Monday, June 13, 2016

Ryan Navion, Lost Horizon Aero Company Inc., N4171K; accident occurred June 13, 2016 in McMinnville, Yamhill County, Oregon -Kathryn's Report

Lost Horizon Aero Company Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N4171K

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Portland FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA317
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 13, 2016 in McMinnville, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION, registration: N4171K
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that about 15 minutes after takeoff he smelled something burning and the cabin filled with smoke. The pilot further reported that the engine lost power and that he was forced to maneuver for an emergency landing. After the loss of power, he heard a "clanging noise" from the engine. While landing in a field, the airplane impacted blueberry bushes and a fence, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

During a postaccident examination by the local law enforcement, it was revealed that the oil filler cap was not in place on the oil filler tube. The oil filler cap retaining chain was still attached to the oil cap and the oil filler tube. Upon further examination of the oil cap and the oil filler tube, no evidence of damage was noted.

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to replace the oil filler cap following the preflight inspection, which resulted in a loss of engine oil and engine power, an emergency landing, and impact with terrain.


YAMHILL COUNTY, Ore. — Police say two people suffered minor injuries after making an emergency landing in Yamhill County Monday afternoon.

The pilot of a single-engine plane headed to San Jose from somewhere in Washington had electrical issues, so he rerouted to McMinnville. The plane lost power before they got to the airport, so they made an emergency landing at Lafayette Highway near Leach Lane.

The pilot and a passenger walked away with minor injuries. The plane is damaged, but didn't catch on fire.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the single-engine Ryan Navion was built in 1948. Lost Horizon Aero Company LLC, based in Seattle, Washington, owns the plane.

The FAA will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here:  http://katu.com

Cape college's aviation program taking off

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Shannon Dugan, who plans to attend the new aviations program at Cape Cod Community College, looks over the Pratt & Whitney V2500-A1 engine students will be able to study and work on at the college's Aviation Maintenance Technology Facility at Plymouth Municipal Airport where a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Monday. 



PLYMOUTH — Against a blue backdrop framed by an open hangar door at Plymouth Municipal Airport, Cape Cod Community College President John Cox on Monday predicted clear skies for the college’s new aviation maintenance program.

“We’re celebrating one of those moments in the history of our college” that people will remember decades from now, Cox said during a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the program that is scheduled to start accepting students in September.

The 12-month certificate program will allow graduates to sit for the Federal Aviation Administration’s certification exam in airplane mechanics, known as airframe and powerplant, Cox said.



The program is getting off the ground with about $5.6 million in state and federal grants, including money for financial aid, Cox said.

Plymouth Municipal Airport “ended up being the most cost effective” of airport space that went out to bid, beating out Barnstable Municipal Airport and New Bedford Regional Airport, he said. Students will progress through the program in “cohorts” of 25, with about 65 full-time equivalent students being enrolled in the program at any one point.

The facility in Plymouth includes classrooms for all aspects of the aviation program, according to college spokesman Michael Gross.

The college is still working with the FAA, which requires facilities and staff to be in place before giving its approval, to get final sign off for the program, Cox said.

Monday's ceremony opened with Cox calling for attendees to remember the victims of the Orlando shootings and their families.

“It was a very unsettling thing coming here today to celebrate anything,” said U.S. Rep. William Keating, D-Mass.

But the promise of a bright financial future for young people is a weapon against terrorism and radicalization, he said.

What Cape Cod Community College is working toward “is so important on days like this,” Keating said.

Legislators, educators and aviation industry executives said the mechanics program will result in good-paying jobs and help address a worldwide shortage of aircraft technicians.

“There are very few programs like this in the state and in the country,” said Sheila Vanderhoef, chairwoman of the Cape Cod Community College Board of Trustees.

“We are going to train the next generation,” said board Vice Chairman David Bushy, a pilot and retired airline industry executive.

With the age of aircraft mechanics now averaging 51 or 52, there will be a need for hundreds of thousands of mechanics around the world, Bushy said.

Eric Goeldner, 35, of Dennis, plans to be one of them.

A chef for 20 years, Goeldner said he was planning to make a career change when he heard about the aviation maintenance program and took a tour of the new facility, which includes two hangars, classroom space with state-of-the-art computers and, as of last week, a massive jet engine donated by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft as a hands-on learning tool.

