Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Illinois man dies at Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture campgrounds: Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

OSHKOSH – A 65-year-old Illinois man died Tuesday morning while camping at Wittman Regional Airport, authorities said.

The Winnebago County Sheriff’s Office responded to a medical call at 5:43 a.m. Tuesday at the Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture campgrounds, near the intersection of 27th Avenue and Elm Road, Lt. Joe Kroncke said. The man appeared to have suffered a medical episode and was declared deceased.

EAA staff and emergency workers from the Oshkosh Fire Department administered first aid but were unable to revive the man, Kroncke said.

The Winnebago County Coroner’s Office and detectives with the sheriff’s office are working to locate next of kin, Kroncke said. As of Tuesday morning, the death did not appear suspicious in nature, Kroncke said. The Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner’s Office will conduct an autopsy.

Authorities are not releasing the man’s name, pending notification of his family.

Source: http://www.thenorthwestern.com

Incident occurred July 26, 2016 at Washington Dulles International Airport (KIAD), Dulles, Virginia

DULLES, Va. (ABC7) — A United Airlines Express flight experiencing mechanical issues had to return to Dulles Airport Tuesday evening, according to reports.

Passenger Sam Olivares posted a collage on his Instagram stating that many people were sick and some almost passed out during the emergency landing. He also said the right engine apparently stopped working in midair.

This is an ongoing story and will be updated when more details emerge. 

Story and photos:  http://wjla.com

STOL CH 750, N750AZ: Accident occurred July 24, 2016 near Greene County Airport (KWAY), Franklin Township, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Analysis 

The flight instructor and student pilot were conducting a local instructional flight. Following uneventful touch-and-go-landings and a refueling, the student pilot and flight instructor departed again. Shortly after departure, the engine began to vibrate and lose power. The flight instructor took control of the airplane and landed straight ahead. During landing, the airplane impacted a row of tractor tires.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the accumulation of carburetor icing. The flight instructor stated that he applied carburetor heat once he noted the drop in rpm. After applying carburetor heat and noting the continued loss of rpm, he turned off the carburetor heat to reduce the loss of rpm and to extend the airplane's glide range. Rapid ice accumulation would have required the carburetor heat to be on for a longer period of time to fully melt the ice and restore full power to the engine. Therefore, it is likely that the carburetor accumulated ice during departure, which resulted in the partial loss of engine power and vibration during the subsequent climb. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The partial loss of engine power due to carburetor icing.

Findings

Environmental issues
Conducive to carburetor icing - Effect on operation (Cause)

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N750AZ

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA270
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in Waynesburg, PA
Aircraft: CRAIG D CARTER STOL CH 750, registration: N750AZ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, about 0915 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zenith STOL CH 750, N750AZ, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during the initial climb after takeoff from Greene County Airport (WAY), Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. The flight instructor and a student pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The purpose of the flight was for the student pilot and flight instructor to practice touch-and-go landings. After about 0.8 hours of touch-and-go landings, they added 8 gallons of fuel. During the ensuing climb, about 1/2-mile beyond the runway at 300 feet, the engine began to vibrate and lose power. The instructor took control of the airplane and decided to land straight ahead. He noted that there was no oil pressure, normal oil temperature, and decreasing engine rpm. He elected to perform a forced landing on the midfield of the Green County Fairgrounds.

During the landing roll, the airplane impacted tractor tires and the landing gear folded back. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed damage to the wing spar and wing struts. Delaminating of the composite propeller, consistent with impact damage, was also noted.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental O-200-A EXP, 100-horsepower engine, which was examined by an FAA inspector. The accessory section, and oil pump was removed for inspection, with no noted anomalies; about 5 quarts of oil was drained from the oil sump. The oil filter was opened and free of debris. The oil pressure sending unit was removed and tested, no malfunction was observed. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. The #2 cylinder had lower compression than the other cylinders. Engine powertrain continuity was established and no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation were observed. Fuel drained from the wing tanks were free of debris or contamination.

The closest weather reporting facility was the about 15 miles north of the accident site. At 1035, the weather conditions reported at Washington County Airport (AFJ) included temperature 29 degrees C; dewpoint 23 degrees C.

According to a statement provided by the flight instructor, the carburetor heat was not used during takeoff, "as recommended in the pilot manual," and "carburetor heat was applied at the first sign of vibration and power reduction." After applying carburetor heat and noting the loss of RPM, the instructor turned the carburetor heat off to get as much power from the engine as possible to extend their glide range.

