Saturday, October 13, 2018

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, registered to and operated by GTA Air Inc, N24LF: Accident occurred July 03, 2017 near El Paso International Airport (KELP), El Paso County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Hartzell Propeller; Piqua, Ohio
GTA Air Inc; Addison, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N24LF

Location: El Paso, TX
Accident Number: CEN17LA255
Date & Time: 07/03/2017, 2006 MDT
Registration: N24LF
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On July 3, 2017, about 2006 mountain daylight time, a single engine Beech A36 airplane, N24LF, lost engine power during the initial climb after takeoff from El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by GTA Air, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) visual flight rules flight plan had been filed for the flight. The non-scheduled domestic cargo flight departed ELP and was en route to Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL), Dallas, Texas.

According to the pilot, he climbed to an altitude of 4,800 ft and the engine lost power. The pilot reversed course towards ELP and intended to land on runway 26R. The glide of the airplane did not reach the runway and the wings and fuselage were substantially damaged during the forced landing to a field.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental IO-520-BB87B engine. The engine had been modified with the addition of a Tornado Alley Turbo Whirlwind system under a supplemental type certificate. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed thermal damage concentrated on the lower left side of the engine. The induction tube, forward of the turbocharger compressor, was melted and the remains were found in the cowling below. The induction wye exhibited a hole emanating outward from the turbine wheel. The engine, magnetos, and related systems were otherwise unremarkable.

The turbocharger on the accident airplane was not part of the original modification. Examination and disassembly of the Hartzell Engine Technologies turbocharger (SN HSGL00002) revealed that the turbocharger had been reconfigured with a different compressor housing and the addition of wear washers. The turbocharger had originally been sold to the operator on a factory remanufactured engine from Continental Motors in 2015 (TSIO-520-EB5B – SN 1031058). According to the operator, they did not repair or modify the turbocharger, they only loosened and tightened the V-band clamp and loosened and tightened the hot side bolts. Investigators were unable to determine who modified the turbocharger prior to its installation on the accident airplane.

Evidence of high temperatures and thermal distress were noted on the turbine housing exhaust flange, the thrust collar, thrust spacer, and back plate. The turbine and compressor wheels exhibited evidence of rub within their housings. The turbine wheel hub exhibited evidence of hard rub with the center housing seal bore area. The turbine housing exhibited red coloring on the internal surfaces, bubbling of the exhaust flange, and spiraling tongue erosion, which according to Hartzell are consistent with high turbine inlet temperatures. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/18/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/02/2017
Flight Time:  1085.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 206.6 hours (Total, this make and model), 1004.2 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 212.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 101.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N24LF
Model/Series: A36 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: E-1665
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/09/2017, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3780 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  12899.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: T.C.M.
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB87B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KELP, 3961 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1951 MDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 12000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: El Paso, TX (KELP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Dallas, TX (KDAL)
Type of Clearance: VFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 2000 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class C

Airport Information

Airport: El Paso International Airport (KELP)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 3961 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.812222, -106.382778 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA255
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Monday, July 03, 2017 in El Paso, TX
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N24LF
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 3, 2017, about 2006 mountain daylight time, a single engine Beech A36 airplane lost engine power after takeoff from El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight had departed ELP and was en route to Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL), Dallas, Texas.

According to the pilot, he was climbing to an altitude of 4,800 feet when the engine lost power. The pilot reversed course towards the airport and intended to land on runway 26R. The glide of the airplane did not reach the runway and the wings and fuselage were substantially damaged during the forced landing to the field.

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee E, N4244T: Accident occurred June 30, 2017 near Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (PHNL), Honolulu, Hawaii


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N4244T



Location: Honolulu, HI
Accident Number: WPR17LA138
Date & Time: 06/30/2017, 1330 HST
Registration: N4244T
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 3 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 30, 2017, about 1330 Hawaii-Aleutian standard time, a Piper PA-28-140 airplane, N4244T, collided with the ground under a highway overpass following a loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from Daniel K Inouye International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii. The private pilot, a commercial pilot rated passenger and a passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight that departed HNL at 1320.

