Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Cessna R172K Hawk XP, N736AS: Fatal accident occurred March 05, 2017 in Nome, Alaska


Thomas Joseph Grainger 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Fairbanks, Alaska  

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N736AS


Location: Nome, AK
Accident Number: ANC17FA018
Date & Time: 03/05/2017, 2223 AKS
Registration: N736AS
Aircraft: CESSNA R172K
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 5, 2017, about 2223 Alaska standard time, a Cessna R172K airplane, N736AS, impacted sea ice in Norton Sound, about 10 miles east of Nome, Alaska. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight, and instrument meteorological condition (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed. The flight departed Wasilla Airport (IYS), Wasilla, Alaska, at 1710 destined for Nome City Field Airport (94Z), Nome, Alaska.

The pilot's fiancée stated that the pilot had not flown his airplane since late summer 2016 and that he had listed the airplane for sale in January 2017 because he flew the airplane infrequently. She said that the pilot had flown to Nome often but usually during the summer. On the day of the accident, the pilot's fiancée observed him fueling the airplane from a self-service commercial fuel tank and filling 5-gallon fuel containers before departure. A fuel receipt indicated that the pilot purchased 35.3 gallons of fuel. 

The distance from IYS to 94Z is about 470 nautical miles (nm). The pilot's fiancée reported that she received a text message from the pilot about 2100 indicating that he was about 45 minutes from 94Z but would not be able to land there due to weather. The pilot also sent a text message to a friend in Nome, asking about the weather. The friend reported that she sent a text message at 2141 to the pilot indicating a visibility of 10 miles and a ceiling of 600 ft overcast. The pilot responded, "Ok I think I can sneak in." He sent text messages to his friend indicating "one more try" and "one more ok" before texting "not happening" at 2214. A review of Garmin GPSmap 296 data showed an airplane track that included four approaches to runway 21 at 94Z, some maneuvering in the area, and a departure from the area to the east.

Witnesses observed the airplane in fog. They stated that the airplane engine sounded normal and that the airplane lights were on. One witness called the Nome flight service station to ensure that the runway lights were on at Nome Airport (PAOM), which was a larger airport located 1 mile west of 94Z. This witness stated that he was surprised that someone would attempt to land at 94Z given the weather conditions (reported by a witness who lived near 94Z to be "very foggy" with a ceiling of about 300 ft) and the unlit snow-covered runway. That witness observed the airplane making multiple approaches in fog and then departing to the east. He also heard, on the common traffic advisory frequency, a transmission that sounded as if someone were stating "no, no, no!" sometime after the airplane departed the area. This witness then listened to another frequency for an emergency locator transmitter signal but did not hear one.

The Garmin GPSmap 296 data showed that the airplane made no en route stops after departure from IYS and that the airplane was at an altitude of about 9,000 ft while in cruise flight. The total GPS distance flown was 518 nm; the total GPS movement time was about 5 hours 15 minutes. The last GPS data point, which was 9 minutes after the last landing attempt, was at 2223 and indicated that the airplane's groundspeed was 36 knots at an altitude of 373 ft. Figure 1 shows the GPS track data in the Nome area. A GPS report is in the public docket for this accident.


Figure 1. Garmin GPSmap 296 flight data and airport and wreckage locations.


The pilot's fiancée reported the airplane overdue about 0530 on March 6. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice at 0606, and an area-wide airport and radio search was conducted. About 0959, a Nome search and rescue crew located the airplane wreckage on sea ice about 10 miles east of Nome, in Norton Sound near Hastings Creek. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 28, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/22/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 250 hours (Total, all aircraft), 250 hours (Total, this make and model), 200 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 28, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He held a third-class medical certificate issued on January 22, 2013, with the limitation "not valid for night flying or by color signal control." A review of FAA aeromedical certification documentation revealed that the pilot failed the color vision test during his 2013 and 2006 aeromedical physicals. According to a statement by the pilot's fiancée, the pilot was well rested and had worked until 1300 on the day of the accident.

The pilot's logbook was not located. His most recent FAA medical application, dated January 22, 2013, stated that he had 62 hours total flight experience with no accumulated time in the previous 6 months. The flight time that the pilot accumulated in the 4 years after the examination could not be determined. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N736AS
Model/Series: R172K K
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate:  Normal
Serial Number: R1722378
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/05/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2102.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-K
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 210 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear Cessna R172K Hawk XP airplane, serial number R1722378, was manufactured in 1977. The airplane was equipped with a 210-horsepower Continental Motors IO-360-K engine, serial number 355372, and a constant-speed two-blade McCauley 2A34C203-C propeller. The airplane was configured with wheels.