An FAA carburetor icing probability chart indicated the temperature and dew point conditions were conducive to the formation of serious icing at glide power, and icing at glide and cruise power.

According to the FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, carburetor ice occurs due to the effect of fuel vaporization and the decrease in air pressure in the carburetor's venturi, which can cause a sharp temperature decrease in the carburetor. If water vapor in the air condenses when the carburetor temperature is at or below freezing, ice may form on the internal surfaces of the carburetor, including the throttle valve. This then restricts the flow of the fuel/air mixture and reduces engine power. Generally, the first indication of carburetor icing in an airplane with a fixed-pitch propeller is a decrease in engine rpm, which may be followed by engine roughness. Under certain conditions, carburetor ice can build unnoticed until power is added.

The handbook further described that carburetor heat is an anti-icing system that preheats the air before it reaches the carburetor, and is intended to keep the fuel/air mixture above the freezing temperature to prevent the formation of carburetor ice. Carburetor heat can be used to melt ice that has already formed in the carburetor if the accumulation is not too great, but using carburetor heat as a preventative measure is the better option.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA270
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in Waynesburg, PA
Aircraft: CRAIG D CARTER STOL CH 750, registration: N750AZ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, about 1030 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Zenith STOL CH 750, N750AZ, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power during the initial climb after takeoff from Greene County Airport (WAY), Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. The flight instructor and a student pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The purpose of the flight was for the student pilot and flight instructor to practice touch-and-go landings. The student pilot stated that they had completed a touch-and-go landing, when during the ensuing climb, the engine began to vibrate and lose power. They noted that there was no oil pressure and decreasing engine rpm, and elected to perform a forced landing straight ahead, on the midfield of the Green County Fairgrounds.

During the landing roll, the airplane impacted tractor tires and the landing gear folded back.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed damage to the wing spar.


The airplane was equipped with a Continental O-200, 100-horsepower engine, which was retained for further examination.













AIRCRAFT: 2014 Zenith CH-750 N750AZ Home Built Experimental, s/n: 75-8188, 75 TOTAL HOURS* (estimated)

ENGINE:   Continental 0-200A, s/n: 65743-6-A.  Accessory case has been removed for inspection.  75 TOTAL HOURS*

PROPELLER:   Catto

AVIONICS: Dynon Skyview MFD PFD including SVXPNDE 262 remote mount transponder, Garmin SL30 Garmin GMA 340

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Loss of engine power resulting in forced landing

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Firewall, Propeller, Lower Cowling, both wings destroyed. Landing Gear ripped from fuselage

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Greene County Airport, Waynesburg, PA       

REMARKS: Times are approximate as aircraft is not equipped with hobbs meter*

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com


FRANKLIN TWP. (KDKA) — Two men were able to walk away unhurt after their small plane crashed in Greene County.

According to the Observer-Reporter,  it happened Sunday morning at the Greene County Fairgrounds.

The 71-year-old pilot, Daniel Dean Smith, and 71-year-old co-pilot, Paul Henry Dawson, were flying the fixed-wing airplane when they had to perform an emergency landing.

“I just started flying, we were taking off and landing in the grass,” Smith said. “The engine was running rough so I turned to Paul and said ‘what’s going on?'”

“We noticed we had lost all oil pressure,” said Dawson, the more experienced flier, who took over controls when trouble began.

Dawson thought putting the plane down at the fairgrounds would be smooth, but it didn’t go as planned.

The aircraft hit a large tire while landing, causing damage to the landing gear.

“I think we were a little bit in shock, at least I was. He said ‘you okay?’ I said ‘I’m okay,'” Smith said. “He [Dawson] did a great job.”

Story and video:   http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com

Two men escaped injury when their small, fixed-wing airplane crashed while making an emergency landing Sunday morning at the Greene County Fairgrounds in Franklin Township.

State police in Waynesburg said Daniel Dean Smith, 71, of New Freeport, and Paul Henry Dawson, 71, of Greensburg, were operating the airplane when they had to execute the emergency landing about 9:30 a.m. 

The airplane hit a large tire while landing, causing damage to the landing gear. The airplane came to rest in a grassy area.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Tree removal on private lots near Danbury Municipal Airport (KDXR) to cost $1 million



DANBURY - The surveyors who are evaluating trees in a high-elevation neighborhood west of Danbury Airport are not to be confused with vegetation managers working across greater Danbury to clear branches from power lines.

