Saturday, May 16, 2015

Raytheon (Beech) B200 King Air, N505SP, N505SP LLC: Accident occurred May 16, 2015 at McClellan-Palomar Airport (KCRQ), Carlsbad, California

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA165
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 16, 2015 in Carlsbad, CA
Aircraft: RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT COMPANY B200, registration: N505SP
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 16, 2015, at 1548, Pacific daylight time (PDT), a Beech King Air B200, N505SP, landed gear up at Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport (CRQ), Carlsbad, California. The owner/pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wing structure. The cross-country personal flight departed Palm Springs, California, about 1515, with a planned destination of Santa Ana, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that about 10 minutes after takeoff he experienced a loss of electrical power. The pilot was able to maintain VFR conditions on top of the clouds and proceeded to fly westbound until reaching the coastline, at which time he turned southbound. As he flew towards Carlsbad he was able to recover some radio operations. He obtained a green light to land from the ATC tower personnel at CRQ. The pilot related that he did not realize his landing gear was retracted until it was too late and he was committed to land.

Witnesses reported that the airplane approached the runway faster than a normal and the gear was still retracted.

http://registry.faa.gov/N505SP


CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

CARLSBAD (CBS 8) - A plane reportedly made a hard landing at Palomar Airport Saturday afternoon.

The King Air 200 may have had landing gear issues before touching down on the runway. Emergency crews are on the scene.

There are no reports of any injuries.

The airport has been closed until further notice.

Source:   http://www.cbs8.com


Fatal accident occurred May 16, 2015 in Angel Fire, Colfax County, New Mexico

AUSTIN -- A senior Austin police officer died while flying an ultralight aircraft in Angel Fire, New Mexico Saturday, KVUE confirmed with sources.

While in flight, the engine malfunctioned, causing the aircraft to quickly lose altitude and impact the ground. The officer died instantly on impact.

46-year-old Paul L. Johnson leaves behind a wife and two children. 

Source: http://www.kvue.com

A senior police officer died in an aircraft crash in New Mexico Saturday.
(Photo: Austin Police Department)

Piper PA-24 Comanche, N9032P: Fatal accident occurred May 16, 2015 near Kestrel Airpark (1T7), Spring Branch, Comal County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Factual Report   -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -     National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms  

http://registry.faa.gov/N9032P

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA232 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 16, 2015 in Spring Branch, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-260, registration: N9032P
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 16, 2015, about 1231 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260 airplane, N9032P, impacted terrain near Spring Branch, Texas. The pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed during the impact and subsequent ground fire. The airplane was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight. Day visual flight rules conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from the Kestrel Airpark (1T7), near Spring Branch, Texas, at the time of the accident.

A witness at 1T7 saw the accident airplane taxi from the common area/hangars on the north taxiway and saw it headed to runway 12. There was a strong quartering headwind for runway 12. The witness estimated the wind was 20 knots sustained, gusting 25-30 knots. He watched the accident airplane's takeoff roll. The aircraft climbed and was about 20-30 feet in the air when it was abeam the witness. The aircraft's nose dropped for a couple seconds after it passed him. It then started climbing out and the witness saw and heard the landing gear retracting. The airplane was about 100 feet above the ground. The aircraft then looked like it weathervaned into the wind and continued climbing to about 200-300 feet above the ground. At that point, the witness stopped watching the airplane. He stated that he did not notice anything fall off the airplane or anything unusual about the appearance of sound of the airplane during its taxi by and its takeoff.

The airplane banked left during the takeoff, descended, and impacted terrain nose down near a store parking lot.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 38-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and multi engine land ratings. He held a FAA airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. A review of FAA records show that the pilot's last medical examination was completed on March 29, 2010, when he was issued a first-class medical certificate with no limitations. On the application for that medical certificate, the pilot reported that he had accumulated 96 hours of total flight time.

