Monday, June 13, 2016

Ryan Navion, Lost Horizon Aero Company Inc., N4171K; accident occurred June 13, 2016 in McMinnville, Yamhill County, Oregon -Kathryn's Report

Lost Horizon Aero Company Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N4171K

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Portland FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA317
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 13, 2016 in McMinnville, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION, registration: N4171K
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that about 15 minutes after takeoff he smelled something burning and the cabin filled with smoke. The pilot further reported that the engine lost power and that he was forced to maneuver for an emergency landing. After the loss of power, he heard a "clanging noise" from the engine. While landing in a field, the airplane impacted blueberry bushes and a fence, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

During a postaccident examination by the local law enforcement, it was revealed that the oil filler cap was not in place on the oil filler tube. The oil filler cap retaining chain was still attached to the oil cap and the oil filler tube. Upon further examination of the oil cap and the oil filler tube, no evidence of damage was noted.

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to replace the oil filler cap following the preflight inspection, which resulted in a loss of engine oil and engine power, an emergency landing, and impact with terrain.


YAMHILL COUNTY, Ore. — Police say two people suffered minor injuries after making an emergency landing in Yamhill County Monday afternoon.

The pilot of a single-engine plane headed to San Jose from somewhere in Washington had electrical issues, so he rerouted to McMinnville. The plane lost power before they got to the airport, so they made an emergency landing at Lafayette Highway near Leach Lane.

The pilot and a passenger walked away with minor injuries. The plane is damaged, but didn't catch on fire.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the single-engine Ryan Navion was built in 1948. Lost Horizon Aero Company LLC, based in Seattle, Washington, owns the plane.

The FAA will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here:  http://katu.com

Cape college's aviation program taking off

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Shannon Dugan, who plans to attend the new aviations program at Cape Cod Community College, looks over the Pratt & Whitney V2500-A1 engine students will be able to study and work on at the college's Aviation Maintenance Technology Facility at Plymouth Municipal Airport where a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Monday. 



PLYMOUTH — Against a blue backdrop framed by an open hangar door at Plymouth Municipal Airport, Cape Cod Community College President John Cox on Monday predicted clear skies for the college’s new aviation maintenance program.

“We’re celebrating one of those moments in the history of our college” that people will remember decades from now, Cox said during a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the program that is scheduled to start accepting students in September.

The 12-month certificate program will allow graduates to sit for the Federal Aviation Administration’s certification exam in airplane mechanics, known as airframe and powerplant, Cox said.



The program is getting off the ground with about $5.6 million in state and federal grants, including money for financial aid, Cox said.

Plymouth Municipal Airport “ended up being the most cost effective” of airport space that went out to bid, beating out Barnstable Municipal Airport and New Bedford Regional Airport, he said. Students will progress through the program in “cohorts” of 25, with about 65 full-time equivalent students being enrolled in the program at any one point.

The facility in Plymouth includes classrooms for all aspects of the aviation program, according to college spokesman Michael Gross.

The college is still working with the FAA, which requires facilities and staff to be in place before giving its approval, to get final sign off for the program, Cox said.

Monday's ceremony opened with Cox calling for attendees to remember the victims of the Orlando shootings and their families.

“It was a very unsettling thing coming here today to celebrate anything,” said U.S. Rep. William Keating, D-Mass.

But the promise of a bright financial future for young people is a weapon against terrorism and radicalization, he said.

What Cape Cod Community College is working toward “is so important on days like this,” Keating said.

Legislators, educators and aviation industry executives said the mechanics program will result in good-paying jobs and help address a worldwide shortage of aircraft technicians.

“There are very few programs like this in the state and in the country,” said Sheila Vanderhoef, chairwoman of the Cape Cod Community College Board of Trustees.

“We are going to train the next generation,” said board Vice Chairman David Bushy, a pilot and retired airline industry executive.

With the age of aircraft mechanics now averaging 51 or 52, there will be a need for hundreds of thousands of mechanics around the world, Bushy said.

Eric Goeldner, 35, of Dennis, plans to be one of them.

A chef for 20 years, Goeldner said he was planning to make a career change when he heard about the aviation maintenance program and took a tour of the new facility, which includes two hangars, classroom space with state-of-the-art computers and, as of last week, a massive jet engine donated by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft as a hands-on learning tool.

“It’s just fantastic,” Goeldner said. He said he intends to get his aircraft mechanic’s certificate as well as an associate’s degree in applied science and then go on to Bridgewater University.

