Thursday, May 5, 2016

Daleville-based aviation training company undergoes foreign certification process

Shane Labrie, program manager at Concord XXI U.S.A. Inc. Aviation Training, talks about the company's advanced flight simulator at the facility on Thursday.
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DALEVILLE -- An international company based in Daleville that trains pilots, flight engineers and maintenance technicians on Russian Mi-17 helicopter simulators is in the process of obtaining foreign certification.

Concord XXI USA, located on Robert C. Barnes Drive, moved toward completion of a foreign certification this week through the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), via the State Aviation Administration of Ukraine. According to the website for EASA, which is headquartered in Germany, the agency provides specific regulatory and executive tasks in civil aviation safety and environmental protection for more than 30 countries.

Eric Huppert, president of the company, said a team from Ukraine spent much of the week inspecting Concord XXI’s facilities and overlooking syllabi and the Level D-equivalent, Full Flight simulators for the Russian Mi-17. The certification process is expected to be completed on Saturday.

Huppert said EASA is the equivalent to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration in the countries EASA represent. He said the certification will allow Concord XXI to appeal to entities that require a training facility to have a foreign certification before training a company’s contractors.

Retired from the U.S. Air Force, Huppert said he founded Concord XXI in 2010 after he recognized the need to train pilots on the Russian aircraft the way training is done in the west, instead of the old Soviet style of training. He said the company is now training all American Air Force advisors who train the military in Afghanistan.

“The new certification allows us to show those others who require a certification other than FAA certification that they can train at our facility,” Huppert said.

“We’ve trained, in addition to the U.S. Army and Air Force, the Colombians, Peru, Malaysians, and others on Russian helicopters. We are working toward training some Sri Lankans soon.”

Concord XXI Vice President Edward Shulman said the EASA certification process began about six months before the physical inspection of the Daleville facility this week. He said Concord XXI has already trained more than 2,000 pilots, most of whom are NATO members.

Concord XXI USA program manager Shane Labrie said EASA is a significant accomplishment, giving the company all approvals possible for any agency to scrutinize.

“We’ve trained with the U.S. Air Force, Army and U.S. government agencies, but on the civilian side, this opens up more opportunities,” he said.

“We’re one of the only instrument-capable Mi-17 training facilities in the world, and the only one of its kind in the U.S.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.dothaneagle.com

Live Oaks Hit By Crashing Plane Might Not Survive: Cessna 421B Golden Eagle, N3372Q, accident occurred April 26, 2016 in Foley, Baldwin County, Alabama


FOLEY, AL- Two massive Live Oak trees damaged during a plane crash in Foley last week might not survive the extensive damage. 

The pilot escaped the burning plane with only a cut on his hand, but the oaks, which have been on the property for more than a century, are in rough shape.

A certified master arborist tells News 5 the beautiful trees could be saved if treatment starts soon. Treating the trees could cost as much as $10,000.

The owner of the property where the trees are located says he does not want to cut them down or bulldoze them. Adam Bond says he’ll do what it takes to bring the trees back to health.

The FAA is investigating the plane crash. The investigation could take months.

Story and video:  http://wkrg.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N3372Q

Date: 26-APR-16
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N3372Q
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 421
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FOLEY
State: Alabama

AFTER LANDING THE AIRCRAFT RAN OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY. FOLEY, AL

Beech 65-A90-1 King Air, St. Tammany Parish Mosquito Abatement, N7MC: Fatal accident occurred April 19, 2016 at Slidell Airport (KASD), St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Saint Tammany Mosquito Abatement District; Slidell, Louisiana


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Mosquito Abatement District: http://registry.faa.gov/N7MC

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA158
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Accident occurred Tuesday, April 19, 2016 in Slidell, LA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/13/2017
Aircraft: BEECH 65 A90 1, registration: N7MC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot and commercial copilot were conducting a mosquito abatement application flight. Although flight controls were installed in both positions, the pilot typically operated the airplane. During a night, visual approach to landing at their home airfield, the airplane was on the left base leg and overshot the runway's extended centerline and collided with 80-ft-tall power transmission towers and then impacted terrain. Examination of the airplane did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Both pilots were experienced with night operations, especially at their home airport. The pilot had conducted operations at the airport for 14 years and the copilot for 31 years, which might have led to crew complacency on the approach.  Adequate visibility and moon disk illumination were available; however, the area preceding the runway is a marsh and lacks cultural lighting, which can result in black-hole conditions in which pilots may perceive the airplane to be higher than it actually is while conducting an approach visually.

The circumstances of the accident are consistent with the pilot experiencing the black hole illusion which contributed to him flying an approach profile that was too low for the distance remaining to the runway. It is likely that the pilot did not maintain adequate crosscheck of his altimeter and radar altimeter during the approach and that the copilot did not monitor the airplane's progress; thus, the flight crew did not recognize that they were not maintaining a safe approach path. Further, it is likely that neither pilot used the visual glidepath indicator at the airport, which is intended to be a countermeasure against premature descent in visual conditions.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The unstable approach in black-hole conditions, resulting in the airplane overshooting the runway extended centerline and descending well below a safe glidepath for the runway. Contributing to the accident was the lack of monitoring by the copilot allowing the pilot to fly well below a normal glidepath.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 19, 2016, about 2115 central daylight time, a Beech 65-A90-1 airplane, N7MC, collided with towers suspending high-power transmission lines while attempting to land at Slidell Municipal Airport (ASD), Slidell, Louisiana. Both pilots were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the Saint Tammany Parish Mosquito Abatement District as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 public aircraft operations flight . Night visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident, and the flight was operating on a visual flight rules flight plan. The local flight originated about 2000.

