Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Beech V35B Bonanza, N252G, Avprop LLC: Fatal accident occurred July 26, 2015 in Colbert, Bryan County, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Colbert, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/12/2017
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N252G
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was in level cruise flight on the second leg of a cross-country flight when the engine lost power. The pilot declared an emergency with air traffic control (ATC) and requested the nearest airport. As the airplane was descending through 8,360 ft mean sea level (msl), the ATC controller told him that there was an airport (Airport A) at his 12-o'clock position and about 15 nautical miles (nm) away. However, there was another airport (Airport B) that was about 7.5 nm away that the controller did not tell the pilot about at this time.

The pilot responded that he had partial power and would see if he could make it to Airport A. He then asked for and received a vector to Airport A. About 2 minutes later, as the airplane descended through 6,023 ft msl, the pilot asked the controller if there was something closer, and the controller told him that there was another airport (Airport B) at his 3- to 4-o'clock position and 10 nm away. The pilot requested a turn toward Airport B, the controller told the pilot to turn right and proceed direct, and the airplane turned 90° right toward Airport B. Airport B was actually about 8.2 nm away.

About 2 minutes later, as the airplane descended through 4,260 ft msl, the controller advised the pilot that there was a private airstrip about 1 mile behind him. The airstrip was actually 10 nm away. The pilot replied, "wish I knew where that was ..." The controller then provided the pilot with runway information for Airport B. The pilot responded, "where's that private strip?" The controller responded, "it's not close enough for you to get to." As the airplane descended through 3,370 ft msl, the controller then gave the pilot his position and distance to Airports A and B. There were no further transmissions from the pilot.

Radar data showed that the airplane made a 180° right turn to the south. About 2 minutes later, the airplane made a 270° left turn and rolled out on a westerly heading. At the last radar contact, the airplane was westbound at 700 ft msl. The terrain elevation in the area was about 660 ft msl. The airplane impacted trees and then the ground. The site was surrounded by fields suitable for a forced landing, and it is likely that if the pilot had selected one of these fields as his landing site, the damage to the airplane and severity of injuries to the occupants would have been minimized.

Postaccident examination revealed that the left fuel tank was full, and the fuel quantity in the right tank could not be determined due to impact damage. The fuel selector valve handle was positioned between the left and right tank detent positions. Fuel selector continuity was established for each detent by blowing air through the valve. No air flowed through the valve when the fuel selector was positioned as found between the right and left tank detents. No preimpact failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine were found that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot's autopsy revealed that he had severe coronary heart disease including atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries. The posterior descending coronary artery was found to have about 90% stenosis and the left main, left anterior descending, and right coronary arteries had about 25% stenosis. Given that there was active radio contact between the pilot and ATC and no mention by the pilot of chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness, or palpitations, it is unlikely that his heart disease contributed to the accident.

Toxicology tests showed the pilot used rosuvastatin, a prescription medication in the class of medications called statin antilipemic agents that is used to reduce blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The rosuvastatin was found in the pilot's urine but not in his blood.

It is likely that while switching tanks during cruise flight, the pilot inadvertently moved the fuel selector to the as-found intermediate position such that it blocked fuel to the engine, which resulted in fuel starvation and a loss of engine power. The Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) listed "Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT OTHER TANK (Check to feel detent)" as the first item in the emergency procedure for an engine failure. Thus, it is likely that, when the engine lost power, the pilot failed to properly position the selector so that fuel could be restored and a restart possible.

At the time that the pilot reported the engine failure to ATC, the airplane was 15.8 nm from Airport A, 7.5 nm from Airport B, and 6.2 nm from the private airstrip. According to radar data, the airplane traveled a total distance of about 7.9 nm from the point at which the pilot reported the engine failure to the accident site. The POH states that, with the landing gear and flaps retracted, cowl flaps closed, propeller at low rpm, and maintaining an airspeed of 105 kts, the airplane's glide distance is about 1.7 nm per 1,000 ft of altitude above the terrain. If the controller had provided accurate information to the pilot about the location of the nearest airports as required by Federal Aviation Administration ATC procedures and if the pilot had immediately acted on that information, based on the radar data, the pilot might have been able to glide to and land at Airport B or the private airstrip.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to properly position the fuel selector, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation. Contributing to the severity of the accident was the pilot's failure to select an appropriate location for a forced landing, which resulted in the airplane impacting trees. Contributing to the accident was the air traffic controller's failure to provide the pilot accurate information on nearby emergency airport and airfields and the pilot's failure to properly follow the airplane's emergency procedures in the Pilot's Operating Handbook that would have led him to properly position the fuel selector and restore fuel flow to the engine.