According to reviewed FAA records, the pilot first applied for a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine rating on January 5, 2007, and received a disapproval notice for airport and seaplane base operations, emergency operations. He reapplied on January 10, 2007, and he was issued a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. On May 21, 2014, he applied for a private pilot certificate with an airplane multiengine rating and he received a disapproval notice for not properly identifying the failed engine during a simulated emergency first. The pilot reapplied on November 6, 2014, and he was issued a private pilot certificate with an airplane multiengine land rating. On that reapplication, he indicated that he had accumulated 122.1 hours of total flight time in airplanes of which 44.6 hours was pilot in command flight time and 10.6 hours was instrument flight time.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

N9032P, a 1966 model Piper PA-24-260, Comanche, serial number 24-4494, was an all-metal airplane with semimonocoque fuselage and empennage construction. The airplane's type certificate data indicated that it seated four and had a maximum gross weight of 3,100 pounds. The airplane was powered by a 260-horsepower, six-cylinder, horizontally opposed, air cooled, fuel injected engine, normally aspirated engine, with a data plate marked as Lycoming IO-540-D4A5, serial number L-3449-48. The engine left half's serial number was stamped as L-10556-40. The left case match number was not discernable and the right case match number was stamped as 51154-3. The airplane was equipped with wing flaps, a two-bladed constant speed Hartzell propeller, and retractable tricycle landing gear. The propeller was a HC-C2YK-1BF/F8467-7R model with serial number CH23698, which propeller manufacturer records show was originally built on November 6, 1978, for Piper.

A receipt showed that the airplane was serviced at 1T7 with 49.7 gallons of aviation gasoline (avgas) on May 16, 2015 at 1059.

N9032P was involved in a ground accident in November of 2013. The airplane's left wing impacted a hangar and it sustained damage. The airplane was salvaged, bought by several parties, and was subsequently sold to the pilot.

Available accident airplane's logbooks were reviewed at the pilot's hangar. Endorsements showed that an annual inspection was completed on September 3, 2012. According to these records, the serial number of the engine installed at that time was L-3447-48. The airplane had accumulated a total time of 8,690.9 hours at that time and the indicated engine accumulated 1,917.7 hours of time since a major overhaul.

According to engine manufacturer's safety representative, the IO-540-D4A5 engine with serial number L-3449-48 was returned to Lycoming Engines Facilities in July of 2012. That engine was overhauled and it was converted to an IO-540-C4B5. That overhauled engine was sent to the field and it was installed on a Piper Aztec.

An undated FAA 8050-2 Aircraft Bill of Sale form along with an unstamped envelope addressed to the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch were also observed in the hangar. That form contained a former owner's name and the pilot's name along with both their signatures. Additionally, invoices for airplane parts and mechanic's notes that indicated parts and maintenance manual references were found in the hangar. These items were consistent with a structural wing repair, engine overhaul, and routine maintenance. However, recent airplane logbooks were not found within the hangar that documented the airplane's repair, inspections since the ground accident, and flight time since the ground accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1206, the recorded weather at the San Antonio International Airport (SAT), near San Antonio, Texas, was: Wind 150 degrees at 13 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 2,200 feet, broken clouds at 3,000 feet, broken clouds at 4,300 feet; temperature 27 degrees C; dew point 22 degrees; altimeter 29.88 inches of mercury.

At 1251, the recorded weather at SAT was: Wind 160 degrees at 13 knots, gusting to 22 knots; visibility 9 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 2,300 feet, broken clouds at 3,700 feet, broken clouds at 4,800 feet; temperature 28 degrees C; dew point 22 degrees; altimeter 29.86 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

1T7, located about 26 miles north of San Antonio, Texas, was a non-towered airport, which was privately owned and operated by the Kestrel Airpark Runway Association. The airport is a public use airport. Its field elevation was 1,261 feet above mean sea level. The airport listed 122.975 megahertz as its common traffic advisory frequency. The airport is serviced by one runway: runway 12/30. The runway is listed as a 3,000-foot by 40-foot asphalt runway. The runway has an operational restriction listed, which indicated that runway 30 rises rapidly at its north end.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A postaccident on-scene investigation was conducted. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The airplane came to rest on terrain and on top of a retaining wall adjacent to a store parking lot about 1/4 mile and 22 degrees magnetic from the intersection of US Highway 281 North and Flightline Drive. The airplane's left wing separated from its fuselage and it was found resting on the retaining wall. The left wing exhibited an outboard skin section that was not painted. This section was consistent with a wing skin replacement. The unpainted section was intact and it remained attached to its wing. Wing separation surfaces exhibited features consistent with overload.

