Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Grumman American AA-1B Trainer, N9576L: Incident occurred February 16, 2016 in Salinas, Monterey County, California

Date: 16-FEB-16
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N9576L
Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN
Aircraft Model: AA1
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15
City: SALINAS
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, SALINAS, CA

http://registry.faa.gov/N9576L

Cessna 150M, N704SL: Accident occurred February 12, 2016 in Santa Paula, Ventura County, California

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA127A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Santa Paula, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N704SL
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, "Due to the restricted visibility from the rear cockpit," he "failed to the see the C-150 that stopped on the taxiway." Subsequently, the propeller of the tailwheel airplane impacted the vertical stabilizer of a stationary Cessna airplane. The student pilot of the Cessna airplane reported that he was preparing for the engine run-up and never saw the tailwheel airplane until after the collision. 

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer of the Cessna airplane. 

The pilot of the tailwheel airplane and the student pilot of the Cessna airplane reported there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with their respective airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The tailwheel pilot's failure to see and avoid a stationary airplane performing a run-up, which resulted in a ground collision.

http://registry.faa.gov/N704SL

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA127A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Santa Paula, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N704SL
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, "Due to the restricted visibility from the rear cockpit," he "failed to the see the C-150 that stopped on the taxiway." Subsequently, the propeller of the tailwheel airplane impacted the vertical stabilizer of a stationary Cessna airplane. The student pilot of the Cessna airplane reported that he was preparing for the engine run-up and never saw the tailwheel airplane until after the collision.

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer of the Cessna airplane. 

The pilot of the tailwheel airplane and the student pilot of the Cessna airplane reported there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with their respective airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

Mooney M20M Bravo, N150FC: Incident occurred February 15, 2016 in Napa County, California

Date: 15-FEB-16
Time: 22:38:00Z
Regis#: N150FC
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20M
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25
City: NAPA
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING GEAR COLLAPSED, NAPA, CA

http://registry.faa.gov/N150FC

Aviat Pitts S-2C Special, N57BC: Accident occurred February 12, 2016 in Santa Paula, Ventura County, California

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA127B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Santa Paula, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/05/2016
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC S-2, registration: N57BC
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, "Due to the restricted visibility from the rear cockpit," he "failed to the see the C-150 that stopped on the taxiway." Subsequently, the propeller of the tailwheel airplane impacted the vertical stabilizer of a stationary Cessna airplane. The student pilot of the Cessna airplane reported that he was preparing for the engine run-up and never saw the tailwheel airplane until after the collision. 

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer of the Cessna airplane. 

The pilot of the tailwheel airplane and the student pilot of the Cessna airplane reported there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with their respective airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The tailwheel pilot's failure to see and avoid a stationary airplane performing a run-up, which resulted in a ground collision.

http://registry.faa.gov/N57BC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer, N763GL: Incident occurred February 13, 2016 in Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, California

Date: 13-FEB-16
Time: 23:19:00Z
Regis#: N763GL
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: 2T1A
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15
City: PALO ALTO
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING TIPPED ONTO ITS NOSE, PALO ALTO, CA

http://registry.faa.gov/N763GL

Cessna 180, N2253C: Accident occurred February 14, 2016 in Sleetmute, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N2253C

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ANC16CA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, February 14, 2016 in Sleetmute, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N2253C
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was on a personal cross-country flight to a remote, off-airport site, in a tailwheel-equipped airplane. The pilot said that before landing he intended to fly a low pass over the snow-covered site to determine the condition of the snowpack, a maneuver commonly known as dragging the landing site. He said that as the main landing gear wheels touched down atop the frozen layer of crusty snow, the wheels broke through, and the airplane subsequently nosed over sustaining substantial damage to the left wing and vertical stabilizer. 

The pilot stated there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to make contact with an unsuitable landing surface, resulting in a nose over.

