Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Cessna 182P Skylane, Skypartners LLC, N7392Q: Accident occurred November 23, 2016 near Bridgeport Municipal Airport (KXBP), Wise County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

SKYPARTNERS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7392Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA044
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Bridgeport, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N7392Q
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 23, 2016, about 1115 central standard time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N7392Q, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power on initial climb after takeoff from runway 36 (4,004 feet by 60 feet, asphalt) at the Bridgeport Municipal Airport (XBP), Bridgeport, Texas. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Skypartners LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight had originated shortly before the accident.

A witness initially observed the airplane on approach to runway 36. The engine was "coughing and sputtering." The airplane crossed the runway threshold about 500 feet above ground level (agl) and subsequently overshot the runway. It first touched down about 1,000 feet beyond the departure end of the runway in the middle of a field. After touching down, the airplane bounced about 25 feet into the air before touching down again and impacting a tree. The propeller separated after the airplane contacted the tree.

The accident site was located about 1,500 feet north of the runway 36 departure threshold.



A Buhler dentist and his wife are still recovering from injuries sustained in a plane crash in Texas on Wednesday morning.

Sara Hunt, 63, a pilot, was flown to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth with serious injuries. The hospital’s house supervisor said she was in stable condition.

Dr. Dalton “Dal” Hunt, 66, was transported to Wise Regional Hospital with serious injuries. A hospital spokeswoman said his condition wasn’t available.

The crash happened about 11:15 a.m. Wednesday shortly after their Cessna 182 aircraft took off from Bridgeport Municipal Airport, near Fort Worth.

The plane lost power, then crashed into a field and hit some trees. Sara Hunt was piloting the plane.

FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said Sara Hunt had reported engine trouble.

“Preliminary information indicates that the pilot was attempting to return to the airport with engine trouble when the aircraft crashed short of the runway,” Lunsford told the Fort Worth Star-Tribune. According to a family friend, the couple left Hutchinson on Wednesday morning and stopped in Bridgeport. They were en route to visit family in Texas. He said Sara Hunt is a veteran pilot.


The plane is registered to a corporation, Sky Partners LLC, in Buhler, according to the FAA website, and was manufactured in 1972.



BRIDGEPORT - A Buhler dentist and his pilot wife were injured when their small plane crashed on take-off from an airport in Texas while the couple was in route to visit family.

Sara Hunt, 63, and Dalton “Dal” Hunt, 66, were both injured in the 11 a.m. crash at Bridgeport Municipal Airport, near Fort Worth. 

Texas Department of Public Safety spokesman Lonny Haschel told the Fort Worth Star-Tribune that one male passenger was transported to Wise Regional Hospital with serious injuries and one female was flown to John Peter Smith Hospital Fort Worth. Her condition was unknown.

“Sara was taking the plane to San Antonio, where they have family,” said Radley Brooks, who is also part owner of the Cessna 182. “They left Hutch this morning, and stopped partway to refuel.”

Brooks said he was making calls to reach Hunt family members, but he was unaware of the reason for the crash or the couple’s conditions.

“Sara’s been a pilot for a long time,” Brooks said. “It was just a personal plane.”

The plane is registered to a corporation, Sky Partners LLC, in Buhler, Kan., according to the FAA website, and was manufactured in 1972. 

"Preliminary information indicates that the pilot was attempting to return to the airport with engine trouble when the aircraft crashed short of the runway," FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said.

Source:   http://www.hutchnews.com




BRIDGEPORT, TX (CBSDFW.COM) — The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed that an airplane crashed shortly after takeoff from the Bridgeport Municipal Airport on Friday morning.

Public Affairs Manager Lynn Lunsford told CBSDFW in an email, “Preliminary information indicates that the pilot was attempting to return to the airport with engine trouble when the aircraft crashed short of the runway.”

Lunsford said the accident occurred at about 11:15 am and that two people who were on board were taken to the hospital.

According to the Texas Department of Public Safety one male passenger was transported to Wise Regional Hospital with serious injuries. One female passenger was also transported by air ambulance to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth. There was no word on the nature of the female victims’s injuries.

DPS says the airplane was a Cessna 182P Skylane.

Source:  http://dfw.cbslocal.com

A single-engine Cessna 182P Skylane with two people on board crashed shortly after takeoff from Bridgeport Municipal Airport Wednesday morning, the Federal Aviation Administration confirms.


Lynn Lunsford, with the FAA, told NBC 5 that preliminary reports are that the pilot had engine trouble.

Texas Department of Public Safety spokesperson Lonny Haschel said the plane lost power shortly after takeoff and crashed into a line of trees at about 11:15 a.m.

The treeline runs parallel to U.S. Highway 380/Texas 114 north of the airport.