A review of the airframe and engine logbooks revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on February 5, 2015, with a tachometer time of 1,380.4 hours, an airframe total time of 2,102.5 hours, and an engine time since major overhaul of 131.4 hours. The airplane had not been inspected for more than 2 years before the accident and thus was not in compliance with 14 CFR 91.409(a), which states that airplanes operating under Part 91 are required to undergo annual inspections.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAOM, 22 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0704 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 293°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Thin Overcast / 400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:  Overcast / 400 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:  Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.49 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -21°C / -22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: WASILLA, AK (IYS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: NOME, AK (94Z)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1710 AKS
Type of Airspace: Class E

The closest weather reporting facility was PAOM, which was about 11 miles west of the accident site. At 2204, an automated special weather observation report indicated the following conditions: wind calm, sky overcast 400 ft, visibility 10 miles, temperature -21°C, dew point 22°C, and altimeter 30.49 inches of mercury.

The PAOM terminal aerodrome forecast (TAF) that was published at 1422 on the day of the accident, which would have been available to the pilot before the flight, stated the following conditions from 1600 onward: wind 330° at 3 knots, visibility 4 miles in light snow and mist, and ceiling broken at 1,500 ft. The next TAF was published at 2020, which was after the flight departed, and was valid starting at 2100. The TAF forecasted wind from 280° at 4 knots, visibility 1 ½ miles in light snow and mist, and ceiling overcast at 500 ft. No evidence indicated that the pilot obtained a weather brief before or during the flight.

The nearest public airport outside of Nome is White Mountain Airport (PAWM), White Mountain, Alaska, which is 60 miles northeast of Nome. The 2158 and 2258 automated observations at PAWM both reported a visibility of 10 miles and a clear ceiling. 

The US Naval Observatory listed sunset in Nome on March 5, 2017, at 1933 and the end of evening civil twilight at 2022. The FAA defines night at "the time between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight."

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 64.448056, -165.091389 (est)

The airplane came to rest in an open area of sea ice and snow in a steep nose-low attitude on a 110° heading, as shown in figure 2. All major components were located in the wreckage field. The engine, forward fuselage, and cabin were significantly crushed, and the wing leading edges exhibited fore-to-aft accordion crush damage. The empennage and rear fuselage were intact with a spanwise fracture and torsional displacement of the rear fuselage behind the wing. All flight control surfaces remained attached to the airplane, and continuity to the cockpit controls was established. The flaps were in the up position. 


Figure 2. N736AS wreckage on the Norton Sound sea ice.


The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft, and the propeller blades were bent slightly aft with no chordwise abrasions or torsional deformation. The engine exhibited impact damage, and the crankcase and cylinders remained intact with no evidence of a catastrophic failure. 

The left and right fuel tank caps were secure, and no measurable fuel was observed in either wing fuel tank, which appeared intact. The fuel selector knob indicated "both." Six plastic 5-gallon containers were located in the aft cabin area. Two of the cans were intact and full of fuel, two were ruptured and smelled of fuel, and two were intact and empty. A large cooler with packaged marijuana was discovered in the rear seat.

Airport Information


According to the FAA Alaska Chart Supplement, 94Z is a public airport with one runway, 03/21. Airport comments state no winter maintenance or snow removal, runway condition not monitored, and visual inspection recommended before landing.

PAOM has a part-time flight service station, instrument approaches to the airport's two runways, and approach lighting systems and precision approach path indicator lights for the runways. Snow removal is performed daily from 0600 to 2130.

PAWM has medium-intensity runway lighting. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Alaska State Medical Examiner, Anchorage, Alaska, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The autopsy report attributed the pilot's cause of death to multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot with negative results for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and drugs.

Additional Information

Performance


Fuel Planning


The Cessna 172 Hawk XP pilot operating handbook (POH) indicated that the airplane had a total fuel capacity of 52 gallons and a usable fuel quantity of 49 gallons. A range profile chart in section 5, figure 5-8, indicated that, with standard temperature conditions, at an altitude of 9,000 ft, and with no wind, a 545-nm range can be planned at 60% brake horsepower (BHP), and a 505-nm range can be planned at 70% BHP, with a 5-gallon fuel reserve for each range. The engine power settings and the total fuel quantity at the start of the flight are unknown.

Engine Failure

Section 3 of the POH states the following:


After an engine failure in flight, the best glide speed should be established as quickly as possible. While gliding toward a suitable landing area, an effort should be made to identify the cause of the failure. If the engine cannot be restarted, a forced landing without power must be completed.

