Saturday, November 3, 2018

Aviat A-1C-180 Husky, registered to and operated by the pilot, N272WY: Accident occurred July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, Buckingham County, Virginia


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N272WY



Location: Dillwyn, VA
Accident Number: ERA17LA229
Date & Time: 07/04/2017, 1130 EDT
Registration: N272WY
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1C-180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 4, 2017, at 1130 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1C-180, N272WY, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Dillwyn, Virginia. The private pilot was seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed.

The pilot reported that he filled the airplane with fuel and departed his home airport for a private, paved airstrip about 12 miles to the northwest. He was encouraged to visit a neighbor who owned a grass airstrip located between the departure and destination airports, so he attempted to find the airstrip. He "falsely identified" the grass airstrip and attempted to land. He attempted two low approaches, the first with no flaps and the second with full flaps. On the third pass, he attempted to land the airplane with full flaps. After touching down, he realized that he did not have sufficient runway remaining to stop, and aborted the landing. Shortly after takeoff and after clearing the trees, the airplane "entered an abrupt stall" and impacted the ground.

The pilot believed that he was at full power when airplane control was lost. He also stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration reported that the airplane came to rest in a steep, nose-low position in a cornfield. There was no fire. Structural damage to both wings and the fuselage was confirmed. The inspector reported that the field where the pilot was attempting to land was a grass strip designed for radio-controlled model aircraft. The strip was oriented to the northeast/southwest, was about 650 ft in length, and was not intended for general aviation aircraft. A large stand of trees formed the boundary of the northeast end of the runway. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/11/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/08/2017
Flight Time:  600 hours (Total, all aircraft), 73 hours (Total, this make and model), 275 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 62 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 29 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC
Registration: N272WY
Model/Series: A-1C-180 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3272
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/05/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 38 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 40 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1P
Registered Owner: Inspire Aviation LLC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FVX, 415 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1135 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 150°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Farmville, VA (FVX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Farmville, VA (FVX)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1120 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Private R-C (NA)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 637 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 4
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 650 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  37.492222, -78.517500 (est)



NTSB Identification: ERA17LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, VA
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1C-180, registration: N272WY
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2017, at 1224 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1C-180, N272WY, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Dillwyn, Virginia. The private pilot was seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed.

According to a witness, the pilot was attempting to land the airplane on a grass field. Three attempts were made, and the airplane touched down on the third attempt. The pilot then executed a go-around, and the airplane climbed, turned to the right, and stalled. The airplane then collided with terrain in a cornfield adjacent to the grass field.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration reported that the airplane came to rest in a steep, nose-low position in the cornfield. There was no fire. The airplane was recovered to a hangar for a further examination by the FAA.

The inspector reported that the field where the pilot was attempting to land was a grass strip designed for radio-controlled aircraft. The strip was oriented to the northeast/southwest and was about 665 ft in length.

Piper PA-18A Super Cub, N245KW: Accident occurred May 08, 2017 at Coeur d'Alene Airport (KCOE), Kootenai County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N245KW



Location: COEUR D'ALENE, ID
Accident Number: WPR17LA102
Date & Time: 05/08/2017, 1330 PDT
Registration: N245KW
Aircraft: Piper PA 18A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Flight control sys malf/fail
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 8, 2017, about 1330 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA18A airplane, N245KW, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Coeur d'Alene Airport (COE), Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight.

The purpose of the flight was to practice maneuvers in the local area. The pilot, who was seated in the front seat, reported that during takeoff he applied one notch of flaps to assist with a shorter takeoff roll. During the initial climb, the airplane yawed to the left and he applied the right rudder; however, the airplane did not respond. About 50 to 75 ft above ground level, the pilot retarded the throttle, and initiated a forced landing. The airplane impacted the ground in a nose down attitude and came to rest oriented about 90° perpendicular to the runway.

On July 20, 2017, the airplane was examined at a secure facility by an NTSB Investigator accompanied by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector. The right rudder pedal was found full forward against the firewall and trapped behind the cabin's front "V" brace. The right rudder cable, between the front and rear seat, had detached at the rear seat foot pedal connection. The thimble remained attached to the rear seat pedal assembly, and the free end of the cable was found loosely threaded through its swage sleeve. The failed rudder cable and swage sleeve appeared bright and clean when compared to the remaining rudder cables in the system, consistent with its recent replacement.