Cessna T210L, N5555G: Incident occurred February 13, 2016 in Durango, La Plata County, Colorado

Date: 13-FEB-16
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N5555G
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07
City: DURANGO
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, DURANGO, CO

http://registry.faa.gov/N5555G

Cessna 152, R & E Airways Corp., N46953: Accident occurred October 17, 2016 in Miami, Miami-Dade County • Incident occurred September 11, 2016 in Homestead , Miami-Dade County, Florida • Incident occurred February 16, 2016 in Pembroke Pines, Broward County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Miami, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N46953
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that after a normal taxi and run-up, he aligned the airplane on the runway centerline and started the takeoff roll. He further reported that he attempted to rotate the airplane at 50 knots and then again at 65 knots, but the airplane “couldn’t takeoff.” The student pilot subsequently reduced the power to idle and applied the brakes to abort the takeoff. During the aborted takeoff, the airplane veered off the runway to the left and encountered high grass and a water retention lake about 635 feet from the runway centerline. 

The student pilot reported that the airplane “wouldn’t respond” to his control inputs during the aborted takeoff. 

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The operator reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident Report that the student pilot “rotated too early and got fixated on the airspeed indicator. Then the left brake was touched causing the airplane to veer to the left.” 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector reported that he completed a postaccident examination of the airplane and found that the brakes were functional and confirmed flight control continuity.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the aborted takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

R & E AIRWAYS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N46953 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N46953
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that after a normal taxi and run-up, he aligned the airplane on the runway centerline and started the takeoff roll. He further reported that he attempted to rotate the airplane at 50 knots and then again at 65 knots, but the airplane "couldn't takeoff." The student pilot subsequently reduced the power to idle and applied the brakes to abort the takeoff. During the aborted takeoff, the airplane veered off the runway to the left and encountered high grass and a water retention lake about 635 feet from the runway centerline.

The student pilot reported that the airplane "wouldn't respond" to his control inputs during the aborted takeoff. 

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The operator reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident Report that the student pilot "rotated too early and got fixated on the airspeed indicator. Then the left brake was touched causing the airplane to veer to the left." 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector reported that he completed a postaccident examination of the airplane and found that the brakes were functional and confirmed flight control continuity.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A CANAL, NEAR MIAMI, FLORIDA.

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 12:10:00Z
Regis#: N46953
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT LANDED AND THE NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA.  

Date: 11-SEP-16
Time: 20:28:00Z
Regis#: N46953
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HOMESTEAD
State: Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR PEMBROOK PINES, FL

Date: 17-FEB-16 
Time:  02:34:00Z
Regis#:  N46953
Aircraft Make:  CESSNA
Aircraft Model:  152
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Unknown
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  PEMBROOKE PINES
State:  Florida




PEMBROKE PINES, Fla. (WSVN) -- Police are investigating after a small plane made an emergency landing in Pembroke Pines.

The plane was forced to land on US Highway 27 just before 10 p.m. on Tuesday due to a currently unidentified issue. The two passengers that were onboard the plane both walked off without any injuries.

There was a slight fuel spill during the landing, so firefighters have placed foam down as a precaution. Traffic in the southbound lane is moving however, only one lane is open at this time.

Story and video:  http://www.wsvn.com



A small plane made an emergency landing on U.S. 27 in Pembroke Pines Tuesday evening.

It happened near the 1000 block in the southbound lanes near Pembroke Boulevard. The pilot called in engine trouble and made the landing. No injuries were reported.

Pembroke Pines Police said there was no damage to the plane or to any surrounding roads or homes. They said the plane was occupied by the pilot and one passenger.

The plane is a single-engine propeller, fixed-wing aircraft. The FAA was called to the scene to investigate.

Pembroke Pines Fire crews responded to plug a fuel leak from the plane.

U.S. 27 was closed for a short time but has since been reopened. The plane is expected to be towed from the area on Wednesday.

Story and photo:  http://www.nbcmiami.com





A small plane made an emergency landing on U.S. 27 in Pembroke Pines Tuesday evening.

It happened near the 1000 block in the southbound lanes near Pembroke Boulevard. The pilot called in engine trouble and made the landing. No injuries were reported.

Pembroke Pines Police said there was no damage to the plane or to any surrounding roads or homes. They said the plane was occupied by the pilot and one passenger.

The plane is a single-engine propeller, fixed-wing aircraft. The FAA was called to the scene to investigate.

Pembroke Pines Fire crews responded to plug a fuel leak from the plane.

U.S. 27 was closed for a short time but has since been reopened. The plane is expected to be towed from the area on Wednesday.