The airplane's fuselage and empennage was found resting on terrain at the top of the retaining wall. The cockpit was deformed, discolored, and sections consumed consistent with a ground fire. The right wing was also deformed, discolored, and an inboard section of it was consumed by fire. The empennage was deformed forward into the fuselage in an accordion like fashion. An outboard section of the left horizontal stabilizer was deformed and discolored. The nylock nuts that held the horizontal stabilizer were in-place and could be removed by fingertip pressure. Flight control cables were traced from the cockpit to each control surface. All observed separations in the flight control system were consistent with overload. The flaps and landing gear were found in their retracted positions.

The engine and propeller were found forward of the fuselage near the base of a tree that was discolored consistent with a coating of soot. One propeller blade was separated near its hub and the other propeller blade's tip was separated. The separated tip exhibited chordwise gouges on its flat face. Charred pieces of paper were found nearby that contained notes consistent with flight training for an instrument rating. The engine was intact and displayed no signs of catastrophic failure. The engine's accessory case was discolored and deformed. The right magneto and the aft section of the engine driven fuel pump were not in place on the accessory case. The top spark plugs and accessory case were removed. The engine's crankshaft was rotated by hand. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to each of the cylinders and to the accessory drive gears. A compression check was performed and all cylinders exhibited suction and a thumb compression. The left magneto exhibited thermal deformation and discoloration. The fuel manifold was intact and its disassembly revealed a trapped liquid that contained water as detected by water disclosing paste. The fuel servo was deformed and discolored. Engine control cables were traced from the cockpit to their respective engine controls. All separations in the engine controls were consistent with overload. The components did not display any anomalies that could not be attributed to the post accident fire.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Comal County Coroner was asked to arrange for an autopsy to be completed on the pilot to include taking samples for toxicological testing. The autopsy, conducted by Central Texas Autopsy, PLLC, indicated the pilot's cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute prepared a Final Forensic Toxicology Accident Report on the toxicological samples taken during the autopsy. The report, in part, indicated:

0.0143 (ug/ml, ug/g) Tetrahydrocannabinol (Marihuana) detected in Blood
0.013 (ug/ml, ug/g) Tetrahydrocannabinol (Marihuana) detected in Lung
0.0037 (ug/ml, ug/g) Tetrahydrocannabinol (Marihuana) detected in Brain
0.1946 (ug/ml, ug/g) Tetrahydrocannabinol Carboxylic Acid (Marihuana) detected in Lung
0.0179 (ug/ml, ug/g) Tetrahydrocannabinol Carboxylic Acid (Marihuana) detected in Brain
0.0119 (ug/ml, ug/g) Tetrahydrocannabinol Carboxylic Acid (Marihuana) detected in Blood

The National Transportation Safety Board Chief Medical Officer reviewed the CAMI findings, FAA documents, and the pilot's autopsy and produced a Medical Factual Report. The report indicated that according to these reviewed items, the pilot initially applied for an aviation medical certificate in 2006. Because he marked "yes" to question 18.w regarding non-traffic convictions for misdemeanors or felonies, the aviation medical examiner deferred the pilot's certificate. The FAA requested additional information, which the pilot provided regarding a conviction for driving with a suspended license; once this had been received and reviewed, the FAA awarded the pilot his medical certificate.

On the pilot's last application for a medical certificate, he reported no medications or chronic medical conditions. He was issued a first class medical certificate without limitations. This certificate would have been no longer valid for any class on March 31, 2015, six weeks before the accident.

The autopsy indicated the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries due to light plane crash and the manner of death was accident. There was significant damage to the body including multiple lacerations of the heart. No significant natural disease was identified.

In addition to CAMI's testing, toxicology testing performed by NMS Laboratories at the request of the forensic pathologist identified 0.034 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9 THC, the active component of marijuana) and 0.0084 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH, the primary metabolite of THC) in the pilot's cardiac blood specimen.