Both occupants were seriously injured and were hospitalized; one occupant, a man, was taken by ground to Wise Regional Hospital, while a second occupant, a female, was airlifted to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth.

Source:  http://www.nbcdfw.com

BRIDGEPORT, Texas - Two people were hurt when a small plane crashed in Wise County Wednesday morning.

It happened around 11:15 a.m. shortly after a Cessna 182 took off from the Bridgeport Municipal Airport. DPS Sgt. Lonny Hashel said the plane lost power, crashed into a field and hit some trees.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford said the pilot had reported engine trouble and was trying to return to the airport. The crash happened just short of the runway.

Both the male and female on board suffered serious injuries. The female was airlifted to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth and the male was taken to Wise Regional Hospital in Decatur.

It's not yet clear which of the victims was piloting the plane.

The FAA is investigating the crash.

Source:   http://www.fox4news.com

Piper PA-18-150, Brooks Flyers LLC, N83641: Accident occurred November 22, 2016 in Bethel, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

BROOKS FLYERS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N83641

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ANC17LA007
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 22, 2016 in Bethel, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA-18, registration: N83641
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 22, 2016, about 1400 Alaska standard time, a Piper PA-18 (Super Cub) airplane, N83641, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power, near Bethel, Alaska. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, Brooks Flyer LLC, as a visual flight rules (VFR) aerial observation flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 when the accident occurred. The certificated commercial pilot and one passenger were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Bethel, at about 1050, with an intermediate stop at a remote unimproved landing site.

In a statement provided to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to conduct wildlife surveys for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. He stated that about 2 hours and 40 minutes into the flight they landed on a remote gravel bar to take a break, followed by departure and climb-out a few minutes later. During the climb he noticed his oil pressure had redlined at 100 pounds per square inch (psi) with an oil temperature of 138 degrees Fahrenheit. In an effort to correct for the high oil pressure, he reduced his power to 2150 rpm and the oil pressure came down to 90 psi, with all other engine instruments in the normal range. He adjusted his course for Bethel while slowly climbing the airplane to about 1,000 feet above ground level, and applied the carburetor heat. Shortly thereafter, smoke began filling the cockpit. He turned into the wind, applied full flaps, reduced the power to idle, and selected a small frozen lake as an emergency landing site. While maneuvering for the emergency landing the engine lost all the power, and he made a forced landing in an area of tundra covered terrain. During the forced landing the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. 

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series engine. 

The closest weather reporting facility was Bethel Airport, Bethel, about 45 miles south of the accident site. At 1353, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) from Bethel Airport was reporting, in part: wind from 020 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 6 statute miles, mist; clouds and sky condition, few clouds at 15,000 feet, few clouds at 25,000 feet; temperature 0 degrees F; dew point -2 degrees F; altimeter 29.41 inHg.

An examination of the engine is pending.

Curtiss Wright Travel Air 4000, N3242: Accident occurred November 22, 2016 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

  AIRCRAFT LEASING & MANAGEMENT LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3242

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Diego FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA077A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 22, 2016 in San Diego, CA
Aircraft: CURTISS WRIGHT TRAVEL AIR 4000, registration: N3242
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that he was cleared to taxi to the departure runway. He added that while taxiing he was doing S-turns to see over the nose of his airplane, and "must have missed a call to the aircraft [airplane] ahead of him," which had been instructed to hold short of the upcoming taxiway. His airplane impacted the empennage of the stopped airplane that was holding short.

His airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing, and the stopped airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage. 


Both pilots reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with their airplane's that would have precluded normal operation.

Robinson R22, N7158S: Incident occurred November 23, 2016 in Kapolei, Hawaii

ALOHA LEASING OF HAWAII AIRCRAFT LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N7158S

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Honolulu FSDO-13

N7158S ROBINSON R22 ROTORCRAFT ON LANDING SUSTAINED MINOR DAMAGE, KAPOLEI, HAWAII

Date: 23-NOV-16
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N7158S
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KAPOLEI
State: Hawaii

Piper PA-38-112, Engineering & Automation Services Inc., N2456D: Incident occurred November 22, 2016 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana

ENGINEERING & AUTOMATION SERVICES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N2456D

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, PROPELLER STRUCK THE TAXIWAY, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 

Date: 22-NOV-16
Time: 20:15:00Z
Regis#: N2456D
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA38
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: INDIANAPOLIS
State: Indiana

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Textron Aviation Employees Flying Club Inc., N746DW: Incident occurred November 21, 2016 in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas

TEXTRON AVIATION EMPLOYEES FLYING CLUB INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N746DW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A RUNWAY LIGHT, WICHITA, KANSAS

Date: 21-NOV-16
Time: 19:45:00Z
Regis#: N746DW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WICHITA
State: Kansas

Vans RV-9A, N19HV: Incident occurred November 22, 2016 in Shelton, Mason County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N19HV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Seattle FSDO-01

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, SHELTON, WASHINGTON

Date: 22-NOV-16
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N19HV
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV9
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SHELTON
State: Washington

The history of 2 forgotten Katy airports: Lite-Flite Ultraport and Franz Airfield

More than 30 airports in the Greater Houston area have been forgotten, according to pilot Paul Freeman. He operates the Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields website, which lists two abandoned Katy airports: Lite-Flite Ultraport and Franz Airfield.