Steve and Vicki Fehr were both 64 years old. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Avprop, LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N252G



NTSB Identification: CEN15FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Colbert, OK
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N252G
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 26, 2015, at 1513 central daylight time, a Beechcraft V35B airplane, N252G, struck trees and impacted terrain during a forced landing near Colbert, Oklahoma. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the passenger was seriously injured and died 2 days later. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Avprop, LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Springfield-Branson National Airport (SGF), Springfield, Missouri, at 1317.

The pilot and his wife were returning to Fort Worth, Texas, from Jackson, Michigan. Earlier in the day, the couple departed from Jackson County-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan, and flew to SGF where they landed and refueled, taking on 45 gallons of aviation gasoline. A fuel receipt showed a time of 1252:47. GPS data showed that the airplane took off to the west-northwest and then turned southwest toward Fort Worth. The airplane climbed to and maintained 11,000 ft. mean seal level (msl).

About 1501, the pilot contacted the Fort Worth Air Traffic Control Center (ZFW) and declared an emergency reporting that the airplane had lost engine power and that he needed to "get to an airport right away." As the airplane was descending through 8,360 ft. msl, the ZFW air traffic controller told the pilot that the North Texas Regional Airport (GYI), Sherman/Denison, Texas, was at his 12 o'clock and about 15 miles. The pilot responded that he had partial power and would see if he could make it to GYI. The pilot asked the controller for a vector to GYI; the controller instructed the pilot to turn to a heading of 245°. About 2 minutes later, as the airplane descended through 6,023 ft. msl, the pilot asked the ZFW controller if there was something closer. The controller told him that the Durant Regional Airport (DUA), Durant, Oklahoma, was at the pilot's 3 to 4 o'clock and 10 miles. The pilot requested a turn toward DUA; the controller told the pilot to turn right direct DUA. Radar data showed that the airplane made a right 90° turn to about a 360° heading.

At 1505, as the airplane descended through 4,260 ft. msl, the controller advised the pilot that there was a private airfield about a mile behind him. The pilot replied, "wish I knew where that was …" The controller then provided the pilot runway information for DUA, and said that the minimum instrument flight rules altitude for the area was 2,700 ft. msl. The pilot responded, "where's that private strip …?" The controller responded, "it's not close enough for you to get to … there is GYI at your 2 to 3 o'clock 10 miles, Durant is at your 6 to 7 o'clock and 10 miles." There was no response. The ZFW controller made several attempts to contact the pilot, but there were no further transmissions from the pilot.

Radar data showed that about 1506, the airplane made a right 180° turn to the south. The airplane descended through 3,370 ft. msl. About 2 minutes later, the airplane made a left 270° turn and rolled out on a westerly heading. At the last radar contact, the airplane was about 5 miles southeast of Colbert, at 700 ft. msl. The terrain elevation in the area was about 660 ft. msl.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with single-engine land airplane and instrument ratings. On April 14, 2015, he received a special issuance third-class medical certificate limited by a requirement for corrective lenses and marked, "not valid for any class after 04/30/2016."

The pilot's logbook showed that he had flown 1,491.0 total hours, 21.9 hours of which were in the 30 days before the accident. The logbook also showed that the pilot successfully completed a flight review and instrument proficiency check in the accident airplane make and model on May 14, 2015.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-place, single-engine, V-tail airplane, serial number D-10266, was registered to a corporation and used by the pilot for both business and pleasure. It was equipped with two 32-gallon fuel tanks and powered by a 285 horsepower Continental Motors IO-520-BB engine, serial number 836904-R.

A review of the airframe and engine records revealed that the airplane had undergone a 100-hour inspection on January 14, 2015, at an airframe time of 3,841.4 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1155, the automated weather observation station at DUA, located 9 nautical miles north-northeast of the accident site recorded wind 190° at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 36° C, dew point 19° C, and altimeter setting 29.93 inches of mercury.



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a wooded area along the east side of a road about 5 miles southeast of Colbert. The site was surrounded by fields suitable for a forced landing. The airplane came to rest upright and was oriented on a south-south westerly heading. The airplane initially impacted some pine trees about 100 ft. east-northeast of the wreckage. Several tree branches in the immediate vicinity of the airplane were broken and showed marks consistent with impact marks on the airplane's wings and fuselage. The debris path was on a bearing of about 200° from the initial tree impact. About 40 ft. east of the airplane was an impact crater that measured about 25 ft. wide and 20 ft. long. Airplane debris and dirt fanned out from the crater toward the airplane wreckage.

Within the debris field were pieces from the engine cowling, forward fuselage, windscreen, and fuel system. Also within the debris field were luggage and broken branches.