Toxicology testing performed by CAMI identified 0.0143 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9 THC, the active component of marijuana) and 0.0119 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH, the primary metabolite of THC) in the specimen of cardiac blood sent to them. In addition, THC was identified in the pilot's lung (0.013 ug/ml) and brain (0.0037 ug/ml). Finally, THC-COOH was also found in lung (0.1946 ug/ml) and brain (0.0179 ug/ml).

According to details in the CAMI description of Marijuana and in a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration technical report titled Drugs and Human Performance Fact Sheets, THC is described as a psychoactive drug with therapeutic levels as low as 0.001ug/ml. THC has mood-altering effects including euphoria, relaxed inhibitions, disorientation, image distortion, and psychosis. Significant performance impairments are usually observed for at least one to two hours following marijuana use, and residual effects have been reported up to 24 hours.

Tetrahydrocannabinol concentrations typically peak during the act of smoking, while peak tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid concentrations occur approximately 9-23 minutes after the start of smoking. Concentrations of both analytes decline rapidly and are often < 0.005 ug/mL at 3 hours. Significant tetrahydrocannabinol concentrations (0.007 to 0.018 ug/mL) are noted following even a single puff or hit of a marijuana cigarette. Chronic users can have mean plasma levels of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid of 0.045 ug/ml 12 hours after use; corresponding tetrahydrocannabinol levels are, however, less than 0.001 ug/ml. Interpreting post mortem blood and tissue results for marijuana is complex for several reasons. The drug is lipophilic and gets stored in fatty tissues; it may leech back into blood from liver, lung, and brain after death. According to a Journal of Analytical Toxicology article titled Cannabinoids in Postmortem Toxicology, post mortem redistribution may double or triple peripheral levels.

FIRE


A video from that store parking lot camera was reviewed at the store. The video showed the airplane descending in a nose down attitude and that a flame, consistent with a ground fire, started at 1231.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA232
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 16, 2015 in Spring Branch, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-260, registration: N9032P
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 16, 2015, about 1231 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260 airplane, N9032P, impacted terrain near Spring Branch, Texas. The pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed during the impact and subsequent ground fire. The airplane was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight. Day visual flight rules conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Kestrel Airpark (1T7), near Spring Branch, Texas.

A witness at 1T7 saw the accident airplane taxi from the common area/hangars on the north taxiway and saw it headed to runway 12. There was a strong quartering headwind for runway 12. The witness estimated the wind was 20 knots sustained, gusting 25-30 knots. He watched the accident airplane's takeoff roll. The aircraft climbed and was about 20-30 feet in the air when it was abeam the witness. The aircraft's nose dropped for a couple seconds after it passed him. It then started climbing out and the witness saw and heard the landing gear retracting. The airplane was about 100 feet above the ground. The aircraft then looked like it weather vaned into the wind and continued climbing to about 200-300 feet above the ground. At that point, the witness stopped watching the airplane. He stated that he did not notice anything fall off the airplane or anything unusual about the appearance of sound of the airplane during its taxi by and its takeoff.

Preliminary witness reports indicated that the airplane banked left during the takeoff, descended steeply, and impacted terrain near a store parking lot.

A video file from that store parking lot camera was reviewed. The video showed that a flame, consistent with a ground fire, started at 1231.

The 38-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and multi engine land ratings. He held a FAA airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. A preliminary review of FAA records show that the pilot's last medical examination was completed on March 29, 2010, when he was issued a first-class medical certificate with no limitations. On the application for that medical certificate, the pilot reported that he had accumulated 96 hours of total flight time.

N9032P, a 1966 model Piper PA-24-260, Comanche, serial number 24-4494, was an all-metal airplane with semimonocoque fuselage and empennage construction. The airplane's type certificate data indicated that it seated four and had a maximum gross weight of 3,100 pounds. The airplane was powered by a 260-horsepower, six-cylinder, horizontally opposed, air cooled, fuel injected engine, normally aspirated engine, with a data plate marked as Lycoming IO-540-D4A5, serial number L-3449-48. The airplane was equipped with wing flaps, a two-bladed constant speed Hartzell model propeller, and retractable tricycle landing gear.