“It’s just fantastic,” Goeldner said. He said he intends to get his aircraft mechanic’s certificate as well as an associate’s degree in applied science and then go on to Bridgewater University.

With the bank of skills he is building, his future could include a career in aviation — or with the MBTA or drones in California , Goeldner said.

“The opportunities are endless,” he said.

The college's aviation mechanic program is “creating another avenue for people to get real jobs,” said state Sen. Viriato “Vinny” deMacedo, R-Plymouth. “This is a collaborative move like none other.”

After two years, aircraft mechanics earn about $50,000 a year, Bushy said.

Shannon Dugan, of Yarmouth, plans to start attending classes in September.

“I’ve been excited since January” after first learning about the program, Dugan said.

“We’re so lucky to have this nearby,” said Susan DeWitt, of Sandwich, who attended the ribbon cutting ceremony with her son Sean DeWitt, who also plans to start the aviation program this fall.

“He can get out of here and get a job right away. It’s affordable, it’s gorgeous — very state of the art,” Susan DeWitt said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.capecodtimes.com

Cessna R172K Hawk XP, Whitesands Inc., N736TB: Incident occurred June 12, 2016 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 12-JUN-16
Time: 21:51:00Z
Regis#: N736TB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07
City: OGDEN
State: Utah

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER, OGDEN, UTAH.

WHITESANDS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N736TB

Perikles Fok-Dr1, Training Services Inc., N757FK: Incident occurred June 12, 2016 in Virginia Beach, Virginia

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 12-JUN-16
Time: 00:13:00Z
Regis#: N757FK
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21
City: VIRGINIA BEACH
State: Virginia

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL EXHIBITION FOK-DRI, ON TAXI STRUCK THE PROPELLER, VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA.

TRAINING SERVICES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N757FK

Air Tractor Inc AT-802A, Thompson Flying Service, N20361: Accident occurred June 12, 2016 in Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois

THOMPSON FLYING SERVICE LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N20361

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Springfield FSDO-19

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA313
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, June 12, 2016 in Cairo, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 802, registration: N20361
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the takeoff roll, the airplane "pulled hard to the left." He recalled that he applied full right rudder pedal and realized that he was approaching the end of the runway. He reported that he applied both brakes, he applied reverse thrust, the airplane exited the runway to the left and ground looped. The pilot reported that he did not confirm that the tailwheel pin was locked, prior to the takeoff roll. He further reported that in the future, he will confirm that the tailwheel is locked by working the tail back and forth, and he will check the tailwheel for inhibiting buildup of fertilizer, grease and dirt that would prevent tailwheel pin actuation. The right wing sustained substantial damage.

Per the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Safety Inspector that arrived shortly after the accident occurred, the airplane was dispersing fertilizer as part of a 49 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 operation. The prolonged use of fertilizer coupled with dirt, will inhibit the tailwheel pin from locking in place. A photograph was taken shortly after the accident by the FAA Inspector revealing a canted tailwheel. The FAA Inspector reported that the mechanic that performed the inspection on the tailwheel assembly noted that the assembly was, "gummed up with fertilizer and the pin was not in place at the time of the ground loop.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to ensure that the tailwheel pin was in the locked position prior to the takeoff roll, resulting in a runway excursion, ground loop, and substantial damage.

Luscombe 8A, N2850K; accident occurred June 12, 2016 in Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N2850K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA South Bend FSDO-17

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA307
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in Valparaiso, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8, registration: N2850K
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during landing the airplane bounced, subsequently the leaf spring on the tail wheel broke midspan. The pilot further reported that the airplane veered to the right despite full left rudder deflection and brake application, which resulted in a ground loop, left main landing gear collapse, and substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper descent rate during landing, which resulted in a bounced landing, failure of the tailwheel suspension leaf spring, a ground loop, and substantial damage to the left wing.

Cessna 525B Citation CJ3, N51EM: Incidents occurred April 25, 2017 in Baltimore, Maryland (and) June 12, 2016 in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland 

26 North Aviation Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N51EM

Aircraft on landing, went off the end of the runway into the grass and struck threshold lights.