With the bank of skills he is building, his future could include a career in aviation — or with the MBTA or drones in California , Goeldner said.

“The opportunities are endless,” he said.

The college's aviation mechanic program is “creating another avenue for people to get real jobs,” said state Sen. Viriato “Vinny” deMacedo, R-Plymouth. “This is a collaborative move like none other.”

After two years, aircraft mechanics earn about $50,000 a year, Bushy said.

Shannon Dugan, of Yarmouth, plans to start attending classes in September.

“I’ve been excited since January” after first learning about the program, Dugan said.

“We’re so lucky to have this nearby,” said Susan DeWitt, of Sandwich, who attended the ribbon cutting ceremony with her son Sean DeWitt, who also plans to start the aviation program this fall.

“He can get out of here and get a job right away. It’s affordable, it’s gorgeous — very state of the art,” Susan DeWitt said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.capecodtimes.com

Cessna R172K Hawk XP, Whitesands Inc., N736TB: Incident occurred June 12, 2016 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 12-JUN-16
Time: 21:51:00Z
Regis#: N736TB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07
City: OGDEN
State: Utah

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER, OGDEN, UTAH.

WHITESANDS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N736TB

Perikles Fok-Dr1, Training Services Inc., N757FK: Incident occurred June 12, 2016 in Virginia Beach, Virginia

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 12-JUN-16
Time: 00:13:00Z
Regis#: N757FK
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21
City: VIRGINIA BEACH
State: Virginia

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL EXHIBITION FOK-DRI, ON TAXI STRUCK THE PROPELLER, VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA.

TRAINING SERVICES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N757FK

Air Tractor Inc AT-802A, Thompson Flying Service, N20361: Accident occurred June 12, 2016 in Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois

THOMPSON FLYING SERVICE LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N20361

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Springfield FSDO-19

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA313
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, June 12, 2016 in Cairo, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 802, registration: N20361
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the takeoff roll, the airplane "pulled hard to the left." He recalled that he applied full right rudder pedal and realized that he was approaching the end of the runway. He reported that he applied both brakes, he applied reverse thrust, the airplane exited the runway to the left and ground looped. The pilot reported that he did not confirm that the tailwheel pin was locked, prior to the takeoff roll. He further reported that in the future, he will confirm that the tailwheel is locked by working the tail back and forth, and he will check the tailwheel for inhibiting buildup of fertilizer, grease and dirt that would prevent tailwheel pin actuation. The right wing sustained substantial damage.

Per the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Safety Inspector that arrived shortly after the accident occurred, the airplane was dispersing fertilizer as part of a 49 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 operation. The prolonged use of fertilizer coupled with dirt, will inhibit the tailwheel pin from locking in place. A photograph was taken shortly after the accident by the FAA Inspector revealing a canted tailwheel. The FAA Inspector reported that the mechanic that performed the inspection on the tailwheel assembly noted that the assembly was, "gummed up with fertilizer and the pin was not in place at the time of the ground loop.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to ensure that the tailwheel pin was in the locked position prior to the takeoff roll, resulting in a runway excursion, ground loop, and substantial damage.

Luscombe 8A, N2850K; accident occurred June 12, 2016 in Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N2850K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA South Bend FSDO-17

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA307
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in Valparaiso, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8, registration: N2850K
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during landing the airplane bounced, subsequently the leaf spring on the tail wheel broke midspan. The pilot further reported that the airplane veered to the right despite full left rudder deflection and brake application, which resulted in a ground loop, left main landing gear collapse, and substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper descent rate during landing, which resulted in a bounced landing, failure of the tailwheel suspension leaf spring, a ground loop, and substantial damage to the left wing.

Cessna 525B, JDI Holdings Inc., N51EM: Incident occurred June 12, 2016 Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Kathryn's Report:http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 12-JUN-16
Time: 20:55:00Z
Regis#: N51EM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA FSDO: FAA Allentown FSDO-05
City: ALLENTOWN
State: Pennsylvania

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WHEEL SEPARATED FROM GEAR, ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA.