After completing a planned mosquito abatement application flight, the pilots radioed their intention to land at ASD. The accident pilots were flying a visual pattern to runway 18, and another company airplane was behind them conducting a practice GPS approach to runway 18. When the pilot of the other company airplane radioed that they had crossed the GPS approach's final approach fix, the accident pilot radioed that they were on the left base leg and were number one to land at the airport. Seconds later, the pilots of the other company airplane saw a blue arc of electricity, followed shortly after by a plume of fire. The accident pilots could not be reached on the radio, and the company pilots notified emergency personnel. The airplane was located in a marsh about 0.6 nautical mile north-northwest of the approach end of runway 18.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Pilot

The left seat pilot, age 59, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane. He was issued a second-class medical certificate, dated February 18, 2016, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision. On his medical application, the pilot reported that he used hydrochlorothiazide and irbesartan.

As of December 11, 2015, the pilot reported accruing 6,825 hours of single-engine total time with 50 hours logged in the preceding 6 months and 952 hours of multiengine total time with 15 hours logged in the preceding year. His flight time in the Beech C90 was 15 hours with 5 hours logged in the preceding year. He estimated that he had 7,762 total hours with 1,135 hours of night time, 10 hours of actual instrument time, and 305 hours of simulated instrument time. He reported his last biennial flight review occurred in February 2014.

Company records showed that the pilot flew the accident airplane for 7.4 hours in 2015 and 5.7 hours in 2014. On July 1, 2015, the pilot was approved by the aerial operations supervisor to act as pilot-in-command for the accident airplane and a Britten-Norman BN-2T airplane, N717MC.

Copilot

The copilot, age 68, who was in the right seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings in airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument airplane and helicopter. He also held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single-engine sea and a flight instructor certificate for airplane single and multiengine, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument airplane and helicopter. He was issued a second-class medical certificate, dated July 14, 2015, with the limitation that he must have available glasses for near vision. On his medical application, the copilot reported that he used diltiazem, losartan, pravastatin, metoprolol, etodolac, pantoprazole, sildenafil, and warfarin.

As of February 25, 2016, the pilot reported accruing 4,310 hours of single-engine total time with 50 hours logged in the preceding 6 months and 5,910 hours of multiengine time with 105 hours logged in the preceding year. His flight time in the Beech C90 was 627 hours with 59 hours logged in the preceding year. He estimated that he had 18,163 total hours with 4,619 hours of night time, 2,199 hours of actual instrument time, and 431 hours of simulated instrument time. He reported that his last biennial flight review occurred in February 2014.

The copilot was also the department's aerial operations supervisor. He had worked for the Saint Tammany Parish Mosquito Abatement District for 31 years. According to other company pilots, although the copilot was the more senior pilot, he was seated in the right seat and would have been performing copilot duties.

Both pilots had flown the accident airplane together on April 4, 7, 8, 11, and 18, 2015, for a total of 6.9 hours. Each flight ended in a night landing to ASD. On the forms for each of the flights, the area for "comments and/or mechanical problems" was blank.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The low-wing, twin engine airplane was manufactured in 1968. It was powered by two 550-shaft- horsepower Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-20 turboprop engines. Each engine drove a three-blade, variable-pitch, full-feathering Hartzell HC-B3TN-3B propeller. The airplane was operated as a public aircraft operations flight by the Saint Tammany Parish of Louisiana for mosquito abatement purposes.

The airplane's most recent inspection was a combined Phase I through IV and annual inspection recorded on December 1, 2015, at an airframe total time of 15,189.6 hours. On that date, the left engine had accrued 9,676.6 hours since new and 1,638.4 hours since overhaul. The right engine had accrued 7,413 total hours since new and 1,248.5 hours since overhaul. Airplane forms filled out before the flight showed that the airplane had logged 15,207.1 total hours.

The airplane was originally manufactured as a US Army U-21D. It remained in military service until 1995 when it was sold to a civilian company. In 1998, the airplane was registered with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as a Beechcraft 65A90-1 and issued a special airworthiness certificate for restricted use for the purpose of agriculture and pest control. The airplane was acquired by the Saint Tammany Parish in June 2012. The airplane was equipped with a radar altimeter and had controls installed in both pilot seats.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 2053, the ASD automated weather reporting facility reported calm wind, visibility 10 miles, clear sky, temperature 68° F, dew point 64° F, and a barometric pressure of 30.09 inches of mercury .

Astronomical data from the US Navy Observatory indicated that the moon rose on the day of the accident at 1730 and set the following morning at 0541. The moon disk illumination was 94%.

COMMUNICATIONS

The accident pilots were communicating on the airport's common traffic advisory radio frequency (CTAF), which was not recorded. The pilots in the company airplane who were also on the CTAF reported no distress calls before the accident.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

ASD is located 4 miles northwest of Slidell, Louisiana, and is a publicly owned, nontowered airport that is open to the public. The airport is at an elevation of 28 ft mean sea level. It has a 5,002 ft long, 100 ft wide asphalt runway aligned with 18/36. Runway 18 has a displaced threshold with a published landing distance of 4,057 ft. It is lit with medium-intensity runway lighting and runway end identifier lights, which are preset to low intensity between the hours of dusk and dawn. There is precision approach path indicator lightning (PAPI) located on the left side of the runway, configured for a 3.0° glideslope.

The other company pilots reported that the airfield lighting was illuminated and that the PAPI operated normally.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane initially impacted two 70- to 80-ft-tall towers that suspended high-power transmission lines . The lines generally ran on a heading of 150°/330° and, due to their height, were not required to be illuminated. Ceramic isolators were shattered on the northern pole, and the top guide wire was damaged on the southern pole. A portion of the airplane's lower chemical tank and left wing tip were found directly beneath the poles. The airplane's debris path followed a 175° heading in marshy terrain for about 555 ft.

The main wreckage came to rest about 0.6 nautical mile northwest of runway 18's approach end. The main wreckage consisted of the metal hopper tank frame, the upper portion of the fuselage, cockpit instrumentation, inboard left wing, outboard right wing, left horizontal, vertical stabilizer, rudder, and the left engine with its propeller. A postimpact fire consumed a majority of the cabin structure. The airplane's nose was generally aligned with 350° magnetic, and the fuselage was inverted.