The POH also stated that the first procedure for an engine failure during flight is to attain 75 knots (indicated airspeed).

Stalls

Section 2, figure 2-2 of the POH indicated that the stall speed at maximum gross weight with the flaps retracted was 54 knots.

The FAA's Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3A), chapter 4, states the following concerning stalls:

A stall is an aerodynamic condition which occurs when smooth airflow over the airplane's wings is disrupted resulting in loss of lift. Specifically, a stall occurs when the AOA [angle-of-attack]—the angle between the chord line of the wing and the relative wind—exceeds the wing's critical AOA. It is possible to exceed the critical AOA at any airspeed, at any attitude, and at any power setting…. A pilot must recognize the flight conditions that are conductive to stalls and know how to apply the necessary corrective action. This level of proficiency requires learning to recognize an impending stall by sight, sound, and feel.

NTSB Identification: ANC17FA018
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 05, 2017 in Nome, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA R172K, registration: N736AS
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 5, 2017, about 2223 Alaska standard time, a wheel-equipped Cessna 172K airplane, N736AS, sustained substantial damage during impact with sea ice in Norton Sound about 10 miles east of Nome, Alaska. The private pilot and sole occupant received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed along the route of flight, and instrument meteorological condition (IMC) prevailed at the destination. No flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Wasilla Airport, Wasilla, Alaska at 1710 destined for Nome City Field Airport (94Z), Nome.

During an interview with the National Transportations Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on March 7, the pilot's fiancé said that the pilot was going to visit friends in Nome and that he was time limited by his work schedule. She said that at about 1700 she witnessed him fueling the airplane and two fuel containers, for a total of 35.3 gallons, per the fuel company records. She said that the pilot flew this route often, maybe 20 times before, but usually in summer.

During an interview with the NTSB IIC on March 8, a friend of the pilot in Nome said that she was expecting him that night by 2130 and he was planning to land at Nome City Field. The airplane arrived in the Nome area at 2141 and she and the pilot texted back and forth for the remainder of the flight. Prior to making any approaches, the friend texted the weather to be "10 miles 600 over." The pilot texted back "Ok I think I can sneak in," then he proceeded to make four visual approaches to City Field runway 21, as well as circling maneuvers in the area. He texted "one more try" and after he couldn't land, he texted "one more ok" before his last attempt. At 2214 he texted "not happening" and departed the area. 

During an interview with the NTSB IIC on March 7, a witness who lives near City Airport saw the airplane making multiple approaches and depart to the east. He also heard a transmission on the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) of 123.6 MHz that sounded like "no, no, no" sometime after the airplane departed the area. The concerned witness then listened on 121.5 MHz for an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal, but did not hear one.

The pilot's fiancé reported the airplane overdue at about 0530 on March 6. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an ALNOT (alert notice) at 0606 and an area wide airport and radio search was conducted. At about 0959 a Nome Search and Rescue crew located the airplane wreckage about 10 miles east of Nome, on sea ice, near Hastings Creek. The wreckage consisted of the entire airplane in a vertical nose down attitude. The Garmin GPSMAP 296 device was recovered and downloaded by the NTSB IIC. 

The Garmin GPS data indicates that the airplane took off from Wasilla at 1710 and made no enroute stops. The data shows an airplane track that included four approaches to Nome City Airport runway 21, some maneuvering in the area, then a departure to the east. The total GPS distance flown was 596 statute miles and total GPS time 5.3 hours. The last data point was at time 2223 and indicated the airplane at a groundspeed of 42 mph and 373 feet GPS altitude near the wreckage location.

According to the FAA Alaska Chart Supplement, the Nome City Field Airport has no lighting and is not plowed in winter. About one mile to the west is Nome Airport, which does have runway and approach lighting and is fully maintained.

The pilot held a current FAA Third Class Medical Certificate that stated the restriction "not valid for night flying or by color signal control." 

The Cessna 172K Pilot Operating Handbook indicates a maximum fuel capacity of 52 U.S. gallons and usable fuel of 49 U.S. gallons. The actual fuel quantity for this flight is unknown.

The closest weather reporting facility is Nome Airport, Nome, Alaska, about 11 miles west of the accident site. At 2204, an aviation special weather report (SPECI) from the Nome Airport was reporting in part: Wind calm; sky condition, overcast 400 feet; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature -21 degrees C; dewpoint -22 degrees C; altimeter, 30.49 inHg. Official sunset was 1933.

Cessna 182P Skylane, N52388: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2016 in Dabob, Washington

9-year-old Logan and 5-year-old Mackenzie Echevarria of Bellingham, Washington.