Date: 25-APR-17
Time: 16:51:00Z
Regis#: N51EM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C525B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BALTIMORE
State: MARYLAND

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aircraft on landing, wheel separated from gear.


Date: 12-JUN-16
Time: 20:55:00Z
Regis#: N51EM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA FSDO: FAA Allentown FSDO-05
City: ALLENTOWN
State: Pennsylvania

Socata RALLYE 150ST, N319RA: Accident occurred June 11, 2016 in York County, South Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N319RA 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA306
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in York, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: S.O.C.A.T.A. RALLYE 150, registration: N319RA
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during takeoff in crosswind conditions, after rotation and about 6 feet above the ground, a gust of wind from the right pushed the airplane to the left of the runway toward a group of peach trees. The pilot further reported that he applied additional correction for the crosswind drift but was unable to give full deflection due to the proximity of the airplane above the ground, the left wing impacted the tree(s), and subsequently the airplane spun to the left. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located about 10 miles to the south east, revealed that, about 36 minutes before the accident the wind was 270 degrees true at 8 knots. A further review revealed that, about 24 minutes after the accident the wind was 290 degrees true at 10 knots. The airplane landed on runway 18.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff, which resulted in an impact with a peach tree(s).

Cessna 310I, N8055M: Incident occurred June 11, 2016 in Burleson, Texas

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 11-JUN-16
Time: 18:21:00Z
Regis#: N8055M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19
City: BURLESON
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, BURLESON, TEXAS.

http://registry.faa.gov/N8055M

Piper PA-28-140, N6700J: Accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Gilmer, Upshur County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N6700J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA312
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Gilmer, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N6700J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that he was providing simulated engine failure (SEF) training, with a left 180 degree turn, to the student pilot. He reported that during the second SEF, he cut the power and the student pilot slowly made a left turn from downwind to base. The flight instructor recalled that the student "cut the base leg short" and turned toward the end of the runway. He reported that the airplane was about 25 degrees to the left of the runway centerline, the sun was setting and they failed to see the powerline wires. The airplane struck the wires and fell to the ground sustaining substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane that would have precluded normal flight operations.

As a recommendation the flight instructor reported that due to the calm wind, he should have switched to the reciprocal runway to mitigate the sun's position during landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The student pilot's failure to see and avoid powerlines during landing, and the flight instructor's delayed remediation when the student cut the base to final turn short, resulting in a wire strike and collision with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's lack of vigilance in monitoring the area for hazards, and the low light condition.

Experimental SNB, N8398T: Incident occurred June 11, 2016 in Detroit Lakes, Becker County, Minnesota

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 11-JUN-16
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: N8398T
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15
City: DETROIT LAKES
State: Minnesota

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL SNB, ON LANDING FLIPPED OVER, DETROIT LAKES, MINNESOTA.

http://registry.faa.gov/N8398T

Cessna 310G, Sofi LLC, N8943Z; accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Apopka, Orange County, Florida -Kathryn's Report

SOFI LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N8943Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA213
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Apopka, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 310, registration: N8943Z
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2016, about 1610 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 310G, N8943Z, collided with a berm during the landing roll at the Orlando Apopka Airport (X04), Apopka, Florida. The airline transport pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to SOFI, LLC, and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations as a Part 91 local, post maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed from X04 at 1515.

The accident flight was the airplane's first flight after an annual inspection, and it had not been flown for about 2 years prior.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot stated he taxied to runway 33, a 3,987-foot-long, 60-foot-wide, asphalt runway, departed and performed two touch-and-go landings. After the second touch-and-go landing, he intended to perform a full-stop landing. The pilot reported the touchdown was normal and in the normal/typical location. After touchdown he retracted the flaps and allowed the airplane to slow aerodynamically to the end of the runway. As the airplane approached the end of the runway, the pilot applied the normal brakes; however, the left brake did not function. He secured the engines, and attempted to maintain control while applying the right brake in an effort to slow the airplane. The airplane went off the right side of the runway at the end and contacted upsloping terrain which caused spar damage to the left horizontal stabilizer.

