Monday, May 29, 2017

Liverpool, Onondaga County, New York: Air Methods helicopter to land at high school for educational program

LIVERPOOL, N.Y. — If you live in the Liverpool area and see a helicopter landing nearby on Tuesday, there is no need to worry.

Liverpool High School is hosting an educational program with Air Methods that will require a helicopter to land at the school.

A select number of students have been given the opportunity to attend the presentation and learn about helicopter ambulances that help those who have been severely injured.

The presentation will be given by a flight nurse and paramedic from Air Methods.

The helicopter is scheduled to land in the field behind the high school gymnasium around 9:20 a.m. 

Original article can be found here: http://cnycentral.com

Cessna 400 Corvalis (LC41-550FG), N400BZ, Icarus Air LLC: Accident occurred April 18, 2015 at Space Coast Regional Airport (KTIX), Titusville, Brevard County, Florida




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Orlando, Florida 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Icarus Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N400BZ

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA189 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 18, 2015 in Titusville, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA LC41-550FG, registration: N400BZ
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a preflight inspection, the private pilot verified that the engine contained about 7 quarts of oil; he subsequently departed on a cross-country flight. About 1 hour into the flight, the pilot observed the oil pressure decline. The propeller stopped turning, and smoke entered the cabin. The pilot declared an emergency and subsequently completed a forced landing at a nearby airport. As the airplane came to rest, the pilot observed flames coming from the engine cowling. After the passengers egressed, most of the airplane was consumed by fire.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed thermal damage to the engine compartment and fuselage. One exhaust valve rocker box cover was missing, another rocker box cover was missing multiple screws, and a third rocker box cover was loose. Multiple oil journals were dry and displayed heat discoloration. The separation of the rocker box cover resulted in the engine depleting its oil supply during the flight and a subsequent catastrophic engine failure due to oil starvation. 

A review of the airplane’s maintenance history indicated that the rocker box covers would have been removed about 4 years before the accident when the engine was disassembled following a propeller strike. However, based on maintenance log entries, it could not be determined whether the rocker box covers had been removed or inspected since that time. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
An inflight fire and a total loss of engine power due to oil starvation, after separation of the No. 3 cylinder exhaust valve rocker box cover for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.




On April 18, 2015, about 1300 eastern daylight time, a Cessna LC41-550FG, N400BZ, was substantially damaged during a fire after an emergency landing at Space Coast Regional Airport (TIX), Titusville, Florida. The private pilot, pilot-rated-passenger and an additional passenger were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight, which departed Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV), Savannah, Georgia, about 1145 and was destined for Okeechobee County Airport (OBE), Okeechobee, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he planned to fly the airplane to OBE for a 50-hour service and some cosmetic maintenance work. During the preflight inspection, he noted about 7 quarts of oil in the oil sump. The pilot then departed, but approximately 1 hour into the flight and during a descent to 8,000 feet mean sea level (msl), he noticed the oil pressure decrease "into the red," while the other instruments remained "in the green." The pilot reported the loss of oil pressure to air traffic control and about 1 minute later, the oil pressure decreased to 0. He identified the nearest airport as TIX and started an emergency descent. As the airplane approached 3,000 feet msl, the engine lost all power and smoke entered the cabin through the air vents. The pilot completed a forced landing to runway 27, but after the airplane came to rest he observed flames coming from the cowling. The pilot and passengers egressed before the fire consumed most of the airplane fuselage.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the engine cowling was destroyed by fire and portions of the airframe and cabin area were substantially damaged. The inspector noted that the No. 3 cylinder exhaust valve rocker box cover was missing and three screws were missing from the No. 4 cylinder exhaust rocker box cover. A screw was also missing from the No. 4 cylinder intake valve rocker box cover, but the cover was in contact with the gasket and no gap was observed between the cover and the mounting surface. The No. 2 cylinder exhaust rocker box cover was loose; however, each of the cover's respective screws were present.

Additional examination of the airplane was conducted on-scene by representatives of the engine and airframe manufacturer, under supervision of the FAA inspector. A large amount of soot and thermal by-products were observed on the No. 3 cylinder exposed rocker arm and surrounding head surfaces. A small hole was observed on the top of the right crankcase half near the No. 5 cylinder base and a similar hole was observed on the left crankcase half near the base of the No. 4 cylinder. The through-bolt nut to the top rear crankcase section was missing and the through-bolt head had backed off from the installed position by about 1/2 inch; however, all six cylinders remained attached to the engine crankcase.

According to a representative of the Titusville Fire Department, their team performed a safety inspection for foreign object debris on runway 09/27; however, the No. 3 cylinder exhaust valve rocker box cover was not located.

The forward section of the oil sump was destroyed by fire. The oil rod was intact and displayed a small amount of dark viscous liquid on the bottom of the rod. The oil quick drain valve was in the closed position and secured to the oil sump with safety wire. Both the oil cooler and oil filter were intact and exhibited some thermal damage; the oil pressure sending unit was destroyed by fire.