The pilot reported that a preflight inspection was accomplished and that a minimum of 20 gallons of fuel was on board. The engine was started, and the airplane was taxied to an open area for a run-up. Shortly after takeoff from runway 4 left, about 300 ft above ground level, the pilot noted that the engine lost power. He subsequently initiated an emergency landing to a riverbed; the airplane came to rest under a highway overpass and caught fire.

The rear seat passenger reported to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector that the right seat pilot took control of the airplane just prior to the collision and he had cut off the mixture (and power) just prior to ground impact.

The owner of the airplane reported that the airplane had been flown every day and no issues with the operation of the airplane were reported. He indicated that the fuel tanks would be filled to the tabs (20 gallons in each tank). The airplane would fly one flight with the fuel selector positioned to one fuel tank, and then on the next flight it would be positioned on the other fuel tank. Prior to the accident flight, the owner had instructed the pilots to switch fuel tanks prior to takeoff since they were used to flying in Cessna airplanes that flew with the fuel selector positioned to BOTH. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 20, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/03/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/29/2017
Flight Time:  68 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model), 28 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)



Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 28, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/04/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/12/2016
Flight Time:  775 hours (Total, all aircraft), 657 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

The 20-year-old left seat pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating in airplane single-engine land. The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration third-class medical certificate issued February 3, 2017 with no waivers or limitations. The pilot's total flight experience was about 68 hours. He logged 28 hours in the previous 90 days, and 8 hours in the previous 30 days. A total of 5 hours were logged in the make and model airplane involved in the accident.

The 28-year-old right seat pilot held a commercial certificate with ratings in airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate issued October 4, 2015, with no waivers or limitations. The pilot's total flight experience was about 775 hours.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N4244T
Model/Series: PA 28-140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7225103
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E30
Registered Owner: MUELLER JAHN P
Rated Power: 140 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The 4-seat, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number 28-7225103, was manufactured in 1971 and was powered by a 140-horsepower Lycoming O-320 series engine. The owner of the airplane reported that the maintenance logbooks for both the airframe and engine were inside the airplane at the time of the accident and were destroyed in the post-crash fire. No total times nor maintenance inspection documentation was obtained.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHNL
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1253 HST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2700 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 17 knots / 25 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 79°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Honolulu, HI (PHNL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Honolulu, HI (PHNL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1320 HST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Honolulu (PHNL)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 12 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 21.316667, -157.916667 (est) 

The airplane came to rest under an overpass about 1.5 miles north of the departure end of runway 4 left. The ground was dirt and loose rocks. The first of 3 ground impact points was noted about 55 ft south of the main wreckage. The main wreckage was facing to the south and laying on its belly. The landing gear had separated and was in front of the engine, which remained partially attached at the firewall. The inboard section of the right wing remained partially attached at the fuselage. The outboard wingtip section was separated and within about 13 ft of the wreckage. The left wing, in its entirety, remained attached to the fuselage, however was deformed about mid-section. The empennage remained in place. All flight control surfaces were accounted for. The aft end of the engine and cabin area, aft to the baggage compartment, was consumed by the postimpact fire.

The postaccident engine examination revealed that the engine sustained fire damage primarily to the rear engine compartment. The cockpit controls were destroyed and could not be moved or identified. A visual examination of the engine revealed no evidence of a catastrophic engine failure.

The top and bottom spark plugs were removed and noted that the electrodes displayed normal operating signatures. The magnetos remained in place to their mountings, however were destroyed by heat distress and could not be tested.

The engine valve covers were removed and the crankshaft was turned by hand. Thumb compression was established in each cylinder. Accessory gear and valve train continuity was established. The oil filter/screen was destroyed. The carburetor was destroyed by fire.

The fuel selector valve was burned and melted. The valve position could not be verified.



NTSB Identification: WPR17LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N4244T
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2017, about 1330 Hawaii standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N4244T, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent hard landing near Honolulu, Hawaii. The private pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The local personal flight departed Honolulu International Airport at 1320. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff from runway 04L, the engine lost power about 300 feet agl. He made an emergency landing at the nearest clear area, which was a river bed. The airplane impacted the ground and came to rest under a highway bridge and caught fire.