Pilot Jon R. Bernhoft (age 63), his fiancee Carla Parke (age 61), her grandson Logan Echevarria (age 9) and granddaughter Mackenzie Echevarria (age 5) died in a plane crash on December 29th, 2016.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Renton, Washington 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Group; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

  
http://registry.faa.gov/N52388 



Location: Dabob, WA
Accident Number: WPR17FA044
Date & Time: 12/29/2016, 1844 PST
Registration: N52388
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 29, 2016, about 1844 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 182P, N52388, collided with terrain near Dabob, Washington. The non-instrument-rated private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to the pilot who was operating it under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night meteorological conditions prevailed in the vicinity of the accident site, and no flight plan was filed for the personal cross-country flight. The visual flight rules (VFR) flight departed at 1816 from Boeing Field International Airport (BFI), Seattle, Washington, and was enroute to William R. Fairchild International Airport (CLM), Port Angeles, Washington.

According to a family member, the pilot, his wife, and two grandchildren flew from CLM to BFI in the morning, spent the day in the Seattle area, and were returning to CLM when the accident occurred. According to air traffic control communications, at 1833, the pilot was transferred from the BFI tower controller to the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island Approach Control West (APW) controller.

A review of the airplane's radar track (see Figure 1) showed that the airplane departed the BFI area on a northwest heading climbing to about 2,800 ft mean sea level (msl) before descending with altitudes varying between 2,500 ft msl and 2,000 ft msl.

At 1833:30, the airplane traveled west into the northern side of restricted airspace P-51. At 1834:04, the APW controller asked the pilot if he was reversing course, and the pilot replied that he was just trying to stay out of the restricted airspace. At this point, the airplane started a 270° left turn at 1,850 ft msl. Halfway through the turn, the airplane descended to 1,025 ft msl or about 600 ft above ground level (agl). The airplane exited P-51 traveling northwest about 1834:44.

At 1837:26, the APW controller asked the pilot for his intentions, and the pilot replied that he was trying to stay out of the clouds. The airplane completed a 270° turn at 1,400 ft msl and headed northeast. At 1837:58, the pilot asked for vectors to Port Townsend. The APW controller recommended a 050° heading to get the airplane east of an area where the minimum vectoring altitude was 8,800 ft msl before turning the airplane north toward Port Townsend.

At 1839:15, the APW controller instructed the pilot to maintain VFR flight and indicated that Port Townsend was at a heading of 340°; the pilot confirmed that he was turning to 340°. Over the next 5 minutes, the airplane performed two left 360° turns, while its altitude varied between 1,100 ft msl and 2,475 ft msl. At 1840:41, the controller told the pilot he would be unable to fly on that 340° heading to maintain VFR and recommended that he head east. The pilot replied and stated he was heading east. About a minute later, the airplane turned north and the controller asked the pilot his intentions. The pilot stated he was going to turn west to CLM, and the controller informed the pilot he would not be able to maintain radar contact with him. The controller again offered assistance and the pilot responded by stating he was heading towards CLM and thought he may have been out of the clouds. At 1843:30, as the airplane completed the last 360° turn and headed northwest, the controller asked if he was heading towards CLM now, and the pilot responded with "affirmative."

At 1844:43, APW lost radar contact with N52388 about 14 miles south of Jefferson County International Airport, Port Townsend, Washington, and about a half mile northwest of the accident site.


Figure 1-Radar Track


A witness located at his residence, about 800 ft to the southwest of the accident site, reported that he heard an airplane flying southeast then east and that the engine was loud.

After radio and radar contact were lost, the FAA issued an alert notice. A search was conducted by the US Navy and a Washington State search and rescue team. The airplane was located on the morning of December 30, 2016, about 1.5 miles south of Dabob, in steep, heavily wooded terrain. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/03/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 700 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot, age 63, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. His most recent third-class FAA medical certificate was issued on April 3, 2015, with limitations that he must wear corrective lenses. The pilot reported on the medical certificate application that he had accumulated 700 total hours of flight experience of which 54 hours were in the last 6 months. The pilot's logbook was examined during the investigation, and the entries did not appear to have been updated recently. The last entry in the logbook was dated September 18, 2015.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N52388
Model/Series: 182 P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1973
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18262571
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/11/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2554 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R-25A
Registered Owner: Gerald E. Lematta and Jon R. Bernhoft
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

A review of the airplane's logbooks revealed that the airplane, serial number 18262571, had a total airframe time of 2,554 hours at the last annual inspection dated August 11, 2016. The engine was a Continental Motors O-470-R-25A, serial number 451850. Total time recorded on the engine at the last annual inspection was 2,554 hours, and time since major overhaul was 517.2 hours.

