Thursday, October 26, 2017

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N143WA, Wright Air Service Inc: Incident occurred at Edward G. Pitka Sr. Airport (PAGA), Galena, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aircraft on taxi, wingtip struck an object.

Wright Air Service Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N143WA

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 18:40:00Z
Regis#: N143WA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C208
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Aircraft Operator: WRIGHT AIR SERVICE
Flight Number: WRF1460
City: GALENA
State: ALASKA

Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion, N6025N, GV Air Inc: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 in Erie, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft force landed in a field.

GV Air Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N6025N

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 15:35:00Z
Regis#: N6025N
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: T210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ERIE
State: COLORADO

Williams T-51 Mustang, N151TA: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 at Sioux Gateway Airport (KSUX),Sioux City, Iowa -and- Accident occurred August 07, 2012 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aircraft on landing, went off the side of the runway and struck a light.

http://registry.faa.gov/N151TA

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 16:34:00Z
Regis#: N151TA
Aircraft Make: TITAN
Aircraft Model: T51 MUSTANG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SIOUX CITY
State: IOWA



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N151TA

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA530 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 07, 2012 in Oshkosh, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/27/2013
Aircraft: WILLIAMS JOHN T-51 MUSTANG, registration: N151TA
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Shortly after takeoff for a test flight, the pilot noticed that the airplane was not climbing as expected and the engine was slowly losing power. The coolant temperature was 225 degrees and the airplane was only 250 to 300 feet above ground level. During the return to the airport, the pilot heard and felt an explosion behind him and felt a burning sensation on his back. During the forced landing, the right main landing gear collapsed. Examination of the airplane revealed that a cooling line had separated from the radiator behind the pilot during the accident flight. The examination also revealed that the radiator hose line clamp for a different cooling hose was overtightened and not seated properly in its pipe bead. A replacement engine had been installed as a result of a blown head gasket during a previous flight; however, the cooling system was not replaced, and it could not be determined when the clamp was overtightened. An examination of the remaining systems revealed no anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The separation of an engine cooling hose from the radiator.

On August 7, 2012, about 1620 central daylight time a Williams T-51 Mustang airplane, N151TA, conducted a forced landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a visual flight rules flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the test flight was to trouble-shoot the lower engine power and higher than expected operating temperatures encountered during the previous test flight. After takeoff, the airplane was not performing as expected and the engine was slowly losing power. The pilot observed that the coolant temperature was 225 degrees and the airplane was only 250 to 300 feet above ground level. The pilot communicated with air traffic control that he wanted to return to the airport and started a turn. During the turn, the pilot heard and felt an explosion behind him and felt a burning sensation on his back. The pilot lost all forward visibility as the windscreen was black with smoke, but he was able to see a small amount out the left side of the windscreen.

The pilot stated that he continued to try and fly the airplane, though he was limited by the inability to see outside of the airplane and the pain associated with the burning sensation on the left side of his body. The pilot extended the landing gear and conducted a forced landing in the grass, just short of the general aviation ramp.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who traveled to the accident scene, the right main landing gear collapsed during the forced landing. The airplane continued an additional 300 feet before coming to rest. The left wing and left flap were wrinkled during the forced landing.

The airplane was recovered and relocated to the owner’s hangar in Ohio for further examination. The FAA inspector who provided oversight for the examination reported that there were no negative properties or operational failures observed during the testing of the cooling system. The number four spark plug was severely damaged. According to the pilot, an examination of the engine revealed no further anomalies. The pilot added that a cooling hose separated from the radiator which was located behind him. The radiator and cooling lines had not been boxed in, which would isolate the cooling system from the cockpit.

Several days prior to the accident flight, the engine and cooling system operated at a higher than normal power setting and coolant temperature. After the flight, the coolant temperature reached the maximum range of 250 degrees Fahrenheit and coolant purged itself from the system. On a subsequent flight, the coolant temperature gauge did not function and shortly after takeoff the pilot observed smoke in the cockpit. As the pilot returned to the airport to land, he noticed that the engine oil temperature was high and the oil pressure was low. An examination revealed an oil leak between the cylinder head and the engine block. Following this flight, a replacement engine was installed; however, the cooling system was not replaced.