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, registered to and operated by Tridelaw Aviation LLC, N210HG: Accident occurred June 30, 2017 near Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE), Gypsum, Colorado



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Eagle, CO
Accident Number: CEN17LA247
Date & Time: 06/30/2017, 1215 MDT
Registration: N210HG
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 30, 2017, about 1215 mountain daylight time, a Cessna P210N airplane, N210HG conducted a forced landing near Eagle, Colorado. The pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged during the landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Tridelaw Aviation, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported that he departed Montrose, Colorado (KMTJ) en route to the Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE). He added that he departed KMTJ with 60 gallons of fuel and 8 quarts of oil in the P210. As he approached KEGE, he contacted the tower controller and was directed to enter the downwind. As he entered the traffic pattern and configured the airplane for the landing, the engine lost power. The pilot reported that he followed the 'engine failure during flight' checklist, and switched fuel tanks; however, the engine did not restart. The pilot informed the controller and selected an empty road for the forced landing. During the landing, the left wing impacted a pole, the airplane then exited the road, coming to rest in an upright position. During the impact with the pole, about a 5 ft section was torn from the wing; damage was also noted on the fuselage and to the four-bladed propeller.

Fire department personal arrived on scene and noted fuel leaking from the airplane, so they applied a water-based fire retardant to both wing fuel tanks. The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector also stated that after the recovery of the airplane fuel was leaking from at least one of the wing fuel tanks. It was also reported that the airplane was filled with about 30 gallons of fuel on June 21.

The airplane was recovered and transported to a salvage facility, where an examination was conducted by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge and a technical representative from the engine manufacturer.

A fuel can was connected to the left-wing fuel line and a visual engine examination was conducted. A slight fuel leak was noted on the fuel metering unit, otherwise no external visual abnormalities were noted with the engine. The top set of sparkplugs were removed; the sparkplugs had normal wear and light grey deposits. Each cylinder was borescoped; the engine crankshaft was rotated by hand, and spark was observed on each ignition lead.

The airplane was equipped with a fuel flow and an JPI engine data monitor (EDM) 700 system. No information could be retrieved from the fuel flow system; however, the EDM contained 28 files, dated from May 27, 2017 to June 30, 2017. A review of the monitor's information revealed that there were two flights on June 19th, one flight on June 20th, and a one-hour flight on June 30th, which corresponded to the accident flight. The June 30th flight was plotted; just before the end of the data, there was a slight rise in exhaust gas temperatures (EGT), followed by a decrease. The rise and decrease in temperatures were uniform across all six cylinders.

In order to conduct an engine run, and due to damage to the engine's propeller, two blades were shortened to provide blade symmetry and balance. Prior to the engine run, the fuel strainer was opened and liquid consistent in appearance with water, was drained from the fuel line.

The engine was started and run to 2,500 rpm; a magneto check was also performed, with no abnormalities noted. During the run, fuel continued to leak from the fuel metering unit. After the run, the unit was disassembled, the internal O-rings appeared flattened or degraded. It was not determined if the O-ring leakage was due to impact to the metering unit during the accident, degradation of the O-rings due to the fire retardant, drying out of the O-rings, or natural degradation of the O-rings over time.

The fuel metering inlet screen was removed and was absent any debris and contamination.

A reason for the loss of engine power was not determined.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 67
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1950 hours (Total, all aircraft), 80 hours (Total, this make and model), 1940 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20.3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N210HG
Model/Series: P210N N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: P21000569
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/15/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4001 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3422 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520 SER
Registered Owner: TRIDELAW AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: TRIDELAW AVIATION LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEGE
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1250 MDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / -4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Montrose, CO (KMTJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Eagle, CO (EGE)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace:



Airport Information

Airport: Eagle County Regional (EGE)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 6547 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.646111, -106.893056 (est)


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA247
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Eagle, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N, registration: N210HG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2017, about 1245 mountain daylight time, a Cessna P210N airplane, N210HG conducted a forced landing near Eagle, Colorado. The pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged during the landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Tridelaw Aviation, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. 

The pilot reported to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, that he departed Montrose, Colorado (KMTJ) en route to the Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE). He departed KMTJ with the left fuel tank full of fuel and the right fuel tank half-full of fuel. As he approached KEGE, the engine lost power, so he attempted to restart the engine. The engine restart was not successful, so he selected a road for the forced landing. During the landing, the left wing impacted a light pole, resulting substantial damage. 