A subsequent engine examination was completed at the engine manufacturer's facility under the supervision of an FAA inspector. The crankcase displayed multiple puncture holes throughout the case. Disassembly of the engine revealed that each of the six connecting rods had separated from the crankshaft at their respective journals. Multiple main oil journals were dry and heat discolored, consistent with oil starvation. The oil sump displayed thermal damage and contained metallic fragments. The main bearing journals appeared blue in color and the connecting rod journals were rusted and exhibited rotational scoring. The camshaft was broken at the No. 5/No. 6 cylinder position.

The pilot reported that he was not aware that the rocker box covers were loose and further stated that he had not removed or manipulated the covers during the time he owned the airplane. He reported that the airplane had only required 1 quart of oil in the preceding 20 hours of operation and recalled that the airplane had been "flying great."

The four-seat, low wing, fixed-gear airplane was manufactured in 2008 and powered by a Continental Motors TSIO-550-C, 310-horsepower reciprocating engine. The FAA registration records indicated that the airplane was purchased by the accident pilot in February 2015. According to the maintenance records, the airplane's most recent required service consisted of an annual inspection that was performed on June 13, 2014, at an airframe time of 459 total flight hours, 43 flight hours before the accident. At the time of the service, the engine had accumulated 459 total flight hours since its production. Additionally, a pre-buy inspection of the airplane was performed on February 6, 2015. According to the maintenance facility that performed the inspection, the engine rocker box covers were not removed during the inspection.

The engine was disassembled and inspected on October 31, 2011, following a propeller strike. The associated maintenance entry stated that the engine was disassembled, cleaned, and "all parts inspected per instructions in TCM overhaul – manual and applicable service bulletins and airworthiness directives." The engine was then reassembled with new main bearings, rod bearings, rod bolts/nuts, new seals, and gaskets. Additionally, the camshaft and lifters were replaced during this service. According to SB96-11B, a service bulletin that was issued by the engine manufacturer and active at the time of the propeller strike inspection, the engine must be completely disassembled and all rotating engine components inspected following any propeller strike. Additionally, the Continental Motors, Inc. overhaul manual stated that the engine should be disassembled completely in accordance with Chapters 12 and 13 of the manual following a propeller strike. Chapter 12 includes instructions to remove the screws, lock washers, washers, and rocker box covers to all six cylinders.

The airplane was equipped with a Garmin G1000 multi-function display that was capable of recording airplane and engine performance data to an SD data card. The data card was removed and successfully downloaded at the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division in Washington, D.C. The data parameters that were recorded for the accident flight included, fuel flow, exhaust gas temperature, oil pressure, and rpm.

According to the data, the airplane began a takeoff roll at 1135:35, at which point the engine rpm increased from 1,200 rpm to 2,550 rpm. The flight was uneventful until about 1249:30, when the oil pressure began a steady decline. At 1253:10, the oil pressure reached 0 psi while the airplane was at approximately 8,000 feet pressure altitude in a constant descent from 10,000 feet. In the 2 minutes and 30 seconds that followed, the exhaust gas temperature of each cylinder rose slightly and then decreased to about 400 degrees F. The airplane reached a pressure altitude of 0 feet at 12:57:00 and the indicated airspeed decreased to 0 knots approximately 30 seconds later.


NTSB Identification: ERA15LA189
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 18, 2015 in Titusville, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA LC41-550FG, registration: N400BZ
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 18, 2014, about 1300 eastern daylight time, a Cessna LC41-550FG airplane, N400BZ, was substantially damaged during a fire after landing near Space Coast Regional Airport (TIX), Titusville, Florida. The private pilot, pilot rated passenger and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV), Savannah, Georgia about 1145 and was destined for Okeechobee County Airport (OBE), Okeechobee, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he planned to fly the airplane to OBE for a 50 hour service and some cosmetic work. During the pilot's preflight he noted about 7 quarts of oil in the engine and subsequently departed. About 1 hour into the flight and during a descent to 8,000 feet, the pilot noticed the oil pressure drop "into the red"; the other instruments remained "in the green." The pilot reported the loss of oil pressure to ATC and about a minute later the oil pressure dropped to zero. He identified the nearest airport as TIX and started an emergency descent. As they approached 3,000 feet, the engine quit and smoke began to come into the cabin through the fresh air vents. The pilot completed a forced landing to runway 27 and once the airplane came to rest he observed flames coming from the cowling. A fire consumed most of the airplane after the pilot and passengers egressed.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the engine cowling was destroyed by fire and portions of the airframe and cabin area were substantially damaged. At the time he also noted the cylinder #3 exhaust rocker box cover was completely missing and another hung from two screws. The cylinder #2 exhaust box rocker cover was loose and missing multiple screws. The fire department searched runway 27 and the adjacent grass areas, but did not locate the missing rocker cover.

Postaccident examination of the airplane was conducted on-scene by representatives of the engine and airframe manufacturer and supervised by the FAA. A large amount of soot and thermal by-products were observed on the cylinder #3 exposed rocker arm and surrounding head surfaces. There was a small hole on the top of the right crankcase half near the cylinder #5 base and a similar hole was observed on the left crankcase half near the base of cylinder #4. The through-bolt nut to the top rear crankcase section was missing and its associated washer was located on top of the adjacent oil cooler tank. The through-bolt head had backed off from the inserted position by about one half inch.