JDI HOLDINGS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N51EM

Socata RALLYE 150ST, N319RA: Accident occurred June 11, 2016 in York County, South Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N319RA 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA306
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in York, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: S.O.C.A.T.A. RALLYE 150, registration: N319RA
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during takeoff in crosswind conditions, after rotation and about 6 feet above the ground, a gust of wind from the right pushed the airplane to the left of the runway toward a group of peach trees. The pilot further reported that he applied additional correction for the crosswind drift but was unable to give full deflection due to the proximity of the airplane above the ground, the left wing impacted the tree(s), and subsequently the airplane spun to the left. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located about 10 miles to the south east, revealed that, about 36 minutes before the accident the wind was 270 degrees true at 8 knots. A further review revealed that, about 24 minutes after the accident the wind was 290 degrees true at 10 knots. The airplane landed on runway 18.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff, which resulted in an impact with a peach tree(s).

Cessna 310I, N8055M: Incident occurred June 11, 2016 in Burleson, Texas

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 11-JUN-16
Time: 18:21:00Z
Regis#: N8055M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19
City: BURLESON
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, BURLESON, TEXAS.

http://registry.faa.gov/N8055M

Piper PA-28-140, N6700J: Accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Gilmer, Upshur County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N6700J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA312
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Gilmer, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N6700J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that he was providing simulated engine failure (SEF) training, with a left 180 degree turn, to the student pilot. He reported that during the second SEF, he cut the power and the student pilot slowly made a left turn from downwind to base. The flight instructor recalled that the student "cut the base leg short" and turned toward the end of the runway. He reported that the airplane was about 25 degrees to the left of the runway centerline, the sun was setting and they failed to see the powerline wires. The airplane struck the wires and fell to the ground sustaining substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane that would have precluded normal flight operations.

As a recommendation the flight instructor reported that due to the calm wind, he should have switched to the reciprocal runway to mitigate the sun's position during landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The student pilot's failure to see and avoid powerlines during landing, and the flight instructor's delayed remediation when the student cut the base to final turn short, resulting in a wire strike and collision with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's lack of vigilance in monitoring the area for hazards, and the low light condition.

Experimental SNB, N8398T: Incident occurred June 11, 2016 in Detroit Lakes, Becker County, Minnesota

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 11-JUN-16
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: N8398T
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15
City: DETROIT LAKES
State: Minnesota

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL SNB, ON LANDING FLIPPED OVER, DETROIT LAKES, MINNESOTA.

http://registry.faa.gov/N8398T

Cessna 310G, Sofi LLC, N8943Z; accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Apopka, Orange County, Florida -Kathryn's Report

SOFI LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N8943Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA213
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Apopka, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 310, registration: N8943Z
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2016, about 1610 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 310G, N8943Z, collided with a berm during the landing roll at the Orlando Apopka Airport (X04), Apopka, Florida. The airline transport pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to SOFI, LLC, and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations as a Part 91 local, post maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed from X04 at 1515.

The accident flight was the airplane's first flight after an annual inspection, and it had not been flown for about 2 years prior.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot stated he taxied to runway 33, a 3,987-foot-long, 60-foot-wide, asphalt runway, departed and performed two touch-and-go landings. After the second touch-and-go landing, he intended to perform a full-stop landing. The pilot reported the touchdown was normal and in the normal/typical location. After touchdown he retracted the flaps and allowed the airplane to slow aerodynamically to the end of the runway. As the airplane approached the end of the runway, the pilot applied the normal brakes; however, the left brake did not function. He secured the engines, and attempted to maintain control while applying the right brake in an effort to slow the airplane. The airplane went off the right side of the runway at the end and contacted upsloping terrain which caused spar damage to the left horizontal stabilizer.

Post accident examination of the airplane's brake system was performed following recovery of the airplane by an FAA airworthiness inspector. Operational testing of the brakes on the pilot's side revealed no discrepancies; however, operational testing of the brakes on the copilot's side revealed a discrepancy with the right brake. No brake system leaks were noted and the fluid levels in both brake master cylinders were at the correct level. The airplane was retained for further examination.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Air America Imagery LLC, N21767: Accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Deming, Luna County, New Mexico

Air America Imagery LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N21767 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA228

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Deming, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N21767
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2016, about 1520 mountain daylight time, a Cessna model 172S single-engine airplane, N21767, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Deming Municipal Airport (DMN), in Deming, New Mexico. The commercial pilot and his pilot-rated-passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Air America Imagery LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight to an unconfirmed destination airport.

Cirrus SR20, Choctaw Brothers Aviation LLC, N975TK: Incident occurred June 10, 2016 in Wiley Post Airport (KPWA), Bethany, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 10-JUN-16
Time: 20:03:00Z
Regis#: N975TK
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15
City: BETHANY
State: Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, WILEY POST AIRPORT, BETHANY, OKLAHOMA.