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Eurocopter EC-130B-4 (AS-350B-4), registered to American Helicopters LLC and operated by Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters as an air tour flight, N151GC: Accident occurred June 27, 2017 in Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N151GC


Location: Boulder City, NV
Accident Number: WPR17LA133
Date & Time: 06/27/2017, 1403 PDT
Registration: N151GC
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER EC 130 B4
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Minor, 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Sightseeing 

On June 27, 2017, about 1403 Pacific daylight time, a Eurocopter EC 130 B4 helicopter, N151GC, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent forced landing near Boulder City, Nevada. The commercial pilot and four passengers were not injured, and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to American Helicopters LLC, and operated by Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters as an air tour flight under the provision of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Boulder City Municipal Airport, Boulder City, Nevada at 1348, and was destined for Grand Canyon West Airport, Peach Springs, Arizona.

The pilot reported that, as he executed an "S-turn" about 3,000 ft mean sea level, the helicopter made a subtle yaw to the right, which was accompanied by an audible "gong." The pilot lowered the collective and simultaneously noted a yellow engine parameter failure indication on the instrument display. Moments later, the main rotor rpm warning horn activated and was followed by warning lights on the caution warning display. The helicopter began to descend immediately. The pilot elected to perform an autorotation to a nearby helicopter pad. In the attempt to steer away from power lines, the pilot made a left cyclic input; however, the retreating main rotor blade contacted a power line. The pilot continued to maneuver the helicopter and subsequently made an up-slope emergency landing on rising mountainous terrain. The helicopter was recovered to the operator's hangar for further examination.

The last maintenance performed on the engine was 109.6 hours prior to the accident at the Safran HE USA facility, Grand Prairie, Texas. On June 30, 2016, the facility received the accessory gearbox for an overhaul. The oil filter was removed and discarded as part of the normal process for arrival inspection. During the document review, it was determined that the overhaul was not due, and the operator agreed to have the accessory gearbox sent back as is. The operator received the accessory gearbox with no tags, and an entry on a log card that stated "Equipment returned repairable, not repaired, not airworthy as is". This statement was subsequently voided by Safran HE USA after being questioned by the operator thus reverting the airworthiness back to the previous entry. The manufacturer did not inform the operator that they had performed maintenance on the accessory gearbox and pulled the engine oil filter prior to sending the module back to the operator. The engine was then rebuilt with the existing accessory gearbox and operated for 109.6 hours without an oil filter installed.

On June 28 and 29, 2017, representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters, and Safran HE conducted an engine examination. The engine did not exhibit any visual external damage. All fuel, oil, and air lines were found secured; oil was present in the oil tank. Both the gas generator and power turbine were seized and could not be rotated by hand. There was no evidence of foreign object debris on the axial compressor. The high pressure turbine was examined with a borescope and revealed a significant amount of heat damage to the turbine blades and thermocouples. The Vehicle and Engine Multifunction Display noted exceedances in engine temperature. Metal particles were found on the accessory gearbox magnetic plug. Sludge was present on the reduction gearbox magnetic plug and electric chip detectors. Upon inspection of the engine oil filter it was revealed that the filter was not installed. The complete onsite examination report is appended to this accident in the public docket.

On July 6 and 7, 2017, at the Safran HE USA facility, the engine was further disassembled by its modules, and the Digital Engine Control Unit (DECU) data was downloaded. All magnetic sensors, strainers, magnetic plugs and the main oil strainer were removed and inspected. All were clean except for the accessory gearbox magnetic plug. The thermocouple harness had sustained thermal damage. The reduction gearbox was freely rotated by hand. The free turbine module was seized at the blade tip/shroud section and its bearings were able to rotate freely by hand. Evidence of thermal and impact damage was present on the leading edge of the free turbine blades. The accessory gearbox was rotated by hand and continuity was established throughout the gear train. The axial compressor could be rotated by hand; however, it was rough and noisy. The gas generator was unable to rotate. After removal of the axial compressor from the gas generator, a hole in the centrifugal compressor was observed. The axial compressor rear bearing was shattered. The oil jet for the rear bearing was obstructed and subsequently sent for further examination to Safran HE factory laboratory in France. The gas generator rear bearing appeared normal and rotated freely. There was no damage to the piston shaft or rear bearing housing. The Safran HE air safety investigator (ASI) stated that this would indicate that the rear of the gas generator stayed in alignment during the failure of the axial compressor bearing.