The forward section of the oil sump was destroyed by fire. The oil rod was intact and a small amount of dark thick liquid was on the bottom ½ inch of the rod. The oil quick drain valve was found in the closed position and secured to the sump with safety wire. Both the oil cooler and oil filter were intact and exhibited some thermal damage; the oil pressure sending unit was destroyed by fire.

The airplane and engine were retained by the NTSB for further examination.

The SD card from the onboard Garmin G1000 glass panel display was recovered from the airplane and sent to the NTSB Recorder's Laboratory in Washington, DC, for further examination.

Cessna A185E Skywagon 185, N4554F: Accident occurred April 23, 2015 at Nome City Field Airport (94Z), Nome, Alaska




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4554F

NTSB Identification: ANC15LA023
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 23, 2015 in Nome, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 185, registration: N4554F
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight in the wheel/ski-equipped airplane. The pilot reported that, just as the airplane became airborne, he heard a “loud bang” and that he then noticed that the left wheel/ski assembly had rotated up and near the left window. The pilot then chose to return to the departure runway for an emergency landing, and he crabbed the airplane into the wind to hold the wheel/ski assembly close to the airplane during the return flight back to the airport. During touchdown, as the airplane settled onto the runway, the left main landing gear leg contacted the ground and collapsed, and the left wing struck the ground. 

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the left main landing gear leg assembly fractured near the axle through bolts. The fractured gear leg and maintenance records were not made available for examination; therefore, the reason for the failure of the left main landing gear leg could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the left main landing gear leg for reasons that could not be determined based on the available evidence. 

On April 23, 2015, about 1240 Alaska daylight time, a wheel/ski equipped Cessna 185 airplane, N4554F, sustained substantial damage during an emergency landing, shortly after takeoff from the Nome City Field, Nome, Alaska. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the certificated commercial pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight destined to White Mountain, Alaska.

During a telephone interview the pilot reported to the NTSB investigator-in-charge that after a normal takeoff roll, just as the airplane became airborne, he heard a "loud bang," and then he noticed that the left side wheel/ski assembly had rotated up and near the left side window. The pilot then elected to return to the departure runway for an emergency landing, and he crabbed the airplane into the wind as to hold the wheel/ski assembly close to the airplane during the return flight back to the airport. 

During touchdown, as airplane settled to the runway and the left main landing gear leg contacted the ground, the left main landing gear leg collapsed, and the left wing struck the ground, sustaining substantial damage. 

A postaccident inspection of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed that the left main landing gear leg assembly fractured near the axle through bolts, which caused the ski to rotate up near the window during takeoff. The fractured gear leg and maintenance records were not made available to the NTSB for examination.

The aircraft had been modified via Supplemental Type Certificate (STC), SA1907NM, for the instillation of Schnider Model SWS-4000 C-19 wheel skies. 

Incident occurred May 27, 2017 at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (KBWI), Baltimore, Maryland




LINTHICUM, Md. — A Laurel man is undergoing a medical evaluation after breaching security Saturday at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.

Maryland Transportation Authority police identified the man who crashed his car through a secure area at Signature Aviation as Andrew Kottke, 42.

According to a witness who declined to be identified, Kottke traveled far into the airport property before being stopped by police. The witness said the breach is more serious than authorities describe, and the man may have been on the loose in a speeding car five to six minutes before being stopped.

"He tried to make a run for it and they apprehended him," the witness said. "It's quite disturbing. You have many people who have families or children, as I do. Anybody could have gotten hurt anywhere around that vehicle. Nobody knew what he was doing it just seemed crazy."

The witness reported seeing a 2013 Chevy Camaro entering the Signature Aviation property at a high rate of speed, crashing through a fence.

"He then drove at a high rate of speed, missing some aircraft and doing doughnuts. Some Signature employees began to come out and tried to figure out what was going on. When they approached, he sped off," the witness said.

The witness said, moments later, the man got out of the car and started to dance, twirling in circles. The witness described the man as distraught.

"It seemed odd, maybe tribal something. It was just weird," the witness said.

MDTA police confirmed that Kottke boarded an unoccupied plane, not an airliner, before he was caught.

Court records indicate Kottke had a domestic violence complaint filed against him. On May 26, Prince George's County District Court issued a peace order against him. The next day, the court expanded it, saying Kottke "shall not abuse, shall not contact, shall vacate the home and shall not enter the property."

Kottke's current employment status is not being confirmed. In 2015, he served in the U.S. Marshal's Service and received honors as an officer of the month for crowd control.

But at the airport on Saturday, Kottke started drawing a crowd, the witness said.

"He sped off again toward the international terminal and started doing doughnuts," the witness said.

Kottke wore a backpack that authorities said contained personal items. Kottke faces state and possibly federal charges when he's released from his medical evaluation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wbaltv.com



LINTHICUM, Md. (WBFF) - The suspect detained for driving through a security fence at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport Saturday afternoon was identified as a 42-year-old Laurel man who is also a former U.S. Marshal.

Andrew John Kottke, who was apprehended after the 1:30 p.m. incident, spent 17 years as a deputy U.S. Marshal for District of Columbia Superior Court, confirmed MDTA police spokesperson Kevin Ayd and U.S. Marshals Service spokesperson Michelle Coghill.