The main wreckage consisted of the cabin, fuselage, engine, propeller, left and right wings, and empennage. (See Figure 1 for a photograph showing the accident site and main wreckage.)

Figure 1. A photograph showing the accident site and main wreckage.

The cowling, engine, and engine mounts were broken downward and twisted right 15°. The nose gear was in the retracted position. The nose gear wheel well and nose gear doors were crushed upward. The front cabin floor and front seats were broken downward and canted right about 10°. The instrument panel, control yoke and glareshield were broken forward and down. The front windscreen was broken out and fragmented. The rear cabin, baggage compartment and aft fuselage showed upward crushing. The empennage showed minor damage.

The propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft flange. The spinner was dented inward. Two of the three propeller blades were intact and undamaged. The third propeller blade was bent aft about 45° and located under the lower engine cowling, and showed no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches.

The airplane's left wing was intact. The forward leading edge showed dents and fractures along its entire span. The left main fuel tank remained intact and 32 gallons of fuel were recovered from it. The left main landing gear was in the retracted position and the gear doors were crushed upward. The left flap and aileron were intact.

The airplane's right wing was broken aft longitudinally at mid-span. The right fuel tank was broken open. The smell of fuel was prevalent. The right main landing gear was in the retracted position and the gear doors were crushed upward. The right flap was in the retracted position and showed minor damage. The right outboard wing section and right aileron were located immediately right of the inboard section. The wing section was broken upward and crushed aft. The leading edge showed impact marks consistent with striking trees. Tree debris was found in several of the dents and skin tears. The right aileron was broken out and bent in several locations along its span. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the left and right ailerons and the V-tail stabilators.

An examination of the engine revealed no anomalies. An examination of the fuel system showed the fuel selector valve handle positioned between the left and right tank positions. Fuel selector continuity was established for each detent by blowing air through the valve. No air flowed through the valve when the fuel selector was in the intermediate position between the left and right tanks. No other anomalies were found with the airplane.

A J. P. Instruments EDM-700 engine data monitor, Garmin Aera 560 GPS, and a Horizon Instruments P1000 tachometer were retained and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Electronic Devices

The Horizon Instruments P1000 tachometer was capable of displaying engine rpm and storing tachometer time to non-volatile memory. The unit powered on normally and a tachometer time of 3,886 hours was observed.

Data extracted from the Garmin Aera 560 GPS produced 37 logs from January 22, 2014, through July 28, 2015. Two logs associated with the day of the accident were identified by recorded date and time; the first starting at 0809:50 CDT and ending at 1226:02 CDT, and the second starting at 1318:52 and ending at 1507:47 CDT.

Engine performance data was extracted from the J. P. Instruments EDM-700 engine data monitor memory chips. Engine parameters monitored and recorded by the unit included:

exhaust gas temperature (EGT),

cylinder head temperature (CHT),

fuel flow,

fuel used, and

voltage.

The EDM recorded about 11,375 data points over 11 flight logs. Two logs associated with the day of the accident were identified by recorded date and time; the first starting at 0816:02 and ending at 1234:34, and the second starting at 1315:49 and ending at 1513:30. The data points were recorded every 6 seconds.

A noticeable drop in EGT and CHT for all 6 cylinders occurred 9 minutes before the last recorded data point. The EGTs dropped from about 1,500°F to 400°F, and then to about 100°F. The CHTs dropped from about 380°F to about 115°F.

Air Traffic Control

The ZFW controller was a developmental controller and was on duty with an instructor. After the pilot declared an emergency and requested the closest airport, the controller gave the pilot runway information for GYI and gave the location as 15 miles straight ahead. The controller issued the pilot a vector to the airport, but did not obtain any further information from the pilot about the emergency. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Joint Order 7110.65, Air Traffic Control, paragraph 10-1-2 states in part that a controller should obtain enough information to handle an emergency intelligently and should base his or her decision as to what type assistance is needed on information and requests received from the pilot because the pilot is authorized by 14 CFR Part 91 to determine a course of action.

When the controller issued the vector to GYI, the airport was about 15.8 nautical miles (nm) straight ahead; DUA was located 7.5 nm to the north. The instructor did not offer the controller a correction or suggestion that DUA was a more appropriate choice for diversion. According to radar data, the airplane traveled a total distance of 7.9 nm from the point at which the pilot reported the engine failure to the accident site.