There was no annotation in the maintenance logbooks indicating the cable had been replaced.

Right rudder cable from rudder intact. Cable thimble to front seat attached, cable missing. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/25/2016
Flight Time: 654 hours (Total, all aircraft), 145 hours (Total, this make and model), 584 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N245KW
Model/Series: PA 18A 135
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1953
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18-2495
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/23/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4555 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series:  O320-A2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCOE, 2307 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1056 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 168°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: COEUR D'ALENE, ID (COE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: COEUR D'ALENE, ID (COE)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1336 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: COEUR D'ALENE - PAPPY BOYINGTON (COE)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2320 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 20
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5400 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  47.774444, -116.819444 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA102 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 08, 2017 in COEUR D'ALENE, ID
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18A, registration: N245KW
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2017, about 1337 Pacific daylight time, a Piper Super Cub PA18A, N245KW, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain at Coeur d'Alene Airport (COE), Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the owner as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight. 

In the written statement, the pilot reported that during takeoff, he applied one notch of flaps to assist with a shorter takeoff roll. During the initial climb, the airplane veered to the left and the pilot applied the right rudder; however, there was no response from the control input. About 50 to 75 feet above ground level, the pilot retarded the throttle, and initiated a forced landing. The airplane impacted the ground in a nose down position, and came to rest oriented about 90 degrees perpendicular to the runway.

Cirrus SR22 G3, registered to a private company and operated by the pilot, N271TS: Fatal accident occurred May 05, 2017 at Clearwater Air Park (KCLW), Pinellas County, Florida

James R. Fink 
November 12, 1972 - May 5, 2017 
Born in Stuttgart, Germany 
Resided in Exeter, Rhode Island 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N271TS




Location: Clearwater, FL
Accident Number: ERA17FA174
Date & Time: 05/05/2017, 1922 EDT
Registration: N271TS
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 5, 2017, about 1922 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N271TS, impacted terrain during a go-around at the Clearwater Airpark (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to a private company and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport at the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed for the personal cross-country flight that departed Marion County Airport (MAO), Mullins, South Carolina, about 1620.

A review of air traffic control (ATC) communications revealed that the airplane departed from the Groton-New London Airport (GON), Groton, Connecticut, about 1103 and was destined for the Hagerstown Regional Airport - James A. Henson Field (HGR), Hagerstown, Maryland. While en route, the pilot elected to continue to MAO. At MAO, he purchased 61.6 gallons of 100LL fuel. After departing MAO, the pilot received flight following services from Jacksonville Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) until he was handed over to Tampa Approach. When the airplane was about 8 miles north of CLW, about 1915, Tampa Approach terminated radar services, and the pilot proceeded to CLW. There was no further ATC contact with the pilot.

As the accident airplane approached runway 16 at CLW, an airline transport pilot (ATP) was entering the traffic pattern at CLW in his Grumman Tiger airplane after deciding to terminate a local flight due to approaching convective weather. The ATP heard the accident pilot announce over the airport's common traffic advisory frequency that he was west of the airport and inbound for landing. The ATP told the pilot that there was a noise restriction on the west side of the airport and that he would need to enter the traffic pattern from the east. The pilot acknowledged and told the ATP that he would follow him in. The ATP said that weather was approaching the airport, and as he crossed over the approach end of the runway to land, the winds became increasingly strong and gusty. It took a long time to get the airplane on the ground, and he had to use full aileron deflection to maintain control. The ATP said that there was wind shear, but he could not estimate the speed or direction of the shear. He estimated that the wind was from between 240° and 270° at a velocity of about 40 knots.

According to the ATP, while he was on final approach, he saw the accident airplane on the downwind leg and was aware that it was close behind him in the traffic pattern, so he cleared the runway quickly. He then radioed the pilot and told him that the wind was "snotty" at the approach end of the runway and to be careful. The pilot acknowledged. The ATP then taxied to his parking spot and did not see the accident airplane land. The ATP said that after he parked his airplane the wind was blowing so hard that it was a struggle to get the canopy cover on his airplane. It had also started to rain. The ATP was unaware that the accident airplane had crashed until he heard sirens on the airport and responded to the location of the accident.

