Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Turbulence Encounter: Ercoupe 415-C, N2101H, accident occurred May 06, 2019 in Rosendale, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 



Location: Rosendale, WI 
Accident Number: GAA19CA245
Date & Time: 05/06/2019, 1220 CDT
Registration: N2101H
Aircraft: Ercoupe 415 C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Turbulence encounter
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that he made an off-airport precautionary landing due to turbulent conditions; during the landing roll in a pasture, the airplane's nose gear encountered a "line fence" and nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

An automated weather observation station located 9 miles north/east of the accident location reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 080° at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear of clouds, temperature was 13°C (55°F) and the dew point was 4°C (39°F).

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/20/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1174 hours (Total, all aircraft), 547 hours (Total, this make and model), 1174 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Ercoupe
Registration: N2101H
Model/Series: 415 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2724
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 897 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2700 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C-75-12
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOSH, 782 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 47°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / Clear Air
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / Severe
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Pulaski, WI (92C)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Juneau, WI (UNU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.880556, -88.710556 (est)
 
ROSENDALE - A 70-year old Suamico man was able to walk away from a plane crash in a rural farm field in Fond du Lac County Monday afternoon with only minor injuries. 

Pilot Gary W. Dornfeld said he met wind sheer-like conditions that downed his plane at about 12:50 p.m. in the area of Triangle Road and Fond du Lac County M in the town of Rosendale, according to Fond du Lac County Sheriff's Lt. Chris Dobyns. 

A witness was able to reach the plane and reported to the sheriff's office that Dornfield was able to get out of the airplane and was standing in the field when he got there. 

Dornfeld was flying from Pulaski to Juneau when he encountered what he described as turbulent air or wind shear-like conditions. He tried to maintain control of the airplane, he said, but was unable to and attempted to make an emergency landing in the field. 

Dornfeld told officers he lost control of the airplane  — a 1946 Engineering & Research 415-C Fixed Wing Single-Engine airplane —  and it came to rest upside down in the field, causing significant damage to the aircraft.

 The 70-year-old was transported by ambulance to Ripon Medical Center Hospital for evaluation and treatment of minor injuries. 

The crash investigation will be conducted by the sheriff's office, along with National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration.

Rosendale Fire Department and Ripon Ambulance also responded to the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.fdlreporter.com

ROSENDALE, Wisconsin (WBAY) - The owner and pilot of a single-engine plane was checked at a hospital for minor injuries after a rough emergency landing in a field in Fond du Lac County.

A witness called 911 shortly before 1 p.m. Monday to report a plane crash near Triangle Road and County Highway M in Rosendale.

The sheriff's office says the 1946 Engineering & Research 415-C fixed-wing airplane sustained heavy damage, but 70-year-old Gary Dornfield of Suamico had minor injuries. He was able to get out of the plane on his own.

Dornfield was alone in the plane.

He told authorities he was flying from Pulaski to Juneau when he ran into turbulence or wind shear. The plane became difficult to control, and he continued losing control as he attempted to make an emergency landing in a farm field.

The crash will be investigated by the FAA, which is routine.

Online sales listings value the 415-C between $22,500 and $40,000 today.

The Rosendale Fire Department and Ripon Ambulance assisted the sheriff's office at the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wbay.com

FOND DU LAC COUNTY, Wisconsin (CBS 58) -- A 70-year-old pilot is being treated for minor injuries after a plane crash in Fond du Lac County.

It happened around 12:53 p.m. Monday in the area of Triangle Road and CTH M in the Town of Rosendale.

A witness told police that the plane had crashed in an agricultural field and that the occupant was able to get out of the plane on his own with minor injuries. 

The pilot was identified as a 70-year-old Suamico man who was flying from Pulaski to Juneau alone when he encountered what he described as turbulent air. The pilot attempted to maintain control but was unable to, so he made an emergency landing in the field.

The conditions he was experiencing allegedly made the landing difficult and he lost control. The plane came to rest upside with significant damage.