Some of the accident airplane's logbooks were reviewed at the pilot's hangar. Endorsements showed that an annual inspection was completed on September 3, 2012. The airplane had accumulated a total time of 8,690.9 hours at that time. Recent airplane logbooks were not found within the hangar.

A receipt showed that the airplane was serviced at 1T7 with 49.7 gallons of aviation gasoline (avgas) on May 16, 2015 at 1059.

Preliminary information indicated that N9032P was involved in a ground accident in November of 2013. The airplane's left wing impacted a hangar and it sustained damage. The airplane was salvaged and subsequently sold the pilot.

At 1206, the recorded weather at the San Antonio International Airport (SAT), near San Antonio, Texas, was: Wind 150 degrees at 13 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 2,200 feet, broken clouds at 3,000 feet, broken clouds at 4,300 feet; temperature 27 degrees C; dew point 22 degrees; altimeter 29.88 inches of mercury.

At 1251, the recorded weather at SAT was: Wind 160 degrees at 13 knots, gusting to 22 knots; visibility 9 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 2,300 feet, broken clouds at 3,700 feet, broken clouds at 4,800 feet; temperature 28 degrees C; dew point 22 degrees; altimeter 29.86 inches of mercury.

1T7, located about 26 miles north of San Antonio, Texas, was a non-towered airport, which was privately owned and operated by the Kestrel Airpark Runway Association. The airport is a public use airport. Its field elevation was 1,261 feet above mean sea level. The airport listed 122.975 megahertz as its common traffic advisory frequency. The airport is serviced by one runway: runway 12/30. The runway is listed as a 3,000-foot by 40-foot asphalt runway. The runway has an operational restriction listed, which indicated that runway 30 rises rapidly at its north end.

A postaccident on-scene investigation was conducted. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The airplane came to rest on terrain and on top of a retaining wall adjacent to a store parking lot about 1/4 mile and 22 degrees from the intersection of US Highway 281 North and Flightline Drive. The airplane's left wing separated from its fuselage and it was found resting on the side of a retaining wall. The left wing exhibited an outboard skin section that was not painted. This section was consistent with a wing skin replacement. The unpainted section was intact and it remained attached to its wing.

The airplane's fuselage and empennage was found resting on terrain at the top of the retaining wall. The cockpit was deformed, discolored, and sections consumed consistent with a ground fire. The right wing was also deformed, discolored, and an inboard section of it was consumed by fire. The empennage was deformed forward into the fuselage in an accordion like fashion. An outboard section of the left horizontal stabilizer was deformed and discolored. The nylock nuts that held the horizontal stabilizer were in-place and could be removed by fingertip pressure. Flight control cables were traced from the cockpit to each control surface. All observed separations in the flight control system were consistent with overload. The flaps and landing gear were found in their retracted positions.

The engine and propeller were found forward of the fuselage near the base of a tree that was discolored consistent with a coating of soot. One propeller blade was separated near its hub and the other propeller blade's tip was separated. The separated tip exhibited chordwise gouges on its flat face. The engine was intact and displayed no signs of catastrophic failure. The engine's accessory case was discolored and deformed. The right magneto and the aft section of the engine driven fuel pump were not in place on the accessory case. The top spark plugs and accessory case were removed. The engine's crankshaft was rotated by hand. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to each of the cylinders and to the accessory drive gears. A thumb compression check was performed and all cylinders exhibited a thumb compression. The left magneto exhibited thermal deformation and discoloration. The fuel manifold was intact and its disassembly revealed a trapped liquid that contained water as detected by water disclosing paste. The fuel servo was deformed and discolored. Engine control cables were traced from the cockpit to their respective engine controls. All separations in the engine controls were consistent with overload. The components did not display any anomalies that could not be attributed to the post accident fire.

Members of the pilot's family were asked to locate the pilot's logbook and recent airplane logbooks for review.