CHOCTAW BROTHERS AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N975TK

Team Tango Tango 2, N324TT; accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Sunrise Beach Village, Llano County, Texas -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N324TT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA299
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Sunrise Beach Village, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: BAREISS DAVID A TANGO 2, registration: N324TT
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while decelerating during the landing roll on a grass runway the nose gear began to skid. The pilot further reported that the nose gear impacted an ant hill, which resulted in a nose over and substantial damage to the fuselage and empennage

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

After the accident, the pilot reported that the tolerance between the nose wheel tire and fairing was estimated to be 1/4". The pilot further reported that there was debris build up in the back of the nose gear fairing and that during a postaccident check the nose gear was not able to rotate as freely as the main landing gears.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The nosewheel fairing becoming packed with debris during landing on the soft field due to a gap between the nosewheel tire and the fairing, which resulted in a loss of control and subsequent nose-over.

United Airlines, Boeing 777-222, N779UA: Incident occurred June 10, 2016 in Denver, Colorado

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 10-JUN-16
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N779UA
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 777
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: UAL-United Airlines
Flight Number: UAL328
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03
City: DENVER
State: Colorado

N779UA UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT UAL328 BOEING 777 AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE EXPERIENCED AN ENGINE MALFUNCTION, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE TO BE DETERMINED, DENVER, COLORADO 

UNITED AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N779UA

Van's RV-6, N164BJ: Incident occurred June 10, 2016 in Halsey, Linn County, Oregon

Kathryn's Report:http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 10-JUN-16
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: N164BJ
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: HALSEY
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR HALSEY, OREGON

http://registry.faa.gov/N164BJ

Cessna 150, N102DK: Fatal accident occurred June 13, 2016 at Butler Field Airport (IN46), Rockville, Adams Township, Parke County, Indiana

KURT M.  WAUGH: http://registry.faa.gov/N102DK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA216
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 13, 2016 in Rockville, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA 150F, registration: N102DK
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 13, 2016, at 0957 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150F airplane, N102DK, impacted terrain while departing from Butler Field Airport (IN46), Rockville, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident. The flight departed without a flight plan and was destined for Eagle Creek Airpark (EYE), Indianapolis, Indiana. 

According to a witness mowing grass at IN46, the airplane lifted off near midfield from the 2,081 x 65 ft turf runway. The witness noticed the airplane initially climb with a high pitch attitude, but did not observe the subsequent climb out or accident. The airplane struck the top of trees located about 1,125 ft from the departure end of the runway and came to rest about 125 ft beyond the initial tree strike. A post-crash fire ensued.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

PARKE COUNTY, Ind. (WTHI) The investigation is on-going after two died in a plane crash Monday morning in Parke County.

The Parke County Sheriffs Office reported on Monday that the Cessna 150 crashed shortly after take-off from Butler Airfield, which is just south of Rockville.

Both occupants died in the accident after it crashed in a wooded area behind a home. The cause of the accident is not yet known.

One of the identities of the two who died in the crash was released Tuesday afternoon. That person was Kurt M. Waugh, 44 of Rockville and was the pilot of the plane.

Wednesday morning, the second victim was identified as Kimberly D. Heald-Chaplin, 39 of Terre Haute

The cause of death has been ruled as blunt force trauma for both Waugh and Heald-Chaplin.

Officials reported the identity of the second victim will be released at a later time after further testing and procedures are performed.


Parke County Sheriff Cole reports the National Transportation Safety Board as well as the FAA continue to investigate this accident.

Story and video:  http://wishtv.com
















PARKE COUNTY, Ind. (WTHI) – The Parke County Sheriff’s Office reports two people are dead after a small plane crash Monday morning in Parke County just south of Rockville.

PCSO reports the small, single engine aircraft crashed in a wooded area near Butler Airfield around 10 a.m. and that both occupants inside the plane were pronounced dead at the scene.

Parke County Sheriff Justin Cole reports the FAA was responding and the National Transportation Safety Board reports they are investigating as well.

NTSB stated the crash involved a Cessna 150 and the accident was during take-off.

Officials report they have not identified the two who died in the accident but autopsies are scheduled for Tuesday at Regional Hospital.

According to airnav.com, Butler Field Airport is a privately owned airfield and houses seven, single engine airplanes.