Story and photo:  http://www.nbcmiami.com Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

R & E AIRWAYS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N46953 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N46953
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that after a normal taxi and run-up, he aligned the airplane on the runway centerline and started the takeoff roll. He further reported that he attempted to rotate the airplane at 50 knots and then again at 65 knots, but the airplane "couldn't takeoff." The student pilot subsequently reduced the power to idle and applied the brakes to abort the takeoff. During the aborted takeoff, the airplane veered off the runway to the left and encountered high grass and a water retention lake about 635 feet from the runway centerline.

The student pilot reported that the airplane "wouldn't respond" to his control inputs during the aborted takeoff. 

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The operator reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident Report that the student pilot "rotated too early and got fixated on the airspeed indicator. Then the left brake was touched causing the airplane to veer to the left." 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector reported that he completed a postaccident examination of the airplane and found that the brakes were functional and confirmed flight control continuity.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A CANAL, NEAR MIAMI, FLORIDA.

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 12:10:00Z
Regis#: N46953
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT LANDED AND THE NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA.  

Date: 11-SEP-16
Time: 20:28:00Z
Regis#: N46953
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HOMESTEAD
State: Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR PEMBROOK PINES, FL

Date: 17-FEB-16 
Time:  02:34:00Z
Regis#:  N46953
Aircraft Make:  CESSNA
Aircraft Model:  152
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Unknown
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  PEMBROOKE PINES
State:  Florida




PEMBROKE PINES, Fla. (WSVN) -- Police are investigating after a small plane made an emergency landing in Pembroke Pines.

The plane was forced to land on US Highway 27 just before 10 p.m. on Tuesday due to a currently unidentified issue. The two passengers that were onboard the plane both walked off without any injuries.

There was a slight fuel spill during the landing, so firefighters have placed foam down as a precaution. Traffic in the southbound lane is moving however, only one lane is open at this time.

Story and video:  http://www.wsvn.com



A small plane made an emergency landing on U.S. 27 in Pembroke Pines Tuesday evening.

It happened near the 1000 block in the southbound lanes near Pembroke Boulevard. The pilot called in engine trouble and made the landing. No injuries were reported.

Pembroke Pines Police said there was no damage to the plane or to any surrounding roads or homes. They said the plane was occupied by the pilot and one passenger.

The plane is a single-engine propeller, fixed-wing aircraft. The FAA was called to the scene to investigate.

Pembroke Pines Fire crews responded to plug a fuel leak from the plane.

U.S. 27 was closed for a short time but has since been reopened. The plane is expected to be towed from the area on Wednesday.

Story and photo:  http://www.nbcmiami.com

Cessna 140, N3625V: Accident occurred February 13, 2016 in Independence, Polk County, Oregon

http://registry.faa.gov/N3625V 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA068 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 13, 2016 in Independence, OR
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N3625V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 13, 2016, about 1100 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 140G airplane, N3625V, sustained substantial damage when the left main landing gear axle broke during landing and the airplane ground looped at the Independence State Airport, Independence, Oregon. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was owned by the pilot and operated as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that the approach and touchdown were normal. Just after touchdown, he felt something similar to a bump, and the airplane started to drift to the left. He stated that he thought that he possibly had a flat tire and tried to compensate, but the airplane continued drifting to the left and exited the left side of the runway into the dirt and ground looped, sustaining substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. 

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector from the Portland Flight Standards District Office was at the airport at the time of the accident and examined the airplane at the accident site. The examination revealed that the left main landing gear axle had fractured and the wheel assembly separated from the airplane. A detailed examination of the fractured axle by the NTSB materials laboratory is pending.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09

Maule M-4-220C Strata Rocket, Adventure Flight LLC, N2032U: Accident occurred February 13, 2016 in Anchorage, Alaska

ADVENTURE FLIGHT LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2032U 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA141
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 13, 2016 in Anchorage, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2016
Aircraft: MAULE M 4, registration: N2032U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the airline transport pilot, during the takeoff roll the airplane briefly exited the runway to the left after the passenger inadvertently pushed the left rudder pedal. While correcting for the runway excursion, the right main landing gear struck a taxiway sign, as the pilot controlled the airplane back on to the runway. The pilot and passenger reported that they did not observe any damage from their cockpit seats, and continued the takeoff roll and departure. The pilot reported that after reaching their destination, during the touchdown roll he noticed the right main landing gear tire deflated and affirmed that "the right wheel dug in and threw up debris that damaged the right elevator." However, photographs taken at the departure airport depict a taxiway sign with blue paint and metallic particle transfer on the sign which appears to be the same blue color as the accident airplane. Further the photographs show damage to the sign consistent with the damage to the airplane's elevator. There were impact impressions on the taxiway sign's black metal frame that were consistent with the damage sustained to the right side of the airplane's elevator.