Flight control continuity was confirmed to all surfaces. The flaps were in the retracted position. The elevator and rudder trim positions could not be determined due to impact damage. The fuel selector position could not be determined. The emergency locator transmitter (ELT) was still attached to the airplane, and the antenna and was found in the "armed" position, but it was thermally damaged. The company pilots in the other airplane reported that they did not hear any ELT beacon.

Both pilots' restraint hardware remained latched; the webbing was consumed by fire. The left fuel flow gauge read 400 pounds per hour and the right fuel gauge read 250 pounds per hour. The cockpit instrumentation was impact and thermally damaged and was largely unreadable. The right inlet turbine temperature gauge read about 700°. The left propeller speed read about 1,100 rpm.
The right engine was impact-separated and found upright. Its propeller remained attached to the engine. Two of the three blades displayed S-bending with nicks on their leading edges. Examination of the left propeller blades found one blade almost completely consumed by the postcrash fire. Another blade was partially consumed and displayed curling with a rearward bend. The third blade was curled and bent rearward. No anomalies were detected with the airframe and engine.

A thermally damaged SD card was recovered from the airplane's ADAPCO Wingman GX system and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board laboratory for data extraction. Due to the damage sustained in the accident, the chips on the card were not recoverable.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Pilot

The St. Tammany Parish Coroner's Office conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy showed no natural diseases that could have posed a potential hazard to flight safety.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. Testing was negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. The following drugs were detected:

Ibuprofen detected in urine
Irbesartan detected in urine
Irbesartan detected in blood

The pilot had previously reported the use of irbesartan, which is used to treat high blood pressure, to the FAA. Ibuprofen is a nonnarcotic analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent and is available in prescription and nonprescription forms.

Copilot

The St. Tammany Parish Coroner's Office conducted an autopsy on the copilot. Although the autopsy did note several chronic medical conditions, there did not appear to be any natural diseases that posed an immediate hazard to flight safety.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the copilot. Testing was negative for ethanol and 15% carbon monoxide was detected in blood from the heart. The following drugs were detected:

Diltiazem detected in urine
Diltiazem detected in blood (heart)
Metoprolol detected in urine
Metoprolol NOT detected in blood (heart)
Rosuvastatin detected in urine
Rosuvastatin detected in blood (heart)
Warfarin detected in urine
Warfarin detected in blood (heart)

The copilot had previously reported all of the detected medications except the rosuvastatin to the FAA. Rosuvastatin is a prescription medication used to reduce blood cholesterol and triglycerides levels.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The FAA's Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25A), dated 2008, Chapter 10, "Night Operations," states the following:
Night Illusions

A black-hole approach occurs when the landing is made from over water or non-lighted terrain where the runway lights are the only source of light. Without peripheral visual cues to help, pilots will have trouble orientating themselves relative to Earth. The runway can seem out of position (downsloping or upsloping) and in the worse case, results in landing short of the runway. If an electronic glide slope or visual approach slope indicator (VASI) is available, it should be used. If navigation aids (NAVAIDs) are unavailable, careful attention should be given to using the flight instruments to assist in maintaining orientation and a normal approach. If at any time the pilot is unsure of his or her position or attitude, a go-around should be executed.

Approaches and Landings

To fly a traffic pattern of proper size and direction, the runway threshold and runway-edge lights must be positively identified. Once the airport lights are seen, these lights should be kept in sight throughout the approach. Distance may be deceptive at night due to limited lighting conditions. A lack of intervening references on the ground and the inability of the pilot to compare the size and location of different ground objects cause this. This also applies to the estimation of altitude and speed. Consequently, more dependence must be placed on flight instruments, particularly the altimeter and the airspeed indicator.

The altimeter and VSI [vertical speed indicator] should be constantly cross-checked against the airplane's position along the base leg and final approach. A visual approach slope indicator (VASI) is an indispensable aid in establishing and maintaining a proper glidepath.


Wayne Fisher, 68, and Donald Pechon, 59, were the two men aboard the Mosquito Abatement District plane when it crashed into the woods just north of the Slidell airport while trying to land, according to James Hartman, a spokesman for the St. Tammany Parish Coroner’s office.


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA158
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Tuesday, April 19, 2016 in Slidell, LA
Aircraft: BEECH 65 A90 1, registration: N7MC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 19, 2016, about 2115 central daylight time, a Beech 65-A90-1 airplane, N7MC, collided with towers suspending high power transmission lines, while attempting to land at the Slidell Municipal Airport (KASD), Slidell, Louisiana. Both pilots were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the Saint Tammany Parish Mosquito Abatement District as a public use flight. Night visual meteorological condition prevailed for the flight, which operated on a visual flight rules flight plan. The local flight originated about 2000.

After completing a planned mosquito abatement aerial application flight, the accident pilots radioed their intentions to land at KASD. A company airplane was also in the area and flew the GPS approach to runway 18 for practice, while the accident airplane flew a visual pattern. When the pilots of the other company airplane radioed that they had crossed the GPS approach's final approach fix, the accident pilots radioed that they were on a left base and were number one to land at the airport. Seconds later, the company pilots of the other airplane saw an arc of electricity followed shortly by a plume of fire from the ground. The accident pilots could not be reached on the radio, and emergency responders were contacted.

The airplane was located in a marsh about 0.6 nautical miles north-northwest of approach end of runway 18. The initial point of impact was damage to two towers suspending high power transmission lines. These two towers were between 70-80 feet tall and were located 200 yards north of the main wreckage. The airplane's left wing tip and a portion of the aerial applicant tank were found near the towers.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

At 2053, an automated weather reporting facility located at KASD reported a calm wind, visibility 10 miles, a clear sky, temperature 68° F, dew point 64° F, and a barometric pressure of 30.09 inches.