A short time after the controller issued the initial vector to GYI, the pilot asked for a closer airport. The controller provided the location of DUA as 3 to 4 o'clock and 10 miles. By that time, however, DUA was at 4 o'clock and about 8.2 nm. At 1505:31, the controller advised the pilot of a private airstrip 1 nm behind the airplane. The pilot transmitted "wish I knew where that was for ..." The airstrip was actually about 10 nm away and the instructor did not correct the developmental controller. Interviews with other controllers assisting with the emergency revealed that they had used a visual flight rules (VFR) sectional chart when they suggested the private airstrip was 1 nm behind the airplane. The private airstrip was not depicted on the radar display and there were no identifying features on the display to allow a precise assessment of the direction and distance to the private airstrip.

At 1506:12, when the airplane was 7 nm from DUA, the pilot initiated a 180° right turn to the south. The pilot again asked for the location of the private airstrip. About a minute later, the controller advised the pilot that the private airstrip was too far away and repeated the locations of GYI and DUA. Radar contact was lost shortly after.

FAA traffic management software continually monitors predicted and actual traffic levels in various sectors as a means of tracking controller workload and sector staffing needs. Monitor Alert Parameters (MAP) are established as a workload benchmark to assist supervisors and controllers-in-charge (CIC) in recognizing high-workload situations. Traffic counts above 18 would be a reason for workload concern, even with training in progress. At 1500, the predicted traffic load for the developmental controller was 24 aircraft and expected to remain above the MAP until 1530, when it was expected to drop back down to 15 aircraft. The CIC had developed a plan to split the combined sector into individual sectors based on the increased MAP levels, but delayed its implementation. The emergency had already begun, adding workload to the already busy sector.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Board of Medicolegal Investigations, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The pilot's death was attributed to "multiple blunt force injuries." In addition, significant heart disease was identified that included atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries. The posterior descending coronary artery was found to have about 90% stenosis, and the left main, left anterior descending, and right coronary arteries had about 25% stenosis.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research laboratory conducted toxicology testing on the pilot's specimens. The tests detected rosuvastatin in the pilot's urine but not in his blood. Rosuvastatin is a prescription medication in the class of medications called statin antilipemic agents. It is used to reduce blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and it is not impairing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Raytheon Beech Hawker Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) for the model V35B airplane provides emergency procedures in the event of an engine failure after takeoff or while in flight. The first item in the emergency procedure states, "Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT OTHER TANK (Check to feel detent)."

Additionally, the POH provides an emergency checklist for maximum glide configuration that states that with the landing gear and flaps retracted, cowl flaps closed, propeller at low rpm, and maintaining an airspeed of 105 kts, the airplane's glide distance is approximately 1.7 nm per 1,000 ft. of altitude above the terrain.

An after-market laminated checklist found in the airplane wreckage, under ENGINE FAILURE INFLIGHT, showed the fourth item as "FUEL SELECTOR … FULLEST TANK/OTHER."


NTSB Identification: CEN15FA316 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Colbert, OK
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N252G
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2015, about 1500 central daylight time, a Beechcraft V35B airplane, N252G, sustained substantial damage following loss of engine power in flight and subsequent impact with the ground in Colbert, Oklahoma. The instrument rated private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Avprop, LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and an instrument flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at Jackson County-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan.

Aviat A-1C-180 Husky, N272WY, Inspire Aviation LLC: Accident occurred July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, Buckingham County, Virginia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Inspire Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N272WY

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, VA
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1C-180, registration: N272WY
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2017, at 1224 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1C-180, N272WY, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Dillwyn, Virginia. The private pilot was seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed.

According to a witness, the pilot was attempting to land the airplane on a grass field. Three attempts were made, and the airplane touched down on the third attempt. The pilot then executed a go-around, and the airplane climbed, turned to the right, and stalled. The airplane then collided with terrain in a cornfield adjacent to the grass field.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration reported that the airplane came to rest in a steep, nose-low position in the cornfield. There was no fire. The airplane was recovered to a hangar for a further examination by the FAA.

The inspector reported that the field where the pilot was attempting to land was a grass strip designed for radio-controlled aircraft. The strip was oriented to the northeast/southwest and was about 665 ft in length.


Justin Knight, CEO of Apple Hospitality REIT Inc. 




Justin Glade Knight, the Chesterfield County man injured in a Tuesday plane crash in Buckingham County, is the president and CEO of Apple Hospitality REIT Inc., a Richmond-based real estate investment trust.

A Wednesday statement released by the company stated that Knight "sustained serious, non-life-threatening injuries" in the crash.

Knight was flown to the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville after the small plane he was flying crashed in a cornfield in Buckingham County. His 11-year-old son was also in the plane and was treated at the scene for minor injuries.

While Knight recovers, Krissy Gathright, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, and Bryan Peery, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will share responsibilities and oversight of Apple Hospitality, according to the company's statement.

The U.Va. Medical Center said Knight was in fair condition at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday.