Refueling records provided by Diamond Service at BFI, revealed that the pilot purchased 10.2 gallons of 100 low lead aviation grade gasoline on the day of the accident.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPWT, 444 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0235 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 177°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 5°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SEATTLE, WA (BFI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: PORT ANGELES, WA (CLM)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1816 PST
Type of Airspace: Class G

At 1753, the reported weather at BFI included variable wind at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, light rain, broken ceiling at 1,800 ft agl, overcast skies at 3,000 ft agl, temperature 8°C, dew point 6°C, and altimeter setting 30.13 inches of mercury.

At 1835, Bremerton National Airport (PWT), Bremerton, Washington, located about 20 miles south of the accident site, reported, in part, wind calm, visibility 10 miles, overcast ceiling at 600 ft agl, temperature 5°C, dew point 4°C, and altimeter setting 30.15 inches of mercury.

Review of infrared satellite imagery from 1845 and 1900 indicated abundant clouds over the accident site at the accident time. The clouds were moving from west to east, and there was a band of clouds oriented west to east over the accident site around the accident time. Based on the brightness temperatures above the accident site and the vertical temperature profile provided by upper air data, the cloud-top heights over the accident site were about 20,000 ft at 1845. Based on the upper air data, infrared satellite imagery, and surface observation data, the flight likely encountered precipitation, lowering ceilings, and instrument meteorological conditions shortly after passing northwestward across Puget Sound.

Astronomical data obtained from the United States Naval Observatory for the accident site on the day of the accident indicated that sunset was at 1627, the end of civil twilight was at 1703, and moonset was at 1721.

A search of official weather briefing sources, such as Lockheed Martin Flight Service and Direct User Access Terminal Service, indicated that the pilot did not receive an official weather briefing from those sources. A search of ForeFlight weather information revealed that the pilot did not request a weather briefing using ForeFlight Mobile before the flight. It is unknown if the pilot checked or received any other weather information before or during the accident flight.

For more information see the Weather Study in the public docket for this accident. 


Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 47.823611, -122.790000 (est) 

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane came to rest at the base of a draw between two hills that gradually sloped down in a northeast to southwest direction. The debris field from the initial impact to the last piece of wreckage was about 160 ft long and on a magnetic heading of 225°. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was with three trees at about 30 ft above the ground. The left aileron outboard wing section was found near the base of the trees.

The main wreckage consisting of the fuselage, engine, propeller, empennage, and sections from the left and right wings, was located near the end of the debris path. The fuselage was orientated on about a 100° magnetic heading. The forward fuselage and cabin were fragmented and mostly separated.

The engine had separated from the airframe and was located near the main wreckage.

The propeller had separated from the engine and was found buried in the dirt near the main wreckage. The propeller hub assembly was heavily fragmented and both blades had separated from the hub. Rotational scoring was observed on one of the propeller shanks. Both blades displayed S-bending and about 2 inches of the tip had separated from one blade.

The aft fuselage and empennage separated from the main wreckage near the aft cabin area. The separated rudder and vertical stabilizer fragments were located 160 ft northeast of the main wreckage and displayed circular tree strike indentions.

The attitude indicator had separated from the instrument panel and was located near the main wreckage. The outer case of the instrument was fragmented. Its gyro was extracted, and rotational scoring was noted. 



Medical And Pathological Information

Pacific Northwest Forensic Pathologists, Tacoma, Washington, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The forensic pathologist determined that the cause of death was severe multiple blunt force injuries to the body.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on available tissue specimens from the pilot and identified 7-amino-clonazepam, bupropion, and trazodone in muscle. Bupropion and trazodone were also identified in lung.

The drug 7-amino-clonazepam is an inactive metabolite of clonazepam, which is a sedating benzodiazepine prescription medication used to treat anxiety and often marketed with the name Klonopin. Clonazepam carries this warning, "Since clonazepam produces [central nervous system] CNS depression, patients receiving this drug should be cautioned against engaging in hazardous occupations requiring mental alertness, such as operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle. They should also be warned about the concomitant use of alcohol or other CNS-depressant drugs during clonazepam therapy."

Bupropion is an antidepressant. Trazodone is a sedating antidepressant that may be used to treat insomnia. Trazodone carries this warning, "Antidepressants may impair the mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks, such as operating an automobile or machinery; the patient should be cautioned accordingly. Trazodone hydrochloride may enhance the response to alcohol, barbiturates, and other CNS depressants."