The pilot reported that he used duct tape to make repairs to the airplane, took off and landed at their final destination airport without further incident. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the elevator.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane prior to departure or during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The inadvertent rudder input by the passenger, resulting in a runway excursion during takeoff and collision with a taxiway sign.

Work nearly finished on jet that caught fire in aborted takeoff • Boeing 777-236ER, British Airways, G-VIIO, accident occurred September 08, 2015 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada



Work is nearing completion on the British Airways Boeing 777 that caught fire after an aborted takeoff in Las Vegas in September, but airline officials aren't saying when the plane will be flown from McCarran International Airport.

A construction tent that had been placed over the hull of the wide-bodied jet has been removed. An aluminum alloy skin patch appears to have been placed on the port side of the aircraft. The port-side jet engine that had been removed last year has yet to be replaced.

"Safety is always British Airways' first priority," a spokeswoman for the London-based airline said in an email. "A team from Boeing is carrying out the repair work, which will be certified to the same high standards as if the aircraft was brand new. The aircraft will resume flying once stringent checks have been completed."

The spokeswoman said no timeline has been set for when the aircraft would resume flying.

While parked at McCarran, British Airways is paying $375 a day in fees and by the end of February, the bill would reach more than $53,000.

The jet, a twin-engine Boeing 777-200ER, was scheduled to fly as British Airways Flight 2276 from McCarran to London's Gatwick International Airport on Sept. 8.

Midway through its takeoff run, before the plane lifted off the ground, the jet's left engine experienced an uncontained failure that started a fire. Debris spewed out of the engine and onto the runway.

The pilot shut down the engine and aborted the takeoff and while McCarran's emergency response crews sped to the burning plane, the plane's 157 passengers and 13 crew members began evacuating on emergency slides.

A preliminary National Transportation Safety Board report in October said the "left engine and pylon, left fuselage structure and inboard left wing ... were substantially damaged by the fire."

Officials reported 14 people suffered minor injuries, most of them as a result of a rough ride down the emergency chutes. The runway was closed for four hours.

Aviation experts initially said they expected the plane's insurers to declare the aircraft a "hull loss," meaning that it was too damaged for repair and that it would be disassembled for parts.

In December, the airline determined that the plane's damage was suitable for repair so a plan was established to bring repair crews to McCarran to make the jet airworthy.

Story and photo:  http://www.reviewjournal.com



NTSB Identification: DCA15FA185
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of BRITISH AIRWAYS PLC
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 08, 2015 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: BOEING COMPANY BOEING 777-236, registration: G-VIIO
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 Minor, 164 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 8, 2015, about 1613 pacific daylight time (PDT), British Airways flight 2276, a Boeing 777-200, equipped with two GE90-85B engines, registration G-VIIO, experienced a #1 engine uncontained failure during takeoff ground roll on runway 7L at McCarran International Airport (LAS), Las Vegas, Nevada. The #1 engine, inboard left wing, and a portion of the left and right fuselage sustained fire damage. Resulting fire was extinguished by airport rescue and fire fighting. The 157 passengers, including 1 lap child, and 13 crew members evacuated via emergency slides on the runway. There were 5 minor injuries and 1 serious injury as a result of the evacuation. The airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 129 
 and was en route to London - Gatwick Airport (LGW), Horley, England.

Globe Swift GC-1B, N80775: Incident occurred February 12, 2016 and accident occurred November 19, 2011 - Denver, Colorado

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN12CA075
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 19, 2011 in Denver, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/06/2012
Aircraft: GLOBE GC-1B, registration: N80775
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that the engine began to gradually lose power shortly after takeoff and that he could smell raw fuel. As the pilot turned back to the airport, the engine stopped running, and he made a forced landing to a field short of the runway. During the landing, the airplane nosed over and the vertical stabilizer was bent. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed a fitting that secured the main fuel line to the engine was loose and leaking fuel. The interruption of fuel was enough to cause the loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to fuel starvation as a result of a loose fuel line fitting.