Kottke was being medically evaluated as of Sunday, and will be formally charged after his release, said Ayd.

The. U.S. Office of Public Affairs confirmed Sunday morning that Kotke is a former employee of the United States Marshals Service.

FBI is also involved in the investigation, said Ayd.

The vehicle drove through a perimeter security fence, said Ayd.

"There was no impact to airline flight operations," he said.

Story and video:  http://foxbaltimore.com

BALTIMORE (WJZ) —  Our media partner The Baltimore Sun reports a man who drove through a perimeter gate at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport on Saturday afternoon made it onto an airplane with a backpack before authorities could catch up to him and detain him, according to Maryland Transportation Authority Police.

“He did enter an unoccupied aircraft,” MDTA Police spokesman Kevin Ayd tells The Sun.

“The aircraft and the backpack were checked, and there was nothing that was alarming,” he says.

The backpack contained only “papers and personal effects,” and the FBI determined “this was not terrorism related,” Ayd said.

The FBI did not respond to a request for comment on Monday, The Sun reports.

Ayd tells The Sun the plane was a smaller model aircraft, such as those that are boarded not directly from terminal gates but via stairs on the tarmac. He also says he did not know the owner of the aircraft, or whether it was a major airline.

MDTA Spokesman Kevin Ayd says the incident occurred around 1:30 p.m. when a vehicle broke through the perimeter gate at the Signature Flight Support, which is mostly used for private and charter planes.

MDTA police responded and took Andrew John Kottke, 42, from Laurel, into custody.

Police don’t yet have a motive.

Within hours, the hole in the fence was replaced by concrete barriers, security and police officers.

Court records show just hours before the incident at BWI, a domestic violence case was brought against Kottke in Prince George’s County.

WJZ has also learned Kottke is an accomplished officer. He once received an Officer of the Month award as a Deputy U.S. Marshal.

There was no impact to BWI flight operations.

BWI authorities have ruled the incident isn’t terrorism-related.

“This is still a very active investigation at this time. So we don’t really have much more information to go on, as the investigators go into the reason why the individual did drive onto the, through the security gate,” Ayd says.

Police haven’t released Kottke’s charges.

Original article can be found here:  http://baltimore.cbslocal.com

Hiller UH-12E, N138HA, Slikker Flying Service, Inc: Fatal accident occurred May 27, 2015 in Wasco, Kern County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA168
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 27, 2015 in Wasco, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: HILLER UH 12E, registration: N138HA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The truck operator, who was assisting with an agricultural application operation, reported that the pilot of the helicopter had just finished spraying a small field. The helicopter landed and was serviced with fuel and water to flush the spray system. The pilot departed the immediate area, flying about 15 ft above the field. Shortly thereafter, the truck operator saw a plume of black smoke about 1/4 mile away. He drove toward the fire and saw the helicopter engulfed in flames. There were no witnesses to the accident. 

Postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed that the helicopter initially impacted the field in a right-skid-low attitude. There were no anomalies observed that would have precluded normal operation. The reason for the impact with terrain could not be determined based on the available information. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
An in-flight impact with terrain for reasons that could not be determined based on available evidence. 


Jay Psomas 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Slikker Flying Service, Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N138HA





NTSB Identification: WPR15LA168 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 27, 2015 in Wasco, CA
Aircraft: HILLER UH 12E, registration: N138HA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 27, 2015 about 0815 Pacific daylight time, a Hiller UH-12E, N138HA, impacted an onion field during agricultural application operations near Wasco, California. The pilot was fatally injured, and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Slikker Flying Service, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from a refueling truck about 0813. 

The truck operator reported that the pilot had just finished spraying a small field. The helicopter was filled with fuel and about 30-40 gallons of water to clean out the spray system. The pilot took off and departed the immediate area about 15 ft above the field. The truck operator cleaned the fuel/spray truck and was getting into the truck when he observed a plume of black smoke about ¼ mile away over a field crest. He drove toward the fire and observed the helicopter engulfed in flames. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter, and a Federal Aviation Administration second-class medical certificate dated February 18, 2015, with no limitations. The pilot's logbook was not recovered. During the pilot's last medical examination, he reported 1,136.2 total hours of flight experience, 277 of which were accrued in the previous 6 months. The pilot was hired by the operator in February 2014. 

The pilot initially survived the accident but succumbed to his injuries about one week later. No autopsy or toxicology testing was performed. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0754, automated weather observation at Bakersfield Kern County Airport (BFL), located about 25 nautical miles southeast of the accident site, included wind from 290° at 3 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 18°C, dew point 8°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The helicopter impacted the onion field in a right-skid-low attitude. The field was disturbed between the first point of impact and the main wreckage. Throughout this area were bearings and portions of the tail boom and windscreen. The helicopter came to rest on its right side. The cabin area was destroyed and sustained heavy thermal damage. The tail boom was fracture-separated about mid-span and was found partially underneath the main wreckage.

The helicopter's main cabin was mostly consumed by the postcrash fire; however, the majority of the airframe remained intact. The cyclic, collective, and pedals were all found loose within the main wreckage; all exhibited signs of heat distress. The left side of the spray boom was fracture-separated in an aft direction. The tail boom was fracture-separated about mid-span, consistent with main rotor blade contact. 