The mosquito abatement plane that crashed at Slidell Municipal Airport last month, killing two pilots, collided with high-power transmission line towers, according to a preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board. In response, Slidell officials are renewing efforts to get those lines near the airport’s north runway approach relocated or buried.

Airport manager Richard Artigue said Tuesday that even though the towers conform with Federal Aviation Administration regulations, local officials have long recognized they pose a potential safety hazard for aircraft. The April 19 crash proved those fears were valid, he said.

Wayne Fisher, 68, and Donald Pechon, 59, were both experienced pilots, Artigue said. Fisher, a reserve deputy with the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office, also flew a helicopter for that agency.

Many of the pilots who use the airport are far less experienced, he said, and the airport is heavily used by student pilots.



Moving the lines would not be easy, however.

Both Artigue and Slidell City Councilman Val Vanney, whose district includes the airport, said the project would cost millions of dollars and require the cooperation of numerous players, from Entergy and Cleco, the two utility companies that own the lines, to the state and federal governments.

“One company or one person can’t do it,” Artigue said, adding that it would take federal money.

City officials met last week with executives of Cleco, which owns the inner power transmission lines. Vanney described the company as cooperative. Officials also plan to contact Entergy, which owns the outer lines.

The Slidell City Council had been poised to vote Tuesday night on a resolution asking the companies to relocate their overhead lines as far as possible from the airport or else to bury the lines. The resolution called the relocation “absolutely necessary for the safety of pilots” and urged the companies to “act as expeditiously as possible.”

But Vanney said he was withdrawing the resolution in light of Cleco’s expressed willingness to work with the city and the complexity and cost of the project.

The work will require the support of state officials and Louisiana’s congressional delegation because of the cost, he said.

Artigue said Slidell officials don’t want to appear to be blaming anyone for the accident.

But the accident is giving new impetus to efforts to get the lines moved, something Artiguqe said former Mayor Ben Morris had pushed to do.

“We don’t want to try to put the blame on anyone,” Artigue said. “We do want to do something in the name of safety.”

Vanney noted that the only other fatal crash at the Slidell airport happened in 1974.

Some officials speculated immediately after the crash that engine trouble had played a role, but the NTSB report does not mention that. Instead, it makes it clear that the Beech 65 collided with the towers as it was making its approach to land at the airport after aerial spraying for mosquitos.

“The initial point of impact was damage to two towers suspending high-power transmission lines,” the report says. “These two towers were 70-80 feet tall and were located 200 yards north of the main wreckage. The airplane’s left wing tip and a portion of the aerial applicant tank were found near the towers.”

The report notes that it was a clear, calm night with visibility at 10 miles.

Another mosquito district plane that was preparing to land at the airport about the same time reported seeing an arc of electricity followed shortly by a plume of fire from the ground.

The plane’s wreckage was found in a marsh just north of the approach end of Runway 18.

Story and video:  http://www.wwltv.com

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.theneworleansadvocate.com






LACOMBE-  With spring-like weather at its peak, it's a challenge for Joanna Parr to wrangle her 19-month-old when outdoors.

But she's had to take on that feat because of mosquitos.

"It's hard with the little ones because they want to go outside and he can't go outside and play, we've got to bring him inside," she said, "He's getting lots of bites."

She said the increase in her Lacombe neighborhood has been noticeable over the past two weeks, when the parish spray plane has not been flying.

Mosquito Control says that's, on one hand, due to the loss of their large plane, and two esteemed pilots, in a heartbreaking crash.  But St. Tammany Mosquito Abatement Director Chuck Palmisano said it's mostly because, "The populations are not that high right now.  They're relatively low. But light traps indicated an increase in certain areas across the parish so we did conduct an aerial operation Tuesday night in south Slidell and also Lacombe. Tonight, we're going to go aerially in the Mandeville area."

Ground and preventative efforts haven't missed a beat though, and as the bug-riddled summer months creep closer, leaders have a plan to keep the aerial attack active.

"We're going to utilize this plane as much as we can, also, we've been talking with a couple of aerial spray contractors, looking to maybe engage their service at least until the time we get another airplane and put it in service," said Palmisano.

Even though Mosquito Control says its operation is on track, they still need the public to do their part.

Palmisano said, "Encouragement to survey your yards, see if you might have artificial things breeding mosquitos and if you're in a really mosquito prone area, use repellent."

The operations plan has Parr looking forward to fewer bite-filled afternoons outdoors.

Mosquito Control hopes to have its replacement plan purchased and in operation by the Fall.

Story and video:  http://www.wwltv.com

Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (KAUS) adding non-stop flights to Guadalajara



Non-stop flights to Guadalajara, Mexico, are on the way to Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.

Volaris, a low-cost airline, will begin service Aug. 7, airport officials said.

Flights will run three days a week – Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays – departing Austin at 1:20 p.m. and arriving at the Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla Guadalajara International Airport at 3:28 p.m.

The return flight will operate the same three days, departing Guadalajara at 9:33 a.m. and arriving in Austin at 11:50 a.m.

Volaris said it will be using a 179-seat Airbus A320 aircraft for the new air service.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.statesman.com

Hawaiian Airlines Seeks to Fast Track Tokyo to Kona, Honolulu Route



Hawaiian Airlines is pushing to have its application to provide split services between Honolulu, Kona, and Haneda Airport in Tokoyo, Japan approved.

The company’s request went to the United States Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Fox.

On Thursday afternoon, the company announced that it filed a motion on Wednesday noting that its the only applicant for the single available night-time frequency to serve Haneda Airport that will be available to United States airlines when a February 2016 agreement between the U.S. government and Japan takes effect later this year.

“It is long-standing DOT practice to grant an airline route when no other airlines are competing for the same limited opportunity,” said Mark Dunkerley, president and Chief Executive Officer of Hawaiian Airlines. “When you couple the lack of other applicants with our demonstrated knowledge of the Japanese market, it is clear that granting Hawaiian the right to operate this lone night-time slot from Haneda to Kona and Honolulu is in the best interest of the United States and the traveling public.”