The Comal County Coroner was asked to arrange for an autopsy to be completed on the pilot to include taking samples for toxicological testing.










The investigation continues in Comal County where a plane crashed -- killing a family of four on board.

The victims were a couple and their two young children.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board were at the crash site Sunday.

Sunday morning's storm delayed the investigation for NTSB, they said, but once the rain stopped, they were able to go through and start collecting evidence at the wreckage site.

Spokesman Ed Malinowski said they'll most likely be out there again Monday.

Malinowski said they are looking at three things: the crashed plane, pilot Scott Galloway's background and the aircraft's background.

The spokesman said the plane was a Piper PA-24 Comanche.

He said it would be speculation to discuss if this specific type of plane has had any issues before or engine problems.

The manufacturer of the plane, Piper, was out at the site Sunday, including the engine manufacturer and the federal aviation administration.

"We're looking to gather everything from witness remarks, how the airplane impacted the ground at an angle, where the burning did occur during the ground impact fire," Malinowski said.

"Even if you didn't know the family themselves we know people who knew them, worked with them, who loved them. It impacts us all. There's a heavy dark sadness all over the area today," Tina Platt said, an area resident.

On the FAA's website, it indicates Galloway's plane was either rented or borrowed.



Heather Galloway and children Cheyenne, Clayton.
~




Michael Scott Galloway and his wife Heather 
~


A single engine plane crashed Saturday afternoon in Spring Branch and killed four people, according to the Comal County Sheriff's Office.

According to the FAA, a Piper PA-24 Comanche  with a four people aboard crashed into the parking lot of Strutty's Feed and Pet Supply on the 4800 block of U.S. Hwy. 281 North shortly after 12:30 p.m. It crashed after departing from Kestrel Air Park.

The Sheriff's Department identified the victims as Michael Scott Galloway, 38, who was flying the plane; his wife, Heather Louise Galloway, 32; and their two children Clayton “Clay-Clay,” 10, and Cheyenne Elizabeth, 8. 

A friend of the family told KENS 5 that  Scott left behind two other children, who are 16 and 18.

Comal Independent School District confirmed Heather Galloway worked as a bus driver for the school district since 2014. A family friend said she chose that line of work to be closer to her children.

Those who knew Scott Galloway said he loved airplanes since he was a kid and at one point even traveled to Afghanistan as a contractor to work on military planes for nine months as a mechanic. Over the years Galloway also owned several of his own businesses, including in construction and a paintless dent removal business.

His friends told Eyewitness News Galloway worked full time as he went to pilot school at night earning his license four years ago. His friends also added last year Galloway bought his own plane and the family would go on trips together frequently.

FAA investigators and the National Transportation Safety Board have both been notified. The NTSB began their investigation Sunday morning.

Source: http://www.kens5.com


























Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N7099R: Incident occurred May 16, 2015 near Gillespie Field Airport (KSEE), San Diego/El Cajon, California

RICARDO A. LOPEZ: http://registry.faa.gov/N7099R 

SANTEE — A single-engine airplane made an emergency landing on Prospect Avenue in Santee Saturday morning, striking a truck but causing no injuries, the Sheriff’s Department said. 

The plane, a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, was headed from the Phoenix area to Montgomery Field in Kearny Mesa when it suffered a mechanical problem that forced it to divert from its flight plan and make for Gillespie Field in ElCajon.

However, the plane came down on Prospect near Cuyamaca Street instead.

The pilot, a 30-year-old man who identified himself only as Rich, said he has been flying for five years. During the emergency landing he managed to slip his aircraft under some low-hanging power lines in the area before setting down on the roadway.

“To be honest, it was instinct,” he said. “I’m going to call my instructor and tell him ‘thank you’ because he taught me well.”

Ryan Fuentez, 30, who was the plane’s only passenger, said he is learning to fly and will not be deterred by the accident.

“It’ll take a lot more than that to make me wanna stop flying,” Fuentez said.

The truck hit by the single-prop plane sustained only minor damage, according to a sheriff’s deputy.

Source: http://www.utsandiego.com




SANTEE, Calif. – A small plane made an emergency landing on a street and rolled through an intersection in Santee Saturday, deputies said.