An airport employee observed the accident airplane on final approach for runway 16. He said it was very windy and gusty, and rainstorms were approaching the airport. The employee said that the airplane appeared to make a normal approach to the airport before it disappeared from his view. The employee then heard the airplane's engine go to full power and saw the airplane in a vertical climb before it rolled left onto its back and descended out of view. The witness said that he knew the airplane was going to crash and started yelling for someone to call 911. He then responded to the accident site and found the airplane in an inverted position adjacent to the taxiway.

Data downloaded from the airplane's Avidyne electronic primary flight display (PFD) revealed that the flight from MAO to CLW was recorded. The data showed the airplane approaching CLW from the northeast, making a 360° left turn over the airport, and entering a left downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 16. The airplane continued to turn onto the base leg and then onto final approach before the data ended about 1922 when the airplane was over the runway. The last 4 to 6 seconds of the flight were not recorded by the PFD. According to the manufacturer, this can occur when there has been an abrupt loss of power. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:  07/14/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/04/2016
Flight Time:  244.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 23.6 hours (Total, this make and model)

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. Review of his logbook revealed that as of April 26, 2017, he had a total flight experience of about 244 hours of which 23.6 hours were in the accident airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on July 14, 2015, with no waivers or limitations.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N271TS
Model/Series: SR22 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2619
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/09/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 50 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1670.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-N
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was a four-seat, low-wing, composite airplane with fixed landing gear. It was powered by a 310-horsepower Continental Motors IO-550-N piston engine.

The airplane's last annual inspection was on June 9, 2016, at an airframe total time of 1,621.1 hours. The engine was also inspected at this time and had a total of 120.1 total hours since overhaul. Since the annual inspections, both the engine and airplane had accrued an additional 49.5 hours.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CLW, 71 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1935 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3200 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 14 knots / 23 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Mullins, SC (MAO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1620 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

CLW had an automated weather observing system. Recorded weather at 1915 included wind from 280° at 10 knots with gusts to 19 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,500 ft above ground level (agl), a broken ceiling at 6,000 ft agl, overcast skies at 8,500 ft agl, temperature 21°C, dew point temperature 11°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.78 inches of mercury.

Recorded weather at 1935 included wind from 280° at 14 knots with gusts to 23 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,200 ft agl, a broken ceiling at 4,500 ft agl, an overcast ceiling at 6,000 ft agl, temperature 21°C, dew point 12°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.79 inches of mercury.

Based on the airplane's flight track, at 1920, it was located in an area of 0 to 15 dBZ reflectivity values. Between 1924 and 1928, Reflectivity values of 10 to 30 dBZ moved over the accident site between 1924 and 1928, and the main band of higher reflectivities of 40 dBZ moved over the accident site after 1928. The 0 to 30 dBZ reflectivity values corresponded to light precipitation. There were no lightning strikes around the accident site at the accident time.

An airmen's meteorological information (AIRMET) advisory was valid for the accident site at the accident time. AIRMET Tango was issued at 1645 and advised of moderate turbulence below 12,000 ft. The area forecast issued at 1345 and valid at the time of the accident forecasted a scattered to broken ceiling at 4,000 ft, cloud tops at 8,000 ft, isolated light rain showers, and a west wind with gusts from 25 to 30 knots. The terminal area forecast (TAF) issued for PIE at 1333 and valid at the time of the accident forecasted a wind from 290° at 18 knots with gusts to 28 knots, greater than 6 miles visibility, and scattered clouds at 5,000 ft.

A search of weather briefing sources, such as Lockheed Martin Flight Service, Leidos weather briefings, and Direct User Access Terminal Service indicated that the pilot did not receive an official weather briefing from any of these sources.

The pilot did receive a weather briefing at 1012 through ForeFlight for a flight between GON and HGR; no ForeFlight weather briefing data was requested or received for a flight to CLW. It is unknown if the pilot checked or received additional weather information before or during the accident flight.