Additional Information

Spatial Disorientation


According to the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3), "night flying is very different from day flying and demands more attention of the pilot. The most noticeable difference is the limited availability of outside visual references. Therefore, flight instruments should be used to a greater degree.… Generally, at night it is difficult to see clouds and restrictions to visibility, particularly on dark nights or under overcast. The pilot flying under [visual flight rules] VFR must exercise caution to avoid flying into clouds or a layer of fog." The handbook described some hazards associated with flying in airplanes under VFR when visual references, such as the ground or horizon, are obscured. The handbook states that, "the vestibular sense (motion sensing by the inner ear) in particular tends to confuse the pilot. Because of inertia, the sensory areas of the inner ear cannot detect slight changes in the attitude of the airplane, nor can they accurately sense attitude changes that occur at a uniform rate over a period of time. On the other hand, false sensations are often generated; leading the pilot to believe the attitude of the airplane has changed when in fact, it has not. These false sensations result in the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation."

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA044
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 29, 2016 in Dabob, WA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N52388
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 29, 2016, about 1844 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 182P, N52388, collided with terrain near Dabob, Washington. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual and instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the vicinity of the accident site during dark nighttime. A flight plan was not filed for the cross-country flight. The flight originated from Boeing Field International Airport (BFI), Seattle, Washington at 1816 with a planned destination of William R. Fairchild International Airport (CLM), Port Angeles, Washington.

After losing radio and radar contact with Whidbey Island Naval Air Station Approach Control the accident airplane became the subject of an Alert Notice (ALNOT) issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). A search was conducted by the U.S Navy and a Washington State search and rescue team. The airplane was subsequently located the morning of December 30, 2016. The wreckage was located about 1.5 miles south of Dabob, WA in steep, heavily wooded terrain. 

A witness located at his residence, about 800 feet to the southwest of the accident site, reported that he heard the airplane flying southeast then east and that the engine was loud.

Review of radar data provided by the FAA revealed a primary target, consistent with the accident airplane, was traveling on a northwest heading climbing to about 2,800 feet mean sea level (msl) before descending and oscillating between 2,500 feet msl and 2,000 feet msl. The radar target then depicted three left 360-degree turns to a northerly heading, while continuing to oscillate between 1,700 feet msl and 1,100 feet msl before descending to its last radar target. The last radar target was about a half mile northwest of the accident site at an altitude of 1,675 feet msl.

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane collided with trees in steep rising terrain and came to rest at the base of a draw between two hills. The left outboard wing section separated during the initial impact sequence and semicircular impact damage was noted to the leading edge of the wing. 

The closest weather reporting station was located at Bremerton National Airport (PWT), Bremerton, Washington, located about 20 miles to the south of the accident site. A review of the weather revealed that conditions deteriorated after 1615 with an overcast ceiling of 800 feet above the ground level (agl). A further review revealed that at 1835, 9 minutes prior to the accident, the station disseminated an automated observation, that reported, in part, wind calm, 10 miles visibility, overcast ceiling at 600 feet, temperature 5° C, dew point 4° C, altimeter 30.15 inches of mercury. 

According to the Astronomical Applications Department at the United States Naval Observatory, the official sunset was at 1626, the official end of civil twilight was at 1702, and the official moonrise was 1404. 

The wreckage was recovered and transported to a secure facility for further examination.

BRM Aero Bristell NG 5, registered to and operated by Industrial Mobile Cranes Inc, N587BL: Fatal accident occurred December 22, 2018 at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (KLAL), Polk County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N587BL

Location: Lakeland, FL
Accident Number: ERA19LA078
Date & Time: 12/22/2018, 1012 EST
Registration: N587BL
Aircraft: BRM Aero Bristell S-LSA
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On December 22, 2018, at 1012 eastern standard time, a BRM Aero Bristell, N587BL, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (LAL), Lakeland, Florida. The student pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Industrial Mobile Cranes Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a training flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

Review of preliminary air traffic control communications provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the student pilot had completed two landings to runway 27 in a left traffic pattern, and prior to the third landing, the tower controller instructed the pilot to fly a right traffic pattern after departure to avoid a potential conflict with another airplane operating in the airspace. The pilot responded with, "affirmative, right traffic after this touch and go." There were no further radio transmissions from the pilot.

Review of a surveillance video from a building located on the airport showed the accident airplane climbing after departing runway 27. Subsequently, the airplane entered a left turn, and started to descend. The airplane impacted terrain in a near vertical attitude and an explosion was observed immediately after impact.

Review of photographs provided by LAL airport operations personnel, revealed that the airplane impacted an open field on the airport, about 800 ft south of runway 27, and came to rest upright. A postcrash fire consumed a majority of cockpit and fuselage. The left and right leading edges of the wings displayed significant aft crushing. All flight control surfaces were observed. The empennage remained intact and showed little fire damage. The engine was located with the fuselage, it sustained impact and fire damage. All three propeller blades were fragmented.