 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA530 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 07, 2012 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: WILLIAMS JOHN T-51 MUSTANG, registration: N151TA
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 7, 2012, approximately 1620 central daylight time a Williams T-51 Mustang, N151TA, was substantially damaged while landing at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. The local flight has just departed KOSH and was landing when the accident occurred.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector who traveled to the accident scene, shortly after takeoff steam and radiator coolant started entering the cockpit and burned the pilot. The pilot returned to the airport for a forced landing. During the landing the right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane continued an additional 300 feet before coming to rest short of the general aviation ramp. The left wing and left flap were wrinkled.

Cessna 180J, N9789G, Oneida Wood Products LLC: Incident occurred October 24, 2017 in New Orleans, Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aircraft on landing went off the runway and struck a light.

Oneida Wood Products LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N9789G

Date: 24-OCT-17
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: N9789G
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C180J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NEW ORLEANS
State: LOUISIANA

Piper PA-28-181, N52326, Lehigh Valley Flying Club Inc: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 at Lehigh Valley International Airport (KABE), Allentown, Hanover Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aircraft on landing, wing leading edge sustained birdstrike damage.  Landed with incident.

Lehigh Valley Flying Club Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N52326

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 15:18:00Z
Regis#: N52326
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALLENTOWN
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Cessna 152, N422JP, U S Aviation Group LLC: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 at North Texas Regional Airport (KGYI), Denison, Grayson County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas

Aircraft on landing gear collapsed.

U S Aviation Group LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N422JP

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 23:20:00Z
Regis#: N422JP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SHERMAN
State: TEXAS

Cessna P210N Pressurized, N507HH, MWM Interest Inc: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 at Waco Regional Airport (KACT), McLennan County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas

Aircraft on takeoff, gear collapsed and went off the runway.

MWM Interest Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N507HH

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 16:14:00Z
Regis#: N507HH
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: WACO
State: TEXAS

Bellanca 7KCAB Citabria, N53735, Vermont Flight Academy: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 at Burlington International Airport (KBTV), Chittenden County, Vermont

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft on final, wing sustained bird strike damage. Landed without incident.

Vermont Flight Academy:  http://registry.faa.gov/N53735

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 19:10:00Z
Regis#: N53735
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 7KCAB
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
City: BURLINGTON
State: VERMONT

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N4409M: Accident occurred October 06, 2017 in Webster, Burnett County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis

Aircraft on takeoff, went off the grass strip onto the brush area.

http://registry.faa.gov/N4409M

Date: 06-OCT-17
Time: 20:11:00Z
Regis#: N4409M
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA12
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: WEBSTER
State: WISCONSIN

Cessna 182, N9350X: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2008 near Young Lake, Juneau, Alaska

In August 2008, a Cessna 182 airplane took off from Young Lake about 15 miles south of Juneau en route to the Juneau International Airport. It never made it. 

On board were 56-year-old Brian Andrews and his 24-year-old son Brandon. Brian Andrews was the deputy commissioner for the Alaska Department of Revenue at the time. The wreckage — along with the two men in the plane — remained missing.

This past Wednesday, that might have changed.

A man reported to the Alaska State Troopers that he and a group of friends and family found the wreckage of a float-equipped Cessna 182 airplane on Admiralty Island and that he found human remains inside as well, Alaska State Troopers Spokesperson Tim DeSpain said Friday.

“We’re reasonably certain, from his description and documentation, that it is that (Andrews’) plane,” DeSpain said.

National Transportation Safety Board Chief Clint Johnson said that the Andrews family has been notified of the discovery.

Brent Andrews, Brian’s son and Brandon’s brother, wrote a blog post Saturday about the discovery, saying that the people who found the plane are “lifelong friends” of the Andrews family.

“I understand that this news has been, and will be, a shock to some,” Brent wrote. “For some, and for my family, it has lead to a resurgence in all the feelings that arose when Dad and Brandon went missing, especially as we still miss your presence every day.”

The wreckage was found near Young Lake, Johnson said.

Members of the Juneau Mountain Rescue Group, a State Trooper and Mike Hodges from the NTSB are investigating the crash site, having flown to Young Lake on a U.S. Forest Service flight.

Johnson said the team arrived on Admiralty Island on Saturday afternoon, too late in the day to make the hike to the wreckage. They spent the night at a nearby cabin and started their journey to the wreckage Sunday morning. Johnson said that from the report Troopers receieved, there appears to have been a post-crash fire. They’re not sure how much of the plane remains, Johnson said.

They will seek to identify not only the plane but the remains, DeSpain said. There will be a tentative identification of the remains, he said, but it could take some time for the state medical examiner’s office to positively identify the remains.