Two people aboard the Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee landed it at Cuyamaca Street and Prospect Avenue just after 10:30 a.m. and “clipped” the side of a car parked on the street, a witness told FOX5. 

San Diego Sheriff’s Department deputies and Heartland Fire Department crews were called to assist the pilots after they landed.

No one, including a man inside the car, was injured, deputies said.

What caused the pilot to make the emergency landing was not immediately disclosed.  

Federal Aviation Administration investigators were headed to the scene.

Source:  http://fox5sandiego.com




SANTEE, Calif. - A small plane made an emergency landing just before 10:30 a.m. in Santee. 

The plane, a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, was occupied by a pilot and one passenger. They were heading to Montgomery Field in Kearny Mesa from Phoenix. While flying over Santee, the pilot felt the engine lose power.

The pilot said he tried to turn around and land at Gillespie Field, but couldn't make it.

The plane landed in the 9800 block of Prospect Avenue near Cuyamaca Street. It hit an occupied pickup truck, causing minor damage to the plane and truck.

No injuries were reported. The National Transportation Safety Board is responding to the incident.

Source:   http://www.10news.com
  













Exclusive: Guns N' Roses guitarist talks about helicopter ride

8 News NOW

 LAS VEGAS -- In an exclusive interview with 8 News NOW, guitarist Daren Jay Ashba is speaking for the first time about the helicopter ride that cost his friend and former police captain his job.

Metro Captain David O'Leary was demoted for arranging a ride on a department helicopter for the Guns N' Roses guitarist and Columbian actress Nathalia Henao on Aug. 7, 2013.

Ashba said he asked O'Leary where he could find a private helicopter to use for his proposal to his then girlfriend and was instead offered a ride in the police helicopter.

When news broke that a member of Guns N' Roses got the free ride, O'Leary's attorney said he was forced to resign by Metro.

A state board ruled on Friday that O'Leary did not break rules and he should be reinstated with the department.

"Now that Dave and me have been cleared, and my wife, now it's time to speak. Now you know, 'cause I'm tired of being quiet," said Ashba.

A picture of the couple posted on Instagram, about a free ride on the Metro Police helicopter, caused controversy.

"I felt horrible because it's supposed to be an amazing moment for us and somebody lost a job. A friend of us, like I was clueless and I couldn't believe it was happening," said Henao.

"There's nobody more loyal and honest than him and that's why it was just horrifying what they were saying about us, you know. They made it seem like we, you know, jumped a fence at midnight and stole a helicopter," said Ashba.

As it turns out, a civilian ride along on the Metro helicopter is allowed. According to the Employee Management Relations Board, it was within department policy and O'Leary should be reinstated with back pay. The state board's decision comes nearly two years after the incident.

"When you know you're innocent for almost two years, it couldn't be a better day," said Ashba.

O'Leary declined an interview, but his attorney, Adam Levine, says the decision is what they've been waiting for.

Metro released a statement saying they disagree with the ruling and will be appealing the decision.

"I hope that their threats to appeal were just a statement made in the spur of the moment and that they will welcome him back," said Levine.

After hearing Metro's statement, Ashba maintains O'Leary's innocence.

"He loses his job because he did something out of the kindness of his heart," said Ashba. "He did nothing wrong. We did nothing wrong. What are they gonna fight? Fight us."

The controversy happened around the time former Sheriff Doug Gillespie was going to ask for a tax increase for more Metro funding.

According to the state board, management at Metro then told O'Leary the negative media attention might affect the funding and he was coerced into retiring. The board's decision says that Metro should stop discriminating against employees for political reasons.

Story, video and photo:  http://www.8newsnow.com



Humboldt County, California: Lack of flights impacting aviation fund

Humboldt County’s Aviation Enterprise fund is flying low, with the need to attract a second airliner becoming more pressing as backup funds are depleted, officials said.

At the beginning of the 2014-2015 fiscal year in July 2014, the fund already had a negative balance of over $525,500, which is now expected to dip to a negative $826,500 balance by June 30, according to the County Administrative Office’s third quarter budget report released this month. The fund’s structural deficit, which carries over from year to year, is currently around negative $350,000 and is expected to drop to negative $500,000 at the start of the next fiscal year.

