pilot spent the day exploring the Estrella War Birds Museum and Woodland Auto Display

"We are going to come down here and hang out with some other aviation people and support the museum,” Rutan said about his plans."It is always important to maintain aviation and the airplanes and so forth. It is kind of our history. I always look at it as - you can see on my airplane, the American flag - and I'm somewhat patriotic.”

Rutan was the first to fly around the world without stopping or re-fueling.

Story and video:   http://www.ksby.com

Cessna 414, N127BC: Fatal accident occurred August 15, 2014 near Bowie Municipal Airport (0F2), Montague County, Texas

Lawrence Robert Liptack, 51, and Landon Robert Liptack, 9



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration North Texas Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama 
McCauley Propeller Systems; Wichita, Kansas
RAM Aircraft, LP; Waco, Texas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N127BC

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA438
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 15, 2014 in Bowie, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/26/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 414, registration: N127BC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The multi-engine airplane was about 500 ft above ground level (agl) and on a left base landing approach when a witness saw the airplane suddenly point straight down, begin spinning, and make three complete rotations before impacting terrain in a partially nose-down attitude. The airplane came to rest upright, and was mostly consumed by an immediate postimpact fire. A postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. A pilot operating another pipeline patrol airplane in the vicinity reported frequent severe-to-extreme turbulence about 1,000-2,000 ft above ground level. Data from an on-board GPS unit indicated that, while on the base leg of the airport traffic pattern for landing, the accident airplane’s airspeed decayed 10 knots below the manufacturer’s recommended approach speed for turbulent conditions. 

An autopsy performed on the pilot found significant existing atherosclerotic disease (60 to 80 percent) and described evidence of an acute, premortem, nonocclusive thrombosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The medical examiner’s conclusion stated it “appears the decedent likely suffered an acute cardiac event while piloting his aircraft” and “died primarily due to hypertensive and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and that his multiple blunt force injuries likely contributed to his death.”

It is likely that the pilot was incapacitated due to the acute cardiac event and lost control of the airplane during the approach to land.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s incapacitation in flight as the result of a an acute cardiac event, which resulted in a loss of control and collision with terrain. 




HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 15, 2014, about 1535 central daylight time, a Cessna 414 multi-engine airplane, N127BC, was destroyed after impacting terrain near Bowie Municipal Airport (0F2), Bowie, Texas. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The airplane had departed from La Porte Municipal Airport (T41), La Porte, Texas, at 1344 and was destined for 0F2.

The airplane was about 500 feet above ground level (agl) and on a left base for a south landing when a witness saw the airplane suddenly point straight down, begin spinning, and make three complete rotations before impacting the ground. Evidence at the scene showed the airplane had impacted in a nose down attitude, came to rest upright, and was mostly consumed by the immediate postimpact fire.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 51, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) commercial pilot certificate with ratings in airplane single engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He also held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued on March 5, 2014, which included a restriction "must wear corrective lenses".

The pilot's personal logbooks were not available for examination by the NTSB during the course of the investigation. Based on a review of copies of partial pilot logbook entries, FAA documents, and statements from witnesses and other persons, the pilot's total flight experience on August 15, 2014, 2014, was estimated as about 1,200 hours in all aircraft, which included an estimated 15 hours of pilot experience in Cessna 414 airplanes, with all of those 15 hours accumulated in the previous 90 days.

A certificate of training showed that the pilot completed initial and recurrent training in a Cessna 414 airplane on July 30, 2014, and he then met the biennial flight review requirements 14 CFR 61.56.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The low-wing, retractable landing gear, pressurized, multi-engine airplane, manufacturer's serial number (s/n) 414-0519 was manufactured in 1974. It was powered by two, 335-horsepower Continental Motors TSIO-520 series turbo-charged engines and each engine drove a three-bladed, variable pitch, full-feathering, McCauley propeller.

The left engine was built in 1972 and was converted from a TSIO-520-K1A to a TSIO-520-N on September 17, 1997 via a RAM Aircraft conversion. The right engine was built in 1973 and was converted from a TSIO-520-K2A to a TSIO-520-NB on June 27, 1997 via a RAM Aircraft conversion in accordance with FAA approved Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) SA8424SW-D.

The airplane was equipped with Micro Aerodynamics vortex generators, which were installed in June 1997, in accordance with FAA approved STC SA7984SW.