The surveyors seen on Briar Ridge Road and Miry Brook Road are part of an expensive and complicated mission to remove trees that have grown into the western approach of Danbury Airport’s Runway 8.

The problem trees - one dozen stands of them on eight private properties - have become such hazards that the Federal Aviation Administration has banned all bad-weather night landings at Danbury until the obstructions are removed.

Since the city cannot cut back the problem trees without property owners’ permission, it is negotiating with homeowners to buy the rights.

It was not clear on Tuesday when the city would reach agreements with the homeowners and begin cutting back the trees.

“When our attorney says we have these documents in hand, we can move to the next phase,” said Paul Estefan, the city’s airport administrator.

The project is budgeted to cost $1 million - 90 percent of which is expected to be reimbursed by the federal government. Another 7.5 percent will be reimbursed by the state, Estefan said.

Although Danbury is not a commercial airport, it is important to the regional economy. With 70,000 combined takeoffs and landings each year, it is the busiest airport of its kind in Connecticut.

When the FAA banned bad-weather night landings in November, it had an immediate impact on the charter aviation business. One Danbury company said it was losing up to $50,000 each month because it had to divert flights to Westchester County Airport on the Greenwich border.





Estefan said the FAA had previously allowed the city to warn aircraft of tree obstructions on the airport’s western approach with blinking lights on 70-foot poles.

“Now, they change the rules,” Estefan said on Tuesday.


He added Danbury was not unique.

“There are 580 airports across the country that have the same problem,” he said. “Thank goodness I don’t have buildings to deal with. I only have trees.”

There have been no obstruction related crashes, the airport said. A small plane did land upside down in the neighborhood in 2011. The crash was equipment related.

 




The last time the city removed this many trees in airport space was 2007, when it bought 10 acres on Miry Brook Road for $500,000. The FAA reimbursed the city most of the cost.

The surveyors in the neighborhood are double-checking calculations before any cutting is done.

“The surveyors are there to make sure we don’t go beyond the limits of what the FAA is looking for,” Estefan said. “I am not interested in taking down every tree - I am only interested in the ones that are safety issues.”

Source:  http://www.newstimes.com

Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX) to get commercial flights: Great Lakes Airlines to restart service from Denver on December 17th

It has been 680 days since a commercial airline flew into the Telluride Airport.

But the drought of passenger flights to Telluride is coming to an end. On Tuesday, Colorado Flights Alliance announced that it has completed a deal with Great Lakes Airlines to reinstate year-round commercial air service to the airport beginning Dec. 17.

Great Lakes will partner with United Airlines to book flights to and from Denver International Airport. Matt Skinner, chief operating officer of the alliance, said Great Lakes is planning an average of 10 flights per week: one per day during slower periods and two or more per day during busier times of the year.

“Guests from around the world can once again book flights directly into the Telluride Airport, which sits just 10 minutes from town and the ski slopes,” Skinner said in a news release. “Commercial air service to TEX is hugely important to both visitors and residents alike, and we have been diligently working on its return for the past two years, exploring every possible option.”

Great Lakes served Telluride continually for 17 years, but discontinued its service on Sept. 16, 2014, amid a pilot shortage.

“Ultimately, we are more than pleased to have our original partner, who knows the airport and the operation, back flying here,” Skinner said.

In a follow-up interview Tuesday, Skinner said Great Lakes will be serving the route with its 19-seat Beechcraft 1900 twin-engine turboprop aircraft. The aircraft specializes in airports with short runways.

Colorado Flights Alliance, a regional partnership, actively works to secure commercial air service to Telluride and Montrose. Skinner said more news about increased service to the area will be forthcoming.

“We do have a couple of other announcements coming, some added capacity in Dallas and Phoenix (to Montrose),” he said, saying that specifics will be revealed in the near future when the full 2016-17 winter schedule is released.

As for Great Lakes, Skinner said that flights will be diverted to Montrose when warranted by Telluride’s weather conditions. Previously, Great Lakes diverted its Denver-to-Telluride flights to Durango.

The flights alliance struck its deal with Great Lakes. The airline’s partnership with United Airlines means that flights and their national and international connections can be booked through United’s website. However, the Telluride-Denver route also can be secured through Great Lakes at www.FlyGreatLakes.com.