The student pilot's flight instructor reported that he had not been contacted by the student on the day of the accident flight, and he was unaware that the student had planned to complete a solo flight. He reported that it is routine for his students to contact him, prior to solo flight, so that they may discuss the weather and other particulars for the flight.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a student pilot certificate. He did not hold a medical certificate, as he was operating under sport pilot provisions. Review of his logbook revealed that his flight training began in October 2015 and he accumulated 108.8 total hours of flight time. The pilot had accumulated 32.8 hours in the accident airplane, of which 6.4 hours were solo. In the past 90 days, he had logged 8.6 hours, all in the accident airplane. The logbook contained a solo endorsement for the accident airplane.

The single-engine low-wing special light sport airplane was powered by a Rotax 912 ULS engine, that drove a three-blade fixed-pitch propeller. According to airplane logbook entries, an annual and 100-hour condition inspection was completed in April 2018. The airplane had accumulated 390.8 hours of total flight time at the time of that inspection.

The weather conditions reported at 0950 at the airport were, wind 360° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 1,800 ft above ground level (agl), temperature 12°C, dew point 8°C, barometric altimeter setting 30.18 inches of mercury. The wind conditions reported at 1053, were 310° at 12 knots, gusting to 16 knots.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BRM Aero
Registration: N587BL
Model/Series: Bristell S-LSA
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Industrial Mobile Cranes Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLAL, 142 ft msl
Observation Time: 0950 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 360°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lakeland, FL (LAL)
Destination: Lakeland, FL (LAL) 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  27.986667, -82.023889 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Gary A.  Mansell
June 5, 1954 - December 22, 2018

Plant City — Gary A Mansell, 64, died on December 22, 2018. Gary was born in Ontario Canada on June 5, 1954.

Gary Moved to Florida where he opened Dry Dock Inc. in 1980. In the years following, Gary adventured everywhere from the Appalachian Trail to the Caribbean Islands. When he returned to Florida he partnered with Tampa Forklift Inc. in 1994. In 2012 Gary moved to Plant City. Gary was an adventurous soul and loved racing, flying, and nature.

Gary is survived by his daughters, Chloe and Tatum; his sisters, Gail Mansell and Gina Rausch; step-sister, Carol Bennington; step-father, Bill Evans; his girlfriend, Lucy; and her children, Jamie, Damian and her grandchildren, Riley, Liyla, and William. 

A visitation will be held from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm on January 4, 2019 at Gentry Morrison 3350 Mall Hill Drive Lakeland, FL 33810. Memorial service to follow in the funeral home chapel at 2:00 pm. 


https://www.gentry-morrison.com




LAKELAND — A student pilot died Saturday morning after his plane crashed on his third touch-and-go landing at Lakeland Linder International Airport.

According to Lakeland Police reports, Gary Alan Mansell, 64, of 3316 Ranchdale Drive, Plant City, was doing touch-and-go landings at the airport at 10:12 a.m. when his plane took a hard left and crashed into the ground, bursting into flames.

The crash occurred in a grass area in front of the Sun n’ Fun Expo Campus, at 4175 Medulla Road. Mansell was flying a BRM Aero Bristell NG 5 plane.

The Lakeland Fire Department Aircraft Rescue Firefighting vehicle arrived within minutes and extinguished the fire, said Gary Gross, spokesman for LPD.

Manse ll was deceased at the scene, said Gross. The Medical Examiner’s office will conduct an autopsy to confirm cause of death and rule out a medical emergency.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.theledger.com


A 64-year-old student pilot died in a crash landing at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport on Saturday morning, according to the Lakeland Police Department.

Gary Alan Mansell of Plant City was the only person aboard the small plane.

At 10:12 a.m., according to spokesman Gary Gross, Mansell was executing a touch-and-go landing, during which the plane lands on a runway and takes off again without coming to a full stop.

The pilot touched down successfully twice, but on the third attempt, his plane turned sharply to the left and crashed into the grass next to the Sun 'n Fun aviation education campus by the runway.

On impact, the BRM Aero Bristell NG 5 plane burst into flames, according to police.

"It's a tragedy for all involved," Gross said.

Firefighters responded and put out the flames within five minutes, but Mansell died at the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.tampabay.com


LAKELAND, Fla. (FOX 13) - The pilot of a plane that crashed at Lakeland Linder Airport Saturday morning was doing a maneuver called touch-and-go before the crash.