On his blog post, Brent said the group of investigators were able to identify both the plane and the remains, though Johnson said Saturday that the group hasn’t been able to fully investigate.

According to the NTSB crash report filed in 2008, the men on board were flying supplies back from a family camping trip. Andrews’ youngest son reported that at the conclusion of the family’s camping trip, they determined that they had too much camping gear to safely take it to Juneau on one trip. They decided that three of them would fly back to Juneau and then Brian and Brandon would make one more round-trip flight to bring back the additional gear.

The plane departed the airport in Juneau at about 3:40 p.m. on Aug. 9, according to the report, and was expected to be back around 4:30 p.m. When the plane still wasn’t back at 7:15 p.m., the youngest son reported the plane overdue.

The Coast Guard, along with Alaska State Troopers and Civil Air Patrol, searched a 1,000-square mile area for the plane in 2008, but found nothing. A four-member team from Juneau Mountain Rescue hiked to the cabin the family was at, and found that the gear had been retrieved. The NTSB crash report said the two men were “presumed to have been killed.”

“I know that their disappearance was a very rare case,” Brent wrote Saturday, “and I’m glad that since 2008 there have been improvements in aircraft emergency signal requirements, photo reconnaissance, and other technologies, so that families in the future won’t have to conduct such searches for their loved ones.”

http://juneauempire.com

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances. The two (2) souls on board were fatally injured. Subject of an alert notice issued August 09, 2018. Missing aircraft wreckage located October 25, 2017

http://registry.faa.gov/N9350X

Date: 09-AUG-08
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N9350X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C182
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: JUNEAU
State: ALASKA

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC08FAMS01
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 09, 2008 in Juneau, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 182E, registration: N9350X
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 9, 2008, about 1600 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Cessna 182 airplane, N9350X, departed from a remote lake about 15 miles south of Juneau, Alaska, en route to the Juneau International Airport Seaplane Base, Juneau. When the airplane did not arrive in Juneau, it was reported overdue. The airplane remains missing and is presumed to have crashed about 1615 while en route to Juneau. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, when the accident occurred. The private certificated pilot, and the sole pilot-rated passenger, are presumed to have been killed. Instrument meteorological conditions were reported along the airplane's anticipated flight path, and no flight plan was filed.

An Alaska State Trooper that participated in the search reported that family members said that the accident flight was the second of two round trip flights between Young Lake and Juneau, intended to shuttle people and supplies back to Juneau following a family camping trip. The Trooper said about 1915, the pilot's youngest son, who was on board the first round trip flight, walked into the Juneau Flight Service Station to report that the airplane had not returned to Juneau, and to inquire about any radio contact from the overdue airplane. The airplane was officially declared overdue at 1932. The son said that he had expected the accident airplane to return to Juneau about 1630, but he thought that the flight might have been delayed due to poor weather conditions around the Juneau area. 

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on August 28, the missing pilot's youngest son reported that on Saturday, August 9, at the conclusion of a family camping trip, the group discovered that they had too much camping gear, which required an additional round trip flight between Young Lake and Juneau. He said that after discussing various options, it was collectively decided that all three would fly back to Juneau together, then one of them would stay behind in Juneau, while the other two returned to pick up the remaining camping gear. After arriving in Juneau, the son decided to wait at the Juneau International Airport Seaplane Base until the airplane returned. He said that the airplane departed from Juneau about 1540, with an anticipated return time of 1630. 

The son reported that his father and older brother on board the missing airplane were both experienced pilots, but said that his father was seated in the left seat when the airplane departed Juneau. He said that he was confident that his father was flying the airplane at the time of their disappearance. 


During a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC on August 12, an Alaska State Trooper that participated in the search reported that a witness recalled seeing the accident airplane depart from Young Lake about 1600. Also, search and rescue personnel reported that the camping gear that had been left behind at Young Lake was gone. 

The missing airplane's anticipated flight path would have been over about 15 miles of ocean. The terrain around the Juneau area is characterized by tree-covered steep mountainous island terrain, numerous ocean channels, and an extensive shoreline, containing small coves and bays. The area frequently has low ceilings and reduced visibility due to rain, fog, and mist. 

Search and rescue personnel from the U.S. Coast Guard, Air Station Sitka, surface vessels, aerial and ground search volunteers participated in search operations. Coast Guard personnel suspended the official search on August 20, 2008. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea, and instrument ratings. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on May 1, 2008, and contained no limitations.