Freeman, an aerospace engineer and personal aviation hobbyist for 21 years, said he started the website 17 years ago as of a result of his interests and out of self-preservation.

“If there’s a runway that still exists somewhere that’s abandoned, the [Federal Aviation Administration] depicts those on aeronautical charts because that might be useable in an emergency for an aircraft,” he said.

According to Freeman, a Virginia resident, the website has grown to include about 2,100 airfields in all 50 states since 1999. Website visitors make suggestions and contribute materials, and Freeman does further research and gathering before typing up an entry.

“It’s a very collaborative venture,” he said.



Lite-Flite Ultraport

Larry Haskins said his father, Norman Haskins, owned and operated Lite-Flite Ultraport in western Katy from the late 1970s until the mid-1980s.

Andrew Haskins, Larry’s son and Norman’s grandson, said Ultraport combines the words airport and ultralights. Andrew described the ultralight as “a hang glider with an engine”—a class of aircraft that Freeman said was most popular in the 1970s and 1980s because they are lightweight, affordable and do not require an operator to have a pilot’s license.

Larry said Norman leased the land on which the ultraport sat and constructed a facility from which to assemble, sell and repair ultralight aircrafts in addition to providing hangar space for patrons and offering instructional courses. Norman also sublet additional space to a Spitfire ultralight manufacturer, Larry said.

Both Andrew and Larry said ultralights earned a reputation for being dangerous machines. When the fad ended in the mid-1980s, Norman closed down the dealership and airport and built a go-kart track in its place.



Franz Airfield/King Air Airfield

Freeman said his research indicates the Franz Airfield operated between the mid-1950s to sometime in the 1980s or 1990s. Unlike Lite-Flite, it probably was not used by the general public, he said.

“I think it was basically just a private airfield with a couple hangars,” Freeman said. “It’s the kind of place where there may have just been a couple of folks who flew their planes from it: the property owner and then some of their buddies.”

According to Freeman’s research, the earliest depiction he has located of the airfield was on the 1956 U.S. Geological Survey topographical map. The earliest photo he found was from 1958, showing the airfield as having two unpaved runways intersecting in an ‘X’-shape and surrounded by four small buildings.

Freeman said the airfield probably was renamed sometime between 1964 and 1971 as the 1971 USGS topographical map labeled the site as King Landing Strip. It had just a single unpaved runway running northwest-to-southeast.

He said the site likely closed some time between 1981 and 1995. Modern photos suggest the Grand Parkway was built directly through the airfield, a phenomenon that Freeman said is far too common in general aviation.

“Our nation loses a lot of airports every year,” he said. “The continual urban [and] suburban sprawl eats up a lot of suburban airports.”

Source:  https://communityimpact.com

New air ambulance means quicker response time

From left, Atmore Fire Department Lt. Wayne Kelley, Capt. Daniel Love and firefighters Jake Lambert and Jesse Boone examine the new Medstar air ambulance.



Emergency responders in Atmore and the surrounding area have a new tool that will help lessen the time it takes to provide preliminary treatment to a seriously injured person and to get that person to a medical facility.

Medstar EMS recently unveiled its sleek Medstar Air Care 1, a Bell 407 GXP air ambulance that can reach speeds of up to 150 miles per hour and significantly cut response times for calls in the area.

“It will be a lot closer to us,” noted Atmore Fire Chief Ron Peebles of the new emergency medical transport, which will be stationed at Stapleton Volunteer Fire Department until a permanent base is constructed in Robertsdale. “It has about an eight-minute response time to us and it will give us more options when we have a bad wreck or other incident where we need a medical helicopter.”

Chad Jones, program manager for Medstar, said the total response time would actually be a little longer than the chief’s estimate, but not much.

“I don’t think it will be that way all the time,” Jones said. “We’ll probably be in the air only eight minutes, but we’ll probably average 10-11 minutes, depending on the wind, from the time the skids come up until it touches down. Once we get to the scene, we have to recon the area and find a place to land, and that will probably take a minute or two.”

He admitted that the sleek chopper, which he called “the sports car of helicopters,” would be a marvel for those watching it speed across the sky and maneuver its way to the site of an emergency.

“It’s a crowd-pleaser, and sometimes you’ve got to please the crowd,” he said. “But we want to be proud of the care we provide.”