Original article can be found here: http://wthitv.com 





ROCKVILLE, Ind. -- Two people were killed Monday when their plane crashed in Parke County.

The small, single-engine aircraft crashed into a wooded area just after takeoff from Butler Field Airport in Rockville, Indiana, around 10 a.m. Monday.

The Parke County Sheriff's Department said both occupants of the plane were killed in the crash.

The identities of the victims weren't being released pending notification of their families.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.theindychannel.com




The Parke County Sheriff's office confirms that two occupants in a plane crash in central Parke County south of Rockville this morning were pronounced dead at the scene.

Positive identification has yet to be made. Autopsies are scheduled for Tuesday at Terre Haute Regional Hospital.

An investigator from the Federal Aviation Administration is on the scene of the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board has personnel en route to the crash site.

Deputy Shay Vandivier of the Parke County Sheriff's Department confirmed that the small, single engine aircraft was found in a wooded area northeast of the intersection of Catlin Road and County Road 200 South.

The location of the crash is about a half-mile west of Butler Airfield, a deputy at the scene said.

The crash occurred at about 10 a.m. shortly after takeoff from a grass runway at Butler Airfield.

The cornfield adjacent to the scene has been restricted with yellow crime scene tape.

Sheriff Justin Cole said notification of family is ongoing.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.tribstar.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, Floyd Vuncannon Aviation Inc., N789MR: Fatal accident occurred June 12, 2016 at Jonesboro Municipal Airport (KJBR), Craighead County, Arkansas

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

FLOYD VUNCANNON AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N789MR

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Little Rock FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA215
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 12, 2016 in Jonesboro, AR
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N789MR
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 12, 2016, about 1530 central daylight time, a Robinson Helicopter Company, R44 II helicopter, N789MR, impacted terrain during takeoff from the Classic Airstrip (23AR), near Jonesboro, Arkansas. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The helicopter was destroyed during the impact and subsequent ground fire. The helicopter was registered to Floyd Vuncannon Aviation Inc. and was operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from 23AR at the time of the accident.

A witness at 23AR reported that he saw the accident. He, in part, indicated that the saw the accident pilot coming from his hangar back to another hangar. When the witness finished working on a task, he heard the accident pilot say that he was going to put on an airshow. The witness was in the process of departing from the airport when he saw the accident pilot getting into his helicopter across the runway on the airstrip, east of his location. The witness observed that the helicopter lifted off at a 45-degree pitch-up attitude. The helicopter rose to about 125 feet and descended out of sight behind hangars between the two airstrips. The witness indicated that he thought he "heard it hit" but the engine never shutdown. The helicopter began to rise upwards above the hangars and it began to spin around. It appeared that the tail rotor was not working and the skids were bent as if it had hit the ground. It continued to rise to approximately the same liftoff height. The helicopter descended again, impacted terrain, and burst into flames in the middle of the west airstrip. The witness stated that another witness nearby called 911 and they waited for first responders to arrive.

The 73-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, rotorcraft gyroplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate, expiring October 31, 2017, with airplane single engine, rotorcraft helicopter, and rotorcraft gyroplane ratings. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate issued on May 1, 2014, with limitations that the pilot "must wear corrective lenses and possess glasses for near and intermediate vision." At the time of that medical examination, he reported 6,000 hours total flight time to date and 110 hours in the six months before that examination. A review of excerpts from the pilot's logbook, acquired by a FAA inspector, did not reveal an entry for a flight review. The logbook pages were not totaled and the last entry was dated August 2, 2015.

N789MR, serial number 10561, was a Robinson R44 II, Raven, four-place, two-bladed, single main rotor, single-engine helicopter, with a spring and yield skid type landing gear. The primary structure of its fuselage was welded steel tubing and riveted aluminum sheet. The tailcone was a monocoque structure consisting of an aluminum skin. A Lycoming IO-540-AE1A5, serial number L-29728-48A, engine rated at 205 horsepower, powered the helicopter. The helicopter had a five-minute takeoff rating of 245 horsepower.

A review of helicopter logbook excerpts, acquired by a FAA inspector, showed that the helicopter's last annual inspection was completed on July 2 2015. At the time of that inspection, the helicopter had accumulated a total time of 1,242.1 hours.