The DECU download revealed 3 faults recorded during the accident flight. The first recorded fault indicated a P3 drift. Within the same second the next fault was a raw t4 fault which, according to the Safran HE ASI was most likely caused by the thermal damage to the thermocouple harness. The third fault recorded 6 seconds later was a helicopter t4 indication fault, which was most likely also caused by the thermal damage to the thermocouple harness. During those 6 seconds, the gas generator speed and free turbine speed decreased, and the fuel flow increased. Torque indication recorded at the last fault was .52%, which is consistent with the helicopter freewheeling at this point.

On October 9, 2017, the obstructed axial compressor oil jet was examined at the Safran HE factory laboratory, Bordes, France. The double oil jet was found blocked on only one side and was subsequently tested to identify the cause of the obstruction. A borescope examination of the obstruction revealed that it was composed of carbon oxygen and phosphor, which was significant of oil cokefaction. Oil cokefaction appears in the presence of oil in a hot temperature environment. Coke pollution moved through the scavenge circuit to the oil tank, and then through the oil filter to the lubrication circuit of the engine. Due to a lack of the engine oil filter, coke pollution migrated to the oil jet.

The axial compressor bearing and its external housing were analyzed and revealed that all the balls were deformed with flat zones. The two-half internal race had material transfer which led to seizure and jamming. The outside race and the separating cage were stuck together with the outside housing. The complete onsite examination reports, and the engine and oil jet examination reports are appended to this accident in the public docket.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 33, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front 
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/10/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 3827 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1634 hours (Total, this make and model), 3748 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 118 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 42 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Registration: N151GC
Model/Series: EC 130 B4 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 4402
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 8
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/22/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 12536.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Turbomeca
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: Arriel 2B1
Registered Owner: AMERICAN HELICOPTERS LLC
Rated Power: 592 hp
Operator: Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commercial Air Tour (136); Rotorcraft External Load (133); On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBVU, 2202 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1335 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 129°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 13 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown 
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 39°C / -8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: BOULDER CITY, NV (BVU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: BOULDER CITY, NV (BVU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1348 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor, 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor, 5 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.967500, -114.892222 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA133
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 27, 2017 in Boulder City, NV
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER EC 130 B4, registration: N151GC
Injuries: 2 Minor, 5 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2017, about 1403 Pacific daylight time, a Eurocopter EC 130 B4, N151GC, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent forced landing, during which the helicopter contacted power lines, near Boulder City, Nevada. The pilot and four passengers were not injured, and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to American Helicopters LLC, and operated by Papillion Grand Canyon Helicopters as an air tour flight under the provision of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Boulder City Municipal Airport, Boulder City, Nevada at 1348 with a planned destination of Grand Canyon West Airport, Peach Springs, Arizona.

The pilot reported that as he executed an "S-turn" about 3,000 feet mean sea level, the helicopter made a subtle yaw to the right, which was accompanied by an audible "gong." The pilot lowered the collective and simultaneously noted a yellow engine parameter failure indication on the instrument display. Moments later, the main rotor rpm warning horn activated and was followed by warning lights on the caution warning display. The helicopter began to descend immediately. The pilot elected to perform an autorotation to a nearby helicopter pad. In the attempt to steer away from power lines, the pilot made a left cyclic input; however, the retreating main rotor blade contacted a power line. The pilot continued to maneuver the helicopter and subsequently made an up-slope emergency landing on rising mountainous terrain.