Honolulu and Kona service would be the second Haeda route operated by Hawaiian. The flights would join Honolulu to Haneda daily service that began in November 2010.

In the filed motion, Hawaiian pledged to initiate service to Honolulu four times a week once the amendment takes effect, along with service from Haneda to Kona three times a week.

Governor David Ige, Hawai’i County Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Hawaii’s Congressional Delegation have supported the expansion.

Original article can be found here: http://bigislandnow.com

JetBlue Returns To Nashville International Airport (KBNA)




NASHVILLE, Tenn. - JetBlue airlines celebrated its return to the Nashville International Airport.

Airline officials held a ribbon cutting ceremony after a brief press conference. The ticketing station was also decorated with blue balloons.

They marked its return with the arrival of the first JetBlue plane that rolled into BNA Thursday.

JetBlue will operate nonstop service to Boston and Fort Lauderdale.

Officials said in addition to the non-stop flights on board the new aircraft, they will also offer free wi-fi, in-flight TV and snacks.

Story and video:  http://www.newschannel5.com

Lancair IV-P, N401PT, registered to and operated by the commercial pilot: Fatal accident occurred January 30, 2016 at Southwest Georgia Regional Airport (KABY), Albany, Dougherty County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 
Lancair; Redmond, Oregon
Turbine Power Technologies; Deland, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N401PT  




Location: Albany, GA
Accident Number: ERA16FA097
Date & Time: 01/30/2016, 1445 EST
Registration: N401PT
Aircraft: BROOK AARON D LANCAIR IV P
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The two pilots and a passenger were departing in the turbine engine-equipped, experimental, amateur-built airplane for a local personal flight. The airplane fuel tanks had been topped off before the flight. Video imagery indicated that the airplane rotated for takeoff about 1,200 ft from the start of the runway. After rotation, the airplane banked sharply to the right and climbed to the height of the treetops. The bank angle increased to about 90° where it remained as the airplane descended to ground impact; a postcrash fire ensued. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.

The commercial pilot seated in the left seat had recently purchased the airplane, and, based on data recovered from a portable GPS unit onboard the airplane, the airplane had been flown at least 36 hours since the purchase. The second pilot, who was seated in the right seat, held airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificates. The second pilot was assisting the owner in becoming more familiar and proficient in the airplane; however, although he had received 9 hours of dual instruction in the airplane, none of it was given with him seated in the right seat. The pilot/owner and the second pilot had estimated flight times in the airplane of 27 and 36 hours, respectively. The investigation could not determine which of the pilots was flying the airplane at the time of the accident.

In addition to the two pilots, the airplane was loaded with full fuel and a passenger in the rear seat, and calculations indicated that the airplane was about 470 pounds over its maximum gross takeoff weight and 0.5 inch beyond its most aft center of gravity limit. This was likely the only flight the pilots had conducted with the airplane loaded in this manner. Following a takeoff about 2 weeks before the accident, during which the airplane had full fuel but no rear seat passenger, the second pilot reported to the flight instructor from whom he received his training in the airplane that they had almost crashed on takeoff. The instructor cautioned the second pilot that, with full fuel, the rotation must be gradual and should not occur at too low an airspeed. Further, the instructor stated that, during the second pilot's training, he had told him that, if the airplane's auxiliary fuel tanks were full, the airplane should have no more than two occupants.

Although the rotation speed during the accident takeoff could not be determined, the video imagery showed that the airplane lifted off after a ground roll similar to that on previous takeoffs from the same airport that were recorded by the portable GPS unit. Therefore, it is likely that the airplane rotated about the same speed on the accident flight as it had during the previous takeoffs conducted by the pilots. However, because the airplane was likely operating at a higher gross weight and aft center of gravity than previous flights, during the accident takeoff, the pilots should have used a higher rotation speed. Because of the lower rotation speed, the airplane was likely more difficult and possibly impossible to control upon liftoff. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilots' failure to maintain control during a takeoff attempt in a high-performance airplane. Contributing to the accident were the pilots' decision to operate the airplane above its maximum gross weight and with an aft center of gravity and their lack of experience in the make and model airplane.

Findings

Aircraft
Lateral/bank control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Maximum weight - Capability exceeded (Factor)
CG/weight distribution - Capability exceeded (Factor)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)
Decision making/judgment - Copilot (Factor)
Total experience w/ equipment - Pilot (Factor)
Total experience w/ equipment - Copilot (Factor)

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 30, 2016, at 1445 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Lancair IV-P, N401PT, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport (ABY), Albany, Georgia. The two pilots, a commercial pilot and an airline transport pilot, and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the commercial pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Video recordings from an airport security system captured a portion of the flight. A review of those recordings revealed that the airplane rotated for takeoff about 1,200 ft from the beginning of runway 22. After rotation, the airplane banked sharply to the right and climbed to the height of the treetops. The bank angle increased to about 90° where it remained as the airplane descended to the ground.

A witness located about 1/4 mile north of the accident site reported that the airplane sounded "normal" until shortly before impact, when the engine noise became louder.



PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A witness reported that as the occupants embarked, the commercial pilot (owner/pilot) was seated in the left front seat, and the airline transport pilot (second pilot) was seated in the right front seat. The investigation could not determine which pilot was at the controls at the time of the accident or which pilot served as pilot in command. Neither of the pilots' logbooks was available for examination during the investigation.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the owner/pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He reported 1,000 hours of flight experience at the time of his most recent FAA third-class medical examination, which was performed on January 20, 2015.

The second pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land and rotorcraft helicopter. He held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine, rotorcraft helicopter, instrument airplane, and instrument helicopter. He reported 6,750 hours of flight experience at the time of his most recent FAA second-class medical examination, which was performed on July 8, 2015.