“We look forward to the restart of scheduled airline service from our Denver hub in December,” Doug Voss, CEO of Great Lakes, said in the news release. The airline will install advanced avionics, or electronic equipment, into its fleet to improve performance, the press release said.

Tickets for flights between Denver and Telluride will be available for sale sometime in the next few weeks.

Jon Dwight, chairman of the board of the Telluride Regional Airport Authority, said the airport will be ready for action come Dec. 17. 

“We’re working with the Transportation Security Administration to get the security system back up,” he said.

Dwight added that the board is excited to have commercial service back at the Telluride airport, describing the announcement as good news both for the community and its visitors.

“Getting commercial service back to the Telluride Airport has been a primary focus of the (board) and management for the past two years,” he said.  “This is what the Telluride community has been looking for, and we are pleased that both Colorado Flights and the Telluride Airport have been able to deliver.”

Source:   http://www.telluridenews.com

Van's RV-8, N825RV: Incident occurred September 11, 2016 in Concord, Contra Costa County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N825RV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GROUND LOOPED, CONCORD, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 11-SEP-16
Time: 21:15:00Z
Regis#: N825RV
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV8
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CONCORD
State: California

General Dynamics F-16CM Fighting Falcon, USAF Thunderbirds: Accident occurred June 02, 2016 in Colorado Springs, Colorado

LISTEN: Audio released from Thunderbirds crash, pilot talks of avoiding Colorado Springs homes




The Air Force on Tuesday was still investigating the Colorado Springs crash of an Air Force Thunderbirds jet and had no timeline for completion of the inquiry, a spokeswoman for Air Combat Command in Virginia said.

Air Traffic Control radio tapes released Tuesday by the Federal Aviation Administration, though, show engine problems hit seconds before the F-16 fighter crashed just south of the Colorado Springs Airport.

The June 2 crash came after the Thunderbirds flying team put on a show over the Air Force Academy graduation ceremony. The jets were below 500 feet on their final approach to the airport when Thunderbird 6 pilot Maj. Alex Turner reported trouble,

"It suddenly cycled the engine off and on in the descent," he told air traffic controllers.

Seconds later, Turner said he was aiming the plane into a field and ejecting.

"I'm putting it away from somebody's house here," Turner said. "I'm getting out."

Turner safely ejected from the stricken jet, which crashed in a field off Powers and Fontaine boulevards about a block away from a church and cluster of homes.

The indication of engine failure is the first hint at what went wrong with the plane.

The Air Force hasn't given any indication of what may have led to the crash and leaders say nothing will be released before the investigation is finished, as soon as next month.

F-16s like those flown by the Thunderbirds have proven prone to engine troubles over their decades of service.

If the F-16's single jet engine fails, pilots have seconds to find a place to safely ditch. Leaders have said Turner's actions to aim the plane into an open field saved lives.

Turner, an 11-year veteran of the Air Force, has logged more than 1,200 hours in the cockpit, including 270 in combat over Iraq and Libya, the Air Force said.

Turner walked away from the crash and was greeted minutes later by Air Force Academy graduation speaker President Barack Obama at the airport.

The flying team briefly was grounded after the crash, but returned to the air last month with Turner in a cockpit.

The wrecked jet was hauled to Peterson Air Force Base after the crash where it was meticulously disassembled to determine what caused the incident.

Story and audio:  http://gazette.com

Canadair CL-600-2B16, Dad Consulting LLC, N721G: Incident occurred July 25, 2016 at Chicago Midway International Airport (KMDW), Illinois

DAD CONSULTING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N721G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Chicago PART 121 OPS ONLY - FSDO-31

Date: 26-JUL-16
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N721G
Aircraft Make: CANADAIR
Aircraft Model: CL600 2B16
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: CHICAGO
State: Illinois

N721G CANADAIR CL-600 ON DEPARTURE FROM CHICAGO MIDWAY AIRPORT, A LANDING WHEEL SEPARATED FROM GEAR, FELL AND STRUCK A PARKED SOUTHWEST AIRLINE FLIGHT SWA3513 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT - REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, DAMAGES TO BE DETERMINED, N721G DIVERTED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, WINDSOR LOCKS, CONNECTICUT.