No personal flight records were located for the pilot, and the aeronautical experience listed on page 3 of this report was obtained from FAA records on file in the Airman and Medical Records Center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. On the pilot's application for medical certificate, dated May 1, 2008, he indicated that his total aeronautical experience was 1,200 flight hours, of which 5 flight hours were accrued in the previous 6 months.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather reporting facility was the Juneau International Airport, the accident airplane's intended destination. At 1629, a weather observation from the Juneau Airport was reporting, in part: Wind, 230 degrees (true) at 5 knots; visibility, 2.5 statute miles with rain and mist; clouds and sky condition, 200 feet scattered, 1,300 feet broken, 2,000 feet overcast; temperature, 53 degrees F; dew point, 53 degrees F; altimeter, 29.90 inHg. 

COMMUNICATIONS

After the airplane departed from Juneau there were no reports of communications with the missing airplane. 

No emergency transmitter locator (ELT) signal was received by search personnel.

SEARCH AND RESCUE / SURVIVAL ASPECTS

The U.S. Coast Guard, and the Alaska State Troopers, Juneau, conducted extensive air, water, and ground searches. The official search was suspended by Coast Guard personnel on August 20, 2008. Family members and volunteers continued to search for the missing airplane. 

Search personnel reported that survival time, in water less than 40 degrees F, is typically less than one hour.

Texas ranches air freight cattle to Vietnam




Ten Brahman bulls sat patiently in 10-by-8-foot crates as the doors were drilled shut. They peeped through slats when lifted some two stories into the air and onto a Boeing 747 cargo plane at Bush Intercontinental Airport. They would go much higher and farther during the 30-hour-plus journey to Vietnam.

International sales of Texas cattle are not new, but they are increasing as population growth and rising incomes around the world have more people introducing beef, pork and other meat-based proteins into their diets.

"As their incomes go up, people eat more meat," said David Anderson, a professor and agriculture economist at Texas A&M University. "And so there are countries who want to upgrade their quality of meat production and quantity of meat production."




In Vietnam, specifically, beef production has been relatively stagnant while demand has increased. Imported beef made up 19 percent of consumption in 2016, compared with 5 percent in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Seeing the strong demand, Vietnamese producers have been investing in their herds. The USDA reports the value of U.S. shipments of live cattle and bovine semen reached $11.6 million and $1.1 million, respectively, between January and August.

Houston-area exports of live animals to Vietnam was worth $731,554 last year, according to WISERTrade data provided by the Greater Houston Partnership.




The 10 Texas Brahmans flown out Wednesday will be bred with local cows to improve Vietnamese beef's quality and quantity. Texas cattle have more meat with better marbling and tenderness.

And since one bull produces 30,000 units of semen throughout his lifetime - about two units of semen are required to inseminate a cow - each of these 10 bulls could produce 5,000 calves.

Alfredo A. Muskus, of the family-owned Santa Elena Ranch in Madisonville, first went to Vietnam a year ago on a trade mission with the American Brahman Breeders Association, based in Houston, and Holstein Association USA. Santa Elena sent its first shipment of bulls to Vietnam in March.




"I think a lot of cattlemen in the United States need to start realizing that there's a lot of international markets," Muskus said.

Eight of the bulls headed to Vietnam were from Santa Elena Ranch. The other two were from Detering Red Brahmans.

After the cattle were loaded onto the plane in their two crates, Muskus climbed aboard himself. As the livestock attendant for the flight, he would sit on the 747's upper deck while the cattle, with some room to lie down inside their crates, are in the bottom portion of the plane. Muskus will feed the animals and be available should they need anything.




He compared it to flying in first class with food and a few lie-flat beds. The cattle might as well be flying first class, too, as the cost to ship a bull to Vietnam is similar to the cost of a premium airline ticket.

The 747 departed Wednesday for Anchorage, Alaska, and will then fly to Taipei, Taiwan. The crates are unloaded in Taipei and placed onto another plane that will travel to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and then their ultimate destination in Hanoi.

The cattle will be taken to a breeding station that, according to an article in the Brahman Journal, is run by the Vietnamese government. It collects semen from beef and dairy bulls to sell to local producers.