Knight was appointed to the position of CEO of the company in 2014. He has served on the company's board of directors since 2015. Knight joined the company in 2000. Apple Hospitality REIT owns one of the largest portfolios of upscale service hotels in the United States, owning 235 hotels across 33 states.

The 44-year-old Midlothian man also serves on the Board of Trustees for Southern Virginia University in Buena Vista. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University in Utah, and is married with four children.

Knight is the son of Glade M. Knight, the company’s executive chairman and founder, and the brother of Nelson G. Knight, the company’s executive vice president and chief investment officer.

Glade Knight also founded Apple Ten and served as chairman and CEO of that company until its merger with Apple Hospitality in September 2016. He is the largest shareholder among directors and company officers of Apple Hospitality, owning 10.2 million shares or 4.6 percent of common stock, according to the company's May 18 proxy statement.

Justin Knight, also one of the top 10 shareholders among directors and officers, owns 1.3 million shares, according to the public filing.

Apple Hospitality's stock, APLE, closed at $18.72, down 31 cents.

“We greatly appreciate the concern for Justin’s well-being and the outpouring of support following yesterday’s accident,” Glade Knight said in the statement. “We feel very fortunate that the injuries he sustained were not more serious and we look forward to his full recovery.”


http://www.richmond.com



BUCKINGHAM COUNTY, Va. — A pilot suffered life-threatening injuries and a passenger was hurt their Richmond-based plane crashed Tuesday afternoon in Buckingham County.

Virginia State Police were called to the scene at 12:24 p.m.

“An Aviat A-1C-180 aircraft stalled out causing it to crash land in a cornfield in the 100 block of Mountain View Lane,” a Virginia State Police spokesperson said. “The plane had taken off from a private landing strip on Alcoma Road in Buckingham County and was flying locally when the crash occurred.”

The pilot has been identified as Justin G. Knight of Midlothian. He was flown to UVA Hospital in Charlottesville and is being treated for life-threatening injuries. Knight’s 11-year-old son, the second passenger, suffered minor injuries and was treated at the scene.

The plane was registered to Richmond-based Inspire Aviation LLC, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

While Virginia State Police are investigating the crash, the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have been notified.

The crash remains under investigation at this time.


http://wtvr.com





One person suffered life-threatening injuries in the crash of a small-single-engine fixed-wing plane crash Tuesday shortly after 12:20 p.m. in the 100 block of Mountain View Lane off of Rock Mill Road near Enonville in Buckingham County.

According to Virginia State Police Trooper Rick Chambliss, who was on scene with volunteer firefighters, sheriff’s deputies and rescue personnel, the occupants of the aircraft were Justin Knight and his son, Bowen A. Knight. Bowen A. Knight only suffered minor injuries in the crash, which occurred in a cornfield near a residence.

Virginia State Police are investigating the incident, according to a press release from agency spokeswoman Corinne Geller.

“The pilot was flown to U.Va. Hospital for treatment of life-threatening injuries,” Geller said, referring to Justin.

“The  Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have both been notified. The crash remains under investigation at this time,” Geller said.

http://www.farmvilleherald.com

Vickers Supermarine Ltd, Spitfire VC, N5TF, Comanche Fighters LLC: Accident occurred July 04, 2017 at Marana Regional Airport (KAVQ), Pima County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Comanche Fighters LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N5TF


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA141
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Marana, AZ
Aircraft: VICKERS SUPERMARINELTD SPITFIRE VC, registration: N5TF
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2017, about 0900 mountain standard time, a Vickers Supermarine Spitfire, N5TF, was substantially damaged following a loss of control and runway excursion during landing at Marana Regional Airport (AVQ), Marana, Arizona. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The personal cross-country flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed Las Cruces International Airport (LRU), Las Cruces, New Mexico, about 0900 mountain daylight time.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that after landing on runway 12 the airplane veered to the left, at which time he corrected back to the right. As the airplane continued to the right the pilot attempted to correct back to the left. However, the left brake was ineffective, which resulted in an excursion off the right side of the runway and into some soft dirt. The airplane subsequently came to rest on its nose, having incurred damage to the landing gear, fuselage and propeller. The reported wind about 5 minutes prior to the accident was from 230 degrees at 3 knots.

The airplane was recovered to a secured hangar for further examination.
========

MARANA, AZ (Tucson News Now) -  Crews from Northwest Fire were called to the Marana Regional Airport on Tuesday, July 4, after a small plane left the runway after landing.

According to NWFD Deputy Chief Scott Hamblen, there were no injuries. The pilot was not hurt.