Complete aircraft maintenance logbooks could not be located during the course of the investigation. Based on the partial logbook entries available, FAA records, and other documents, the accident airplane had been returned to service following a satisfactory annual inspection on June 17, 2014, when the recorded aircraft total flight time was 4,256.4 hours. Logbook entries show that the left engine, s/n 217630-73K, then had a total of 4,300.2 hours, with 1,139.4 hours since left engine overhaul. Logbook entries show that the right engine, s/n 217929-73K, then had a total of 5,265.8 hours, with 783.0 hours since right engine overhaul. Total flight times after the annual inspection in June, 2014, could not be determined.

FAA records showed the airplane had been initially registered to the pilot on July 14, 2014.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1535 the Automated Surface Observation System (AWOS) at 0F2 reported wind from 150 degrees at 9 knots gusting to 14 knots, wind direction 100 degrees variable 170 degrees, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 35 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 17 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 29.92 inches of mercury.

The AWOS indicated a variable wind at the time of the accident, which produced a tailwind condition for the airplane on a left base leg to runway 17, and would have resulted in a left crosswind component of about 14 knots during landing.

A witness operating a pipeline patrol airplane at about 2,000 feet agl in the vicinity at the time of the accident reported he had an in-flight air temperature of about 37 to 40 degrees C, and he described severe to extreme turbulence in frequent strong low-level thermals, which created sudden downdrafts and resulted in his airplane suddenly losing altitude. He reported it was not just turbulence or thermals and associated sink. It was like the airplane "completely stopped flying and just fell straight down".

A National Weather Service (NWS) upper air sounding indicated a high estimated cloud base about 9,000 feet agl, immediately above a defined temperature inversion. The sounding indicated strong thermals through 9,000 feet due to the intense surface heating, and the warm core high pressure system dominating over the region. The lowest 1,000 feet was also noted to have a super-adiabatic lapse rate, which would have likely enhanced any thermal bubbles developing at low levels as reported by the pipeline patrol witness.

The NWS sounding wind profile also indicated the strongest wind was 15 knots from 140 degrees at 2,000 feet mean sea level (msl). The winds decreased above this level and there were no other strong vertical wind shears associated with any turbulence layers below 18,000 feet

Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration showed that, at the accident location, at 1535, the altitude of the sun was about 56 degrees above the horizon and the azimuth of the sun was about 241 degrees. Sunset occurred at 2018.

COMMUNICATIONS

There was no record of any radio communications with N127BC. The Unicom radio frequency at 0F3 was not recorded.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The FAA Airport/Facility Directory, South Central U. S., indicated that 0F2 was a non-towered airport with a field elevation of 1,100 feet msl. The only runway was 17-35, which was an asphalt runway 3,603 feet long by 60 feet wide. Runway 17 was oriented to 174 degrees true and 167 degrees magnetic.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located on a rural flat grassy pasture area about 1-mile north from 0F2 at an estimated terrain elevation of about 1,105 feet msl. A postimpact fire consumed major portions of the fuselage and wings and thermally damaged much of the vegetation within a diameter of about 100 feet.

Evidence at the scene showed the airplane impacted terrain in a partially nose-down attitude, coming to rest upright with the fuselage oriented on a magnetic heading of 135 degrees. Dirt ejecta was observed on a debris direction of about 150 degrees. The initial impact ground scars were located under the wreckage and no other ground scars were observed.

Emergency responders reported that the pilot was found in the left front cockpit seat and the passenger was found in the rear passenger cabin area, but the passenger's specific seat location could not be determined. Thermal damage to the lap belts and shoulder harness straps prevented a determination of safety belt restraint usage by either the pilot or the passenger.

The major components of the airplane remained attached. All flight control surfaces remained attached. The left wing remained intact. The right wing remained attached, but exhibited a forward bend in the leading edge along the lateral axis, outboard of the engine nacelle. The aft spar of the right wing separated outboard of the engine nacelle. Deformation in the nose structure indicated an impact crush angle of approximately 15 degrees nose down.

The nose gear and left and right main landing gear were all observed to be extended. The flaps were observed extended to about 35 degrees. Impact damage and thermal damage prevented a determination of the selected position of either the landing gear handle or the flap handle.

Flight control continuity was mostly confirmed for the rudder, elevators, and the left aileron. Flight control continuity was mostly confirmed for the right aileron except for a cable fracture in the inboard right wing area.