A review of the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Situation Display applicable to the Tampa Bay, Florida, area for the time surrounding the accident indicated that a downburst/microburst/gust front was moving eastward across the CLW and PIE areas around the accident time. ITWS information is not available to controllers in ARTCCs but is available to airports with air traffic control towers. CLW did not have an air traffic control tower. 



Airport Information

Airport: Clearwater Airpark (CLW)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4108 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  27.977778, -82.759167 (est) 

The airplane came to rest inverted on a magnetic heading of 073° in a dry retention pond just east of the runway. The initial impact point was a ground scar. Embedded in the scar were pieces of the left wingtip. The main wreckage, which include the empennage, fuselage, wing, and the engine and propeller, was located about 50 ft east of the initial impact point. The left section of the wing was fractured just outboard of the left flap, and the wing tip had separated. There was no postimpact fire, and the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) was not deployed. The roof of the airplane had collided with an elevated storm drain that was made of concrete. A section of the airplane's roof and door were found at the base of the drain. Propeller marks were also observed on the aluminum guard-rail that was attached to the drain. Flight control cable continuity was established from all major flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. The flap actuator indicated the flaps were at 100% (fully extended). The pitch trim motor was found near the neutral pitch trim position, and the roll trim motor was found in about the full left roll trim position. Both front seats were equipped with airbags, and both bags were deployed. The pilot's four-point seat belt/shoulder harness assembly was cut by rescue personnel.

The engine remained partially attached to the airplane, and the three-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. All three blades were bent aft and exhibited polishing at the tips. The spinner exhibited only minor damage. Examination of the engine revealed that it had sustained some impact damage, but the accessories remained on the engine. The fuel pump was removed, and some fuel was observed in the chamber. The fuel coupling was not broken. The engine crankshaft was manually rotated, and valve train continuity and compression were established on each cylinder. The top spark plugs were grey in color consistent with normal wear per the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Spark was observed to each ignition lead when the crankshaft was rotated. The fuel manifold valve was removed and disassembled. Some fuel was noted in the manifold chamber, and the screen was absent of debris. Honey-colored oil was observed throughout the engine. The oil pump pumped oil when the crankshaft was rotated. The oil filter was removed and opened. The filament was absent of debris. No mechanical deficiencies were observed with the engine that would have precluded normal operation at the time of impact. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Medical Examiner's Office (District Six), Largo, Florida, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be blunt head trauma.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing that was negative for all items tested.

Additional Information

Advisory Circular

The FAA's Advisory Circular (AC) 00-6B, titled "Aviation Weather," issued in August 2016 is the primary basic training guide on many weather hazards, including downbursts and microbursts. Section 19.6.3 of the AC states that downbursts and microbursts are associated with rain showers and more frequently with thunderstorm activity. Downbursts create many hazards for aviation and often cause damaging wind at the surface. Further information on the hazards of downbursts and microbursts and the safest courses of action for pilots can be found in the FAA's AC 00-24C and the FAA's Aeronautical Information Manual and obtained from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The FAA and the National Weather Service provide many examples of downburst and microburst conditions associated with rain showers.

Pilot Operating Handbook

The go-around procedure described in the airplane pilot operating handbook included retracting the flaps to 50%, after the application of full power.




NTSB Identification: ERA17FA174
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 05, 2017 in Clearwater, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N271TS
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 5, 2017, about 1925 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N271TS, impacted terrain while attempting to land at the Clearwater Airpark (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to a private company and operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport at the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Plantation Airpark (JYL), Sylvania, Georgia, about 1711, and was destined for CLW.

A preliminary review of air traffic control (ATC) communications revealed the flight originated about 1103 from the Groton-New London Airport (GON), Groton, Connecticut, and was destined for the Hagerstown Regional Airport - James A. Henson Field (HGR), Hagerstown, Maryland. While en route, the pilot diverted to JYL. After departing JYL, the pilot requested flight following services from ATC. When the airplane was about 8 miles north of CLW, about 1918, radar services were terminated and the pilot proceeded to CLW.