Embraer EMB-505 Phenom 300, Flexjet LLC, N362FX: Accident occurred July 26, 2016 at Sugar Land Regional Airport (KSGR), Houston, Texas

FLEXJET LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N362FX

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Houston FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA286
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 26, 2016 in Sugar Land, TX
Aircraft: EMBRAER EMB-505, registration: N362FX
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2016, at 1509 central daylight time, an Embraer EMB-505 airplane, N362FX, was substantially damaged during a runway excursion on landing at the Sugar Land Regional Airport (SGR), Sugar Land, Texas. The two pilots sustained minor injuries; the sole passenger was not injured. The airplane was registered to FlexJet LLC and operated by Flight Options LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a corporate/executive flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the airport; however, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the local area. The flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Scottsdale Airport (SDL), Scottsdale, Arizona, at 1029 mountain standard time.

The pilot-in-command reported that he flew an instrument landing system (ILS) approach to runway 35 (8,000 feet by 100 feet, concrete) and then transitioned to a visual approach. The approach and landing were normal; however, after touchdown the brakes seemed ineffective. He subsequently activated the emergency brake at which time the airplane started to slide. The airplane ultimately departed the end of the runway and encountered a small creek before coming to rest.





SUGAR LAND, TX (KTRK) -- A plane slid off the runway at Sugar Land Airport today as it was attempting to land.

According to the city of Sugar Land, at around 3:15pm, the twin-engine jet slid off the north end of the runway. 

Three people were on board.

No injuries suffered serious injuries.

The runway is currently closed down and will stay closed until it can be inspected. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is on the way to investigate.

Story and video:  http://abc13.com

SUGAR LAND, Texas - A plane skidded off the runway Tuesday afternoon while landing at an airport in Sugar Land, according to police.

According to Sugar Land police spokesman Doug Adolph, the twin-engine jet was attempting to land at the Sugar Land Regional Airport when it slid off the north of end of the runway and into a creek.

Adolph said two pilots and a passenger were on board at the time of the crash. Nobody was injured.

Federal Aviation Administration records showed that the tail number of the airplane was registered to Flex Jet in Cleveland, Ohio. Officials said that is where the flight originated.

Story and video:  http://www.click2houston.com

A corporate jet slid off the runway on Tuesday while landing at an airport in Sugar Land, authorities said.

The aircraft, a twin-engine Embraer Phenom 300, came in for a landing about 3 p.m. at Sugar Land Regional Airport.

"It slid off the north end of the runway into Oyster Creek," said Doug Adolph, a Sugar Land city spokesman.

Adolph said two pilots and a passenger were aboard the jet at the time. There were no reported injuries.

It wasn't immediately clear why the airplane wasn't able to stop in time but Adolph said it was raining at the time.

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N7974W: Incident occurred May 20, 2017 at Ramona Airport (KRNM), San Diego County, California and Incident occurred July 25, 2016 in Yermo, San Bernardino County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Francisco, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N7974W

Aircraft on landing, ground looped.

Date: 20-MAY-17
Time: 20:20:00Z
Regis#: N7974W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: RAMONA
State: CALIFORNIA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California


Aircraft force landed on a road.

Date: 25-JUL-16
Time: 17:53:00Z
Regis#: N7974W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: YERMO
State: California

Bell OH-13H/M74A, Hendrickson Flying Service Inc., N10009: Accident occurred July 25, 2016 in Minonk, Woodford County, Illinois

HENDRICKSON FLYING SERVICE INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N10009

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Springfield FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA284
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Monday, July 25, 2016 in Minonk, IL
Aircraft: TEXAS HELICOPTER CORP OH 13H/M74A, registration: N10009
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 25, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Texas Helicopter Corp OH-13H/M74A, N10009, was substantially damaged during loading operations near Minonk, Illinois. The pilot was not injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Hendrickson Flying Service; Rochelle, Illinois, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 agricultural application flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan for the local flight had not been filed.

The westbound agricultural application nurse truck was stationary and parked on the right shoulder of a paved rural county road and was completely clear of the roadway surface. The helicopter was parked on the elevated helipad on top of the nurse truck with the helicopter's engine operating and the rotor blades turning. The nose of the helicopter was oriented to the north, and the helicopter's tail boom and the rotor disk then extended over the north edge of the east-west paved road.

While the loader was standing on top of the elevated helipad and reloading the helicopter's product tanks, a westbound 18-wheeler truck drove underneath the rotor disk and impacted the helicopter's tail boom. The impact resulted in the complete separation of the aft half of the tail boom and dislodged the helicopter from its position on the helipad. The helicopter remained upright and remained on the top of the helipad. The uninjured loader also remained standing on top of the helipad.