The helicopter manufacturer issued, R44 Service Bulletin (SB)-78B, on December 20, 2010, and issued a revised SB on September 28, 2012. The SB, in part, indicated:

TO: R44 and R44 II owners, operators, and maintenance personnel
SUBJECT: Bladder Fuel Tank Retrofit
ROTORCRAFT AFFECTED: R44 helicopters S/N 0001 thru 2064, and R44 II
Helicopters S/N 10001 thru 12890, unless previously accomplished.
TIME OF COMPLIANCE: As soon as practical, but no later than 30 April 2013.
BACKGROUND: This bulletin requires R44 helicopters with all-aluminum
fuel tanks to be retrofitted with bladder-type tanks. In addition to a
factory retrofit program, a field kit is now available. To improve the R44
fuel system's resistance to a post-accident fuel leak, this retrofit must
be performed as soon as possible.

The review of the helicopter logbook excerpts did not reveal an entry for the installation of the fuel tank mandatory SB.

At 1538, the recorded weather at the Jonesboro Municipal Airport, near Jonesboro, Arkansas, was: Wind 090 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; present weather thunderstorms in the vicinity; temperature 34 degrees C; dew point 21 degrees C; altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury.

23AR was a private, non-towered airport, which was owned by an individual. It was located about seven miles east of Jonesboro, Arkansas. The airport had an estimated elevation of 260 feet above mean sea level. The airport's published runway 17/35 was a 2,600 feet by 80 feet runway with a turf surface.

Another north/south oriented turf runway west of the published runway existed. It was located about 350 feet west of the published runway and it was owned by another individual.

The main helicopter wreckage came to rest about 1,800 feet and 35 degrees from the intersection of Highway 18 and Barnhill Road. The helicopter's resting heading was about 270 degrees magnetic. The tailcone was folded to the left and separated near its forward end. Most of the aluminum and fiberglass components of the fuselage were discolored, deformed, and consumed by fire. The aft section of the tailcone was separated and it came to rest approximately 20 feet south of the airframe. The tail rotor gearbox remained attached to the aft bulkhead of the aft section of the tailcone. The empennage was separated from the bulkhead and the empennage came to rest approximately 40 feet south of the airframe. Both tail rotor blades were separated near their roots and came to rest east of the airframe on the other side of a hangar. The main rotor gearbox and main rotor was separated from the airframe and found resting about three feet north of the airframe. Ground scars north of the airframe were consistent with main rotor blade strikes. Main rotor blade tip pieces were recovered in and or near the scars and yellow paint was transferred to the dirt inside the scars.

A series of ground scars consistent with the shape, size, and distance apart for tail rotor strikes were located east of the location that the tail rotor blades had come to rest.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage was conducted. All flight control rod ends remained attached to their attachment points. Sections of push pull tubes were not continuous, separated from their original location, and/or consumed by fire. All flight control discontinuities exhibited either thermal damage or separations consistent with overload. No preimpact anomalies were detected in the flight control system.

The fuel mixture control knob was found in the full rich position. The mixture control wire was found disconnected near its fuel mixture arm on the engine fuel control servo unit. The throttle linkage sustained thermal damage and its position could not be determined. The governor switch sustained thermal damage and its position could not be determined.

The right skid tube was recovered from under the main wreckage and it sustained thermal damage. The four struts were separated from the airframe and were thermally damaged. The aft cross tube appeared to be thermally deformed. A portion of the front cross tube was consumed by fire. The remaining end was not bent near its elbow. The tailskid had some witness marks on its lowest bottom surface consistent with scuffing.

Observed damage to the cabin structure included deformation, discoloration, and consummation by fire. The removable cyclic and collective were recovered from under seat debris. The removable pedals were installed. The pedals were found in a neutral position. The vertical tube of the cyclic control was bent aft. The cyclic grip was consumed by fire. The aft left and aft right doors were recovered in the main wreckage and sustained thermal damage. The two front doors were not identified or found in the wreckage.

The upper and lower frames were bent and had some separations in their tubes. The surface of the separations exhibited angular and jagged features consistent with overload. The lower edge of the vertical firewall was deformed. The tailcone was bent to the left and thermally damaged at its forward end. An aft tailcone bay by its tail rotor was separated from the tailcone and the separated tailcone exhibited deformation damage consistent with several tail rotor blade strikes. The empennage was separated from the aft bulkhead. The surface of the separation was rough and jagged. The lower vertical stabilizer was bent to the right as viewed from its aft looking forward. A segment of the tail rotor guard that included the curved section of the tail rotor guard was separated below its forward mount and forward of its aft mount. The surfaces of the guard's separations were angular and jagged. The aft section of the tail rotor guard remained attached to its mount and the tip of the tail rotor guard exhibited witness marks consistent with scuffing on its lower left surface.