Interviews with several of the owner's acquaintances revealed that his flight experience in the Lancair IV-P make and model was exclusively in the accident airplane, which he had purchased about 2 months before the accident. According to one acquaintance, the owner/pilot arranged for the second pilot to receive Lancair specific training at Deland Municipal Airport (DED), Deland, Florida, where the airplane was stored temporarily after its purchase. The plan was for the second pilot to subsequently provide training to the owner/pilot. The acquaintance did not know how many flight hours the owner had accrued in the airplane; however, he said that, as of January 12, 2016, the owner had not met the insurance policy requirements for solo flight.

According to a representative of the owner/pilot's insurance company, the policy did not require a specific number of flight hours, but it required that the owner complete ground and flight training in the Lancair IV-P make and model and have that training endorsed in his logbook before solo flight.

According to the flight instructor at DED who provided flight training to the second pilot, on December 21, 2015, both pilots attended a one-day ground school training session on engine and propeller operations. During the week of January 6, 2016, the second pilot received 9 hours of flight training at DED from the instructor, who was endorsed by the Lancair Owners and Builders Organization (LOBO). The training was conducted in the accident airplane, and the second pilot flew all 9 hours from the left seat. He had not flown the Lanciar IV-P before that training. The instructor stated that one flight was conducted "at max rear [center of gravity] CG" with full main fuel tanks and the pilot/owner in the rear seat. He also stated that he discussed with the second pilot that, if the airplane's belly and rear tanks were full, the airplane should be treated "as a two seater aircraft and no weight in the luggage compartment."

An employee from the Eagles of America fixed base operator at ABY observed several previous flights of the accident airplane. On two occasions, he observed the owner fly the airplane alone, and on one occasion he observed the owner flying with the second pilot in the right seat and the passenger in the rear seat.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The turbo-propeller-powered airplane was built in 2002. It was powered by a 724-horsepower Walter M601-D engine driving a 3-blade propeller. It was equipped with retractable tricycle-style landing gear. It was not equipped with a gust lock feature. A review of maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent condition inspections of the airframe and engine occurred on October 29, 2015, and both were found to be in satisfactory condition. The pilot purchased the airplane on December 10, 2015.

According to a mechanic, maintenance was performed on the airplane during the week of January 25, 2016. The starter generator was replaced, and a nose gear door was repaired. These tasks were not documented in the airplane logbooks.

A review of fuel records indicated that the airplane had been fueled nine times at the ABY airport between January 10 and January 30, 2016. The airplane was fueled with 64 gallons of fuel just before the accident flight, with an order to top off all tanks. The fuel capacity was 60 gallons in each wing tank and a combined total of 38 gallons in the two auxiliary tanks, one located in the baggage area and one in the belly of the airplane.

Two weight and balance specification sheets were found in a binder recovered from the airplane's baggage compartment. One sheet, dated May 2005, indicated that the maximum allowable gross weight was 3,800 pounds and that the allowable center of gravity (CG) moment range was between 108.37 and 116.3 inches. The sheet did not contain any reference to the two auxiliary fuel tanks, which, according to the airplane maintenance records, were installed in October 2011. In addition, it indicated an empty weight and moment arm of 2,566 pounds and 111.6 inches, respectively. The second weight and balance sheet was undated and included a reference to an auxiliary tank in the baggage area, using 20 gallons of fuel in that tank as an example calculation. The second sheet did not reference the belly fuel tank, and it did not indicate any values for maximum gross weight or CG limits. It indicated a "new" empty weight and moment arm of 2,576 pounds and 111.97 inches, respectively.

Using occupant weights obtained from medical and/or motor vehicle records, and full main and auxiliary fuel tanks, the weight and balance at the time of the accident was estimated to be 4,270 pounds at a CG moment arm of 116.8 inches. According to the limits shown on the May 2005 sheet, the airplane was about 470 pounds above its maximum gross takeoff weight and 0.5 inch beyond its most aft CG limit.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1451 recorded weather observation at ABY included wind from 210° at 9 knots, skies clear, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 21°C, dew point 3°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a grass field about 1,900 ft from the beginning of the runway and 280 ft to the right of the runway centerline. The wreckage path extended from the initial impact ground scar along a heading of 270° and was 170 ft long. A position light with green lens fragments and the right winglet were among the debris found closest to the initial impact scar. Both wings were separated from the fuselage at their roots and fragmented with pieces distributed along the wreckage path. The left-wing tip and winglet were found about 130 ft along the wreckage path. The main wreckage area included the empennage, which was largely intact and displayed severe fire and impact damage forward of the rear seats. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were fractured about mid-span with the outboard portion displaced forward. The trailing edge of the elevator trim tab was found deflected about 1/2 inch downward. The trailing edge of the rudder trim tab was found deflected about 1/4 inch to the right. The engine mounting structural tubes were fractured, and the engine was found inverted. The propeller hub separated from the engine flange, and one of the three blades separated from the hub. All three blades exhibited some bending in the aft direction from about mid-span outward, and each showed some amount of twisting deformation.

The engine power turbine blades were intact and exhibited slight bending at their tips and rub marks at their roots. The engine casing was displaced and twisted, and the engine could not be turned by hand at the starter or the propeller shafts. After removal of the planetary gear system, the propeller shaft turned easily and did not exhibit any evidence of twisting.

Examination of the airframe revealed that the main landing gear were retracted. The position of the nose landing gear could not be determined. The position of the flaps could not be determined. The elevator moved freely, and pitch control continuity was confirmed from the elevator through the push-pull tubes to the aft cabin area. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder through a push-pull tube to the cable and bell crank assembly in the empennage. The rudder was free to move, and both cables exhibited binding as a result of fire damage. Both ailerons had separated from their respective wings and were found fractured and fire damaged. Both cockpit control sticks remained connected to their control tubes. Continuity from those tubes to the remainder of the control components could not be confirmed due to impact and fire damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Division of Forensic Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, State of Georgia, conducted autopsies on both pilots. The cause of death was determined to be "multiple blunt force trauma" in both cases.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of specimens from both pilots. The results for the pilot/owner were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and drugs of abuse. Acetaminophen, a common over the counter analgesic/antipyretic (Tylenol), was detected in the urine. This medication does not pose a hazard to flight safety. The results for the second pilot were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, drugs of abuse and medications.