Another pilot was entering the traffic pattern at CLW when he heard the accident pilot announce over the airport's common traffic advisory frequency frequency that he was west of the airport and inbound for landing. The other pilot told the accident pilot that there was a noise restriction on the west side of the airport and that he would need to enter the traffic pattern from the east. The accident pilot acknowledged and told the other pilot that he would follow him in. The other pilot said he could see storms approaching the airport. When he crossed over the approach end of the runway to try and land, the winds became increasingly strong and gusty. The pilot said it took him a long time to get the airplane on the ground and he had to use full aileron deflection to maintain control. He said there was wind shear, but he could not estimate the speed or direction of the shear; however, he estimated the wind was between 240 and 270 degrees at a velocity of about 40 knots.

The pilot said that he saw the accident airplane on downwind, while he was on final approach, and was aware that he was close behind him in the pattern, so he cleared the runway quickly. He then radioed the accident pilot and told him the wind was "snotty" at the approach end of the runway and to be careful. The accident pilot acknowledged. The other pilot then taxied to his parking spot and did not see the accident airplane land. The pilot said that after he parked his airplane the wind was blowing so hard that it was struggle to get the canopy cover on his airplane. It had also started to rain. The pilot was unaware that the accident airplane had crashed until he heard sirens on the airport and responded to the location of the accident.

An airport employee observed the accident airplane on a final approach for runway 16. He said it was very windy and gusty, and storms were approaching the airport. The employee said the airplane appeared to make a normal approach to the airport before it disappeared from his view. The employee then heard the airplane's engine go to full power. He said the airplane entered a vertical climb before it rolled left onto its back. The airplane then descended while traveling toward the east inverted before it disappeared from view. The witness said he knew the airplane was going to crash and started yelling for someone to call 911. He then responded to the accident site and saw fuel draining from the airplane.

The airplane came to rest inverted on a magnetic heading of 073° in a dry retention pond just east of the runway. The initial impact point was a ground scar. Embedded in the scar were pieces of the left wing tip. The main wreckage, which include the empennage, fuselage, the right wing, portions of the left wing, and the engine and propeller, were located about 50 ft east of the initial impact point. The left wing was fractured just outboard of the flap, and the wing tip had separated. There was no post-impact fire and the onboard ballistic recovery system (parachute) was not deployed. The roof of the airplane had collided with an elevated storm drain that was made of concrete. A section of the airplane's roof and door were found at the base of the drain. Propeller marks were also observed on the aluminum guard-rail that was attached to the drain. Flight control continuity was established for all major flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. The flap actuator indicated the flaps were fully extended. The pitch trim motor was found near the neutral trim position and the roll trim motor was found in an approximate full left roll position. Both front seats were equipped with airbags and both bags were deployed. The pilot's four-point seat belt/shoulder harness assembly had been cut by rescue personnel.

The engine remained partially attached to the airplane and the three-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. All three blades were bent aft and exhibited polishing at the tips. The spinner exhibited only minor damage. Examination of the engine revealed it had sustained some impact damage, but the accessories remained on the engine. The fuel pump was removed and some fuel was observed in the chamber. The fuel coupling was not broken. The engine was manually rotated and valve train continuity and compression were established on each cylinder. The top spark plugs were grey in color consistent with normal wear per the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Spark was observed to each ignition lead when the engine was rotated. The fuel manifold valve was removed and disassembled. Some fuel was noted in the manifold chamber and the screen was absent of debris. Honey-colored oil was observed throughout the engine. The oil pump was pumping oil when the engine was rotated. The oil filter was removed and opened. The filament was absent of debris. No mechanical deficiencies were observed with the engine that would have precluded normal operation at the time of impact.

The airplane was equipped with an Avidyne electronic primary flight display (PFD) and a multi-function display (MFD). The PFD unit and the solid-state memory card from the MFD were recovered from the wreckage for examination and download.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. Review of his logbook revealed that as of April 26, 2017, he had a total of about 244 flights hours, of which, 23.6 hours were in the accident airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on July 14, 2015, with no waivers or limitations.

Recorded weather at CLW, at 1935, included wind from 280° at 14 knots with gusts to 23 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,200 ft, a broken ceiling at 4,500 ft, an overcast ceiling at 6,000 ft, temperature 21° C, dew point 12° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.79 inHg.