Control continuity from the cabin controls to the main rotor system was established. There was no evidence of binding or restrictions on the intact portions of the control linkages. The control linkages located underneath the seats and behind the cabin firewall exhibited breaks and evidence of heat distress. The observed fracture surfaces that were not consumed by the postcrash fire exhibited signatures consistent with overload. 

Both main rotor blades remained attached to the main rotor hub. Both blades were deformed opposite the direction of rotation. The tips of both blades were fracture-separated and were not located. 

The angled tail rotor drive shaft remained connected to the main transmission tail output flange, but it was separated at the aft end. The shaft and shaft housing were deformed about 90° to the left. Separated, deformed, and heavily fragmented pieces of the tail rotor drive shaft exhibited signatures consistent with overload. The aft portion of the tail rotor drive shaft remained attached to the severed aft tail boom structure and was connected to the tail rotor gearbox; when rotated, the tail rotor blades rotated normally. 

The tail rotor blades remained installed at the tail rotor hub. The first blade exhibited a fracture at its leading edge near the root end of the blade and was deformed in the opposite direction of normal rotation. The second blade exhibited downward, chordwise bending near its inboard end. 

The main transmission and engine remained mounted to the airframe. The main rotor mast exhibited evidence of contact with the main rotor hub. 

The spark plugs were removed from the engine and exhibited normal operating signatures and evidence of sooting. The rocker covers were removed and there was no evidence of heat distress. The dual carburetor was removed from the engine and disassembled. There was no evidence of blockage. The interior of the right carburetor was dry, and the floats exhibited cracks. The interior of the left carburetor was wet with possible corrosion byproducts. Both magnetos were removed from the engine and rotated freely. The fuel tank was ruptured and contained no fuel. The fuel screen did not exhibit evidence of blockage or contamination.





NTSB Identification: WPR15LA168
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 27, 2015 in Wasco, CA
Aircraft: HILLER UH 12E, registration: N138HA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 27, 2015 about 0815 Pacific daylight time, a Hiller UH-12E, N138HA, impacted an onion field during spray operations near Wasco, California. The pilot (sole occupant) died, and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Slikker Flying Service Inc under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from a refueling truck about 0813.

The refueler reported that the pilot had just finished spraying a field when he stopped at the refueling truck to partially fill the hopper with water. After filling the hopper, the pilot took off to empty the hopper. The refueler turned away to prepare for leaving, and when he turned around, he saw smoke rising from the field. He mentioned that he did not hear any abnormal noises from the helicopter prior to seeing the smoke. 

San Diego Oceanographers Track Down Two Missing WWII Bombers




San Diego researchers have helped locate two missing B-25 bombers that went missing during World War Two.

The discovery was made by Project Recover, an effort launched in 2012 to track down aircraft associated with American service members who went missing in action.

Researchers recently found two B-25 bombers off the coast of Papua New Guinea. One plane was connected with six men, one who went down with the plane and five who were captured as prisoners.

"Through this, it has sort of reinvigorated my interest in U.S. history," said Scripps Institution of Oceanography scientist Eric Terrill, one of the project's founders.

He said discoveries like this have special significance on days like Memorial Day.

"Because we're focused on MIAs, we really are focused on that closure aspect — that recognition aspect. So it is a very humbling program to be part of," Terrill said.

Project Recover relies on historical documents and knowledge from islanders to narrow down its search, and then deploys underwater robots to find the final resting places of WWII aircraft.

The planes can be difficult to spot — they're often significantly dismantled, partially buried under the sea floor or overgrown with corals and other sea life.

"One of the things that makes it so exciting for me, and so rewarding, is that we are bringing together these different disciplines," said Terrill. "Underwater technology, search technology as well as history, archival work as well as interviewing locals."

The project is a partnership between Scripps, the University of Delaware and a nonprofit organization BentProp, Limited. 

Story and audio:  http://www.kpbs.org

North Wing Apache Sport, N51311: Fatal accident occurred June 18, 2015 near Taos Regional Airport (KSKX), New Mexico

Herbert "Buzz" Waterhouse


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N51311





NTSB Identification: CEN15FA277
14 CFR Part 103: Ultralight
Accident occurred Thursday, June 18, 2015 in Taos, NM
Aircraft: NORTHWING DESIGN APACHE SPORT, registration: N51311
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 18, 2015, about 0738 mountain standard time, a North Wing Apache Sport powered-lift aircraft, N51311, impacted terrain following a loss of control during initial climb after takeoff from Taos Regional Airport (SKX), Taos, New Mexico. The sport pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the aircraft sustained substantial damage. The aircraft was registered to the pilot/owner and was being operated as a 14 Code of Regulations (CFR) Part 103 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident near the accident site, and a flight plan had not been filed for the local flight, which departed about 0736. 