TEST AND RESEARCH

A portable GPS receiver was recovered from the accident site and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for examination. The unit captured about 36 hours of flight data from January 6 through January 30, 2017, including the taxi portion of the accident flight. A review of the recorded GPS data from previous takeoffs during January 2016 revealed that when departing ABY, the airplane typically lifted off the runway about 1,000 to 1,500 ft from the start of the runway. During the week of January 6, when the second pilot was receiving instruction at DED, the airplane typically lifted off about 1,500 to 1,900 ft from the start of the runway.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the flight instructor who provided the second pilot with his Lancair training at DED, about 2 weeks before the accident, the second pilot contacted him and explained that, during one recent takeoff with the auxiliary fuel tanks full, after rotating for takeoff at 80 knots, he and the pilot/owner lost control and nearly crashed the airplane. The flight instructor advised the second pilot that with the airplane fully fueled, it was important that the rotation technique be "real easy," that rotation should not occur at too low of an airspeed, and that the pilot should be "ready with rudder control." The second pilot also reported that, during the same takeoff, one of the nose gear doors was damaged during the gear retraction. The flight instructor opined that the damage was caused by uncoordinated or side-slipped flight, resulting in the relative wind blowing the gear door to a partially closed position and impinging on the landing gear, as it retracted. (During a conversation with an acquaintance, the owner provided a different explanation for the nose gear damage stating that he believed the damage was because he did not neutralize the rudder before retracting the landing gear.)

The flight instructor, who was a turbo-propeller powered Lancair IV-P owner, offered the following additional information:

For takeoff, he normally would rotate about 85 or 90 knots and then transition promptly to a high pitch attitude to avoid exceeding the landing gear operating speed limitation of 120 knots. He added that, at slower airspeeds or higher density altitudes, care should be taken not to raise the landing gear too soon as the landing gear doors may cause an undesired yawing moment. He said this effect was more pronounced in ground effect.

According to the Pilot's Operating Handbook, the design rotation speed for a 3,900-pound maximum gross weight airplane is 80 knots.

According to the FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Chapter 10, Weight and Balance, center of gravity locations aft of the allowable range may cause "extreme control difficulty."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/20/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 1000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 27 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/08/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 6750 hours (Total, all aircraft), 36 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BROOK AARON D
Registration: N401PT
Model/Series: LANCAIR IV P NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: LIV-408
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/29/2015, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 1069 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Walter/GE
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: M601-D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 724 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KABY, 193 ft msl
Observation Time: 1451 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 355°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 3°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 210°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Albany, GA (ABY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Albany, GA (ABY)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1445 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: SOUTHWEST GEORGIA RGNL (ABY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 196 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6601 ft / 148 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 31.539722, -84.190833



Brittany Kerfoot 

Britt Knight

Kevin Coalson, one of three people who died in the Lancair IV-P (N401PT) crash at Southwest Regional Airport on January 30, 2016 is shown in an undated image.


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA097
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 30, 2016 in Albany, GA
Aircraft: BROOK AARON D LANCAIR IV P, registration: N401PT
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 30, 2016, at 1445 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Lancair IV-P, N401PT, operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport (ABY), in Albany, Georgia. The commercial pilot, pilot rated passenger and one additional passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Witness reports indicated that the airplane taxied to the beginning of runway 22 at ABY, and lifted off within the first 1,000 feet of the 6,601 foot-long runway. The airplane began to bank sharply immediately after takeoff, and reached a 90-degree bank as it climbed to treetop height. The witness was not certain if the bank was to the right or left; however, the airplane then began to pitch downward and descend, while maintaining the 90 degree bank until it struck the ground.

A witness located about a quarter mile north of the accident site reported that the airplane sounded "normal" until shortly before impact, when the engine noise became louder.

The airplane impacted a grass field about 1,900 feet down the runway, and 280 feet to the right of the runway centerline. The wreckage path extended from the initial impact ground scar along a heading of 270 degrees, and was 170 feet long. A position light with green lens fragments and the right winglet were among the debris found closest to the initial impact scar. Both wings were separated from the fuselage at their root, and were fragmented along the wreckage path. The left wing tip and winglet were found about 130 feet along the wreckage path. The main wreckage area included the empennage, which was largely intact, with severe fire and impact damage forward of the rear seats. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were fractured about mid-span with the outboard portion displaced forward. The elevator trim tab was found slightly trailing edge down. The rudder trim tab was found slightly trailing edge right. The engine mounting structural tubes were fractured and the engine was found inverted. The propeller hub separated from the engine flange, and one of the three blades separated from the hub. All three blades exhibited some bending in the aft direction from about mid-span outward, and each had showed some amount of twisting deformation.

The engine power turbine blades were intact and exhibited slight bending at their tips and rub marks at their roots. The engine casing was displaced and twisted, and the engine could not be turned by hand at the starter or the propeller shafts. After removal of the planetary gear system, the propeller shaft turned easily and did not exhibit any evidence of twisting.

Examination of the airframe revealed that the main landing gear were retracted, however the position of the nose landing gear could not be determined. The position of the flaps could not be determined. Pitch control continuity was confirmed from the elevator though push-pull tubes to the aft cabin area. The elevator moved freely. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder through a push-pull tube to the cable and bell crank assembly in the empennage. The rudder was free to move, however both cables exhibited binding as a result of fire damage. Both ailerons had separated from their respective wings and were found fractured and fire damaged. Both cockpit control sticks remained connected to their control tubes, however continuity from those tubes to the remainder of the control components could not be confirmed due to impact and fire damage.