Recorded weather at St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport (PIE), St. Petersburg, Florida, located about 6 miles southeast of CLW, at 1953, included wind from 270° at 16 knots with gusts to 32 knots, 9 miles visibility, light rain, few clouds at 4,700 ft, a broken ceiling at 5,500 ft, an overcast ceiling at 8,000 ft, temperature 21° C, dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.80 inHg. A peak wind was recorded from 260° at 32 knots at 1947 and rain began at 1950.

Bell 206B-3 TH-67A Creek, registered to and operated by the Marion County Sheriff's Office, N911GE: Accident occurred May 02, 2017 in Orange Springs, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N911GE





Location: Orange Springs, FL
Accident Number: ERA17TA170
Date & Time: 05/02/2017, 1815 EDT
Registration: N911GE
Aircraft: BELL 206
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: External load event (Rotorcraft)
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

On May 2, 2017, about 1815 eastern daylight time, a Bell 206B helicopter, N911GE, sustained substantial damage during firefighting operations near Orange Springs, Florida. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the Marion County Sheriff's Office as a public-use aircraft. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Ocala International Airport, Ocala, Florida, about 1500.

According to the Aviation Unit Commander and the pilot, the pilot was utilizing a firefighting bucket (Bambi Bucket®) and had completed between 25 and 30 drops on the fire zone. He landed at a nearby landing zone, refueled, and completed 3 or 4 additional drops when the accident occurred. After lowering the bucket into the water and filling it, he pulled the bucket from the water and immediately felt "a severely out of CG condition to the right." He assumed that the bucket cables were entangled in the right landing skid, so he released the water from the bucket. The condition persisted, so he rocked the helicopter to attempt to free the cable; however, this was not successful. He then released the cable with the cargo release button. He heard the "clunk" sound that was typical with releasing the bucket, then he heard another "clunk." The helicopter then began to spin violently and crashed into the water. The pilot freed himself from the cockpit, inflated his personal flotation device, and swam to shore. He utilized his cell phone to call for assistance and was rescued by first responders.

The pilot reported there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the helicopter.

An examination of the wreckage revealed cable marks on the right rear landing skid tube for about 6 inches in length. There was also a torsional fracture of the tail rotor short shaft. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/02/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/02/2017
Flight Time:  3494 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1552 hours (Total, this make and model), 2510 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 46 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELL
Registration: N911GE
Model/Series: 206 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 5271
Landing Gear Type: High Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/19/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3201 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 76 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 8966 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20 SER
Registered Owner: MARION COUNTY SHERIFF
Rated Power: 400 hp
Operator: MARION COUNTY SHERIFF
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OCF, 89 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1750 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 225°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 8500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ocala, FL (OCF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ocala, FL (OCF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1500 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 29.462778, -81.978056

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA170
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 02, 2017 in Orange Springs, FL
Aircraft: BELL 206, registration: N911GE
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 2, 2017, about 1815 eastern daylight time, a Bell 206B helicopter, N911GE, sustained substantial damage during firefighting operations near Orange Springs, Florida. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the Marion County Sheriff's Office as a public-use aircraft. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Ocala International Airport, Ocala, Florida, about 1500.

According to the Aviation Unit Commander, the pilot was utilizing a firefighting bucket (Bambi Bucket®) and had completed between 25 and 30 drops on the fire zone. He landed at a nearby landing zone, refueled, and completed 3 or 4 additional drops when the accident occurred. After lowering the bucket into the water and filling it, he pulled the bucket from the water and immediately felt "a severely out of CG condition to the right." He assumed that the bucket cables were entangled in the tail skid, so he released the water from the bucket. The condition persisted, so he rocked the helicopter to attempt to free the cable; however, this was not successful. He then released the cable with the cargo release button. He heard the "clunk" sound that was typical with releasing the bucket, then he heard another "clunk." The helicopter them began to spin violently and crashed into the water. The pilot freed himself from the cockpit, inflated his personal flotation device, and swam to shore. He utilized his cell phone to call for assistance and was rescued by first responders.

An initial examination of the wreckage revealed cable marks on the right rear skid tube for about 6 inches in length. There was also a torsional fracture of the tail rotor short shaft.