Several witnesses who were working on the departure end of runway 22 reported seeing the aircraft take off from the runway, climb to about 500 ft, and then enter a right turn. The witnesses stated that the aircraft seemed to "fall out of the sky" and stall before it collided with terrain adjacent to and right of the departure end of the runway. One witness stated that he heard the engine revving before impact. See figure 1 for an overhead image of SKX and the accident location.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 69-year old pilot held a sport pilot certificate for powered-lift aircraft. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had 540 total flight hours, all of which were in powered-lift aircraft and 300 hours of which were in the accident aircraft. According to logbook entries, the last time that the pilot had flown the accident aircraft was August 9, 2014. The most recent entry in the pilot's logbook was dated September 8, 2014, in which he flew another aircraft of the same make and model. Interviews with a family member and a friend of the pilot confirmed that this was pilot's last flight before the accident flight. The family member stated that the pilot kept meticulous records. According to an entry on the last page of his logbook, the pilot had successfully completed a flight review in accordance with 14 CFR Section 61.56(a) on November 22, 2014. The entry was signed by a flight instructor, but the number of flight hours for that flight were not recorded. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat, powered-lift aircraft, serial number 4608087, was manufactured and owned by the pilot since 2003. The aircraft had a special airworthiness certificate classifying its operation in the experimental light sport aircraft category. 

The aircraft was powered by a rear-mounted engine, Rotax model 582 UL. According to a friend of the pilot, the aircraft was in good condition, was well maintained by the pilot, and had been stored in an airport hangar since it was new.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

SKX is a public airport located about 8 miles northwest of Taos at an elevation of 7,094 ft mean sea level. SKX's principal runway is 4/22, which is 4,083 ft long and 75 ft wide and surfaced with asphalt. A postaccident examination of the runway revealed no abnormalities, and no aircraft parts were found along the takeoff path.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0713, the routine aviation weather report for SKX was calm wind, no ceiling, clear skies, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 18°C, dew point 8°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.35 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

On-site examination of the aircraft, including the flight controls, structure and engine, revealed no evidence of any mechanical anomalies. Grounds scars and the orientation of the wreckage were consistent with the aircraft impacting the ground in a nose-low attitude. No manufacturing anomalies were noted with the aircraft. The wooden propeller assembly was shattered and exhibited signatures consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact. See figure 2 for a photograph of the accident site and wreckage. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Autopsy

The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Office of the Medical Investigator, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was reported to be "multiple blunt force injuries," and the manner of death was reported to be "accident."

The autopsy identified significant coronary artery disease with 80% stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery, as well as increased interstitial fibrosis (scarring) of the wall of the heart. The thickness of the right ventricular wall was significantly increased at 0.7 cm (average thickness is 0.3 cm). In addition, there was evidence of arteriosclerosis in the kidneys and extensive emphysema in the lungs. 

Toxicology

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Bioaeronautical Research Laboratory performed toxicology testing of specimens from the pilot. The testing detected sildenafil, its metabolite desmethylsildenafil, and zolpidem in the urine and blood (0.003 ug/ml of zolpidem in blood). In addition, 0.0036 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 0.0105 ug/ml tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) were identified in the cavity blood. THC-COOH was also identified in the liver (0.0219 ug/ml) and brain (0.0012 ug/ml).

Sildenafil is a prostaglandin inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction or pulmonary hypertension and is not impairing. Zolpidem is a short-acting prescription sleep aid and is a Schedule IV controlled substance that carries the warning, "May impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)." Therapeutic levels of zolpidem are typically between 0.0250 and 0.3000 ug/ml.

THC is the psychoactive compound found in marijuana, and THC-COOH is its inactive metabolite. THC concentrations typically peak while smoking, whereas THC-COOH concentrations typically peak about 9 to 23 minutes after the start of smoking. Significant performance impairments are usually observed for at least 1 to 2 hours after using marijuana, and residual effects have been reported up to 24 hours.

Medical History

Attempts were made to locate the pilot's primary physician and obtain his personal medical records, but according to the pilot's wife, the physician had recently retired and left town. Therefore, no personal medical records were made available for review. The pilot's wife reported that he had shortness of breath and often used an inhaler to treat it.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The wreckage was released to the owner's representative.

Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon: City working to settle $15.3M Bend Municipal Airport (KBDN) lawsuit

 The city of Bend is working to reach a settlement with two aviation companies at the Bend Municipal Airport that filed a $15.3 million lawsuit against the city alleging fraud and breach of contract, according to city officials.

The settlement could mark the end of years of legal battles between the city of Bend and Aero Facilities and Professional Air, two tenants at the Bend Municipal Airport. The companies say the city committed fraud and breached contracts when dealing with development and lease agreements at the airport, but the city says the two companies’ claims aren’t valid.

A trial in Deschutes County Circuit Court earlier this month ended in a mistrial, according to City Attorney Mary Winters. The trial will have to be rescheduled, or the city and the two aviation companies can reach a settlement in the meantime, said Winters.

“The parties are currently working cooperatively toward settlement,” she said, adding that any agreement would have to first be approved by Bend city councilors.

Winters would not discuss the terms of the potential settlement but said that the city and the companies want to reach an agreement that’s fair for both of them. A settlement would also mean the lawsuit against the city would be dismissed, Winters said.

“We would publicly discuss the terms of any settlement when final settlement is reached,” she said.

Winters said the Bend City Council is expected to discuss a proposed settlement on June 7. Neither Professional Air nor Aero Facilities could be reached after multiple calls for comment.