The pilot was taken to a local hospital for treatment of minor injuries.

The plane crash remains under investigation. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cbs58.com

A 70-year-old man from Suamico sustained minor injuries in a plane crash in the Town of Rosendale on Monday, May 6th. 

A caller first reported the crash near the area of Triangle Road and County Highway M just before 1 o’clock. The witness told dispatchers the airplane had crashed into a field and that the plane was still occupied. 

The man, who was identified as Gary W. Dornfeld of Suamico, was able to get out of the airplane on his own.

Dornfeld told Sheriff’s Deputies he was flying from Pulaski to Juneau when he encountered what he described as “turbulent air or wind shear like conditions.” Dornfeld said he could not maintain control of the airplane, so he attempted to make an emergency landing in the field – something that the conditions he was experiencing made even more difficult. The ERCO 415-C sustained significant damage as a result of the crash.

Dornfeld was transported by ambulance to Ripon Medical Center for evaluation and treatment of his injuries. The crash remains under investigation by the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office, along with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kfiz.com

Tecnam P2010, N456JB: Accident occurred May 05, 2019 in Denver, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Cockpit fire resulting in pilot burns to hands.

https://registry.faa.gov/N456JB

Date: 05-MAY-19
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: N456JB
Aircraft Make: COSTRUZIONI
Aircraft Model: P2010
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: FIRE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Cessna 177RG Cardinal, N34RG: Incident occurred May 05, 2019 at General William J. Fox Airfield (KWJF), Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Veered off the runway and struck Precision Approach Path Indicators (PAPI) light.

Western State Flyers LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N34RG

Date: 05-MAY-19
Time: 18:50:00Z
Regis#: N34RG
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 177RG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: LANCASTER
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N40RF: Incident occurred May 03, 2019 near Hayward Executive Airport (KHWD), Alameda County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Experienced a bird strike.

https://registry.faa.gov/N40RF

Date: 03-MAY-19
Time: 20:22:00Z
Regis#: N40RF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: HAYWARD
State: CALIFORNIA

Schweizer G-164B, registered to and operated by Anderson's Flying Service under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural application flight , N3630D: Accident occurred May 05, 2019 in Sutter, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California
Pratt and Whitney; FN

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3630D

Location: Sutter, CA
Accident Number: WPR19LA137
Date & Time: 05/05/2019, 1006 PDT
Registration: N3630D
Aircraft: Grumman G164
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On May 5, 2019, at 1006 Pacific daylight time, a Schweizer Aircraft Corporation G-164B airplane, N3630D, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Sutter, California. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Anderson's Flying Service under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural application flight . Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed for the local flight, which departed a private airstrip in Robbins, California at 1005.

According to the pilot, after completing 17 takeoffs that day, he departed the gravel runway to the south with about 45 gallons of JET-A fuel onboard and about 2,500 lbs of fertilizer. He climbed to a cruise altitude of about 500 ft above ground level and set the power to 36 lbs of torque and the propeller to 2,000 rpm. Fifteen seconds after he established cruise flight, the engine rolled back to idle power and the airplane immediately began to descend. After an unsuccessful attempt to add power by advancing the throttle, he jettisoned the load of fertilizer, and initiated a forced landing to a nearby road. The airplane landed short of the road and impacted a group of prune trees before it came to rest.

A review of photographs furnished by the operator revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Grumman
Registration: N3630D
Model/Series: G164 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Anderson's Flying Service
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMYV, 62 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Robbins, CA (PRIV)
Destination: Robbins, CA (PRIV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.189444, -121.708611

Landing Area Overshoot: Stemme S10, N2280X; accident occurred May 03, 2019 at Sonoma Skypark Airport (0Q9), Schellville, California

View of fuselage damage 

View of right wing damage 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

https://registry.faa.gov/N2280X


Location: Sonoma, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA241
Date & Time: 05/03/2019, 1315 PDT
Registration: N2280X
Aircraft: Stemme S 10
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area overshoot
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The pilot of the powered glider reported that, while on final, he saw that the ground speed was higher than the indicated airspeed. Upon landing, the powered glider veered left, and he corrected with left brake and rudder. The powered glider then overran the runway and impacted a tree.