The single-engine plane left the runway after experiencing an unidentified problem after landing.

http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com

Cessna 180J Skywagon, N9961N, Apex Aviation LLC: Accident occurred July 04, 2017 at Nashua Airport (KASH), Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA245
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Nashua, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/17/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N9961N
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the airplane reported that the en route portion of the cross-country flight was uneventful and that conditions were “good.” Following a normal approach and landing, he lost directional control of the airplane. The airplane ground looped and came to rest at the right edge of the runway in grass. During the accident sequence, the left main landing gear separated from the fuselage, and the left wing and propeller contacted the ground.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the wreckage and reported that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll.

The pilot of the airplane reported that the en route portion of the cross-country flight was uneventful and conditions were "good." Following a normal approach and landing, he lost directional control of the airplane. The airplane ground-looped and came to rest at the right edge of the runway, in the grass. The left main landing gear separated from the fuselage and the left wing and propeller contacted the ground during the accident sequence.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the wreckage and reported that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing. The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Apex Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9961N


NTSB Identification: ERA17CA245
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Nashua, NH
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N9961N
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the airplane reported that the en route portion of the cross-country flight was uneventful and conditions were "good." Following a normal approach and landing, he lost directional control of the airplane. The airplane ground-looped and came to rest at the right edge of the runway, in the grass. The left main landing gear separated from the fuselage and the left wing and propeller contacted the ground during the accident sequence.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the wreckage and reported that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing. The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.










NASHUA — A pilot was uninjured after ground looping his plane on the runway at the Nashua Airport Tuesday.

Nashua Fire and Rescue said they responded to the airport around 9:10 a.m. for a reported plane incident.

Upon arrival, they found a four-seat Cessna 180 aircraft leaning on its left side on a grassy area off the runway.

Officials said the single occupant had self-evacuated and reported no injuries.

A small fuel leak was quickly contained, and power to the aircraft was shut down to prevent possible fire ignition.

Officials said the pilot reported a landing gear failure as he was attempting to land and that the left side landing gear buckled upon touchdown, causing the aircraft to veer off the right side of the runway into a grass field.

The aircraft sustained damage to the left wing and landing gear and was moved to an on-site hangar.

The airport was closed until the plane was cleared by FAA to be removed from the runway.

The incident is currently under investigation by the FAA.

http://www.nh1.com




An aircraft carrying one passenger had a rocky landing at Nashua Airport at Boire Field on Tuesday morning.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a 1975 Cessna 180J ground looped while landing at the New Hampshire airport shortly after 9 a.m. A ground loop can occur when aircraft take off, land, or taxi, and can result in a loss of pilot control and horizontal pivoting of the airplane on the ground.

The Cessna ground loop caused the airplane to swerve onto a small grassy area to the right of a runway, according to Nashua Deputy Fire Chief George Walker. Walker and the FAA confirmed that the aircraft’s pilot was not injured in the accident.

Walker said the airplane suffered damage to its wing and underside including the landing gear, and a small fuel leak was contained. The incident left small scrapes on the runway.

Walker said the aircraft was moved to a nearby hangar at the airport after the accident, and the runway was cleared and set to reopen.

The single-engine airplane is registered to Apex Aviation LLC of Exeter, N.H. The FAA is investigating the incident.

https://www.bostonglobe.com

Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six, N555PK: Fatal accident occurred July 14, 2015 in Brazoria, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA305
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 14, 2015 in Brazoria, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32-300, registration: N555PK
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor and student pilot were conducting a local instructional flight. Radar data showed that, after takeoff, the airplane flew on a southwesterly heading and reached about 2,300 ft. The airplane then entered a gradual descent, which continued for about 2 minutes until the airplane was at 1,900 ft. About 20 seconds later, the airplane entered a descending left turn from 1,300 ft. The last radar target was recorded at 600 ft, at which point the airplane had turned about 270° onto a northwesterly heading.

The radar data are consistent with the flight instructor retarding the throttle to simulate a power loss and the student entering a left turn in search of suitable terrain on which to make a forced landing. Evidence on scene and witness marks on the airplane were consistent with the airplane hitting a tree before impacting the ground. Control continuity was established to all the flight control surfaces. Examination of the airframe, engine, and related systems revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operations. It is possible that the student and flight instructor were distracted by the simulated emergency and failed to arrest the descent before impact with trees.

In this accident, the experienced flight instructor failed to safely carry out a routine training maneuver, a simulated forced landing. He had significant levels of two impairing substances in his system at the time (doxylamine and phentermine). Although not conclusive, it is possible that impairing effects of the flight instructor’s use of the combination of two psychoactive substances contributed to his failure to intervene in a timely manner to prevent the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to arrest the descent in a timely manner and the flight instructor's failure to safely intervene in the routine training maneuver for reasons that could not be determined based on the information available.