“Basically you have your structural deficit, which adds to the negative fund balance,” Assistant County Administrative Officer Cheryl Dillingham said. “If you start with a fund balance of $0 and you have a $350,000 structural deficit, at the end of the fiscal year you’ll have a negative fund balance of $350,000.”

County Public Works Director Tom Mattson said this negative trend is due to an imbalance caused by the expenditures needed to operate the county’s six airports being greater than the incoming revenue.

“We have to have a minium level of staffing to run a commercial airport,” Mattson said. “We’re operating 20 hours a day, seven days a week. Realistically, we can’t cut any staffing and keep our commercial operations.”

The Arcata-Eureka Airport currently has only one airline service provider through United Airlines after the loss of Horizon Airlines in 2011. With fewer flights, the airport is bringing in less revenue from landing fees, fuel sales, terminal rental space, and parking. More recently, the airport lost the U.S. Coast Guard as a fuel customer and United Airlines ended service to Sacramento. Even the closing of the airport’s restaurant, The Silver Lining, in March will add to the negative fund balance, Dillingham said.

Mattson said just one new airline service would be a “significant revenue enhancer,” though he said he could not predict how soon it would reverse the Aviation Fund’s negative trend.

“The minute a new airline comes in, new revenue starts coming in,” he said.

The airport’s Program Coordinator Emily Jacobs and other county representatives have been meeting with airline service representatives with the hopes that one will catch. Jacobs said she plans to attend another conference in June, and said she cannot disclose any information about any ongoing negotiations.

“There is nothing to report at this time,” she said. “Things are positive and I will keep everybody posted as soon as there is some type of announcement to make.”

However, the fund cannot wait for another airline service to balance its budget before the end of the fiscal year. Should the deficit carry over to the next fiscal year, the fund would fall out of compliance with state law.

“The deficit combined with a negative fund balance causes the financing sources to exceed financing uses, which is not allowed per the state County Budget Act,” the budget report states. “The recommended budget for the Aviation Enterprise fund is required to be balanced.”

The fund’s current balance “raises concern” for the County Administrative Office.

“This is because enterprise funds are classified by accounting standards as ‘business-type activities’ and are supposed to stand on their own without the sort of short-term borrowing typical of the county’s governmental funds,” the report states.

While the Public Works Department has been using trust funds to cover short-term costs in the Aviation Fund, Mattson said it won’t be a viable option for next fiscal year.

“Think of that as a bank account,” he said. “We’ve drawn that down and we would like to pay it back. We don’t have the cash to draw down this year.”

With options running out, both Public Works and the Administrative Office are currently negotiating a $500,000 loan from Public Work’s Motor Pool fund to balance the Aviation Fund’s budget and provide another year to find a new revenue source.

“The budget has to be balanced,” Mattson said. “That loan allows us to balance the budget for the year and gives us time to figure out a way to get rid of the structural deficit and pay back the loan.”

As to why the Motor Pool fund is being chosen to make the loan, County Administrative Officer Phillip Smith-Hanes told the Board of Supervisors at its May 2 meeting that “there is no magic” to it.

“It’s just simply that that’s a place where we have quite a bit of cash, unlike in the General Fund,” he said.

The Motor Pool fund began the 2014-2015 fiscal year with an over $2.2 million budget. The finalized loan request will go before the board before the end of the fiscal year.

Meanwhile, Jacobs said that the airport will now have a new 70-seat jet from United Airlines starting on July 2 that will be used for a new 5:30 a.m. flight. The new jet will be the second to last returning flight each night, meaning that the airport will now have two morning flights. Jacobs said this flight and jet were added due to increased demand, which she said can also be used as leverage to attract another airline.

“When they see that the seats are full and people are using the airport, it gets them very interested much more than any kind of revenue guarantee or subsidy,” she said. “They want that connecting traffic. The best thing the citizens of Humboldt County can do to get more flights is to use this airport.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.times-standard.com