Post accident examination of the airplane's brake system was performed following recovery of the airplane by an FAA airworthiness inspector. Operational testing of the brakes on the pilot's side revealed no discrepancies; however, operational testing of the brakes on the copilot's side revealed a discrepancy with the right brake. No brake system leaks were noted and the fluid levels in both brake master cylinders were at the correct level. The airplane was retained for further examination.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Air America Imagery LLC, N21767: Accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Deming, Luna County, New Mexico

Air America Imagery LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N21767 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA228

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Deming, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N21767
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2016, about 1520 mountain daylight time, a Cessna model 172S single-engine airplane, N21767, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Deming Municipal Airport (DMN), in Deming, New Mexico. The commercial pilot and his pilot-rated-passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Air America Imagery LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight to an unconfirmed destination airport.

Cirrus SR20, Choctaw Brothers Aviation LLC, N975TK: Incident occurred June 10, 2016 in Wiley Post Airport (KPWA), Bethany, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 10-JUN-16
Time: 20:03:00Z
Regis#: N975TK
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15
City: BETHANY
State: Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, WILEY POST AIRPORT, BETHANY, OKLAHOMA.

CHOCTAW BROTHERS AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N975TK

Team Tango Tango 2, N324TT; accident occurred June 10, 2016 in Sunrise Beach Village, Llano County, Texas -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N324TT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA299
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Sunrise Beach Village, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: BAREISS DAVID A TANGO 2, registration: N324TT
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while decelerating during the landing roll on a grass runway the nose gear began to skid. The pilot further reported that the nose gear impacted an ant hill, which resulted in a nose over and substantial damage to the fuselage and empennage

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

After the accident, the pilot reported that the tolerance between the nose wheel tire and fairing was estimated to be 1/4". The pilot further reported that there was debris build up in the back of the nose gear fairing and that during a postaccident check the nose gear was not able to rotate as freely as the main landing gears.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The nosewheel fairing becoming packed with debris during landing on the soft field due to a gap between the nosewheel tire and the fairing, which resulted in a loss of control and subsequent nose-over.

United Airlines, Boeing 777-222, N779UA: Incident occurred June 10, 2016 in Denver, Colorado

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 10-JUN-16
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N779UA
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 777
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: UAL-United Airlines
Flight Number: UAL328
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03
City: DENVER
State: Colorado

N779UA UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT UAL328 BOEING 777 AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE EXPERIENCED AN ENGINE MALFUNCTION, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE TO BE DETERMINED, DENVER, COLORADO 

UNITED AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N779UA

Van's RV-6, N164BJ: Incident occurred June 10, 2016 in Halsey, Linn County, Oregon

Kathryn's Report:http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 10-JUN-16
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: N164BJ
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: HALSEY
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR HALSEY, OREGON

http://registry.faa.gov/N164BJ

Cessna 150, N102DK: Fatal accident occurred June 13, 2016 near Butler Field Airport (IN46), Rockville, Adams Township, Parke County, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Kurt Michael Waugh:   http://registry.faa.gov/N102DK

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA216 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 13, 2016 in Rockville, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA 150F, registration: N102DK
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 13, 2016, at 0957 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150F airplane, N102DK, impacted trees and terrain after departure from Butler Field Airport (IN46), Rockville, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed about the time of the accident near the accident site, and no flight plan filed. The flight was destined for Eagle Creek Airpark, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

According to a witness who was mowing grass at IN46, the airplane lifted off from the grass runway near midfield. The witness noticed that the airplane initially climbed with a high pitch attitude, but he did not observe the subsequent climbout or accident. The airplane struck the top of 50-ft-tall trees located about 1,100 ft past the departure end of the runway and came to rest about 125 ft beyond the initial tree strike. A postcrash fire ensued. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 

The pilot, age 44, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. On March 15, 2016, the pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate with no limitations. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported having 60 hours of total flight time with 25 hours in the last 6 months. The pilot's logbooks were not available for the investigation. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 

The accident airplane, a Cessna 150F, was manufactured in 1966. It was powered by a Continental Motors O-200A engine, serial number 63037-6-A. On April 24, 2002, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved the use of auto gas for the airplane and engine in accordance with supplemental type certificates SE634GL and SA633. At the time of the airplane's last annual inspection on December 26, 2015, the airframe had accumulated 6,184 total hours, and the engine had accumulated 961 hours since its last overhaul. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 

At 1015, the weather observation station at Edgar County Airport, Paris, Illinois, located about 21 miles west of the accident site, reported wind from 110° at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 24° C, dew point 13° C, and altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of mercury. 