The two companies filed the original, 132-page lawsuit in February 2013 and asked for $4 million, but it was amended in 2014 to ask for $15.3 million.

The lawsuit was filed because of problems with a 2006 development agreement between the city and Aero Facilities. The agreement allowed the company to develop aviation facilities, including a fueling station at the east side of the Bend Municipal Airport. But in 2011, the city decided it wanted to change the agreement and eventually let another company build a fuel station, according to the lawsuit.

Aero Facilities says it spent at least $4.1 million improving the east side of the airport, and it is seeking about $11.85 million for lost profits and damages. Meanwhile, Professional Air, which shares some of the same owners as Aero Facilities, is seeking about $3.5 million for damages and lost profits after the city allegedly removed some of the company’s customer parking and tried to double the cost of rent.

City officials, on the other hand, have said that they don’t agree with the accusations, and that the companies’ claims aren’t valid.

Original article can be found here: http://www.bendbulletin.com

Kinner Sportster B, NC13776: Accident occurred July 23, 2015 at Merritt Field (4PN7), Eagles Mere, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA279
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 23, 2015 in Eagles Mere, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: KINNER SPORTSTER B, registration: NC13776
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that the airplane had undergone a complete restoration and had been flown for about 8 hours in the 9 months before the accident. He added that, about 1 week before the accident, the airplane experienced a loss of engine power on takeoff but that he was able to land the airplane without incident. A carburetor anomaly was found that appeared to have produced an overly rich mixture and was subsequently corrected.

On the day of the accident, an engine run was performed to verify that there were no operational issues. The pilot subsequently took off for the local personal flight, climbed the airplane to 50 ft above the runway, and then landed uneventfully. He then took off again, and when the airplane climbed to about 150 ft above the runway, the engine stopped, and the pilot then performed an off-airport forced landing. During the landing, the fuel tank ruptured, and the engine broke away from the fuselage. Subsequent examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of serious carburetor icing at glide power. The airplane had carburetor heat, but the pilot reported that he did not use it in flight or on the ground. Although the formation of carburetor icing was highly unlikely under a full-power takeoff, it could have formed during the low-power taxi and then broken off or melted due to the added engine heat from the higher takeoff power. However, with no substantive evidence that carburetor ice had formed, the reason for the loss of power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On July 23, 2015, about 1800 eastern daylight time, a Kinner Sportster B, NC13776, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at Merritt Field (4PN7), Eagles Mere, Pennsylvania. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the airplane had undergone a 7-year restoration, which was completed during October 2014, and at the time of the accident, had logged about 8 hours of flight time since then.

The pilot further noted that on July 18, 2015, after an earlier flight that day, the airplane's Kinner B-5 engine lost power on takeoff, but the pilot was able successfully land the airplane. "We found gas running out of the carburetor and believed the float was stuck. The engine appeared to have drowned by virtue of the rich mixture."

The airplane was subsequently hangared, and the following week, the carburetor was cleaned and inspected. "The float was determined to be intact but the float valve was not seating perfectly. It was removed, blued, reseated, reblued, and tested. The carburetor was reinstalled and found to still be leaking."

The carburetor was then removed and re-examined, and the float was found to be "slightly sticking. A modest portion of material was removed from the float bowl where the sticking was occurring, the carburetor was checked in multiple angles, it was reinstalled. It no longer leaked or flooded. Two separate IA's inspected the work."

On the day of the accident, the airplane was tied down and the engine run for "an extended period at full throttle [later stated to be 8 to 10 minutes] to verify there were no operational issues. Fuel was confirmed at 3/4 tank."

The pilot subsequently took off, climbed the airplane to 50 feet above the runway, and landed straight-ahead on the runway to confirm no anomalies. He then made another takeoff, and about 150 feet above the runway, the engine stopped. The airplane was then not in a position to land on the runway, so the pilot landed off runway, and during the landing, the fuel tank ruptured and the engine broke away from the fuselage.

The engine was sent to an overhauler/builder, who did not find any preexisting mechanical anomalies. The pilot also confirmed that the Holley carburetor main metering jet had not dropped out, as had occurred in another accident, NTSB accident number WPR15FA121.

The pilot further confirmed that the airplane did have carburetor heat, but that he did not use it in flight – including the short takeoff and landing flight, and the accident flight.

The nearest recorded weather, at an airport 20 nautical miles to the southwest, about the time of the accident and about 1,500 feet lower elevation, included a temperature of 26 degrees C and a dew point of 12 degrees C. Although not specific to any particular carburetor, a carburetor icing probability chart found in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, indicated that under the likely ambient conditions at 4PN7, there was a probability of "serious icing at glide power."