Both engines remained attached to the airframe. The left propeller remained attached to the propeller flange, and two of the three blades remained attached to the propeller hub. The third blade separated from the propeller hub, and was found underneath the engine. The separated blade was bent aft, and exhibited chord-wise and span-wise paint erosion. The two blades that remained attached displayed little visible damage. The right propeller remained attached to the propeller flange, and two of the three blades remained attached to the propeller hub. The third blade separated from the propeller hub, and was found beneath the engine. The separated blade was bent aft, and exhibited chord-wise and span-wise paint erosion. The two blades that remained attached displayed little visible damage.

Both cockpit throttle controls were observed in the closed position and the control levers were bent over the quadrant to the left. Both mixture controls were observed in the position of about 1/4 forward travel. The left engine propeller control was observed in the position of about 1/2 forward travel. The right engine propeller control was observed in the position of about 3/8 forward travel.

The left fuel selector handle was found in the left position and the left fuel selector valve was found between the left and off positions. The position of the right fuel selector handle could not be determined. The right fuel selector valve was found in the right position. The left and right fuel strainer screens sustained thermal damage and the left and right fuel strainer bowls contained molten debris.

The on-scene examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Both engines and both propellers were removed from the wreckage and were further examined.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences, Office of the Medical Examiner, in Dallas, Texas.

The autopsy found significant existing atherosclerotic disease (60 to 80 percent) and described evidence of an acute, premortem, non-occlusive thrombosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

The medical examiner's conclusion stated it "appears the decedent likely suffered an acute cardiac event while piloting his aircraft" and "died primarily due to hypertensive and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and that his multiple blunt force injuries likely contributed to his death."

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report stated that tests for carbon monoxide and for cyanide were not performed, ethanol was not detected in vitreous, and no listed drugs were detected in blood.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The wreckage was moved to another location and examined.

Left engine

The engine exhibited impact damage and thermal damage from the postimpact fire. The induction filter was crushed and fire damaged. Numerous components of the induction system were destroyed by the postimpact fire. The throttle valve was observed in the idle (closed) position. The left magneto mounting flange was fractured and the magneto was separated from the topside of the engine. The ignition harness remained attached to the magneto. Both magnetos were examined. The sparkplug electrodes displayed a normal wear pattern and little-to-no combustion deposits when compared to the Champion Aviation Service Manual (AV6-R).

The fuel pump flange was fractured and the fuel pump was displaced downward on the backside of the engine. The pump sustained impact and thermal damage. The aneroid bellows were separated from the pump and the valve shaft sustained deformation damage. The drive coupling was fractured with the fracture surface being deformed to one side.

The throttle body sustained fire damage that resulted in the separation of the metering unit from the body. The metering unit sustained thermal and deformation damage to the levers and shafts. The fuel inlet screen was removed and found to be free from any obstructions.

The fuel manifold remained secured to the topside of the engine and the cap was safety-wired to the housing. The fuel injector lines remained attached to the manifold valve. Disassembly of the fuel manifold valve revealed that the screen was clear, the diaphragm was in place, intact, and pliable, and the plunger was attached.

All of the injector nozzles were clear and free from obstructions. The upper deck reference line remained secured around the nozzles. The O-rings were in place and no anomalies were noted. The oil sump was flattened and displaced up into the bottom of the engine. The oil sump was punctured. The oil and scavenge pumps contained residual oil. No anomalies were noted with the pump gears. The oil pump housing displayed some circular scoring on the cap and a half-inch score mark on the housing wall. The oil pump housing contained charred oil that flaked off when touched. The oil filter was examined.

The cylinders were bore scoped during the on-scene portion of the examination with no anomalies noted. During the teardown examination the cylinders were removed and the cylinder barrels, cylinder heads, valves and valve seats were examined. The cylinder heads and valves displayed normal combustion deposits. The rocker arms and shaft were examined. The pistons were intact with normal combustion deposits noted on the piston faces. The piston pins were intact and showed no signs of operational distress. All of the piston rings were intact and lubricated.

The engine case halves were separated and inspected. The crankshaft, bearings, connecting rods, counterweights, camshafts and camshaft lobes were examined. The lifters, accessory gears, starter, starter adaptor, alternator, and propeller governor were examined. The turbocharger, turbo controller, waste gate, and overboost valve were examined.

Right engine

The engine exhibited impact damage and thermal damage from the postimpact fire. The induction filter was crushed. Numerous components of the induction system were destroyed by the postimpact fire. The throttle valve was observed in the idle (closed) position. Both magnetos were examined. The sparkplug electrodes displayed a normal wear pattern and little-to-no combustion deposits when compared to the Champion Aviation Service Manual (AV6-R).