The driver of the 18-wheeler truck was not injured, but the right exhaust stack and the top right edge of the trailer showed damage which corresponded to the impact with the helicopter's tail boom.

The closest official weather reporting station was at KPNT, Pontiac, Illinois; located 17 miles east from the accident location, At 1055 the Automated Surface Observation System at KPNT, reported wind from 330 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 26 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 23 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of Mercury.

AliSport SRL Silent 2 Targa, N602SL: Accident occurred July 24, 2016 near London-Corbin Airport (KLOZ), Laurel County, Kentucky

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky and Nashville, Tennessee 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N602SL

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: London, KY
Accident Number: ERA16LA274
Date & Time: 07/24/2016, 1037 EDT
Registration: N602SL
Aircraft: ALISPORT SRL SILENT 2 TARGA
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 24, 2016, about 1037 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated AliSport SRL Silent 2 Targa motor-glider, N602SL, collided with terrain during an attempted landing at London-Corbin Airport-Magee Field (LOZ), London, Kentucky. The private pilot sustained minor injuries and the motor-glider was substantially damaged. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a local, personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed, for the flight that originated about 7 minutes earlier from LOZ.

The pilot stated that earlier that day, he flew the motor-glider around the traffic pattern at LOZ, and landed uneventfully then secured the motor-glider. There were no discrepancies associated with the canopy during the first flight. When attempting to close the canopy in advance of the accident flight, he noted the right latch did not seat properly. He cycled the right canopy latch and noted it was then seated OK, and then started the engine. He taxied onto runway 24, and initiated takeoff.

After becoming airborne he turned crosswind and then onto downwind leg where while flying at 700 feet above ground level (agl) and 50 mph, he heard a thump on his right knee. He reported the right canopy latch released allowing the right side of the canopy to raise about 1 inch along its full length, though the right canopy lever was full forward at the time (latched). He thought he could close the canopy, but the left side then released. While holding the rear of the canopy down with both hands as best he could, the canopy twisted which released the front latch. He thought about jettisoning the canopy but elected not to, making the decision to attempt to save the canopy. He secured the engine but he did not center the propeller nor retract the engine. He wrestled to keep the canopy closed and when he slowed the glider, the nose of the canopy came up. While wrestling to hold the canopy closed he turned base to final but realized he had drifted too far from the runway. While descending at 50 mph, he was forced to fly the glider into trees short of the runway. The left wing impacted a tree about 15 feet agl, then the motor-glider impacted the ground. He exited the motor-glider, walked to the airport, and was taken to a local hospital for treatment of his injury. He further indicated that at no point either in-flight or after coming to rest did he jettison the canopy.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the motor-glider at the accident site, and found the canopy in close proximity to the main wreckage. Some of the canopy acrylic material was missing but the canopy frame was intact. Further examination of the canopy revealed the left and right latch handles and rods, and also each rod receiver hole in the airframe were intact with no damage noted. Operational testing of the left and right canopy latches and the canopy emergency jettison system revealed no discrepancies. It was noted by the FAA inspector that the canopy could be offset from its normal position during the closing process and that the respective latch rod in that situation would be outside the airframe receiver hole not allowing the canopy to secure properly. It was also noted that there was no visual indication to indicate that the canopy was closed properly, and in the event that the canopy would raise in-flight due to being improperly secured, it would likely lift from the rear initially, but once the air pressure equalized with a forward airspeed, the canopy would stabilize in forward flight.

The accident pilot purchased the motor-glider in June 2014, and since owning it he accrued 2.5 hours. During those flights excluding the accident flight, there were no reported problems with the canopy latch mechanism.

A review of the maintenance records revealed the airplane's last condition inspection occurred on April 20, 2016. The entry associated with the inspection indicated the canopy eject system was functionally checked. The motor-glider had accrued about 2 hours since the inspection was performed. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/19/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/07/2015
Flight Time:  438 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 329 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ALISPORT SRL
Registration: N602SL
Model/Series: SILENT 2 TARGA
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 2024
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tailwheel
Seats: 1  
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/20/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 660 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 2 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 480.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Alisport Srl.
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: A302efi
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 28 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LOZ, 1212 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 240°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 210°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: London, KY (LOZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: London, KY (LOZ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1030 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: London-Corbin (LOZ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1212 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5751 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  37.093056, -84.067500 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in London, KY
Aircraft: ALISPORT SRL SILENT 2 TARGA, registration: N602SL
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, about 1037 eastern daylight time, an AliSport SRL Silent 2 Targa, N602SL, collided with terrain while landing at London-Corbin Airport-Magee Field (LOZ), London, Kentucky. The private pilot sustained minor injuries and the motor-glider was substantially damaged. The glider was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a local, personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated about 7 minutes earlier from LOZ.