Canadair CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604, N613PJ, registered to Paragon Transport Management LLC, and operated by USAC Airways 691 LLC, doing business as Paragon Jets: Accident occurred July 22, 2015 at Palm Beach International Airport (KPBI), West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida
Paragon Jets; Teterboro, New Jersey 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Paragon Transport Management LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N613PJ

 NTSB Identification: ERA15LA288
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in West Palm Beach, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CANADAIR CL-600-2B16, registration: N613PJ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the captain, the pilots were “rushed” as they performed their preflight preparations of the jet and forgot to close the baggage door. Ground personnel noticed the discrepancy and drove an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) out to the airplane so that they could advise the crew. After dismounting from the ATV, which they had parked about 10 ft in front of the airplane’s left wing, they warned the captain, who left the cockpit to close the baggage door. Once the door was closed, he returned to the cockpit. The captain then looked out the side window and noticed that the airplane was rolling forward, and he asked the first officer what she was doing. About that time, the airplane struck the ATV. The flight crew stated that once they realized the airplane was moving, they attempted to apply the brakes, but it was not until they shut down the engines and re-applied the parking brake that the airplane came to a stop. A postaccident functional check of the airplane’s hydraulic and braking systems did not reveal any anomalies.

Review of the airplane’s cockpit voice recorder revealed that the crew did not verbally follow the airplane’s before start checklist, which required them to verify hydraulic system pressure, and that the parking brake was set before starting the engines. Had the flight crew followed this procedure, monitored the airplane’s motion during and immediately after the engine start, and been more cognizant of the objects surrounding the airplane, it is likely that the ground collision would have been avoided.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight crew's failure to properly use the before start checklist, to monitor the airplane's motion, and to see and avoid objects around the airplane, which resulted in an inadvertent roll into a ground vehicle.

On July 22, 2015, about 1410 eastern daylight time, a Canadair CL-600-2B16, N613PJ, registered to Paragon Transport Management LLC, and operated by USAC Airways 691 LLC, doing business as Paragon Jets, was substantially damaged when it struck an all-terrain ground vehicle (ATV) while taxiing at Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), West Palm Beach, Florida. Both airline transport pilots were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which was destined for Opa-Locka Executive Airport (OPF), Miami, Florida. The positioning flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the captain, the flight crew was under pressure from the operations department to continue to southern Florida to complete their flight and pick up customers that were waiting. The flight crew forgot to close the baggage door; they began the prestart checklist and started both engines. The flightcrew then noticed that ground personnel drove up in an ATV and were waving their arms to get their attention. The captain then remembered that he forgot to close the baggage door and got up to go back and close the door. Once closed, he returned to his seat, on the right side, buckled his seat belt and resumed reviewing the checklist. The captain then looked out the side window and noticed the airplane was rolling forward and he asked the first officer what she was doing. At that time, they heard a noise and bounce in the airplane and thought they travelled over a wheel chock. The captain further stated that he was pushing very hard on the brakes and the airplane would not stop. They both made several attempts to stop the airplane and applied maximum brake pressure, but it would not stop. The captain then reached over with both hands and shut down the engines at the same time the first officer released and re-applied the parking brake. The airplane then came to a stop. The captain added that he heard no alarms or sounds during this event.

According to ground service personnel at OPF, they observed the accident airplane as it prepared to taxi and noticed that its baggage door was open. Two of the ground handlers subsequently boarded an ATV and drove out to the airplane, parking about 10 feet in front of the left wing. One of the ground handlers then dismounted the ATV and proceeded in front of the airplane while motioning to the flightcrew in the cockpit that the baggage door was open. The pilot seated in the right seat then stood up and proceeded into the cabin. Shortly after, the airplane began moving forward. The ground handler then attempted to gain the attention of the pilot seated in the left seat, but was unsuccessful as that pilot never looked up. The airplane's left wing then struck the ATV before it came to a stop.

About 1 week after the accident, the operator's director of maintenance completed a preflight inspection and check of the airplane's hydraulic and braking systems under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, with no anomalies noted.

The airplane's cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and flight data recorder (FDR) were forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC for data download. Review of the CVR data did not reveal any tasks associated with the formal prestart checklist being completed. The CVR recorded a conversation about programming the flight management system and then it recorded the captain asking the first officer if she wanted to fly from the left seat. One minute later the first officer replied that she did want to fly from the left seat. The recorder then captured a conversation of an informal checklist usage along with a departure briefing. Two minutes later the recorder captured sounds consistent with both engines starting and then the captain stated, "baggage door… I'll get it." Then sounds consistent with switch manipulation and shortly after the captain asked "what are you doing" with an immediate sound of a warning or alert tone as the captain stated, "no brakes….what are you doing?" the first officer responded, "ah I didn't do anything. What's going on? What is going on? Stop." The captain replied, "I don't know." Then the CVR recorded sounds of engines shutting down, followed by one second later a sound consistent with a collision.

Review of the plotted data from the FDR revealed that it only recorded in-flight parameters and that it did not record any on-ground parameters.

Review of the Challenger 601-3A/3R pilot checklist manual, before shut down, the crew was to verify the parking brake was set and check the hydraulic pressure. If this was the last flight of the day, once the airplane wheels were chocked, the parking brake should be released. The before starting checklist stated the wheel chocks must be removed, hydraulic pressure verified, and the parking brakes set before engine start.

The 13-seat airplane was manufactured in 1992, and was equipped with two GE, CF34-3A, turbine engines. The aircraft maintenance records indicated that airplane was maintained on a continuous airworthiness inspection program, and the brake accumulators test was last performed on May 1, 2015, with an airframe total time recorded of 9,649.3 hours. The total time on the airframe at the time of the accident was 9,770.9 hours.