Sections of the V-belts were consumed by fire with charred sections remaining in the grooves of the upper sheave and on the ground below the lower sheave. The alignment strut's outer rod end for the upper sheave exhibited a separation consistent with overload. No scoring was visible on the sheave face. Scoring was visible on the rod end jam nut adjacent to the aft sheave face. The overrunning clutch operated properly. The actuator was extended approximately one inch.

The main rotor gearbox was separated at the upper housing. The main rotor driveshaft was bent approximately 15 degrees at the swashplate. The mast tube was bent and exhibited thermal discoloration and damage. Both elastomeric teeter stops were consumed by fire. Their brackets were bent across the center. One droop stop tusk was bent downward and the spindle was found cracked. The surface of its crack separation was angular and jagged. The other spindle coning bolthole was deformed.
Both main rotor blades exhibited thermal damage and deformation consistent with impact damage.

The lower frame tube adjacent to the intermediate flex coupling exhibited rotational scoring. The tail rotor driveshaft was bent near its forward end and was disconnected just aft of the bend. The tail rotor drive shaft damper bearing bracket was separated from the bulkhead. The damper bearing exhibited thermal damage and would not rotate. The tail rotor gearbox rotated with no anomalies. Oil was visible in its sight gage. The blades were separated near their roots. The surface of the tail rotor blades' separations exhibited angular and jagged features consistent with overload. Both blades were bent to the right and they exhibited damage to their leading edge at their tips. One blade exhibited deformation damage that was consistent with rivet locations on tailcone. Witness marks running chordwise near the blade tips were present on both blades, which appeared to be consistent with terrain contact.

Observed damage to the cooling fan included discoloration and it was deformed around its forward edge. The cooling scroll was consumed by fire. The alternator's cooling fan was deformed.

The engine was found lying upright and it remained attached to its tubular engine mounts. The exterior surfaces of the engine were discolored consistent with exposure to a post-impact fire. Sections of the oil sump were consumed in the fire. The fuel servo was found separated and partially thermally consumed. The remaining rear mounted accessories exhibited features consistent with fire damaged.

The engine was partially disassembled. The engine was rotated by turning the cooling fan and continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train was confirmed. Thumb compression and suction was observed from all six cylinders as the engine was rotated. The interiors of the cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope and no anomalies noted. The two-piece fuel injector nozzles were disassembled and were found to be unobstructed. Disassembly of both magnetos revealed their internal components sustained thermal damage. The removed sparkplug electrodes exhibited light brown coloration and worn out normal condition when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart.

The Arkansas State Crime Lab Medical Examiner's Office was asked to conduct an autopsy and to take toxicological samples.

The turf, in a circular shaped area around the helicopter was found charred. Portions or the helicopter wreckage were discolored, deformed, and consumed by fire consistent with a ground fire.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Floyd Vuncannon during an interview with Region 8 News in 2010 .

Floyd Vuncannon



JONESBORO, AR (KAIT) -

Witnesses tell investigators a man killed in a helicopter crash Sunday had been drinking and was told not to fly.

Floyd Vuncannon, 72, of Jonesboro died when his helicopter crashed Sunday afternoon at the Classic Airstrip on Highway 18.

Craighead County sheriff’s investigators interviewed two men who witnessed the crash, according to the initial incident report.

One of the men said that Vuncannon was “intoxicated” and had been told not to fly anything.

The second witness corroborated the first’s account, saying Vuncannon had been “drinking for some time” before he got into the helicopter.

The man added that Vuncannon “took off from his hangar before pulling back at a 45-degree angle.”

The helicopter then stalled approximately 125-150 feet in the air before descending toward the ground.

The witness said the helicopter began to spin again before going back up to 150 feet in the air.

“The aircraft then made a descent nose first into the ground,” the report stated. “It immediately burst into flames.”

Sheriff Marty Boyd told Region 8 News that investigators cannot say whether Vuncannon was intoxicated or not.

The body has been sent to the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory in Little Rock for an autopsy and toxicology report.

The Craighead County Sheriff's Office conducted the initial crash investigation; but, Boyd says the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board is now in charge of the investigation.

Story and video: http://www.kait8.com