The fuel pump remained secured to the backside of the engine, but sustained thermal damage that destroyed the aneroid housing and distorted much of the fuel pump housing. The drive coupling remained intact but was bent. The coupling insert area of the drive shaft was displaced. The metering unit sustained thermal and deformation damage to the levers and shafts. The fuel inlet fitting was destroyed. The inlet screen was examined and the soldered joints for the screen were melted away. The screen was covered in soot and re-solidified molten metal.

The fuel manifold remained secured to the topside of the engine and the cap was safety-wired to the housing. The fuel injector lines remained attached to the manifold valve. Disassembly of the fuel manifold valve revealed that the screen was clear, the diaphragm was in place, intact, and pliable, and the plunger was attached.

All of the injector nozzles were clear and free from obstructions. The upper deck reference line remained secured around the nozzles. The O-rings were in place and no anomalies were noted. The oil sump and oil filter were examined.

The cylinders were bore scoped during the on-scene portion of the examination with no anomalies noted. During the teardown examination the cylinders were removed and the cylinder barrels, cylinder heads, valves and valve seats were examined. The cylinder heads and valves displayed normal combustion deposits. The rocker arms and shaft were examined. The pistons were intact with normal combustion deposits noted on the piston faces. The piston pins were intact and showed no signs of operational distress. All of the piston rings were intact and lubricated.

The engine case halves were separated and inspected. The crankshaft, bearings, connecting rods, counterweights, camshafts and camshaft lobes were examined. The lifters, accessory gears, starter, starter adaptor, alternator, and propeller governor were examined. The turbocharger, turbo controller, waste gate, and overboost valve were examined.

Propellers

Both propellers had impact damage consistent with a low amount of rotational energy absorption. Although there was evidence of rotation at impact, with low engine power during the impact, the exact engine power levels could not be determined. Neither propeller had indications consistent with high power at impact.

Neither propeller had impact signature markings or component positions indicating the blades had been in the feathered blade angle range. Both propellers had several indications of operating near the low pitch to latch angle position at the time of impact. Neither propeller had evidence of damage to the latch arrowheads or the latch mechanism that would indicate latch engagement during at the time of impact. There was no evidence of any type of fatigue failure.

Blades on both propellers had blade bending, twisting, and overall propeller assembly damage typical of low engine power at impact.

The examination of the entire wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Electronic Devices

A Garmin GPSmap 696 handheld GPS device was removed from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB vehicle recorder laboratory in Washington, D.C. Data was successfully extracted from the GPSmap 696 and included 81 sessions from September 10, 2013, through August 15, 2014. The accident flight was identified and consisted of 878 data points starting from 1333:57 and ending at 1535:26 on August 15, 2014.

Data showed that, as the airplane neared 0F2, the northbound airplane began to descend about 1534:16 and turned left to enter a left base turn to land on runway 17 at 0F2. During the descent, the airplane's groundspeed gradually decreased. The aircraft's GPS altitude and groundspeed decreased from a GPS altitude of 2,249 feet msl and 132 knots at 1534:16 to its final recorded value of 1,528 feet msl and 80 knots at 1535:26, when the airplane had then continued its left turn from westbound to generally southwest bound,

A Hoskins CFS-2002 fuel flow indicator, an Apple iPhone 4S, and a Blackberry personal electronic device (PED) were removed from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB vehicle recorder laboratory in Washington, D.C. Thermal damage to the Hoskins CFS-2002 fuel flow indicator, Apple iPhone 4S, and Blackberry PED prevented a download of any data and no further work was performed.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the Cessna 414 Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA approved Airplane Flight Manual and Flight Manual Supplements: the airplane had a clean configuration stall speed at zero degrees bank angle of 83 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS) and a landing configuration stall speed at zero degrees bank angle of 71 KIAS. The landing configuration stall speed at a bank angle of 40 degrees was listed as 81 KIAS.

According to 14 CFR 23.73 "Reference landing approach: (b) For normal … category reciprocating engine-powered airplanes of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight … the reference landing approach speed, VREF, must not be less than … 1.3 VSO".

According to the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (Page 8-17) "TURBULENT AIR APPROACH AND LANDING "Power-on approaches at an airspeed slightly above the normal approach speed should be used for landing in turbulent air. This provides for more positive control of the airplane when strong horizontal wind gusts, or up and down drafts, are experienced. … One procedure is to use the normal approach speed plus one-half of the wind gust factors … An adequate amount of power should be used to maintain the proper airspeed and descent path throughout the approach, and the throttle retarded to idling position only after the main wheels contact the landing surface".