AIRPORT INFORMATION 

IN46 was a privately owned, uncontrolled airport, located in a rural area 2 miles south of Rockville, Indiana. The airport elevation was 687 ft mean sea level, and the grass runway, oriented in a 09/27 configuration, was 2,081 ft long and 65 ft wide. The runway was dry and in good condition at the time of the accident. When using runway 27, a 20-to-1 slope was required to clear trees 500 ft beyond the departure end. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION 

The wreckage was located about 1,100 ft beyond the departure end of runway 27 slightly right of the projected runway centerline. Damage was observed to the tops of trees about 125 ft preceding the wreckage location, and broken branches were found below these trees. Broken tree branches were consistent with the airplane descending through the trees at an angle of about 70°. No damage was noted to terrain outside of the immediate footprint of the airplane, which came to rest upright and aligned with the runway heading. 

The cabin area of the fuselage was destroyed by fire, but the tail section was mostly intact and undamaged by fire. Damage to both wing leading edges was consistent with tree and branch impact. One of the propeller's blade tips was bent forward at a 90° angle, and the other blade was bent aft and embedded in the ground. 

Examination of the airplane revealed normal flight control continuity, and no anomalies of the flight control surfaces were noted. The flaps actuator indicated that the flaps were in the "up" position and that the elevator trim was near the "neutral" position. All cockpit engine controls were fire damaged, and the throttle was observed in the "full open" position. 

The engine was removed for further examination, and the carburetor was disassembled, and no anomalies were noted except for thermal damage. The throttle and mixture control arms moved freely by hand, and the accelerator pump actuated normally. 

The top spark plugs were removed, and the electrodes exhibited normal signatures. The cylinder combustion chambers were examined with a lighted borescope, and no anomalies were noted. The propeller was rotated by hand, and engine continuity was confirmed with thumb compression obtained on all four cylinders. The magnetos and ignition harness were thermally damaged, and the magnetos did not produce spark. 

Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The Terre Haute Regional Hospital Department of Pathology conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report noted the cause of death was "blunt force injuries." The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed toxicology tests on the pilot's specimens, and the results were negative for tested drugs. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH 

Weight and Balance Calculations 

Based on the pilot's medical certificate weight, the passenger's driver's license weight, and a full fuel load of 26 gallons, the airplane's takeoff weight would have been 45 lbs above its maximum gross weight. Although a witness observed the pilot add fuel to the airplane with plastic jugs from his car trunk, the investigation was unable to determine the actual amount of fuel onboard the airplane during the takeoff. 

Based on the Pilot's Operating Handbook performance chart, at maximum gross weight and 24° C with no wind, 1,500 ft of runway would have been needed to clear a 50-ft-high obstacle. The chart did not contain a correction for a grass runway. 

Applicable Guidance 

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3B, Chapter 5) describes ground effect as follows: 

Ground effect is a condition of improved performance encountered when the airplane is operating very close to the ground. Ground effect can be detected and measured up to an altitude equal to one wingspan above the surface. When the wing is under the influence of ground effect, there is a reduction in upwash, downwash, and wingtip vortices. As a result of the reduced wingtip vortices, induced drag is reduced. 

Due to the reduced drag in ground effect, the airplane may seem to be able to take off below the recommended airspeed. However, as the airplane rises out of ground effect with an insufficient airspeed, initial climb performance may prove to be marginal because of the increased drag. Under conditions of high-density altitude, high temperature, and/or maximum gross weight, the airplane may be able to become airborne at an insufficient airspeed, but unable to climb out of ground effect. Consequently, the airplane may not be able to clear obstructions. 