The powered glider sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the powered glider that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that, after the accident, he was told the airplane touched down beyond halfway down the runway, and he recommended not landing with a tailwind.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper decision to land with a tailwind and his failure to maintain a proper approach, which resulted in a long landing, a runway overrun, and impact with a tree.

Findings

Aircraft
Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Landing distance - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tailwind - Decision related to condition (Cause)
Tailwind - Effect on operation (Cause)
Tree(s) - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Landing area overshoot (Defining event)
Loss of control on ground
Attempted remediation/recovery
Runway excursion
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 82, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/29/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/16/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Stemme
Registration: N2280X
Model/Series: S 10 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 1991
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 10-27
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/12/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 321 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: AMA/EXPR
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDVO, 4 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2015 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 220°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Schellville, CA (0Q3)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Schellville, CA (0Q3)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1215 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Sonoma Skypark (0Q9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 20 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2480 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  38.257500, -122.434167 (est)






Sonoma County Sheriff’s Deputies were on scene Friday, May 3 at 1:45 p.m. at Eighth Street East near Knolle Brothers Road in Schellville, where a glider crashed at the base of a grove of trees at the side of the road. 

According to the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office there was one person on board with minor injuries.

The street was closed in both directions for an undetermined period of time to clear debris from the road.

Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.sonomanews.com

Beech A36 Bonanza, N871CS: Incident occurred May 05, 2019 in Danville, Yell County, Arkansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Landed in a field.

C & S Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N871CS

Date: 05-MAY-19
Time: 16:39:00Z
Regis#: N871CS
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: FERRY
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: DANVILLE
State: ARKANSAS

Piper PA-32R-301, N9229B: Incident occurred May 05, 2019 at Mobile Downtown Airport (KBFM), Mobile County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama

Landed gear up in grass.

Burton Brothers Air LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9229B

Date: 05-MAY-19
Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: N9229B
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 32R 301
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MOBILE
State: ALABAMA

Bombardier CL601 Challenger, N601VH: Fatal accident occurred May 05, 2019 in Coahuila, Mexico

NTSB Identification: CEN19WA137 
14 CFR Part 129: Foreign
Accident occurred Sunday, May 05, 2019 in COAHUILA, Mexico
Aircraft: Canadair CL 600 2B16, registration: N601VH
Injuries: 14 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On May 5, 2019, a Challenger Ltd CL-600-2B16 airplane, N601VH, impacted terrain near Coahuila, Mexico. The two pilots and fourteen passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. 

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Mexican investigation authorities. Any further information may be obtained from:

Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC)
Blvd. Adolfo López Mateos 1990, Piso 4
Col. Los Alpes Tlacopac, Del. Álvaro Obregón
Codigo Postal 01010, Mexico
Telephone: (52) 55 5723-9400, extension 18548 / 18545
E-mail: cidaiac@sct.gob.mx, jconstan@sct.gob.mx

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the Mexican investigation authorities.

Business jet enroute from Las Vegas, Nevada, crashed under unknown circumstances.

Date: 05-MAY-19

Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N/A
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CH601
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: CORPORATE
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: COAHUILA
State: MEXICO

Crew Members:
Juan José Aguilar Talavera
Luis Ovid González Flores
Adriana Monserrath Mejia Sanchez

Passengers:
Martha Isabel Garcia Lagunes
Gary Amauri Vela Garcia
Manuel Alejandro Sepúlveda González
Frida Alexandrina Reyes Luna
Monica Leticia Salinas Trevino
Ramón Amauri Vela
Jade Paola Reyes Luna
Luis Octavio Reyes Dominguez
Loyda Liliana Luna larrosa
Guillermo Octavio Reyes Luna