Robert A. Mena, ATP, CFII, MEI



David Michael Leining Sr. 



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Piper Aircraft, Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Hartzell Propeller, Inc.; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

David M. Leining, Sr: http://registry.faa.gov/N555PK





NTSB Identification: CEN15FA305 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 14, 2015 in Brazoria, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32-300, registration: N555PK
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 14, 2015, about 1004 central daylight time, a Piper PA-32-300 airplane, N555PK, impacted terrain near Brazoria, Texas. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The flight was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight, and no flight plan had been filed. Day visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site about the time of the accident. The local flight originated from Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Pearland, Texas, about 0910.

Witnesses reported that the flight instructor and student pilot arrived at the airport about 0800. A fuel receipt from the LVJ fixed-base operator showed that the student pilot purchased 59.7 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline that morning. Witnesses also reported seeing the flight instructor and student getting a weather briefing. Airport security cameras captured them walking towards the airplane at 0847, and the airplane taxiing north towards the active runway at 0902.

A review of radar data from the Houston Air Route Traffic Control Center showed that the airplane first appeared on radar about 0915 near LVJ. At 1001:48, radar data showed the airplane flying on a southwesterly heading at 2,300 ft. It then entered a gradual descent, which continued until 1003:45, at which point the airplane had descended to 1,900 ft. At 1004:09, the airplane entered a left descending turn from 1,300 ft. At 1004:21, the airplane was at 1,100 ft. The last radar target was recorded at 1004:33 when the airplane was at 600 ft. By this time, the airplane had turned about 270°.

There were no known witnesses to the accident. A motorist driving on a remote road in the San Bernard Wildlife Refuge saw the wreckage and called 9-1-1 about 1130.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight instructor

The flight instructor held an airline transport pilot certificate with airplane single-engine and multiengine land ratings, a Beech 300 type rating, and commercial privileges with a rotorcraft-helicopter rating. He held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, multiengine, and instrument ratings. He also held an experimental aircraft repairman certificate. His second-class medical certificate, dated March 6, 2015, contained the restriction: "Must wear corrective lenses." When the instructor filed his application for this medical certificate, he estimated that his total flight time was 4,658 hours, 113 hours of which were accrued in the previous 6 months.

Student pilot

The student pilot held a student pilot certificate and a third-class medical certificate, dated December 8, 2014, with the following limitations: "Must have available glasses for near vision. Not valid for any class after December 31, 2014."

The student pilot's logbook contained entries from August 7, 2013, through April 21, 2015. According to the logbook, he had only flown with instructor once for 2 hours.. The logbook indicated that the student pilot had 94.9 hours of total time in single-engine airplanes, 2.2 hours of which were as pilot-in-command (solo). He had received 92.7 hours of dual instruction, and 2.6 hours of simulated instrument training.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The fixed-landing gear airplane, serial number 32-7940100, was manufactured in 1979. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-540-K1G5 engine, rated at 300 horsepower at 2700 rpm. It was equipped with a Hartzell three-bladed, all-metal, constant-speed propeller (serial number B4981U).

According to maintenance records, the last annual inspection of the airframe was completed on September 10, 2014, at an airframe time of 5,393.8 hours. The engine was overhauled on October 12, 2000, at 3,975.55 total hours, and had accrued an additional 1,500.8 hours since the overhaul. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 5,4821.9 total hours

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest official weather reporting station was at Texas Gulf Coast Regional Airport (LBX), Angleton/Lake Jackson, Texas, located 14 miles north-northeast of the accident location. At 0953, the LBX Automated Surface Observation System reported wind from 190° at 12 knots, visibility, 10 miles, few clouds at 2,800 feet, temperature 31° C., dew point, 22° C., and altimeter setting of 29.94 inches of mercury.






WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site revealed evidence of a tree strike. The fuselage was aligned on a magnetic heading of 225°. There was a significant fuel spill at the scene, but there was no post-impact fire. A sample of the fuel was examined, and no evidence of fuel contamination was found. The wreckage was fragmented along the ground for about 110 feet and the outer portion of the left wing was completely separated near the initial impact scar. The forward cabin roof, from the instrument panel aft to the forward side window, was sheared and bent upwards about 90°. The windshield and all the windows were destroyed. The forward cabin door remained attached to its hinges and was lying across the left wing. The aft cabin and cargo door remained attached to the fuselage. The forward baggage compartment door was destroyed. The emergency locator transmitter switch was in the "off" position.