The pilot stated that he performed a short-duration flight around the LOZ traffic pattern earlier that morning and reported no discrepancies. He then intended to fly a second flight to locate thermals. In advance of that flight, he boarded the glider, and while attempting to latch the canopy he identified that the right latch was not secure. He cycled the right latch which corrected the issue then started the engine and taxied to the runway. After takeoff he climbed to 500 feet above ground level (agl) and turned onto the crosswind and then downwind legs of the traffic pattern. While flying at 700 feet agl and 50 mph with the engine operating, he heard a sound and noted that the right canopy latch released which allowed the right side to rise up about 1 inch. He attempted to close the canopy but the left side then became released followed by the nose hinge. The pilot opted not to jettison the canopy because the engine was operating, and attempted to keep the canopy from separating. He secured the engine but did not center the propeller or retract the engine. He turned onto the base and then final leg of the traffic pattern, but noted the glider was not aligned and would be unable to reach the runway. While descending at 50 mph, the left wing collided with trees. The glider then descended and impacted the ground coming to rest in a nose-low attitude with the canopy nearby.

Beech G58 Baron, N669CS: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 -and- Accident occurred June 12, 2015 at Taylorville Municipal Airport (KTAZ), Christian County, Illinois

http://registry.faa.gov/N669CS

Aircraft on landing, went off the end of the runway and struck the propeller. 

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N669CS
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TAYLORVILLE
State: Illinois

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Taylorville, IL
Accident Number: CEN15LA280
Date & Time: 06/12/2015, 1350 CDT
Registration: N669CS
Aircraft: BEECH 58 - UNDESIGNATED
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On June 12, 2015, about 1350 central daylight time, a Beechcraft 58G airplane, N669CS, sustained substantial damage following loss of left engine power during a go-around and subsequent impact with terrain near Taylorville Municipal Airport (TAZ), Taylorville, Illinois. The student pilot, who was the registered owner, and instructor pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N669CS
Model/Series: 58 - UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: Carl Michel
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: TAZ
Observation Time: 1515 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots/ 16 knots, 220°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.83 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 

LATAM Chile Airlines, Boeing 787: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 16:09:00Z
Regis#: LAN600
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 787
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Aircraft Operator: LATAM CHILE AIRLINES
Flight Number: LAN600
City: LOS ANGELES
State: California

LATAM CHILE AIRLINES FLIGHT LAN600 BOEING 787 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, WHILE AT THE GATE, BOTTOM OF FUSELAGE WAS STRUCK BY THE BELT LOADER DURING DISEMBARKING OF PASSENGERS, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE MINOR, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

Powrachute Sky Rascal, N43485: Incident occurred July 20, 2016 in Fairview, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N43485

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Harrisburg FSDO-13

N43485 POWRACHUTE SKY RASCAL POWERED PARACHUTE FORCE LANDED ON A GRASS STRIP, NEAR FAIRVIEW, PENNSYLVANIA.

Date: 20-JUL-16
Time: 00:20:00Z
Regis#: N43485
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FAIRVIEW
State: Pennsylvania

Ercoupe 415-D, N2377H: Accident occurred July 23, 2016 in Collinsville, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N2377H

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA395
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Collinsville, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: ENGINEERING & RESEARCH 415, registration: N2377H
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the takeoff rotation, the nose came up and the left wing rose, but as he looked to the right wing it appeared low and "the next thing he knew" the airplane was going about 45 degrees across the runway to the right, headed for a tree. The pilot further reported that he reduced throttle and applied the brakes while turning left to no avail. The airplane subsequently impacted a tree and spun clockwise about 90 degrees sustaining substantial damage to the right wing and aft fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot recommended that due to the density altitude and low powered airplane it may not have been a good condition for departure.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff in a high density altitude condition, which resulted in a runway excursion and impact with a tree.