A portable global positioning system receiver was recovered from the accident site and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder laboratory for examination.

A witness reported that as the occupants embarked, the pilot/owner was seated in the left front seat, and the pilot rated passenger was seated in the right front seat. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot reported 1,000 hours of flight experience at the time of his most recent third-class medical examination which was performed on January 20, 2015.The pilot rated passenger held airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificates, and he reported 6,750 flight hours of experience at the time of his most recent FAA second-class medical examination, which was performed on July 8, 2015.

According to FAA records, the airplane was equipped with a Walter 601 series turboprop engine and issued an experimental airworthiness certificate in April 2002. It was purchased by the pilot on December 10, 2015. Initial review of maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent condition inspections of the airframe and engine occurred on October 29, 2015, and both were found to be in satisfactory condition.
On Saturday, the loved ones of Brittany Kerfoot will host a family-fun event for the community in her honor.
~


Albany, GA — On Saturday, the loved ones of Brittany Kerfoot will host a family-fun event for the community in her honor.

Brittany's Spring Fling will be held at the Chehaw Park stage from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. The event in memory of Brittany Kerfoot, one of the three victims killed in the plane crash at the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport in January.

Hannah Sholar- Owens, one of the organizers of the event and Kerfoot's best friend, said that the entire event began from the passion Kerfoot had for children. Sholar-Owens said Kerfoot visited Chehaw on a field trip with her students back in November when she picked up on something that she couldn't let go.

"They didn't have any handicap accessible toys, or area, or toddler equipment. So we took it upon ourselves to talk with Chehaw about adding that equipment in her memory" said Sholar-Owens.

The proceeds from the spring fling will go to the Brittany Kerfoot Memorial Playground Project. The goal is to raise money to bring a handicap-accessible and toddler area to the playground at Chehaw, as well as refurbish the tiles at the entrance. Tiles will be sold that children can put their handprints in and will be placed into the new entrance.

"This cause is actually going to help the whole community. This is something that we definitely need and it's an area where anybody can come. Brittany loved children and she made a huge impact on over 300 children's lives just that she personally taught," said Sholar-Owens.

There will be a cornhole tournament, live music, bounce houses, food and more. There is a $5 entrance fee, $3 parking fee and a $15 cooler fee (no glass allowed). Children under 12 are free.

The opening ceremony and live music will kick off at noon. Children's activities are from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Original article can be found here:  http://wfxl.com



Art Sign Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N401PT  

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA097

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 30, 2016 in Albany, GA
Aircraft: BROOK AARON D LANCAIR IV P, registration: N401PT
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 30, 2016, at 1445 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Lancair IV-P, N401PT, operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport (ABY), in Albany, Georgia. The commercial pilot, pilot rated passenger and one additional passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Witness reports indicated that the airplane taxied to the beginning of runway 22 at ABY, and lifted off within the first 1,000 feet of the 6,601 foot-long runway. The airplane began to bank sharply immediately after takeoff, and reached a 90-degree bank as it climbed to treetop height. The witness was not certain if the bank was to the right or left; however, the airplane then began to pitch downward and descend, while maintaining the 90 degree bank until it struck the ground.

A witness located about a quarter mile north of the accident site reported that the airplane sounded "normal" until shortly before impact, when the engine noise became louder.

The airplane impacted a grass field about 1,900 feet down the runway, and 280 feet to the right of the runway centerline. The wreckage path extended from the initial impact ground scar along a heading of 270 degrees, and was 170 feet long. A position light with green lens fragments and the right winglet were among the debris found closest to the initial impact scar. Both wings were separated from the fuselage at their root, and were fragmented along the wreckage path. The left wing tip and winglet were found about 130 feet along the wreckage path. The main wreckage area included the empennage, which was largely intact, with severe fire and impact damage forward of the rear seats. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were fractured about mid-span with the outboard portion displaced forward. The elevator trim tab was found slightly trailing edge down. The rudder trim tab was found slightly trailing edge right. The engine mounting structural tubes were fractured and the engine was found inverted. The propeller hub separated from the engine flange, and one of the three blades separated from the hub. All three blades exhibited some bending in the aft direction from about mid-span outward, and each had showed some amount of twisting deformation.

The engine power turbine blades were intact and exhibited slight bending at their tips and rub marks at their roots. The engine casing was displaced and twisted, and the engine could not be turned by hand at the starter or the propeller shafts. After removal of the planetary gear system, the propeller shaft turned easily and did not exhibit any evidence of twisting.

Examination of the airframe revealed that the main landing gear were retracted, however the position of the nose landing gear could not be determined. The position of the flaps could not be determined. Pitch control continuity was confirmed from the elevator though push-pull tubes to the aft cabin area. The elevator moved freely. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder through a push-pull tube to the cable and bell crank assembly in the empennage. The rudder was free to move, however both cables exhibited binding as a result of fire damage. Both ailerons had separated from their respective wings and were found fractured and fire damaged. Both cockpit control sticks remained connected to their control tubes, however continuity from those tubes to the remainder of the control components could not be confirmed due to impact and fire damage.

A portable global positioning system receiver was recovered from the accident site and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder laboratory for examination.

A witness reported that as the occupants embarked, the pilot/owner was seated in the left front seat, and the pilot rated passenger was seated in the right front seat. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot reported 1,000 hours of flight experience at the time of his most recent third-class medical examination which was performed on January 20, 2015.The pilot rated passenger held airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificates, and he reported 6,750 flight hours of experience at the time of his most recent FAA second-class medical examination, which was performed on July 8, 2015.

According to FAA records, the airplane was equipped with a Walter 601 series turboprop engine and issued an experimental airworthiness certificate in April 2002. It was purchased by the pilot on December 10, 2015. Initial review of maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent condition inspections of the airframe and engine occurred on October 29, 2015, and both were found to be in satisfactory condition.