Vietnam is just one of the markets where Texas cattle are being sent. Muskus said 60 percent of his ranch's business is with international customers. He's sent live Brahman cattle, frozen semen or frozen embryos to countries including Thailand, Pakistan, Venezuela, Paraguay, Colombia and Mexico.

The Texas Department of Agriculture has also expanded international agriculture trade programs. It has coordinated activities on every continent, except Antarctica, and the department said trade missions to countries like China have opened new markets for Texas.

The department's Livestock Export Facility at Bush Intercontinental Airport was built in 1978 to export cattle. But the focus shifted to exporting horses about a decade ago, said Dr. Netia Abercrombie, a veterinary medical officer with the USDA.




Cattle began coming through the export facility again about a year ago, and Wednesday's flight marked the fifth cattle shipment in the past year to go through the site. In general, animals pass through the export facility two to three times a week.

But only certain cattle are worth first-class tickets.

"They have to be really expensive, high-dollar breeding stock," Anderson said. "Meaning they're going to be some really special bulls or cows."

The Brahmans exported Wednesday are a good fit for Vietnam because they're a resilient breed that does well in hot, humid weather.

"They truly thrive where it's harsh," said William Bunce, executive vice president of the American Brahman Breeders Association.

Muskus will spend four days working with his counterparts in Vietnam. He'll make sure the bulls are settled, check on the bulls his ranch previously sent and make suggestions that could improve the program.

Gordon Thornhill, general manager for T.K. Exports, which specializes in livestock, said Muskus will be able to teach them some tricks of the trade.

"You have an opportunity to take what you've learned and share it with somebody else," he said.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.houstonchronicle.com

Horizon pilot shortage reduces flight schedules

Alaska Air Group’s Horizon Air unit will continue flying a reduce schedule for some time, the Seattle-based company acknowledged Wednesday.

Alaska CEO Brad Tilden said regional airline pilots took jobs with legacy airlines in greater numbers than anticipated in recent months. That created a shortage of pilots for Alaska’s Horizon fleet during the summer, resulting in hundreds of flight cancellations as well as dropped routes. The introduction of regional jets to Horizon’s fleet didn’t help.

“We’ve now adjusted our schedule to match pilot availability, and cancellations have dropped dramatically,” Tilden said.

Horizon remains the top carrier in both flights and passenger count in Medford, where it bases some of its crews.

In an effort to improve control and cut costs, Horizon’s operations center was moved to Seattle from Portland.

“We got behind hiring initially last year because we were simply not competitive from a pay standpoint,” Horizon Chief Operations Officer David Campbell said. “We’re now hiring 30 pilots a month, so I feel really good about that, but it’s going to take us another 90 days to really catch up on the backlog of training, and moving forward, I feel very comfortable that we have a solid plan in place. It’s going to work.”

Despite operational challenges and intense competition, the airline posted a third-quarter net profit of $266 million, or $2.14 per share, up from $256 million, or $2.07 per share a year ago.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mailtribune.com

Lindstrand LBL240A, C-FCKX, Sundance Balloons -and- Ultramagic SA T210, N123UT, operated by Pacific Rim Adventures Inc., operator does business as Sky's The Limit Balloon Adventure: Accident occurred October 06, 2017 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico


C-FCKX Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

C-FCKX  Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

C-FCKX Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Analysis 

The Ultramagic balloon pilot reported that, during a balloon festival, after a local sightseeing flight, he landed the balloon and decided to wait for the ground crew to locate the balloon before deflating. He added that, as the balloon was deflating, he "heard a basket sliding across the top of [his] balloon." The balloon rotated counter-clockwise, and the balloon basket, still loaded with passengers, rolled upside down.

The Ultramagic balloon sustained substantial damage to the burner rack. One passenger sustained serious injuries.

The Lindstrand balloon pilot reported that, during landing, there were two balloons in his flightpath. He added that he climbed and passed the first balloon but was unable to pass the second balloon, and "I brushed him with my basket on the top of his balloon." He landed the balloon without further incident.

The Ultramagic pilot and the Lindstrand operations manager reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the balloons that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate clearance from a balloon on the ground during landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Monitoring other aircraft - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Aircraft - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing

Collision during takeoff/land (Defining event)

Location: Albuquerque, NM
Accident Number:  GAA18CA016B
Date & Time:  10/06/2017, 0800 MDT
Registration: C-FCKX
Aircraft: LINDSTRAND LBL240A
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 13 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation - Sightseeing

The Ultramagic balloon pilot reported that, during a balloon festival, after a local sightseeing flight, he landed the balloon and decided to wait for the ground crew to locate the balloon before deflating. He added that, as the balloon was deflating, he "heard a basket sliding across the top of [his] balloon". The balloon rotated counter-clockwise and the balloon basket, still loaded with passengers, rolled upside down.