The engine compartment and forward cockpit area were impact damaged and partially separated from the main cabin area and the fuselage, which was in a nose-down position. The engine remained attached to the firewall, and the propeller remained attached to the engine. The nose landing gear had separated from the firewall. The firewall was crushed against the instrument panel which was crushed upwards. All instrumentation and circuit breakers were destroyed. Both control shafts, control wheels, and rudder pedals were destroyed. Flight control continuity was partially established. The engine power controls were in the "full forward" position. The flap control was in the "up" position. The fuel selector was positioned to the right main tank. The electric (auxiliary) fuel boost pump switch was on.

The vertical stabilizer remained attached to the empennage but was impact damaged, consistent with a tree strike. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer. The left wing was separated from the fuselage, but the right wing remained attached. All three propeller blades were bent aft about 40°, consistent with low rotation at impact. The spinner was crushed around the propeller hub. Partial disassembly of the engine revealed no discrepancies or anomalies that would have precluded power from being developed.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 57-year-old male CFI had reported hay fever, high blood pressure, LASIK eye surgery, and a history of a kidney stone to the FAA. His reported medications included losartan and amlodipine, both blood pressure medications that are not considered impairing. According to the autopsy performed by the County of Galveston Medical Examiner's Office, the cause of death was blunt force injuries and the manner of death was accident. Toxicology testing performed by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory identified amlodipine, losartan, doxylamine (0.116 ug/ml), and phentermine (0.343 ug/ml) in cardiac blood. All of these and naproxen, desmethylsildenafil, and oxymetazoline were found in urine. Amlodipine, losartan, naproxen, desmethylsildenafil, and oxymetazoline are not considered impairing. Doxylamine is a potentially impairing antihistamine that is so sedating its primary use is as a sleep aid. Phentermine is an amphetamine-class drug that is considered potentially impairing and is medically indicated for the short-term treatment of obesity.

The 63-year-old male student pilot had reported hypertension and type 2 diabetes to the FAA. He reported his medications as valsartan (a blood pressure medication not considered impairing), a combination of sitagliptin and metformin (marketed with the name Janumet) indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and simvastatin (a cholesterol lowering medication not considered impairing). While Janumet is not considered directly impairing by itself, it may cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) which is impairing. According to the autopsy performed by the County of Galveston Medical Examiner's Office, the cause of death was blunt force injuries and the manner of death was accident. Toxicology testing performed by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory identified sitagliptin, valsartan, and vardenafil in blood and urine. Vardenafil is an oral medication used to treat erectile dysfunction, which carries a warning about the potential for temporary changes in color vision but no warnings about performance impairment following use.

David Leining was standing in the path of the 2005 blast but survived. 


David Leining, shown in 2005, suffered two broken ankles in the BP explosion that killed 15 co-workers in Texas City. Leining and another man were killed in a plane crash on July 14, 2015.

Man who survived BP explosion dies in plane crash

BP explosion


NTSB Identification: CEN15FA305
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 14, 2015 in Brazoria, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32-300, registration: N555PK
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 14, 2015, about 1004 central daylight time, a Piper PA-32-300 single-engine airplane, N555PK, impacted terrain near Brazoria, Texas. The flight instructor and the student pilot were killed, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. The airplane departed Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Pearland, Texas, about 0910 and was destined to return to LVJ.

No witnesses to the accident have yet been found. A motorist driving on a remote unpaved road in the national wildlife refuge saw the wreckage and called 9-1-1 emergency about 1130. Postaccident radar forensics show the airplane first appeared on radar about 0915 near LVJ and radar contact was lost at 1004. Evidence at the scene showed the airplane was moving to the northwest when it impacted terrain. The wreckage was fragmented along the ground for about 110 feet and the outer portion of the left wing was completely separated near the initial impact scar. The engine compartment and forward cockpit area were impact damaged and partially separated from the main cabin area and the fuselage, which came to rest in a nose down attitude. There was a significant fuel spill at the scene, but there was no postimpact fire.

The remaining on-board fuel was examined and no evidence of fuel contamination was found. At the LVJ facility where the airplane had most recently been refueled, refueling unit records and a review of security camera video showed that the airplane had been refueled with aviation gasoline and postaccident fuel quality checks of that fuel facility were satisfactory.

The wreckage was moved to a different location and will be further examined. A handheld GPS device and several avionics components containing non-volatile memory (NVM), including engine performance data, were removed from the wreckage for examination and an extraction of useful data is possible.

The closest official weather reporting station was at Texas Gulf Coast Regional Airport (KLBX), Angleton/Lake Jackson, Texas, located 14 miles north-northeast from the accident location. At 0953 the Automated Surface Observation System at KLBX reported wind from 190 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear of clouds, temperature 31 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 22 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.94 inches of Mercury.