Date: 12-FEB-16 
Time: 15:22:00Z
Regis#: N80775
Aircraft Make: GLOBE
Aircraft Model: GC1B
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03
City: DENVER
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT LANDED AND THE GEAR COLLAPSED, CENTENNIAL AIRPORT, DENVER, CO

http://registry.faa.gov/N80775

Firefighters responded to the scene of a single-engine plane crash near Centennial Airport on Nov. 19. The pilot was evaluated for injuries but was not transported to a hospital.


CENTENNIAL, Colo. -- A single-engine airplane crashed into a field Saturday afternoon near Centennial Airport.

Becky O' Guin, spokeswoman with South Metro Fire Rescue, said the pilot was walked away from the crash.

South Metro fire crews were dispatched at around 12 :50 p.m. to a field near Potomac Street and Broncos Parkway on a report of a plane crash.

O'Guin said the pilot told investigators that the plane ran out of gas shortly after taking off from the airport. The pilot turned the plane around and tried to land back at the airport without its engine running, O'Guin said.

The pilot put it down in the field and the plane nosed into the ground after landing.
-------------------
South Metro Fire Rescue Authority firefighters responded to an airplane crash just south of Centennial Airport near Chambers and Potomac in unincorporated Douglas County at 12:40 p.m. Nov. 19.

There was one person on board the plane when it went down in a field. The pilot was evaluated for injuries, but was not transported to the hospital. The pilot was flying a Swift single-engine aircraft when he lost power to the engine. He was trying to return to Centennial when the plane went down and came to a stop resting on its top.

Firefighters with South Metro’s Aircraft Rescue Firefighting Team made sure that the fuel and electrical was shut off and checked for fuel leaks.

The crash is under investigation by the FAA and NTSB.

Consolidated Vultee BT-15, Colville Inc., N67086 and Mooney M20J N201DQ: Accident occurred February 13, 2016 in Chino, San Bernardino County, California

COLVILLE INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N67086

http://registry.faa.gov/N201DQ


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA132A 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 13, 2016 in Chino, CA
Aircraft: CONSOLIDATED VULTEE BT 15, registration: N67086
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA132B

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 13, 2016 in Chino, CA
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J, registration: N201DQ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.


NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the taxiing pilot, during taxi to the run-up area in order to perform a maintenance check, he attempted to maneuver around an airplane that had stopped in the non-movement area. He reported that the left wing of his airplane impacted the tail of the stopped airplane. 

According to the pilot of the stopped airplane, he had taxied out of the refuel station in order to allow other aircraft to refuel. He reported that he taxied south and stopped in the non-movement area next to the aircraft tie downs, where he remained stopped for approximately five minutes as he set up the radios and received the ATIS information for his flight. He reported that he felt an impact from the rear of his airplane; he shut down his engine, and exited the airplane. 

The taxiing airplane sustained minor damage to the left wing and stopped airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage and vertical stabilizer.

Both pilots reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane prior to or during the taxi that would have prevented normal flight operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The taxiing pilot's failure to remain a safe distance from the stopped airplane while taxiing to the run-up area, resulting in a ground collision and substantial damage.

New CEO addresses expectations for Ontario International Airport (KONT) at political fundraiser

OIAA’s new CEO Kelly Fredericks, left, talks about his new position during Ontario councilman Alan Wapner’s annual quarterly event at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Ontario Airport in Ontario, CA, Tuesday, February 16, 2016. 



ONTARIO >> As the incoming chief executive officer of the Ontario International Airport Authority, Kelly J. Fredericks wants to manage expectations.

The OIAA is in the midst of a transition, as LA/Ontario International Airport changes hands from Los Angeles World Airports to local control later this year.

When that occurs, Fredericks said the beleaguered airport will not immediately see a return of the 7.2 million passengers the airport handled at its peak nearly a decade ago. That’s going to take some time.

“This airport has the capability of doing that, but we’re going to do that strategically,” Fredericks told about 60 people gathered at Ontario Councilman Alan Wapner’s annual business luncheon. “We’re not going to have an on-and-off switch. But if I didn’t think there was an opportunity here, then I sure wouldn’t be here.”

Attendees at the political fundraiser for Wapner paid anywhere from $1,000 for the annual membership to $5,000 to sponsor the event. Guests were given collectible varsity jackets and treated to a steak lunch at Tuesday’s gathering at the Doubletree hotel.