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook contains the following information about a soft-field takeoff: 

After becoming airborne, the nose should be lowered very gently with the wheels clear of the surface to allow the airplane to accelerate to Vy, or Vx if obstacles must be cleared. Extreme care must be exercised immediately after the airplane becomes airborne and while it accelerates, to avoid settling back onto the surface. An attempt to climb prematurely or too steeply may cause the airplane to settle back to the surface as a result of losing the benefit of ground effect. An attempt to climb out of ground effect before sufficient climb airspeed is attained may result in the airplane being unable to climb further as the ground effect area is transited, even with full power. Therefore, it is essential that the airplane remain in ground effect until at least Vx is reached.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA216
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 13, 2016 in Rockville, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA 150F, registration: N102DK
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 13, 2016, at 0957 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150F airplane, N102DK, impacted terrain while departing from Butler Field Airport (IN46), Rockville, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident. The flight departed without a flight plan and was destined for Eagle Creek Airpark (EYE), Indianapolis, Indiana. 

According to a witness mowing grass at IN46, the airplane lifted off near midfield from the 2,081 x 65 ft turf runway. The witness noticed the airplane initially climb with a high pitch attitude, but did not observe the subsequent climb out or accident. The airplane struck the top of trees located about 1,125 ft from the departure end of the runway and came to rest about 125 ft beyond the initial tree strike. A post-crash fire ensued.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

PARKE COUNTY, Ind. (WTHI) The investigation is on-going after two died in a plane crash Monday morning in Parke County.

The Parke County Sheriffs Office reported on Monday that the Cessna 150 crashed shortly after take-off from Butler Airfield, which is just south of Rockville.

Both occupants died in the accident after it crashed in a wooded area behind a home. The cause of the accident is not yet known.

One of the identities of the two who died in the crash was released Tuesday afternoon. That person was Kurt M. Waugh, 44 of Rockville and was the pilot of the plane.

Wednesday morning, the second victim was identified as Kimberly D. Heald-Chaplin, 39 of Terre Haute

The cause of death has been ruled as blunt force trauma for both Waugh and Heald-Chaplin.

Officials reported the identity of the second victim will be released at a later time after further testing and procedures are performed.


Parke County Sheriff Cole reports the National Transportation Safety Board as well as the FAA continue to investigate this accident.

Story and video:  http://wishtv.com
















PARKE COUNTY, Ind. (WTHI) – The Parke County Sheriff’s Office reports two people are dead after a small plane crash Monday morning in Parke County just south of Rockville.

PCSO reports the small, single engine aircraft crashed in a wooded area near Butler Airfield around 10 a.m. and that both occupants inside the plane were pronounced dead at the scene.

Parke County Sheriff Justin Cole reports the FAA was responding and the National Transportation Safety Board reports they are investigating as well.

NTSB stated the crash involved a Cessna 150 and the accident was during take-off.

Officials report they have not identified the two who died in the accident but autopsies are scheduled for Tuesday at Regional Hospital.

According to airnav.com, Butler Field Airport is a privately owned airfield and houses seven, single engine airplanes.


Original article can be found here: http://wthitv.com 





ROCKVILLE, Ind. -- Two people were killed Monday when their plane crashed in Parke County.

The small, single-engine aircraft crashed into a wooded area just after takeoff from Butler Field Airport in Rockville, Indiana, around 10 a.m. Monday.

The Parke County Sheriff's Department said both occupants of the plane were killed in the crash.

The identities of the victims weren't being released pending notification of their families.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.theindychannel.com




The Parke County Sheriff's office confirms that two occupants in a plane crash in central Parke County south of Rockville this morning were pronounced dead at the scene.

Positive identification has yet to be made. Autopsies are scheduled for Tuesday at Terre Haute Regional Hospital.

An investigator from the Federal Aviation Administration is on the scene of the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board has personnel en route to the crash site.

Deputy Shay Vandivier of the Parke County Sheriff's Department confirmed that the small, single engine aircraft was found in a wooded area northeast of the intersection of Catlin Road and County Road 200 South.

The location of the crash is about a half-mile west of Butler Airfield, a deputy at the scene said.

The crash occurred at about 10 a.m. shortly after takeoff from a grass runway at Butler Airfield.

The cornfield adjacent to the scene has been restricted with yellow crime scene tape.

Sheriff Justin Cole said notification of family is ongoing.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.tribstar.com