Captain Juan José Aguilar Talavera 


Adriana Monserrat Mejia Sanchez

Luis Ovidio Gonzalez Flores

Luis Ovidio Gonzalez Flores

Luis Ovidio Gonzalez Flores


Captain Juan José Aguilar and Luis Ovidio Gonzalez Flores























Boeing 737-800, N732MA: Accident occurred May 03, 2019 at Jacksonville Naval Air Station (KNIP), Duval County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N732MA

Location: Jacksonville, FL
Accident Number: DCA19MA143
Date & Time: 05/03/2019, 2142 EDT
Registration: N732MA
Aircraft: Boeing 737
Injuries: 1 Minor, 142 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Non-scheduled

On May 3, 2019, at 2142 eastern daylight time, Miami Air flight 293, a Boeing 737-81Q, N732MA, departed the end of the runway 10 at Jacksonville Naval Air Station (KNIP), Jacksonville, Florida, and came to rest in shallow water in St. Johns River. There were no serious injuries to the 142 passengers and crew onboard. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by Miami Air International as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 supplemental non-scheduled passenger flight from Leeward Point Field (MUGM), Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to KNIP.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Boeing
Registration: N732MA
Model/Series: 737 81Q
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Miami Air
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121); Supplemental

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: 
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 6 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 136 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 142 None
Latitude, Longitude:

National Transportation Safety Board
B-Roll,  No Sound 

JACKSONVILLE, Florida - As a Boeing 737 jet remains in shallow water at the end of a Naval Air Station Jacksonville's runway after crashing through the seawall and into the river Friday night, we're learning more about the events that led up to the crash landing.

The National Transportation Safety Administration Board had said pilots of the transport flight from Guantanamo Bay requested a last-minute change to the runway where they would be landing during heavy weather.

A recording of air traffic radio traffic captured the exchange with the pilot of the Air Miami International fight, designated Biscayne 293.

Controller: "Biscayne 293, just talked to Navy JAX tower. He said both runways look pretty bad, pretty socked in, showing moderate to heavy precipitation east and west of the airport. Do you want to try RNAV 28?"

Pilot: "Looks better. And when I get closer, I’ll check how it is."

The 9,000-foot-long runway where the chartered jet eventually landed was essentially limited to 7,800 feet since there was a wire barrier set up to recover Navy aircraft in instances they couldn't land on a carrier during training, said Bruce Landsberg, vice chairman of the NTSB.

"We don't know what they were thinking or why they made that choice," Landsberg said at a news conference. "That will be one of the things we look to find out."

Landsberg said the plane's maintenance logs showed a left-hand thrust reverser that was inoperative. Thrust reversers are used to divert thrust from the engine, but they typically aren't used in calculating a plane's performance, Landsberg said.

Reverse thrust can be used to help an aircraft come to a stop.

Capt. Wayne Ziskal, a 50-year veteran pilot who teaches at Jacksonville University’s School of Aviation said the plane came in for a landing during moderate to heavy rain, poor visibility and a tailwind of nearly 20 mph. Planes try to land against the wind, not with the wind behind it.

Ziskal estimated the crew tried to land with a ground speed of more than 200 mph -- dangerous given the conditions.

"80% of accidents have a human factors component to them," Ziskal said. "When we start talking about human factors, we start talking about decision-making, critical thinking -- all the things that go into why you made the decision and why you acted the way that you did."

Ziskal said the pilots always have the option to “go around" -- pull out of a landing and circle back. If conditions are still bad, they can choose to land at another airport.

Investigators have retrieved the flight data recorder, but the NTSB investigators said they hope a cockpit voice recorder helps them answer that question. They have been unable to recover it from the tail of the plane because it is still underwater.

Investigators also asked anyone who shot video of the plane landing to share it with the NTSB.

There were no serious injuries on the flight from a military base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, although almost two dozen of the 143 passengers and crew members sought medical attention for minor injuries and three pets died when the cargo hold in the belly of the plane went under water.

Capt. Michael Connor, the base's commanding officer, said all passengers had left the base Sunday on their way to their scheduled destinations.