The helicopter was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Buckeye Dream Machine 582, N50130: Fatal accident occurred June 25, 2017 in Federalsburg, Caroline County, Maryland

Michael L. Malick, 71, of Federalsburg, Maryland

Mr. Malick served in the Army during the Vietnam War, where he attended Airborne School. After being discharged, he earned his pilot's license, which he was very proud of. Mr. Malick also worked for many years at Cambridge Wire Cloth as a Mechanical Engineer.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N50130

Location: Federalsburg, MD
Accident Number: ERA17FA211
Date & Time: 06/25/2017, 0906 EDT
Registration: N50130
Aircraft: BUCKEYE POWERED PARACHUTES INC DREAM MACHINE 582
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 25, 2017, at 0906 eastern daylight time, an experimental light-sport Buckeye Powered Parachutes Dream Machine 582, N50130, was substantially damaged when it impacted power lines and terrain during takeoff near Federalsburg, Maryland. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The powered parachute was owned by the pilot who was operating it under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight that was originating from the pilot's private airstrip at the time of the accident.

A neighbor assisted the pilot with the unfurling of the aircraft's parachute wing and watched the accident flight. He stated that it was the pilot's first solo flight in a powered parachute. According to the witness, the pilot taxied into position for takeoff to the north from the turf runway designated as runway15/33. The pilot "gave more throttle" after liftoff, and the aircraft turned left. The aircraft climbed to about 35 ft above ground level, turned about 60° to the left, and collided with a power line that was about 245 ft left of the runway centerline. The power line was located along a roadway that ran about parallel to the airstrip.

According to the witness, during the entire flight, the engine sounded smooth, continuous, and "normal" with no interruption of power. The aircraft struck the wires on the near side of the roadway; the pilot was ejected; and both the pilot and the aircraft came to rest on the far side of the road.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. He also held flight and ground instructor certificates. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued March 27, 1984, and he reported 400 total hours of flight experience on that date. The medical certificate was no longer valid for operations requiring a medical certificate; at the time of the accident, the pilot was operating an aircraft that did not require a medical certificate.

Examination of the pilot's logbook revealed a single entry for an instructional flight in a powered parachute; the 1.2-hour flight took place on February 22, 2016, in Dunnellon, Florida. The logbook also had entries for 6.5 hours of powered-parachute ground instruction in July 2016. There was no solo endorsement for powered parachutes in the logbook. The pilot's friend reported that the pilot had flown a powered parachute with a flight instructor once in Virginia and once more recently in New Hampshire.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single-engine, tandem-seat, tricycle-gear powered parachute was manufactured in 1995 and was powered by a 66-horsepower Rotax 582 engine. The maintenance records for the aircraft were not located during the investigation, and the maintenance history of the aircraft could not be determined. The pilot registered the powered parachute in October 2014.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0845, weather conditions reported at Easton/Newnam Field Airport (ESN), Easton, Maryland, 12 nautical miles northwest of the accident site, included scattered clouds at 7,000 ft, visibility 10 statute miles, and wind from 330° at 4 knots. The temperature was 25°C; the dew point was 19°C; and the altimeter setting was 30.05 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The powered parachute came to rest upright, and, except for some structural tubing and landing gear that were fractured, it remained largely intact. All structure and components of the powered parachute were accounted for at the accident site. Flight and engine control continuity were confirmed, and the engine was secure in its mounts. The parachute and lines were adjacent to the airframe. The blades of the three-bladed propeller were fractured near their roots, and the propeller hub was securely mounted to the crankshaft. All fuel lines remained connected and intact. Fuel was observed in the fuel tank, and there was no evidence of fuel leakage anywhere in the fuel system. The pilot's lap belt was found unfastened, undamaged, and unstretched.

The battery was out of its tray, and the positive lead was disconnected. The aft carburetor was separated from its rubber intake manifold/mount. An FAA aviation safety inspector supervised the reinstallation of the battery to its tray and the carburetor to its mount. A test run of the engine was then performed at the accident site on the airframe. The engine started immediately, and it ran smoothly and continuously with no anomalies noted.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Medical Examiner, Wilmington, Delaware, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicology testing and detected the following medications: albuterol (used to treat wheezing), furosemide (used to treat fluid overload), valsartan and metoprolol (used to treat high blood pressure), warfarin (a blood thinner), pravastatin (used to treat high cholesterol) and naproxen (an over-the-counter pain medicine). None of these medications are considered impairing.