Jones added that the $3 million medical helicopter would be the closest air asset to this area and would be equipped to handle most medical emergencies.

The copter’s crew will include the pilot, along with a critical care nurse and a paramedic. He reiterated that it would be able to evacuate injured persons and get them to a hospital in a lot less time than would a ground ambulance.

“We can get a patient to a medical facility in half the time or less than it takes to drive,” he said. “We bring an advanced level of care, and we bring it fast.”

Source:  http://www.atmorenews.com

How much should air traffic controllers trust new flight management systems?



With airfares at their lowest point in seven years and airlines adding capacity, this year’s Thanksgiving air travel is slated to be 2.5 percent busier than last year. Between Nov. 18 and 29, 27.3 million Americans are expected to take to the skies.

The system we use to coordinate all those flights carrying all those Thanksgiving travelers through the air is decades old, and mostly depends on highly trained air traffic controllers, who keep track of where all the planes are, where they’re heading, how fast they’re going and at what altitude.

As the national airspace gets more crowded, and as technology improves, the Federal Aviation Administration has begun upgrading the air traffic control systems. The new system is called NextGen, and some of its capabilities are already being rolled out across the country. It is intended to make air traffic faster, more efficient, more cost-effective and even, through fuel savings, less damaging to the environment. It will also help air traffic controllers and pilots alike handle potential hazards, whether they involve weather, other aircraft or equipment problems.

But we the traveling public will be able to realize all these benefits only if the air traffic controllers of the future make the most of the technology. As a human factors researcher, seeking to understand how people interact within complex systems, I have found that there are challenges for controllers learning to properly trust the computer systems keeping America in the air.

Use as directed

The NextGen system is designed for humans and computers to work in tandem. For example, one element involves air traffic controllers and pilots exchanging digital text messages between the tower and airplane computer systems, as opposed to talking over the radio. This arrangement has several benefits, including eliminating the possibility someone might mishear a garbled radio transmission.

Human controllers will still give routing instructions to human pilots, but computers monitoring the airspace can keep an eye on where planes are, and automatically compare that to where they are supposed to be, as well as how close they get to each other. The automated conflict detection tools can alert controllers to possible trouble and offer safer alternatives.

In addition, air crews will be able to follow routing instructions more quickly, accepting the digital command from the ground directly into the plane’s navigation system. This, too, requires human trust in automated systems. That is not as simple as it might sound.

Trust in automation

When the people who operate automated tools aren’t properly informed about their equipment – including what exactly it can and cannot do – problems arise. When humans expect computerized systems to be more reliable than they are, tragedy can result. For example, the owner killed in the fatal Tesla crash while in autopilot mode may have become overreliant on the technology or used it in a way beyond how it was intended. Making sure human expectations match technical abilities is called “calibration.”

When the people and the machinery are properly calibrated to each other, trust can develop. That’s what happened over the course of a 16-week course training air traffic controller students on a desktop air traffic control simulator.

Researchers typically measure trust in automated systems by asking questions about the operator’s evaluations of the system’s integrity, the operator’s confidence in using the system and how dependable the operator thinks the system is. There are several types of questionnaires that ask these sorts of questions; one of them, a trust scale aimed at the air traffic management system as a whole, was particularly sensitive to discerning changing trust in the student group I studied.

I asked the air traffic controller students about their trust in the automated tools such as those provided by NextGen on the first day, at the midterm exam in week nine of their course, and at the final exam at the end of the training. Overall, the students’ trust in the system increased, though some trusted it more than others.

Too much trust, or too little?

There is such a thing as trusting technology too much. In this study, some students, who trusted the system more, were actually less aware than their less trusting classmates of what was going on in the airspace during simulated scenarios at the final exam with lots of air traffic. One possible explanation could be that those with more trust in the system became complacent and did not bother expending the effort to keep their own independent view (or “maintain the picture,” as air traffic controllers say).

These more trusting students might have been more vulnerable to errors if the automation required them to manually intervene. Correlation analyses suggested that students with more trust were less likely to engage in what might be called “nontrusting” behaviors, like overriding the automation. For example, they were less likely to step in and move aircraft that the automated conflict detection tools determined were far enough apart, even if they personally thought the planes were too close together. That showed they were relying on the automation appropriately.

These trust disparities and their effects became clear only at the final exam. This suggests that as they became familiar with the technology, students’ trust in the systems and their actions when using it changed.

Previous research has shown that providing specific training in trusting the automation may reduce students’ likelihood of engaging in nontrusting behaviors. Training should aim to make trainees more aware of their potential to overly trust the system, to ensure they remain aware of critical information. Only when the users properly trust the system – neither too much nor too little – will the public benefits of NextGen truly be available to us all.

Original article can be found here:   http://theconversation.com