Some aircraft will be allowed to depart the base and be relocated so that pilots can continue with their training, but air traffic in and out of Naval Air Station Jacksonville is effectively closed until the plane is removed from the river, Connor said.

The NTSB investigators are still deciding when and how to relocate the plane off the base, which would require the use of a barge.

"How the aircraft is positioned now certainly gives you limitations on a good thorough assessment," said NTSB investigator John Lovell. "We are not aware of the extent of the damage under the waterline because it can't be seen."

All fuel needs to be removed before the plane can be moved, and that effort was complicated by the aircraft being partially submerged in the river, as well as stormy weather on Sunday, Landsberg said.

Officials said they didn't know how many gallons of fuel have spilled into the river, but engineers were using booms to contain the fuel and skimmers to vacuum up contaminants.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection Agency is urging anyone who sees an oil slick or distressed wildlife to call its emergency hotline number: 800-320-0519.  

Divers on Sunday were sent into the plane's cargo area to search and remove a handful of pets that had been unable to be rescued because of safety concerns. The investigators didn't say outright whether the animals were dead, but the pets would have been submerged for almost two days.

Cellphone video from passenger Darwing Silva captured the immediate, uncertain moments after the chartered jet landed.

A passenger shouted "Watch out! Watch out!" as other passengers and crew members cautiously walked out on a wing of the plane. Another passenger shouted, "Baby coming through!" and a man can be seen holding an infant in his arms as he walks along with the other passengers in yellow life jackets getting drenched by rain.

Silva said those passengers initially were told Friday the aircraft might not be fit for takeoff. Then the flight was cleared to leave Cuba, but with the warning there would be no air conditioning.

Even though the plane was hot, there were no other problems during the flight from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Silva said.

The landing at Naval Air Station Jacksonville seemed normal at first, but then the plane didn't stop on the runway. There was a loud bang, he hit his head on the ceiling, and the jet ended up in the water, Silva said.

He looked down and his ankles were in water, he said, and he heard someone yell, "Fuel!"

Silva said he helped usher people out an emergency door onto a wing.

On Sunday, Miami Air International, which operated the aircraft, notified passengers that their overhead luggage from the plane was available for pickup. The airline said passengers would be contacted directly once their checked bags were retrieved.

Also Sunday, a small, one-propeller seaplane crashed into the St. Johns River in Jacksonville. The pilot, who was the only person on board and wasn't injured, was rescued by a kayaker, according to the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com




JACKSONVILLE, Florida - Miami Air International, the charter airline whose Boeing 737 made an emergency landing Friday evening at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, is offering passengers $2,500 for their inconvenience.

In a letter, Miami Air apologized Monday to the 136 passengers on board the flight when it arrived from Guantanamo Bay and slid off the runway into the St. Johns River, and vowed to return their luggage.

“Please allow this letter to convey our sincerest regret that you were involved in the unfortunate incident aboard Flight 293 at NAS Jacksonville on May 3, 2019,” Miami Air CEO Kurt Kamrad wrote.

Nearly two dozen people, including three children, were taken to Jacksonville area hospitals late Friday night after the mishap. No one was seriously injured, but a dog and two cats died in the cargo hold.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating what happened. Already, the panel has found the pilots for asked for a last-minute runway change and that a left-hand thrust reverser wasn’t working.

It could take up to 18 months for that investigation to be completed.

“Please be confident that the safety and satisfaction of our passengers are our top priorities,” Kamrad said. “As such, we would like to extend a goodwill gesture to all passengers in the amount of $2,500.”

He said luggage stored inside the aircraft’s cargo hold remains on board the plane. He added that the company will retrieve baggage from the plane once it receives the go-ahead from the NTSB.

Five passengers have reached to local attorney John Phillips for representation. In a pair of tweets, Philips wrote: "The story we heard was harrowing... Some are headed back to GITMO as soon as tomorrow and lost basically everything. They’ve only heard about this “promise” through media. No attempt to reach out to them."

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com