Additionally, the toxicology testing detected the antidepressant paroxetine and the central nervous system depressant anticonvulsant/anti-tremor medication primidone and its metabolite phenobarbital. Due to the potentially impairing effects of paroxetine, it is not one of the FAA's approved antidepressants. Medical conditions that require treatment with primidone are often impairing as are the treating medications, and pilots with these conditions or using this medication are advised not to operate airplanes.

According to the pilot's personal medical records, his active medical conditions included: adult onset diabetes treated with insulin; coronary artery disease treated with a 5-vessel bypass in 2003; placement of an internal defibrillator/pacemaker in 2011 for atrial fibrillation, which was also treated with warfarin; cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure treated with furosemide and metoprolol; high blood pressure treated with valsartan; depression treated with paroxetine; elevated cholesterol treated with pravastatin; and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with albuterol, budesonide, and formoterol. Additionally, he had a tremor treated with primidone daily since 2015. The records did not include a recent assessment of the pilot's depression or discuss any side effects from the primidone.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/27/1984
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 400 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BUCKEYE POWERED PARACHUTES INC
Registration: N50130
Model/Series: DREAM MACHINE 582 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Powered Parachute
Year of Manufacture: 1995
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 3315
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 900 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: ROTAX
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 582
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 66 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KESN, 72 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0845 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 296°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 330°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Federalsburg, MD (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Federalsburg, MD (PVT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0906 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Private (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 44 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 33
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 600 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  38.711667, -75.830556

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA211
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 25, 2017 in Federalsburg, MD
Aircraft: BUCKEYE POWERED PARACHUTES INC DREAM MACHINE 582, registration: N50130
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 25, 2017, at 0906 eastern daylight time, an experimental light-sport Buckeye Powered Parachutes Inc. Dream Machine 582, N50130, was substantially damaged after it impacted power lines and terrain near Federalsburg, Maryland. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from a private airstrip, at the time of the accident. The local personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

A neighbor and friend assisted the pilot with the aircraft and watched the accident flight. He provided a written statement and was interviewed at the scene. According to the witness, the pilot taxied into position for takeoff to the north from his turf airstrip, which was orientated 33/15. The pilot "gave more throttle" after liftoff and the aircraft turned to its left. The aircraft climbed to about 35 feet above ground level, turned approximately 60 degrees to the left, and collided with the wires along the roadway which were about 245 feet left of the runway centerline. During the entire flight, the engine sounded smooth, continuous, and "normal" with no interruption of power. The aircraft struck the wires on the near side of the roadway, the pilot was ejected, and both the pilot and the aircraft came to rest on the far side of the road.

In a written statement, a neighbor reported she watched the initial ground run of accident aircraft "parallel to the road," and believed it might be a "4-wheeler or something." When she looked again, she saw the aircraft in flight, and watched as it collided with power lines that ran along the roadway. 

The aircraft came to rest upright, and except for some structural tubing and landing gear which was fractured, it remained largely intact. Flight and engine control continuity was confirmed, and the engine was secure in its mounts. The blades of the three-bladed propeller were fractured near their roots, but the propeller hub was securely mounted to the crankshaft. The battery was out of its tray, and the positive lead was disconnected. The 'aft' carburetor was separated from its rubber intake manifold/mount. All fuel lines remained connected and intact. There was no odor of fuel, and no evidence of fuel leakage anywhere in the fuel system. A test run of the engine revealed that it ran smoothly and continuously with no anomalies noted.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued March 27, 1984, he reported 400 total hours of flight experience on that date. 

Examination of the pilot's logbook revealed a single entry which reflected an instructional flight of 1.2 hours in a powered parachute. He annotated 6.5 hours of ground instruction in July 2016. There was no solo endorsement for powered parachutes annotated in the logbook. 

The tandem-seat, parachute-wing, tricycle-gear aircraft was manufactured in 1995 and was powered by a Rotax 582, 66-horsepower engine. The maintenance records for the aircraft were not located during an extensive search, and therefore the maintenance history of the aircraft could not be determined. 

At 0845, weather conditions reported at Easton/Newnam Field Airport (ESN), Easton, Maryland, 12 nautical miles northwest of the accident site included scattered clouds at 7,000 feet, 10 statute miles of visibility, and wind from 330° at 4 knots. The temperature was 25° C, the dew point was 19° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.05 inches of mercury.