That crash took the 64-year-old student pilot’s life.

It happened just after 10 o'clock Saturday morning.

We don't have too many details about what specifically caused Gary Alan Mansell, 64, to crash his single-engine sport on the grassy grounds of the sun and fun expo, causing it to burst into flames right off the runway.

"It's just a loss for everybody involved,” commented Gary Gross of the Lakeland Police Department. "On the third touch and go, the airplane ended up doing a hard landing, and caught on fire."

Mansell was doing touch-and-go landings, a common maneuver that involves landing on a runway and taking off again without coming to a full stop.

Fire rescue responded in just over two minutes and had the fire out within minutes.

Officials say the plant city resident kept his BRM Aero Bristell NG 5 plane in Lakeland. They are unaware if he notified air traffic control of any issues.

NTSB will be investigating to determine the cause of the accident.

"At this point in time we will impound the airplane and they'll take over the investigation to determine the cause of the accident," Gross said.

Because we're in the midst of a partial government shutdown, there was concern the investigation could be delayed by the NTSB.

During the shutdown of 2013, the government agency was only able to launch investigations into major accidents involving significant casualties.

No word yet though if this shutdown, that started last night, has delayed this investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox13news.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, owned by Air Con LLC and operated by Airplanes 4 Rent, N3015E: Accident occurred December 24, 2018 in Miami-Dade County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N3015E

Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: ERA19LA079
Date & Time: 12/24/2018, 1344 EDT
Registration: N3015E
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On December 24, 2018, about 1344 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172N, N3015E, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The flight instructor, student pilot, and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight. The airplane was owned by Air Con LLC, and operated by Airplanes 4 Rent, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, they were flying along the shoreline at 800 ft above ground level (agl). The engine started to vibrate and then experienced a complete loss of power. The flight instructor tried to restart the engine twice, but the engine did not start. He set up for an emergency landing on the beach. At 200 ft. (agl) he noticed a pier and knew he had to fly over the pier to make a safe landing on the other side. He tried to restart the engine for a third time and the engine restarted but did not produce power over 1200 rpm. Once over the pier, he saw people on the beach and decided to land in the ocean. When the main landing gear touched the water, the airplane immediately flipped over. All four occupants egressed the airplane.

Examination of the engine revealed that the No. 2 exhaust rocker arm stud fractured. Engine continuity was established by rotating the propeller by hand and visually verifying that the pistons and push rods moved on all cylinders.

The four-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was built in 1978, and equipped with a Lycoming O-320-series engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on December 19, 2018. At the time of the inspection, the airframe total time was 5295.0 hours and the engine had 1568.7 hours since major overhaul.

According to the airplane owner, he purchased the airplane in February 2018 from AIG insurance as a salvage purchase. The airplane was located in Belize City, Belize. The airplane was damaged by a trolley that rolled into it and damaged the left-wing strut, rudder and elevator. He flew down, repaired the airplane, and flew it back to Fort Lauderdale. He performed an annual inspection in May 2018 and put it into rental service at that time. The airplane flew for 218 hours before the accident.

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land, and airplane multi-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate was issued on October 26, 2017. He reported 1,580.5 total hours of flight experience at the time of the accident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3015E
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Airplanes 4 Rent
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOPF, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4200 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 350°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE)
Destination: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  25.909444, -80.120556 (est)





HAULOVER BEACH, FLA. (WSVN) - Police and Fire Rescue have responded to the crash site where a small plane went down on Haulover Beach.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue transported four patients with minor injuries from the scene near 10800 Collins Ave.

The single-engine Cessna could be seen upside down on the coast, after coming down just after 2 p.m., Monday.

A flight instructor, pilot and two passengers were inside the aircraft at the time of the crash.

Cellphone video captured a group of good Samaritans rushing to help the occupants.

The plane had visible wing, door and windshield damage.

Miami-Dade Police officials said the plane took off from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport shortly after 1 p.m.

The plane’s engine started experiencing engine failure at 1:33 p.m., police said.

A man who was resting on the beach said he heard the crash which occurred about 150 feet from him.

“I was laying there reading on my towel, and then I heard some noisy stuff like a motor running out of gas and then a big bang,” witness Daniel Dedard said. “I just took my phone to get there and to film while I was going to see if there was anybody to help in there.”

The survivors were escorted off the beach by rescue crews.

“Even I saw it,” witness Vitaly Kozlov said. “They was laughing and smiling, so if the plane is going down, it doesn’t matter. It’s just money. It’s just a piece of metal. It’s really important to be healthy and to be alive.”

Officials said the owner will eventually have to remove the plane.


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://wsvn.com