The appearance was Frederick’s first official visit to the region since being named the authority’s first CEO in January.

“The three things I continually think of is that Ontario is under-utilized, it’s under-served, but it really points to the word of transformation. That’s why I’m here,” said Fredericks, who through March 1 is president and CEO of the Rhode Island Airport Corp., which operates T.F. Green, the commercial airport serving Providence and the New England region.

Before the luncheon, Fredericks made his way around the room, meeting individually with local businessman and elected officials, including San Bernardino County Board Supervisor Curt Hagman, who is also an OIAA commissioner.

When Fredericks met Joe McKay of commercial real estate broker Lee & Associates in Ontario, the local businessman proclaimed he was “excited for you to turn things around.”

Later, McKay said he believes Fredericks is the right fit for the job.

“The airport is on its side, and I’m excited to have him come in and turn it around,” he said.

For the airport to succeed, Fredericks told business leaders and elected officials he’s going to need their support. Another key factor will be taking a regional approach. Fredericks said he didn’t see any of the Southern California airports — including Los Angeles International Airport — as competition.

In fact, he plans on meeting with all Southern California airport directors to determine how they can partner.

That was welcome news for San Bernardino Councilman John Valdivia, also in attendance. The city is trying to develop commercial and cargo service at San Bernardino International Airport.

“We have an airport in (San Bernardino) and we want to make sure we have a complimenting role and not a competing role to Ontario,” he said. “Overall, it was very welcomed approached to the region. I think it was well put that we’ll all be better as a region. I’m looking forward to his leadership.”

Besides focusing on obtaining the certificate of operation from the Federal Aviation Administration, Fredericks said he’ll work on developing a master plan for ONT — a blueprint for the future — as well as building an executive leadership team.

“There’s a lot of more opportunity than I could have ever imagined,” Fredericks said. “I truly believe this airport, this regions’ best days are ahead of them.”

Story and photo:  http://www.dailybulletin.com

American Airlines Airbus A319: Accident occurred February 14, 2016 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

Date: 14-FEB-16
Time: 10:39:00Z
Regis#: AAL476
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Serious
Damage: None
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: AAL-American Airlines
Flight Number: AAL476
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: Minnesota

AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT AAL476 AIRBUS A319 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ENCOUNTERED TURBULENCE, 1 PERSON ON BOARD SUSTAINED A SERIOUS INJURY, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT MINNEAPOLIS, MN

Socata TB-9C, N505PC: Accident occurred February 13, 2016 in Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Arkansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N505PC 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Little Rock FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA125
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Fort Smith, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2016
Aircraft: SOCATA TAMPICO TB 9, registration: N505PC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during takeoff in gusty crosswind conditions, the wind changed from a left crosswind to a left quartering tail wind. The tail of the airplane was pushed to the right; the nose turned to the left. He further reported that the left wing lifted, which caused the airplane to wheelbarrow off the runway to the left/right and impact an airport sign. Following the impact, the right fuel tank ruptured, the wing caught fire, and the airplane came to a stop. The right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff in crosswind conditions, which resulted in runway excursion, impact with terrain and an airport sign, and a postimpact fire.

Pilots who had plane, cash seized in Cody plead not guilty

Lewis
 Park County Sheriff’s Office


POWELL — Two Colorado pilots who are accused of operating an unregistered airplane that authorities claim was involved in a criminal enterprise have pleaded not guilty.

At separate appearances in U.S. District Court in Cheyenne last week, Scott Lewis and Gilbert Wiles pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to operate an unregistered aircraft and aiding and abetting the operation of an unregistered aircraft.

The charges follow the government's seizure in 2014 of the men's Cessna airplane after it landed at the municipal airport in Cody. 

Police also confiscated over $250,000 in cash from a Cody hotel room rented by the pilot and a passenger.

The U.S. Attorney's Office is pressing a civil forfeiture case against the plane and the cash, alleging both are tied to illegal drugs.

Story and photo:  http://trib.com

Beech 95-A55, Kings Wings Inc., N1739G: Incident occurred February 15, 2016 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida

Date: 15-FEB-16
Time: 13:00:00Z
Regis#: N1739G
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 55
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA FSDO: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, GEAR COLLAPSED, WEST PALM BEACH, FL

KINGS WINGS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1739G