The Ultramagic balloon sustained substantial damage to the burner rack. One passenger sustained serious injuries.

The Lindstrand balloon pilot reported that, during landing, there were two balloons in his flight path. He added that he climbed and passed the first balloon, but was unable to pass the second. He reported that, "I brushed him with my basket on the top of his balloon." He landed the balloon without further incident.

The Ultramagic pilot and the Lindstrand operations manager reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the balloons that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Foreign; Private
Age: 28, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: None
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Balloon
Restraint Used: None
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/02/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/11/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 743 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model), 734 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LINDSTRAND
Registration: C-FCKX
Model/Series: LBL240A
Aircraft Category: Balloon
Year of Manufacture: 1995
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Balloon; Normal
Serial Number: 165
Landing Gear Type: 
Seats: 13
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/23/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4270 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 None
Airframe Total Time: 1135.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: 
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: Sundance Balloons (2008) Ltd
Rated Power: 
Operator: Sundance Balloons (2008) Ltd
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Sundance Balloons
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KABQ, 5314 ft msl
Observation Time: 1252 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 186°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1300 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Albuquerque, NM
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Albuquerque, NM
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0738 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 12 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 13 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.198056, -106.596389 (est)


N123UT  Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N123UT  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N123UT Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N123UT

Analysis

The Ultramagic balloon pilot reported that, during a balloon festival, after a local sightseeing flight, he landed the balloon and decided to wait for the ground crew to locate the balloon before deflating. He added that, as the balloon was deflating, he "heard a basket sliding across the top of [his] balloon." The balloon rotated counter-clockwise, and the balloon basket, still loaded with passengers, rolled upside down.

The Ultramagic balloon sustained substantial damage to the burner rack. One passenger sustained serious injuries.

The Lindstrand balloon pilot reported that, during landing, there were two balloons in his flightpath. He added that he climbed and passed the first balloon but was unable to pass the second balloon, and "I brushed him with my basket on the top of his balloon." He landed the balloon without further incident.

The Ultramagic pilot and the Lindstrand operations manager reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the balloons that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The other pilot's failure to maintain adequate clearance from a balloon on the ground during landing. 

Findings

Personnel issues
Monitoring other aircraft - Pilot of other aircraft (Cause)

Environmental issues
Aircraft - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Other

Ground collision (Defining event)

Location: Albuquerque, NM
Accident Number: GAA18CA016A
Date & Time: 10/06/2017, 0800 MDT
Registration: N123UT
Aircraft: ULTRAMAGIC SA T210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 10 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation - Sightseeing 

The Ultramagic balloon pilot reported that, during a balloon festival, after a local sightseeing flight, he landed the balloon and decided to wait for the ground crew to locate the balloon before deflating. He added that, as the balloon was deflating, he "heard a basket sliding across the top of [his] balloon". The balloon rotated counter-clockwise and the balloon basket, still loaded with passengers, rolled upside down.

The Ultramagic balloon sustained substantial damage to the burner rack. One passenger sustained serious injuries.

The Lindstrand balloon pilot reported that, during landing, there were two balloons in his flight path. He added that he climbed and passed the first balloon, but was unable to pass the second. He reported that, "I brushed him with my basket on the top of his balloon." He landed the balloon without further incident.

The Ultramagic pilot and the Lindstrand operations manager reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the balloons that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Balloon
Restraint Used: None
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/21/2016
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 11028 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2148 hours (Total, this make and model), 10992 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 105 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 42 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ULTRAMAGIC SA
Registration: N123UT
Model/Series: T210 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Balloon
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Balloon
Serial Number: 210/42
Landing Gear Type: 
Seats: 12
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/24/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 None
Airframe Total Time: 815.4 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: 
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: PACIFIC RIM ADVENTURES INC DBA
Rated Power: 
Operator: PACIFIC RIM ADVENTURES INC DBA
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Sky's The Limit Balloon Adventure
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KABQ, 5314 ft msl
Observation Time: 1252 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 186°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1300 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Albuquerque, NM
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Albuquerque, NM
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0710 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 10 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 10 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.198056, -106.596389 (est)